QUESTION 1 1. Convert 30 degrees 2 minutes to decimal degrees. Give this answer to 6 decimal places. Do not provide units. You know those are decimal degrees. 5 points QUESTION 2 1. Convert 342 degrees 6 minutes and 41 seconds to decimal degrees. Show your answers to only 6 decimal places. Do not give units. 5 points QUESTION 3 1. COMPUTE the sin of 52 degrees. Give the answer to 6 decimal places. 5 points QUESTION 4 1. What is the sine of 277 degrees and 16 minutes? Give your answer to 6 decimal places. Pay attention to rounding. 5 points QUESTION 5 1. This is a right triangle problem. Angle A is 90 degrees. Draw the triangle and label it as we did in lecture. If angle B is 24 degrees 43 minutes and side c is 395.82 feet, what is the distance in feet of side b? Give your answer to two decimal places. Do not provide units. Those are in feet – right? 10 points QUESTION 6 1. This is a right triangle problem with angle A being the 90 degree angle. It should look like the one from lecture. If angle B is 25 degrees 18 minutes and side c is 206.1 feet, what is the distance to two decimal places of side a? Give your answer to two decimal places. Do not provide units – those are in feet. 10 points QUESTION 7 1. You are given a right triangle with angle A being the 90 degree angle – just like in lecture. If angle C is 42 degrees 9 minutes and side a is 401.73 feet, what is the length of side c? Give your answer to two decimal places. The units are feet – don’t list those. 10 points QUESTION 8 Ad by Browse Safe | Close 1. It is desired to determine the height of a flagpole. Assuming that the ground is level, an instrument is set up 227.59 feet from the flagpole with its telescope centered 5.31 feet above the ground. The telescope is sighted horizontally to a point 5.31 feet from the bottom of the flagpole and then the angle at the instrument looking to the top of the pole is measured. That angle is 26 degrees 51 minutes. How tall is the flagpole from its base? Give your answer to two decimal places with NO units. 10 points QUESTION 9 1. You are hiking in the mountains. For every 100.00 feet you would be walking horizontally, you have increased your elevation by 4 feet. At what grade are you climbing? Give your answer to three decimal places. Hint: Your units will be in ft/ft. 5 points QUESTION 10 1. A grade of -0.9 percent is being considered for a mountain roadway. The elevation at the initial point is 2,848.25 feet and a horizontal distance of 4,377.51 needs to be covered. What is the elevation at the end of the grade? 10 points QUESTION 11 1. A slope distance was measured between two points (A and T) and determined to be 4,788.68 feet. At point A the elevation is 857.23 feet and at point T the elevation is 877.96 feet. What is the horizontal distance between A and T?

QUESTION 1 1. Convert 30 degrees 2 minutes to decimal degrees. Give this answer to 6 decimal places. Do not provide units. You know those are decimal degrees. 5 points QUESTION 2 1. Convert 342 degrees 6 minutes and 41 seconds to decimal degrees. Show your answers to only 6 decimal places. Do not give units. 5 points QUESTION 3 1. COMPUTE the sin of 52 degrees. Give the answer to 6 decimal places. 5 points QUESTION 4 1. What is the sine of 277 degrees and 16 minutes? Give your answer to 6 decimal places. Pay attention to rounding. 5 points QUESTION 5 1. This is a right triangle problem. Angle A is 90 degrees. Draw the triangle and label it as we did in lecture. If angle B is 24 degrees 43 minutes and side c is 395.82 feet, what is the distance in feet of side b? Give your answer to two decimal places. Do not provide units. Those are in feet – right? 10 points QUESTION 6 1. This is a right triangle problem with angle A being the 90 degree angle. It should look like the one from lecture. If angle B is 25 degrees 18 minutes and side c is 206.1 feet, what is the distance to two decimal places of side a? Give your answer to two decimal places. Do not provide units – those are in feet. 10 points QUESTION 7 1. You are given a right triangle with angle A being the 90 degree angle – just like in lecture. If angle C is 42 degrees 9 minutes and side a is 401.73 feet, what is the length of side c? Give your answer to two decimal places. The units are feet – don’t list those. 10 points QUESTION 8 Ad by Browse Safe | Close 1. It is desired to determine the height of a flagpole. Assuming that the ground is level, an instrument is set up 227.59 feet from the flagpole with its telescope centered 5.31 feet above the ground. The telescope is sighted horizontally to a point 5.31 feet from the bottom of the flagpole and then the angle at the instrument looking to the top of the pole is measured. That angle is 26 degrees 51 minutes. How tall is the flagpole from its base? Give your answer to two decimal places with NO units. 10 points QUESTION 9 1. You are hiking in the mountains. For every 100.00 feet you would be walking horizontally, you have increased your elevation by 4 feet. At what grade are you climbing? Give your answer to three decimal places. Hint: Your units will be in ft/ft. 5 points QUESTION 10 1. A grade of -0.9 percent is being considered for a mountain roadway. The elevation at the initial point is 2,848.25 feet and a horizontal distance of 4,377.51 needs to be covered. What is the elevation at the end of the grade? 10 points QUESTION 11 1. A slope distance was measured between two points (A and T) and determined to be 4,788.68 feet. At point A the elevation is 857.23 feet and at point T the elevation is 877.96 feet. What is the horizontal distance between A and T?

Question no Assignment 2 1 30.0333333 degrees 2 342.111389 degrees … Read More...
In this circuit, V = 10 volts, R = 3,000 ohms, and C = 50 x 10-6 farads. The circuit has a time constant t, which depends on the resistance, R, and the capacitance, C, as t = R x C = 0.15 second. 1. Use a for loop. 2. Use the math library function exp(x) to compute ex. You will need to include the system header file math.h. 3. On Unix you will need –lm in your command line to tell the Linker to search the math library. 4. Use macro definition for all the constants. 5. Format the output so the output looks like the following. The time and voltage should display two digits after the decimal point.

In this circuit, V = 10 volts, R = 3,000 ohms, and C = 50 x 10-6 farads. The circuit has a time constant t, which depends on the resistance, R, and the capacitance, C, as t = R x C = 0.15 second. 1. Use a for loop. 2. Use the math library function exp(x) to compute ex. You will need to include the system header file math.h. 3. On Unix you will need –lm in your command line to tell the Linker to search the math library. 4. Use macro definition for all the constants. 5. Format the output so the output looks like the following. The time and voltage should display two digits after the decimal point.

info@checkyourstudy.com
Ch 2 Questions that might be on the test. If you cannot answer them, check your class notes or the textbook. 1. A mineral is a naturally occurring substance formed through geological processes that has: a) a characteristic chemical composition, b) a highly ordered atomic structure c) specific physical properties d) all of the above 2. There are currently more than ______ known minerals, according to the International Mineralogical Association, a) 40 b) 400 c) 4000 d) 40 000 3. Some minerals, like quartz, mica or feldspar are: a) rare b) common c) valuable d) priceless 4. Rocks from which minerals are mined for economic purposes are referred to as: a) gangue b) tailings c) ores d) granite 5. Electrons, which have a _____ charge, a size which is so small as to be currently unmeasurable, and which are the least massive of the three types of basic particles. a) positive b) negative c) neutral 6. Both protons and neutrons are themselves now thought to be composed of even more elementary particles called: a) quarks b) quakes c) parsons d) megans 7. In processes which change the number of protons in a nucleus, the atom becomes an atom of a different chemical: a) isotope b) compound c) element d) planet 8. Atoms which have either a deficit or a surplus of electrons are called: a) elements b) isotopes c) ions d) molecules 9. In the Bohr model of the atom, electrons can only orbit the nucleus in particular circular orbits with fixed angular momentum and energy, their distances from the nucleus being proportional to their respective energies. They can only make _____ leaps between the fixed energy levels. a) tiny b) quantum c) gradual 10. It is impossible to simultaneously derive precise values for both the position and momentum of a particle for any given point in time; this became known as the ______ principle. a) Bohr b) Einstein c) uncertainty d) quantum 11. The modern model of the atom describes the positions of electrons in an atom in terms of: a) quantum levels b) orbital paths c) probabilities d) GPS 12. Isotopes of an element have nuclei with the same number of protons (the same atomic number) but different numbers of: a) electrons b) neutrons c) ions d) photons 13. In helium-3 (or 3He), how many protons are present? a) 1 b) 2 c) 3 d) 4 14. In helium-3 (or 3He), how many neutrons are present? a) 1 b) 2 c) 3 d) 4 15. The relative abundance of an isotope is strongly correlated with its tendency toward nuclear _____, short-lived nuclides quickly go away, while their long-lived counterparts endure. a) fission b) fusion c) decay d) bombardment 16. The isotopic composition of elements is different on different planets. a) True b) False 17. As a general rule, the fewer electrons in an atom’s valence shell, the ____ reactive it is. Lithium, sodium, and potassium have one electron in their outer shells. a) more b) less 18. Every atom is much more stable, or less reactive, with a ____ valence shell. a) partly full b) completely full 19. A positively-charged ion, which has fewer electrons than protons, is known as a: a) anion b) cation c) fermion d) bation 20. Bonds vary widely in their strength. Generally covalent and ionic bonds are often described as “strong”, whereas ______ bonds are generally considered to be “weak”. a) van der Waals b) Faradays c) van Neumans 21. This bonding involves sharing of electrons in which the positively charged nuclei of two or more atoms simultaneously attract the negatively charged electrons that are being shared a) ionic b) covalent c) van der Waals d) metallic 22. This bond results from electrostatic attraction between atoms: a) ionic b) covalent c) van der Waals d) metallic 23. A sea of delocalized electrons causes this bonding: a) ionic b) covalent c) van der Waals d) metallic 24. The chemical composition of minerals may vary between end members of a mineral system. For example the ______ feldspars comprise a continuous series from sodiumrich albite to calcium-rich anorthite. a) plagioclase b) orthoclase c) alkaline d) acidic 25. Crystal structure is based on ____ internal atomic arrangement. a) irregular b) regular c) random d) curvilinear 26. Pyrite and marcasite are both _______, but their arrangement of atoms differs. a) iron sulfide b) lead sulfide c) copper silfide d) silver sulfide 27. The carbon atoms in ______ are arranged into sheets which can slide easily past each other, while the carbon atoms in diamond form a strong, interlocking three-dimensional network. a) sapphire b) graphite c) aluminum d) carbonate 28. TGCFAOQTCD a) Crystal habit b) Hardness scale c) Luster scale 29. Dull to metallic, submetallic, adamantine, vitreous, pearly, resinous, or silky. a) Crystal habit b) Hardness scale c) Luster scale d) Heft scale 30. The color of the powder a mineral leaves after rubbing it on unglazed porcelain. a) color b) streak c) lustre d) iridescense 31. Describes the way a mineral may split apart along various planes. a) fracture b) streak c) lustre d) cleavage 32. In modern physics, the position of electrons about a nucleus are defined in terms of: a) probabilities b) circles c) ellipses d) chromodomes 33. The symbol H+ suggests a: a) hydrogen atom b) hydrogen isotope c) hydrogen cation d) hydrogen anion 34. The tabulated atomic mass of natural carbon is not exactly 12 because carbon in nature always has multiple ________ present. a) electrons b) isotopes c) quarks d) protons 35. This type of bonding due to delocalized electrons leads to malleability, ductility, and high melting points: a) covalent b) ionic c) van der Waals d) metallic 36. The mineral ___________ is 3 on Mohs Scale whereas the mineral ___________ is 9. a) calcite, corundum b) corundum, calcite c) caliche, calcite d) chalcedony, quartz 37. In hand specimens, geologists identify most minerals based on: a) physical properties b) chemical analyses c) xray diffraction 38. This type of chemical bonding is the weakest but occurs in all substances. a) covalent b) ionic c) metallic d) none of the above 39. Quartz, feldspar, mica, chlorite, kaolin, calcite, epidote, olivine, augite, hornblende, magnetite, hematite, limonite: these minerals are: a) common in rocks b) occasionally found c) rare d) extremely rare 40. Characteristics of a mineral do NOT include: a) naturally occurring b) characteristic chemical formula c) crystalline d) organic e) all of the above 41. The chemical composition of a particular mineral may vary between end members. For example, the common mineral plagioclase feldspar varies from being _______-rich to being _________-rich. a) sodium, calcium b) potassium, sodium c) iron, magnesium d) carbon, oxygen 42. Sharing of electrons typifies the __________ bond whereas electrostatic attraction typifies the _______ bond. a) ionic, covalent b) ionic, triclinic c) covalent, ionic d) triclinic, covalent 43. If number of protons does not equal the number of electrons, the atom is a(n) : a) isotope b) ion c) quark d) simplex e) google 44. Atoms generally consist of: a) electrons b) protons c) neutrons d) all of the above 45. Not counting rare minerals, about how many mineral species are at least occasionally encountered in rocks? a) 20 b) 200 c) 2000 46. Carbon is atomic number 6. Carbon-13 has _______ protons and _______ neutrons. a) thirteen, six b) six, seven c) twelve, twenty-five d) twelve, twelve 47. Which of these particles are not nucleons? a) electrons b) neutrons c) protons 48. A mineral with visibly recognizable crystals is said to have good crystal habit; otherwise the mineral is said to be: a) massive b) granular c) compact d) any of the above 49. In chemical bonding, two atoms become linked by moving or sharing __________. a) neutrons b) protons c) electrons 50. The name of an element is determined by the number of ______ present in the ______ of an atom. a) electrons, nucleus b) neutrons, nucleus c) protons, nucleus d) protons, electron cloud e) neutrons, electron cloud 51. Generally ________ and ____________ bonds are strong whereas the ______________ bond is weak. a) covalent, ionic, van der Waals b) van der Waals, covalent, ionic c) ionic, van der Waals, covalent 52. Which of the following are held together by chemical bonds? a) molecules b) crystals c) diatomic gases 53. An ion with fewer electrons than protons is called an ______ and it carries a _________ electric charge. a) cation, positive b) anion, negative c) cation, negative d) anion, positive 54. Two or more minerals may have the same _________ composition but different _______ structure. These are called polymorphs. a) crystal, chemical b) chemical, crystal 55. Industrial minerals are: a) gem quality b) commercially valuable c) tailings d) worthless 56. All minerals are crystalline. If the crystals are too small to see, they can be detected by: a) x-ray diffraction b) cosmic rays c) sound waves d) odor 57. If two atomes have the same number of protons but different numbers of neutrons, the atoms are _______ of the same _________. a) elements, mineral b) atoms, isotope c) elements, isotope d) isotopes, element 58. Modern physics recognizes that electrons show both particle and ______ behavior. a) wave b) emotional c) thermal d) revolting 59. Sodium and potassium have one ______ electron in their outer shells and are extremely ________. a) valence, stable b) inverted, reactive c) valence, reactive d) contaminated, inactive 60. The luster of _______ would be described as ________. a) glass, vitreous b) diamond, dull c) pyrite, silky d) graphite, resinous 61. The minerals ________ and __________ are polymorphs of carbon. a) diamond, graphite b) calcite, silicate c) bonite, bronzite 62. In the ______ atom based on _______ physics, electrons were restricted to circular orbits of fixed energy levels. a) Bohr , quantum b) Rutherford, classical c) Bohr, classical d) Rutherford, quantum 63. Virtually all elements other than ______ and _______ were formed in stars and supernovae long after the Big Bang. a) hydrogen, helium b) carbon, phosphorus c) carbon, oxygen d) silica, carbon 64. Physicist Werner _________ developed the ___________ principle which means that it is impossible to know exactly the position and momentum of a particle. a) Heisenberg, certainty b) Heisenberg, uncertainty c) Bohr, uncertainty d) Bohr, certainty

Ch 2 Questions that might be on the test. If you cannot answer them, check your class notes or the textbook. 1. A mineral is a naturally occurring substance formed through geological processes that has: a) a characteristic chemical composition, b) a highly ordered atomic structure c) specific physical properties d) all of the above 2. There are currently more than ______ known minerals, according to the International Mineralogical Association, a) 40 b) 400 c) 4000 d) 40 000 3. Some minerals, like quartz, mica or feldspar are: a) rare b) common c) valuable d) priceless 4. Rocks from which minerals are mined for economic purposes are referred to as: a) gangue b) tailings c) ores d) granite 5. Electrons, which have a _____ charge, a size which is so small as to be currently unmeasurable, and which are the least massive of the three types of basic particles. a) positive b) negative c) neutral 6. Both protons and neutrons are themselves now thought to be composed of even more elementary particles called: a) quarks b) quakes c) parsons d) megans 7. In processes which change the number of protons in a nucleus, the atom becomes an atom of a different chemical: a) isotope b) compound c) element d) planet 8. Atoms which have either a deficit or a surplus of electrons are called: a) elements b) isotopes c) ions d) molecules 9. In the Bohr model of the atom, electrons can only orbit the nucleus in particular circular orbits with fixed angular momentum and energy, their distances from the nucleus being proportional to their respective energies. They can only make _____ leaps between the fixed energy levels. a) tiny b) quantum c) gradual 10. It is impossible to simultaneously derive precise values for both the position and momentum of a particle for any given point in time; this became known as the ______ principle. a) Bohr b) Einstein c) uncertainty d) quantum 11. The modern model of the atom describes the positions of electrons in an atom in terms of: a) quantum levels b) orbital paths c) probabilities d) GPS 12. Isotopes of an element have nuclei with the same number of protons (the same atomic number) but different numbers of: a) electrons b) neutrons c) ions d) photons 13. In helium-3 (or 3He), how many protons are present? a) 1 b) 2 c) 3 d) 4 14. In helium-3 (or 3He), how many neutrons are present? a) 1 b) 2 c) 3 d) 4 15. The relative abundance of an isotope is strongly correlated with its tendency toward nuclear _____, short-lived nuclides quickly go away, while their long-lived counterparts endure. a) fission b) fusion c) decay d) bombardment 16. The isotopic composition of elements is different on different planets. a) True b) False 17. As a general rule, the fewer electrons in an atom’s valence shell, the ____ reactive it is. Lithium, sodium, and potassium have one electron in their outer shells. a) more b) less 18. Every atom is much more stable, or less reactive, with a ____ valence shell. a) partly full b) completely full 19. A positively-charged ion, which has fewer electrons than protons, is known as a: a) anion b) cation c) fermion d) bation 20. Bonds vary widely in their strength. Generally covalent and ionic bonds are often described as “strong”, whereas ______ bonds are generally considered to be “weak”. a) van der Waals b) Faradays c) van Neumans 21. This bonding involves sharing of electrons in which the positively charged nuclei of two or more atoms simultaneously attract the negatively charged electrons that are being shared a) ionic b) covalent c) van der Waals d) metallic 22. This bond results from electrostatic attraction between atoms: a) ionic b) covalent c) van der Waals d) metallic 23. A sea of delocalized electrons causes this bonding: a) ionic b) covalent c) van der Waals d) metallic 24. The chemical composition of minerals may vary between end members of a mineral system. For example the ______ feldspars comprise a continuous series from sodiumrich albite to calcium-rich anorthite. a) plagioclase b) orthoclase c) alkaline d) acidic 25. Crystal structure is based on ____ internal atomic arrangement. a) irregular b) regular c) random d) curvilinear 26. Pyrite and marcasite are both _______, but their arrangement of atoms differs. a) iron sulfide b) lead sulfide c) copper silfide d) silver sulfide 27. The carbon atoms in ______ are arranged into sheets which can slide easily past each other, while the carbon atoms in diamond form a strong, interlocking three-dimensional network. a) sapphire b) graphite c) aluminum d) carbonate 28. TGCFAOQTCD a) Crystal habit b) Hardness scale c) Luster scale 29. Dull to metallic, submetallic, adamantine, vitreous, pearly, resinous, or silky. a) Crystal habit b) Hardness scale c) Luster scale d) Heft scale 30. The color of the powder a mineral leaves after rubbing it on unglazed porcelain. a) color b) streak c) lustre d) iridescense 31. Describes the way a mineral may split apart along various planes. a) fracture b) streak c) lustre d) cleavage 32. In modern physics, the position of electrons about a nucleus are defined in terms of: a) probabilities b) circles c) ellipses d) chromodomes 33. The symbol H+ suggests a: a) hydrogen atom b) hydrogen isotope c) hydrogen cation d) hydrogen anion 34. The tabulated atomic mass of natural carbon is not exactly 12 because carbon in nature always has multiple ________ present. a) electrons b) isotopes c) quarks d) protons 35. This type of bonding due to delocalized electrons leads to malleability, ductility, and high melting points: a) covalent b) ionic c) van der Waals d) metallic 36. The mineral ___________ is 3 on Mohs Scale whereas the mineral ___________ is 9. a) calcite, corundum b) corundum, calcite c) caliche, calcite d) chalcedony, quartz 37. In hand specimens, geologists identify most minerals based on: a) physical properties b) chemical analyses c) xray diffraction 38. This type of chemical bonding is the weakest but occurs in all substances. a) covalent b) ionic c) metallic d) none of the above 39. Quartz, feldspar, mica, chlorite, kaolin, calcite, epidote, olivine, augite, hornblende, magnetite, hematite, limonite: these minerals are: a) common in rocks b) occasionally found c) rare d) extremely rare 40. Characteristics of a mineral do NOT include: a) naturally occurring b) characteristic chemical formula c) crystalline d) organic e) all of the above 41. The chemical composition of a particular mineral may vary between end members. For example, the common mineral plagioclase feldspar varies from being _______-rich to being _________-rich. a) sodium, calcium b) potassium, sodium c) iron, magnesium d) carbon, oxygen 42. Sharing of electrons typifies the __________ bond whereas electrostatic attraction typifies the _______ bond. a) ionic, covalent b) ionic, triclinic c) covalent, ionic d) triclinic, covalent 43. If number of protons does not equal the number of electrons, the atom is a(n) : a) isotope b) ion c) quark d) simplex e) google 44. Atoms generally consist of: a) electrons b) protons c) neutrons d) all of the above 45. Not counting rare minerals, about how many mineral species are at least occasionally encountered in rocks? a) 20 b) 200 c) 2000 46. Carbon is atomic number 6. Carbon-13 has _______ protons and _______ neutrons. a) thirteen, six b) six, seven c) twelve, twenty-five d) twelve, twelve 47. Which of these particles are not nucleons? a) electrons b) neutrons c) protons 48. A mineral with visibly recognizable crystals is said to have good crystal habit; otherwise the mineral is said to be: a) massive b) granular c) compact d) any of the above 49. In chemical bonding, two atoms become linked by moving or sharing __________. a) neutrons b) protons c) electrons 50. The name of an element is determined by the number of ______ present in the ______ of an atom. a) electrons, nucleus b) neutrons, nucleus c) protons, nucleus d) protons, electron cloud e) neutrons, electron cloud 51. Generally ________ and ____________ bonds are strong whereas the ______________ bond is weak. a) covalent, ionic, van der Waals b) van der Waals, covalent, ionic c) ionic, van der Waals, covalent 52. Which of the following are held together by chemical bonds? a) molecules b) crystals c) diatomic gases 53. An ion with fewer electrons than protons is called an ______ and it carries a _________ electric charge. a) cation, positive b) anion, negative c) cation, negative d) anion, positive 54. Two or more minerals may have the same _________ composition but different _______ structure. These are called polymorphs. a) crystal, chemical b) chemical, crystal 55. Industrial minerals are: a) gem quality b) commercially valuable c) tailings d) worthless 56. All minerals are crystalline. If the crystals are too small to see, they can be detected by: a) x-ray diffraction b) cosmic rays c) sound waves d) odor 57. If two atomes have the same number of protons but different numbers of neutrons, the atoms are _______ of the same _________. a) elements, mineral b) atoms, isotope c) elements, isotope d) isotopes, element 58. Modern physics recognizes that electrons show both particle and ______ behavior. a) wave b) emotional c) thermal d) revolting 59. Sodium and potassium have one ______ electron in their outer shells and are extremely ________. a) valence, stable b) inverted, reactive c) valence, reactive d) contaminated, inactive 60. The luster of _______ would be described as ________. a) glass, vitreous b) diamond, dull c) pyrite, silky d) graphite, resinous 61. The minerals ________ and __________ are polymorphs of carbon. a) diamond, graphite b) calcite, silicate c) bonite, bronzite 62. In the ______ atom based on _______ physics, electrons were restricted to circular orbits of fixed energy levels. a) Bohr , quantum b) Rutherford, classical c) Bohr, classical d) Rutherford, quantum 63. Virtually all elements other than ______ and _______ were formed in stars and supernovae long after the Big Bang. a) hydrogen, helium b) carbon, phosphorus c) carbon, oxygen d) silica, carbon 64. Physicist Werner _________ developed the ___________ principle which means that it is impossible to know exactly the position and momentum of a particle. a) Heisenberg, certainty b) Heisenberg, uncertainty c) Bohr, uncertainty d) Bohr, certainty

info@checkyourstudy.com
“Sex, Lies and Conversation” Paper For the “Sex, Lies and Conversation” paper you will be writing about the article written by Deborah Tannen that I gave you in class. Your purpose is to evaluate her theory on male and female communication and offer your opinion on whether her theory is valid and still accurate twenty-one years after she published the article. In your introduction, you will identify the author and article (full title at least once) and explain briefly what Tannen’s general theory on male/female communication is to your reader. You’ll also explain that you are evaluating and discussing her theory in order to see if it is still a valid, proven theory. Each body paragraph will focus on one of Tannen’s “differences” between men and women ( the ones we just discussed in class and the one above). For each one you will briefly explain the difference, talk about whether you believe this difference is accurate and true and provide 2-3 examples of people in your life (friend, relative, yourself) who either demonstrates her theory or contradicts it. When you have covered all of her differences, your conclusion will basically move on to discuss whether, based on what you have just said and demonstrated, you believe Tannen’s theory is still current, useful and valid, that it is false or outdated or that it is somewhere in between the two extremes. The paper will run 3 to 4 pages in MLA paper format. Women Men Look at each other when talking Not necessary to look at each other Support/Agree Dismiss Stay on one topic Switch topics frequently Want reactions toward their conversations/feedback Silent/ Listeners They prefer to talk in private areas like home They like to talk in public

“Sex, Lies and Conversation” Paper For the “Sex, Lies and Conversation” paper you will be writing about the article written by Deborah Tannen that I gave you in class. Your purpose is to evaluate her theory on male and female communication and offer your opinion on whether her theory is valid and still accurate twenty-one years after she published the article. In your introduction, you will identify the author and article (full title at least once) and explain briefly what Tannen’s general theory on male/female communication is to your reader. You’ll also explain that you are evaluating and discussing her theory in order to see if it is still a valid, proven theory. Each body paragraph will focus on one of Tannen’s “differences” between men and women ( the ones we just discussed in class and the one above). For each one you will briefly explain the difference, talk about whether you believe this difference is accurate and true and provide 2-3 examples of people in your life (friend, relative, yourself) who either demonstrates her theory or contradicts it. When you have covered all of her differences, your conclusion will basically move on to discuss whether, based on what you have just said and demonstrated, you believe Tannen’s theory is still current, useful and valid, that it is false or outdated or that it is somewhere in between the two extremes. The paper will run 3 to 4 pages in MLA paper format. Women Men Look at each other when talking Not necessary to look at each other Support/Agree Dismiss Stay on one topic Switch topics frequently Want reactions toward their conversations/feedback Silent/ Listeners They prefer to talk in private areas like home They like to talk in public

info@checkyourstudy.com
Q1: A small town has two banks A and B. It is estimated that 45% of the potential customers do business only with bank A, 30% only with bank B, and 15% with both banks A and B. The remaining 10% of the customers do business with none of the banks. If E1(E2) denotes the event of a randomly selected customer doing business with bank A(B), find the following probabilities: P(E1), P(E2), P(E1∩E2),P(Ē1Ē2) and P(Ē1UE2) Q2: The inspection of a batch of laminated composite beams produced in a company for defects yielded the following data: No. of defects Proportion of Beams with defects inside Proportion of Beams with defects on surface Total 0 0.4 0.15 0.55 1 0.1 0.05 0.15 2 0.07 0.03 0.1 3 0.06 0.02 0.08 4 0.02 0.03 0.05 5 or more 0.03 0.04 0.07 Total 0.68 0.32 1.0 Determine the probability that the beam has a defect on the surface or it has 4 or more defects. Q3. A batch of 1000 piston rings manufactured in an engine manufacturing facility contains 40% defective. Two piston rings are randomly selected from the batch, one at a time, without replacement. If Ei denotes the event that the i th piston ring selected is defective (i=1, 2), determine the values, P(E1) and P(E2). Q4. An automobile transmission can fail due to three types of problems i.e. gear failure, bearing failure, or shaft failure, wit probabilities 0.3, 0.5 an 0.2 respectively. The probability of transmission failure given a gear failure is 0.5, given a bearing failure is 0.5 and given a shaft failure is 0.6. If a transmission fails, what is the most likely cause? Q5. In the manufacture of a fiber-reinforced laminated composite material, the following probabilities can be associated with the failure of the components made out of this material: Prob. Of failure of components Level of defect in material 0.2 High 0.05 Medium 0.01 Low In a batch of composite material manufactured, 10% of material is found to have High defects, 30% to Medium level defects and 60% to Low level of defects. For a component using this batch of material, indicate the various events associated with the failure of component as a Tree diagram. Also, determine the probability that the component fails.

Q1: A small town has two banks A and B. It is estimated that 45% of the potential customers do business only with bank A, 30% only with bank B, and 15% with both banks A and B. The remaining 10% of the customers do business with none of the banks. If E1(E2) denotes the event of a randomly selected customer doing business with bank A(B), find the following probabilities: P(E1), P(E2), P(E1∩E2),P(Ē1Ē2) and P(Ē1UE2) Q2: The inspection of a batch of laminated composite beams produced in a company for defects yielded the following data: No. of defects Proportion of Beams with defects inside Proportion of Beams with defects on surface Total 0 0.4 0.15 0.55 1 0.1 0.05 0.15 2 0.07 0.03 0.1 3 0.06 0.02 0.08 4 0.02 0.03 0.05 5 or more 0.03 0.04 0.07 Total 0.68 0.32 1.0 Determine the probability that the beam has a defect on the surface or it has 4 or more defects. Q3. A batch of 1000 piston rings manufactured in an engine manufacturing facility contains 40% defective. Two piston rings are randomly selected from the batch, one at a time, without replacement. If Ei denotes the event that the i th piston ring selected is defective (i=1, 2), determine the values, P(E1) and P(E2). Q4. An automobile transmission can fail due to three types of problems i.e. gear failure, bearing failure, or shaft failure, wit probabilities 0.3, 0.5 an 0.2 respectively. The probability of transmission failure given a gear failure is 0.5, given a bearing failure is 0.5 and given a shaft failure is 0.6. If a transmission fails, what is the most likely cause? Q5. In the manufacture of a fiber-reinforced laminated composite material, the following probabilities can be associated with the failure of the components made out of this material: Prob. Of failure of components Level of defect in material 0.2 High 0.05 Medium 0.01 Low In a batch of composite material manufactured, 10% of material is found to have High defects, 30% to Medium level defects and 60% to Low level of defects. For a component using this batch of material, indicate the various events associated with the failure of component as a Tree diagram. Also, determine the probability that the component fails.

info@checkyourstudy.com
under the Articles of Confederation, the United states exhibited some of the same problems later witnessed in __________, 1. the European Union, 2. the united Nations, 3. the world court, 4. the north Atlantic Treaty Organization , 5. the world Trade Organization.

under the Articles of Confederation, the United states exhibited some of the same problems later witnessed in __________, 1. the European Union, 2. the united Nations, 3. the world court, 4. the north Atlantic Treaty Organization , 5. the world Trade Organization.

2.   The united nations
PHET ElectroMagnetism Key to this Document Instructions are in black. Experimental questions that you need to solve through experimentation with an online animation are in green highlighted. Important instructions are in red highlighted. Items that need a response from you are in yellow highlighted. Please put your answers to this activity in RED. Part I- Comparing Permanent Magnets and Electromagnets: 1. Select the simulation “Magnets and Electromagnets.” It is at this link: http://phet.colorado.edu/new/simulations/sims.php?sim=Magnets_and_Electromagnets 2. Move the compass slowly along a semicircular path above the bar magnet until you’ve put it on the opposite side of the bar magnet. Describe what happens to the compass needle. 3. Move the compass along a semicircular path below the bar magnet until you’ve put it on the opposite side of the bar magnet. Describe what happens to the compass needle. 4. What do you suppose the compass needles drawn all over the screen tell you? 5. Use page 10 in your book to look up what it looks like when scientists use a drawing to represent a magnetic field. Describe the field around a bar magnet here. 6. Put the compass to the left or right of the magnet. Click “flip polarity” and notice what happens to the compass. Using the compass needle as your observation tool, describe the effect that flipping the poles of the magnet has on the magnetic field. 7. Click on the electromagnet tab along the top of the simulation window. Place the compass on the left side of the coil so that the compass center lies along the axis of the coil. <--like this 8. Move the compass along a semicircular path above the coil until you’ve put it on the opposite side of the coil. Then do the same below the coil. Notice what happens to the compass needle. Compare this answer to the answer you got to Number 2 and 3. 9. Compare the shape of the magnetic field of a bar magnet to the magnetic field of an electromagnet. 10. Use the voltage slider to change the direction of the current and investigate the shape of the magnetic field the coil using the compass after you’ve let the compass stabilize. Summarize, the effect that the direction of current has on the shape of the magnetic field around an electrified coil of wires. 11. What happens to the current in the coil when you set the voltage of the battery to zero? 12. What happens to the magnetic field around the coil when you set the voltage of the battery to zero? Part II – Investigating relationships- No Answers are written on this document after this point. All three data tables, graphs and conclusion statements go on the Google Spreadsheet that you can download from Ms. Pogge’s website. Experimental Question #1: How does distance affect the strength of the magnetic field around an electromagnet? 1. Using the Electromagnet simulation, click on “Show Field Meter.” 2. Set the battery voltage to 10V where the positive is on the right of the battery (slide the switch all the way to the right). 3. Magnetic field strength (symbol B on the top line of the meter) is measured in gauss (G). You’ll only need to record the value on the top line of the Field Meter. 4. Position zero will be right on top of the coil. Negative number positions will be to the left and positive number positions to the right of the coil. 5. Move the field meter one compass needle to the right and record the value of B at position 1. 6. This data table below will be used to help you fill in the first spreadsheet you downloaded from Ms. Pogge’s website. You will end up with 3 data tables, 3 graphs and 3 conclusion statements in your document, one for each mini-experiment you are doing. a. NOTE: Be sure to take all of your values along the horizontal axis of the coil. You’ll know you’re on the axis because the B-y measurement of the magnetic field is zero along the axis. Compass position (no units) Magnetic Field Strength ( )<--Fill in units! -5 (5 needles to the left of coil) Don’t fill in the table here...do it on the Google Spreadsheet you downloaded -4 -3 -2 -1 0 (middle of coil) 1 2 3 4 5 (5 needles to right of coil) 7. In your Google Spreadsheet: Graph the compass position on the horizontal (x) axis and magnetic field magnitude on the vertical (y) axis. 8. Make sure to label the axes and title the graph. Share this spreadsheet with your teacher. 9. Analyze your graph to discover how the two variables are related, and report the relationship between magnetic field strength and position using 1-3 complete sentences. Experimental Question #2: How does the number of coils affect the strength of the magnetic field around an electromagnet? Design an experiment to test how field strength varies with the number of coils. Enter your data, graph your results and write your conclusion statement on the Google Spreadsheet. Experimental Question #3: How does the amount of current affect the strength of the magnetic field around an electromagnet? Design an experiment to test how field strength varies with the Current. (Recall that voltage is directly proportional to current….Ohm’s Law.) Enter your data, graph your results and write your conclusion statement on the Google Spreadsheet.

PHET ElectroMagnetism Key to this Document Instructions are in black. Experimental questions that you need to solve through experimentation with an online animation are in green highlighted. Important instructions are in red highlighted. Items that need a response from you are in yellow highlighted. Please put your answers to this activity in RED. Part I- Comparing Permanent Magnets and Electromagnets: 1. Select the simulation “Magnets and Electromagnets.” It is at this link: http://phet.colorado.edu/new/simulations/sims.php?sim=Magnets_and_Electromagnets 2. Move the compass slowly along a semicircular path above the bar magnet until you’ve put it on the opposite side of the bar magnet. Describe what happens to the compass needle. 3. Move the compass along a semicircular path below the bar magnet until you’ve put it on the opposite side of the bar magnet. Describe what happens to the compass needle. 4. What do you suppose the compass needles drawn all over the screen tell you? 5. Use page 10 in your book to look up what it looks like when scientists use a drawing to represent a magnetic field. Describe the field around a bar magnet here. 6. Put the compass to the left or right of the magnet. Click “flip polarity” and notice what happens to the compass. Using the compass needle as your observation tool, describe the effect that flipping the poles of the magnet has on the magnetic field. 7. Click on the electromagnet tab along the top of the simulation window. Place the compass on the left side of the coil so that the compass center lies along the axis of the coil. <--like this 8. Move the compass along a semicircular path above the coil until you’ve put it on the opposite side of the coil. Then do the same below the coil. Notice what happens to the compass needle. Compare this answer to the answer you got to Number 2 and 3. 9. Compare the shape of the magnetic field of a bar magnet to the magnetic field of an electromagnet. 10. Use the voltage slider to change the direction of the current and investigate the shape of the magnetic field the coil using the compass after you’ve let the compass stabilize. Summarize, the effect that the direction of current has on the shape of the magnetic field around an electrified coil of wires. 11. What happens to the current in the coil when you set the voltage of the battery to zero? 12. What happens to the magnetic field around the coil when you set the voltage of the battery to zero? Part II – Investigating relationships- No Answers are written on this document after this point. All three data tables, graphs and conclusion statements go on the Google Spreadsheet that you can download from Ms. Pogge’s website. Experimental Question #1: How does distance affect the strength of the magnetic field around an electromagnet? 1. Using the Electromagnet simulation, click on “Show Field Meter.” 2. Set the battery voltage to 10V where the positive is on the right of the battery (slide the switch all the way to the right). 3. Magnetic field strength (symbol B on the top line of the meter) is measured in gauss (G). You’ll only need to record the value on the top line of the Field Meter. 4. Position zero will be right on top of the coil. Negative number positions will be to the left and positive number positions to the right of the coil. 5. Move the field meter one compass needle to the right and record the value of B at position 1. 6. This data table below will be used to help you fill in the first spreadsheet you downloaded from Ms. Pogge’s website. You will end up with 3 data tables, 3 graphs and 3 conclusion statements in your document, one for each mini-experiment you are doing. a. NOTE: Be sure to take all of your values along the horizontal axis of the coil. You’ll know you’re on the axis because the B-y measurement of the magnetic field is zero along the axis. Compass position (no units) Magnetic Field Strength ( )<--Fill in units! -5 (5 needles to the left of coil) Don’t fill in the table here...do it on the Google Spreadsheet you downloaded -4 -3 -2 -1 0 (middle of coil) 1 2 3 4 5 (5 needles to right of coil) 7. In your Google Spreadsheet: Graph the compass position on the horizontal (x) axis and magnetic field magnitude on the vertical (y) axis. 8. Make sure to label the axes and title the graph. Share this spreadsheet with your teacher. 9. Analyze your graph to discover how the two variables are related, and report the relationship between magnetic field strength and position using 1-3 complete sentences. Experimental Question #2: How does the number of coils affect the strength of the magnetic field around an electromagnet? Design an experiment to test how field strength varies with the number of coils. Enter your data, graph your results and write your conclusion statement on the Google Spreadsheet. Experimental Question #3: How does the amount of current affect the strength of the magnetic field around an electromagnet? Design an experiment to test how field strength varies with the Current. (Recall that voltage is directly proportional to current….Ohm’s Law.) Enter your data, graph your results and write your conclusion statement on the Google Spreadsheet.

Chapter 5 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, March 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Tactics Box 5.1 Drawing Force Vectors Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 5.1 Drawing Force Vectors. To visualize how forces are exerted on objects, we can use simple diagrams such as vectors. This Tactics Box illustrates the process of drawing a force vector by using the particle model, in which objects are treated as points. TACTICS BOX 5.1 Drawing force vectors Represent the object 1. as a particle. 2. Place the tail of the force vector on the particle. 3. Draw the force vector as an arrow pointing in the proper direction and with a length proportional to the size of the force. 4. Give the vector an appropriate label. The resulting diagram for a force exerted on an object is shown in the drawing. Note that the object is represented as a black dot. Part A A book lies on a table. A pushing force parallel to the table top and directed to the right is exerted on the book. Follow the steps above to draw the force vector . Use the black dot as the particle representing the book. F  F push F push Draw the vector starting at the black dot. The location and orientation of the vector will be graded. The length of the vector will not be graded. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Tactics Box 5.2 Identifying Forces Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 5.2 Identifying Forces. The first basic step in solving force and motion problems generally involves identifying all of the forces acting on an object. This tactics box provides a step-by-step method for identifying each force in a problem. TACTICS BOX 5.2 Identifying forces Identify the object of interest. This is the object whose motion 1. you wish to study. 2. Draw a picture of the situation. Show the object of interest and all other objects—such as ropes, springs, or surfaces—that touch it. 3. Draw a closed curve around the object. Only the object of interest is inside the curve; everything else is outside. 4. Locate every point on the boundary of this curve where other objects touch the object of interest. These are the points where contact forces are exerted on the object. Name and label each contact force acting on the object. There is at least one force at each point of contact; there may be more than one. When necessary, use subscripts to distinguish forces of the same type. 5. 6. Name and label each long-range force acting on the object. For now, the only long-range force is the gravitational force. Apply these steps to the following problem: A crate is pulled up a rough inclined wood board by a tow rope. Identify the forces on the crate. Part A Which of the following objects are of interest? Check all that apply. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Conceptual Questions on Newton’s 1st and 2nd Laws Learning Goal: To understand the meaning and the basic applications of Newton’s 1st and 2nd laws. In this problem, you are given a diagram representing the motion of an object–a motion diagram. The dots represent the object’s position at moments separated by equal intervals of time. The dots are connected by arrows representing the object’s average velocity during the corresponding time interval. Your goal is to use this motion diagram to determine the direction of the net force acting on the object. You will then determine which force diagrams and which situations may correspond to such a motion. crate earth rope wood board Part A What is the direction of the net force acting on the object at position A? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D upward downward to the left to the right The net force is zero. This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part I This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part J This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Understanding Newton’s Laws Part A An object cannot remain at rest unless which of the following holds? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B If a block is moving to the left at a constant velocity, what can one conclude? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: The net force acting on it is zero. The net force acting on it is constant and nonzero. There are no forces at all acting on it. There is only one force acting on it. Part C A block of mass is acted upon by two forces: (directed to the left) and (directed to the right). What can you say about the block’s motion? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D A massive block is being pulled along a horizontal frictionless surface by a constant horizontal force. The block must be __________. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: There is exactly one force applied to the block. The net force applied to the block is directed to the left. The net force applied to the block is zero. There must be no forces at all applied to the block. 2 kg 3 N 4 N It must be moving to the left. It must be moving to the right. It must be at rest. It could be moving to the left, moving to the right, or be instantaneously at rest. Part E Two forces, of magnitude and , are applied to an object. The relative direction of the forces is unknown. The net force acting on the object __________. Check all that apply. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Tactics Box 5.3 Drawing a Free-Body Diagram Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 5.3 Drawing a Free-Body Diagram. A free-body diagram is a diagram that represents the object as a particle and shows all of the forces acting on the object. Learning how to draw such a diagram is a very important skill in solving physics problems. This tactics box explains the essential steps to construct a correct free-body diagram. TACTICS BOX 5.3 Drawing a free-body diagram Identify all forces acting on the object. This step was described 1. in Tactics Box 5.2. continuously changing direction moving at constant velocity moving with a constant nonzero acceleration moving with continuously increasing acceleration 4 N 10 N cannot have a magnitude equal to cannot have a magnitude equal to cannot have the same direction as the force with magnitude must have a magnitude greater than 5 N 10 N 10 N 10 N Draw a coordinate system. Use the axes defined in your pictorial representation. If those axes are tilted, for motion along an incline, then the axes of the free-body diagram should be similarly tilted. 2. Represent the object as a dot at the origin of the coordinate axes. This is 3. the particle model. 4. Draw vectors representing each of the identified forces. This was described in Tactics Box 5.1. Be sure to label each force vector. Draw and label the net force vector . Draw this vector beside the diagram, not on the particle. Or, if appropriate, write . Then, check that points in the same direction as the acceleration vector on your motion diagram. 5. Apply these steps to the following problem: Your physics book is sliding on the carpet. Draw a free-body diagram. Part A Which forces are acting on the book? Check all that apply. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: F  net F =  net 0 F  net a Part B Draw the most appropriate set of coordinate axes for this problem. The orientation of your vectors will be graded. ANSWER: gravity normal force drag static friction tension kinetic friction spring force Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points.

Chapter 5 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, March 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Tactics Box 5.1 Drawing Force Vectors Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 5.1 Drawing Force Vectors. To visualize how forces are exerted on objects, we can use simple diagrams such as vectors. This Tactics Box illustrates the process of drawing a force vector by using the particle model, in which objects are treated as points. TACTICS BOX 5.1 Drawing force vectors Represent the object 1. as a particle. 2. Place the tail of the force vector on the particle. 3. Draw the force vector as an arrow pointing in the proper direction and with a length proportional to the size of the force. 4. Give the vector an appropriate label. The resulting diagram for a force exerted on an object is shown in the drawing. Note that the object is represented as a black dot. Part A A book lies on a table. A pushing force parallel to the table top and directed to the right is exerted on the book. Follow the steps above to draw the force vector . Use the black dot as the particle representing the book. F  F push F push Draw the vector starting at the black dot. The location and orientation of the vector will be graded. The length of the vector will not be graded. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Tactics Box 5.2 Identifying Forces Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 5.2 Identifying Forces. The first basic step in solving force and motion problems generally involves identifying all of the forces acting on an object. This tactics box provides a step-by-step method for identifying each force in a problem. TACTICS BOX 5.2 Identifying forces Identify the object of interest. This is the object whose motion 1. you wish to study. 2. Draw a picture of the situation. Show the object of interest and all other objects—such as ropes, springs, or surfaces—that touch it. 3. Draw a closed curve around the object. Only the object of interest is inside the curve; everything else is outside. 4. Locate every point on the boundary of this curve where other objects touch the object of interest. These are the points where contact forces are exerted on the object. Name and label each contact force acting on the object. There is at least one force at each point of contact; there may be more than one. When necessary, use subscripts to distinguish forces of the same type. 5. 6. Name and label each long-range force acting on the object. For now, the only long-range force is the gravitational force. Apply these steps to the following problem: A crate is pulled up a rough inclined wood board by a tow rope. Identify the forces on the crate. Part A Which of the following objects are of interest? Check all that apply. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Conceptual Questions on Newton’s 1st and 2nd Laws Learning Goal: To understand the meaning and the basic applications of Newton’s 1st and 2nd laws. In this problem, you are given a diagram representing the motion of an object–a motion diagram. The dots represent the object’s position at moments separated by equal intervals of time. The dots are connected by arrows representing the object’s average velocity during the corresponding time interval. Your goal is to use this motion diagram to determine the direction of the net force acting on the object. You will then determine which force diagrams and which situations may correspond to such a motion. crate earth rope wood board Part A What is the direction of the net force acting on the object at position A? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D upward downward to the left to the right The net force is zero. This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part I This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part J This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Understanding Newton’s Laws Part A An object cannot remain at rest unless which of the following holds? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B If a block is moving to the left at a constant velocity, what can one conclude? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: The net force acting on it is zero. The net force acting on it is constant and nonzero. There are no forces at all acting on it. There is only one force acting on it. Part C A block of mass is acted upon by two forces: (directed to the left) and (directed to the right). What can you say about the block’s motion? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D A massive block is being pulled along a horizontal frictionless surface by a constant horizontal force. The block must be __________. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: There is exactly one force applied to the block. The net force applied to the block is directed to the left. The net force applied to the block is zero. There must be no forces at all applied to the block. 2 kg 3 N 4 N It must be moving to the left. It must be moving to the right. It must be at rest. It could be moving to the left, moving to the right, or be instantaneously at rest. Part E Two forces, of magnitude and , are applied to an object. The relative direction of the forces is unknown. The net force acting on the object __________. Check all that apply. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Tactics Box 5.3 Drawing a Free-Body Diagram Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 5.3 Drawing a Free-Body Diagram. A free-body diagram is a diagram that represents the object as a particle and shows all of the forces acting on the object. Learning how to draw such a diagram is a very important skill in solving physics problems. This tactics box explains the essential steps to construct a correct free-body diagram. TACTICS BOX 5.3 Drawing a free-body diagram Identify all forces acting on the object. This step was described 1. in Tactics Box 5.2. continuously changing direction moving at constant velocity moving with a constant nonzero acceleration moving with continuously increasing acceleration 4 N 10 N cannot have a magnitude equal to cannot have a magnitude equal to cannot have the same direction as the force with magnitude must have a magnitude greater than 5 N 10 N 10 N 10 N Draw a coordinate system. Use the axes defined in your pictorial representation. If those axes are tilted, for motion along an incline, then the axes of the free-body diagram should be similarly tilted. 2. Represent the object as a dot at the origin of the coordinate axes. This is 3. the particle model. 4. Draw vectors representing each of the identified forces. This was described in Tactics Box 5.1. Be sure to label each force vector. Draw and label the net force vector . Draw this vector beside the diagram, not on the particle. Or, if appropriate, write . Then, check that points in the same direction as the acceleration vector on your motion diagram. 5. Apply these steps to the following problem: Your physics book is sliding on the carpet. Draw a free-body diagram. Part A Which forces are acting on the book? Check all that apply. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: F  net F =  net 0 F  net a Part B Draw the most appropriate set of coordinate axes for this problem. The orientation of your vectors will be graded. ANSWER: gravity normal force drag static friction tension kinetic friction spring force Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points.

please email info@checkyourstudy.com
A small object of mass m starts from rest at the position shown and slide along the frictionless loop-the-loop track of radius R. what is the smallest value of y such that object will slide without losing contact with the track ? (1) R/2, (2) R/4, (3) R, (4) 2R, (5) zero

A small object of mass m starts from rest at the position shown and slide along the frictionless loop-the-loop track of radius R. what is the smallest value of y such that object will slide without losing contact with the track ? (1) R/2, (2) R/4, (3) R, (4) 2R, (5) zero