Hum Ass Due In a five supe grou orga The subm The for suffi conc and The and off’ w The angr they Que Wha Man man Res signmen e Date: N Marketing employee ervisor has up membe anization. task given mitted to t forecasts special in cient to ke cerned wit he is inclin members seemingly work. employee ry that the y speak to h estion: at are th nagement source M nt No. 01 Novemb g Departm es, who wo s his office ers are we to the gro the market are mostl formation eep all five th the spe ned to leav of group a y unimport es would li eir supervi him. he proble deal with t Manage 1 ber 26, 2 ent of an ork closely e two floo ell‐educate oup is to p ting manag ly routine, is receiv e group m cial respon ve the grou are frustra tant – alth ike to initi sor does n ems in a this situat ment (M 2015 organizati y together ors above ed, but m repare ma ger whose , although ved. The v embers bu nsibilities up alone. ated becau hough they iate more not show above sce ion? MGT501) ion, the w r in an op in the sa most of th arket forec office is in occasiona volume of usy. The gr which kee use much y sometim of their o any intere enario an ) F M ork group pen‐plan o ame buildi hem are n casts, whic n a differe ally ‘one‐o f work is roup’s lead ep him ful of the wo mes enjoy d own projec est in this nd how Fall 2015 Marks: 1 consists o office. The ing. All th new to th ch would b nt building off’ reques not reall der is mor ly occupie rk is borin doing ‘one cts and ar idea whe might th 5 0 of ir e e be g. st ly re d ng ere n e DEAD   FORM     REFE  RULE     DLINE: Make sure Any subm MATTING GU Use the fo It is advise You may a Use black ERENCING G Use APA Google an http://lin ES FOR MAR Please not It is subm The file yo It is in any It is cheat e to upload th mission made UIDELINES: ont style “Tim ed to compo also compos and blue fon GuIDELINES style for refe nd read vario guistics.byu.e RKING: te that your a mitted after th ou uploaded y format othe ed or copied he solution f via email aft mes New Ro ose your docu e your assign nt colors only : erencing and ous website c edu/faculty/ assignment w he due date. does not op er than MS-W d from other file before the ter the due d oman” or “Ar ument in MS nment in Op y. citation. Fo containing in /henrichsenl/ will not be co en or is corru Word or Ope students, int e due date on ate will not b rial” and fon S-Word form en Office fo or guidance s nformation fo /apa/APA01 onsidered, if: upt. en Office; e.g ternet, books n VULMS. be accepted. nt size “12”. mat. rmat. search “APA or better und 1.html g. Excel, Pow s, journals etc A reference st derstanding o werPoint, PD c. tyle” in or visit DF etc.

Hum Ass Due In a five supe grou orga The subm The for suffi conc and The and off’ w The angr they Que Wha Man man Res signmen e Date: N Marketing employee ervisor has up membe anization. task given mitted to t forecasts special in cient to ke cerned wit he is inclin members seemingly work. employee ry that the y speak to h estion: at are th nagement source M nt No. 01 Novemb g Departm es, who wo s his office ers are we to the gro the market are mostl formation eep all five th the spe ned to leav of group a y unimport es would li eir supervi him. he proble deal with t Manage 1 ber 26, 2 ent of an ork closely e two floo ell‐educate oup is to p ting manag ly routine, is receiv e group m cial respon ve the grou are frustra tant – alth ike to initi sor does n ems in a this situat ment (M 2015 organizati y together ors above ed, but m repare ma ger whose , although ved. The v embers bu nsibilities up alone. ated becau hough they iate more not show above sce ion? MGT501) ion, the w r in an op in the sa most of th arket forec office is in occasiona volume of usy. The gr which kee use much y sometim of their o any intere enario an ) F M ork group pen‐plan o ame buildi hem are n casts, whic n a differe ally ‘one‐o f work is roup’s lead ep him ful of the wo mes enjoy d own projec est in this nd how Fall 2015 Marks: 1 consists o office. The ing. All th new to th ch would b nt building off’ reques not reall der is mor ly occupie rk is borin doing ‘one cts and ar idea whe might th 5 0 of ir e e be g. st ly re d ng ere n e DEAD   FORM     REFE  RULE     DLINE: Make sure Any subm MATTING GU Use the fo It is advise You may a Use black ERENCING G Use APA Google an http://lin ES FOR MAR Please not It is subm The file yo It is in any It is cheat e to upload th mission made UIDELINES: ont style “Tim ed to compo also compos and blue fon GuIDELINES style for refe nd read vario guistics.byu.e RKING: te that your a mitted after th ou uploaded y format othe ed or copied he solution f via email aft mes New Ro ose your docu e your assign nt colors only : erencing and ous website c edu/faculty/ assignment w he due date. does not op er than MS-W d from other file before the ter the due d oman” or “Ar ument in MS nment in Op y. citation. Fo containing in /henrichsenl/ will not be co en or is corru Word or Ope students, int e due date on ate will not b rial” and fon S-Word form en Office fo or guidance s nformation fo /apa/APA01 onsidered, if: upt. en Office; e.g ternet, books n VULMS. be accepted. nt size “12”. mat. rmat. search “APA or better und 1.html g. Excel, Pow s, journals etc A reference st derstanding o werPoint, PD c. tyle” in or visit DF etc.

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Assignment 2 Conditional Probability, Bayes Theorem, and Random Variables Conditional Probability and Bayes’ Theorem Problems 1-14 from Problem Set on Conditional Probability and Bayes’ Theorem I am including all the question here so that there is no confusion. Q1. Pair of six sided dices are rolled and the outcome is noted: What is the sample space? What is the size of the sample space? Suppose all we are interested in is the sum of the two outcomes. What is the probability that the sum of the two is 6? 7? 8? (Note: This can be solved using both enumeration and conditional probability method). Here, it makes more sense to use the enumeration approach than conditional probability. It is, however, listed here to set the stage for Q5. What is the probability that the sum of the two is above 5 and the two numbers are equal? Express this question in terms of events A, B, and set operators. What is the probability that the sum of the two is above 5 or the two numbers are equal? Express this question in terms of events A, B, and set operators. Q2. If P(A)=0.4, P(B)=0.5 and P(A∩B)=0.3 What is the value of (a) P(A|B) and (b) P(B|A) Q3. At a fair, a vendor has 25 helium balloons on strings: 10 balloons are yellow, 8 are red, and 7 are green. A balloon is selected at random and sold. Given that the balloon sold is yellow, what is the probability that the next balloon selected at random is also yellow? Q4. A bowl contains seven blue chips and three red chips. Two chips are to be drawn at random and without replacement. What is the probability that the fist chip is a red chip and the second a blue? Express this question in terms of events A, B, and set operators and use conditional probability. Q5. Three six sided dices are rolled and the outcome is noted: What is the size of the sample space? What is the probability that the sum of the three numbers is 6? 13? 18? Solve using conditional probability How does the concept of conditional probability help? Q6. A grade school boy has 5 blue and four white marbles in his left pocket and four blue and five white marbles in his right pocket. If he transfers one marble at random from his left pocket to his right pocket, what is the probability of his then drawing a blue marble from his right pocket? Q7. In a certain factory, machine I, II, and III are all producing springs of the same length. Of their production, machines I, II, and III produce 2%, 1%, and 3% defective springs respectively. Of the total production of springs in the factory, machine I produces 35%, machine II produces 25%, and machine III produces 40%. If one spring is selected at random from the total springs produced in a day, what is the probability that it is defective? Given that the selected spring is defective, what is the probability that it was produced on machine III? Q8. Bowl B1 contains 2 white chips, bowl B2 contains 2 red chips, bowl B3 contains 2 white and 2 red chips, and Bowl B4 contains 3 white chips and 1 red chip. The probabilities of selecting bowl B1, B2, B3, and B4 are 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, and 1/8 respectively. A bowl is selected using these probabilities, and a chip is then drawn at random. Find P(W), the probability of drawing a white chip P(B1|W): the probability that bowl B1 was selected, given that a white chip was drawn. Q9. A pap smear is a screening procedure used to detect cervical cancer. For women with this cancer, there are about 16% false negative. For women without cervical cancer, there are about 19% false positive. In the US, there are about 8 women in 100,000 who have this cancer. What is the probability that a woman who has been tested positive actually has cervical cancer? Q10. There is a new diagnostic test for a disease that occurs in about 0.05% of the population. The test is not perfect but will detect a person with the disease 99% of the time. It will, however, say that a person without the disease has the disease about 3% of the time. A person is selected at random from the population and the test indicates that this person has the disease. What are the conditional probabilities that The person has the disease The person does not have the disease Q11. Consider two urns: the first contains two white and seven black balls, and the second contains five white and six black balls. We flip a fair coin and then draw a ball from the first urn or the second urn depending on whether the outcome was a head or a tails. What is the conditional probability that the outcome of the toss was heads given that a white ball was selected? Q12. In answering a question on a multiple-choice test a student either knows the answer or guesses. Let p be the probability that she knows the answer. Assume that a student who guesses at the answer will be correct with probability 1/m where m is the number of multiple choice alternatives. What is the conditional probability that a student knew the answer given that she answered it correctly? Q13. A laboratory blood test is 95% effective in detecting a certain disease when it is, in fact, present. However, the test also yields a “false positive” result for 1% of the healthy persons tested (i.e., if a healthy person is tested, then, with probability 0.01, the test result will imply that he has the disease.). If 0.5% of the population actually have the disease, what is the probability a person has the disease given that his test results are positive? Q14. An urn contains b black balls and r red balls. One of the balls is drawn at random, but when it is put back in the urn, c additional balls of the same color are put in it with it. Now suppose that we draw another ball. What is the probability that the first ball drawn was black given that the second ball drawn was red? Random Variables Q15. Suppose an experiment consists of tossing two six sided fair dice and observing the outcomes. What is the sample space? Let Y denote the sum of the two numbers that appear on the dice. Define Y to be a random variable. What are the values that the random variable Y can take? What does it mean if we say Y=7? What does it mean if I say that Y<7? Q16. Suppose an experiment consists of picking a sample of size n from a population of size N. Assume that n≪N. Also, assume that the population contains D defective parts and N-D non defective parts, where n<D≪N. What is the sample space? If we are interested in knowing the number (count) of defective parts in the sample space, describe how, the concept of a random variable could help. Define a random variable Y and describe what values the random variable Y can take? What does it mean if we say Y=5? Q17. Suppose an experiment consists of tossing two fair coins. Let Y denote the number of heads appearing. Define Y to be a random variable. What are the values that the random variable Y can take? What does it mean if we say Y=1? What are the probabilities associated with each outcome? What is the sum of the probabilities associated with all possible values that Y can take? Q18. A lot, consisting of 100 fuses, is inspected by the following procedure. Five fuses are chosen at random and tested: if all 5 fuses pass the inspection, the lot is accepted. Suppose that the lot contains 20 defective fuses. What is the probability of accepting the lot? Define the random variable, its purpose, and the formula/concept that you would use. Q19. In a small pond there are 50 fish, 10 of which have been tagged. If a fisherman’s catch consists of 7 fish, selected at random and without replacement. Give an example of a random variable that can be defined if we are interested in knowing the number of tagged fish that are caught? What is the probability that exactly 2 tagged fish are caught? Define the random variable, its purpose, and the formula/concept that you would use. Applied to Quality Control Q20. My manufacturing firm makes 100 cars every day out of which 10 are defective; the quality control inspector tests drives 5 different cars. Based on the sample, the quality control inspector will make a generalization about the whole batch of 100 cars that I have on that day. Let d denote the number of defective cars in the sample What are the values that d can take (given the information provided above)? What is the probability that the quality control inspector will conclude that: (a) 0% of the cars are defective- call this P(d=0); (b) 20% of the cars are defective- call this P(d=1); (c) 40% of the cars are defective- call this P(d=2); (d) 60% of the cars are defective- call this P(d=3),(e) 80% of the cars are defective- call this P(d=4), and (f) 100% of the cars are defective- call this P(d=5) What is P(d=0)+ P(d=1)+ P(d=2)+ P(d=3)+ P(d=4)+ P(d=5) Let’s assume that the quality control inspector has been doing the testing for a while (say for the past 1000 days). What is the average # of defective cars that he found? Q21. Assume that the quality control inspector is selecting 1 car at a time and the car that he tested is put back in the pool of possible cars that he can test (sample with replacement). Let d denote the number of defective cars in the sample (n) What are the values that d can take (given the information provided above)? What is the probability that the quality control inspector will conclude that: (a) 0% of the cars are defective, (b) 20% of the cars are defective, (c) 40% of the cars are defective, (d) 60% of the cars are defective, (e) 80% of the cars are defective, and (f) 100% of the cars are defective. Let’s call these P(d=0)….P(d=5) What is P(d=0)+ P(d=1)+ P(d=2)+ P(d=3)+ P(d=4)+ P(d=5) Let’s assume that the quality control inspector has been doing the testing for a while (say for the past 1000 days). What is the average # of defective cars that he found? Interesting Problems Q22. A closet contains n pairs of shoes. If 2r shoes are chosen at random (2r<n), what is the probability that there will be no matching pair in the sample? Q23. In a draft lottery containing the 366 days of the leap year, what is the probability that the first 180 days drawn (without replacement) are evenly distributed among the 12 months? What is the probability that the first 30 days drawn contain none from September? Q25. You and I play a coin-tossing game. If the coin falls heads I score one, if tails, you score one. In the beginning, the score is zero. What is the probability that after 2n throws our scores are equal? What is the probability that after 2n+1 throws my score is three more than yours?

Assignment 2 Conditional Probability, Bayes Theorem, and Random Variables Conditional Probability and Bayes’ Theorem Problems 1-14 from Problem Set on Conditional Probability and Bayes’ Theorem I am including all the question here so that there is no confusion. Q1. Pair of six sided dices are rolled and the outcome is noted: What is the sample space? What is the size of the sample space? Suppose all we are interested in is the sum of the two outcomes. What is the probability that the sum of the two is 6? 7? 8? (Note: This can be solved using both enumeration and conditional probability method). Here, it makes more sense to use the enumeration approach than conditional probability. It is, however, listed here to set the stage for Q5. What is the probability that the sum of the two is above 5 and the two numbers are equal? Express this question in terms of events A, B, and set operators. What is the probability that the sum of the two is above 5 or the two numbers are equal? Express this question in terms of events A, B, and set operators. Q2. If P(A)=0.4, P(B)=0.5 and P(A∩B)=0.3 What is the value of (a) P(A|B) and (b) P(B|A) Q3. At a fair, a vendor has 25 helium balloons on strings: 10 balloons are yellow, 8 are red, and 7 are green. A balloon is selected at random and sold. Given that the balloon sold is yellow, what is the probability that the next balloon selected at random is also yellow? Q4. A bowl contains seven blue chips and three red chips. Two chips are to be drawn at random and without replacement. What is the probability that the fist chip is a red chip and the second a blue? Express this question in terms of events A, B, and set operators and use conditional probability. Q5. Three six sided dices are rolled and the outcome is noted: What is the size of the sample space? What is the probability that the sum of the three numbers is 6? 13? 18? Solve using conditional probability How does the concept of conditional probability help? Q6. A grade school boy has 5 blue and four white marbles in his left pocket and four blue and five white marbles in his right pocket. If he transfers one marble at random from his left pocket to his right pocket, what is the probability of his then drawing a blue marble from his right pocket? Q7. In a certain factory, machine I, II, and III are all producing springs of the same length. Of their production, machines I, II, and III produce 2%, 1%, and 3% defective springs respectively. Of the total production of springs in the factory, machine I produces 35%, machine II produces 25%, and machine III produces 40%. If one spring is selected at random from the total springs produced in a day, what is the probability that it is defective? Given that the selected spring is defective, what is the probability that it was produced on machine III? Q8. Bowl B1 contains 2 white chips, bowl B2 contains 2 red chips, bowl B3 contains 2 white and 2 red chips, and Bowl B4 contains 3 white chips and 1 red chip. The probabilities of selecting bowl B1, B2, B3, and B4 are 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, and 1/8 respectively. A bowl is selected using these probabilities, and a chip is then drawn at random. Find P(W), the probability of drawing a white chip P(B1|W): the probability that bowl B1 was selected, given that a white chip was drawn. Q9. A pap smear is a screening procedure used to detect cervical cancer. For women with this cancer, there are about 16% false negative. For women without cervical cancer, there are about 19% false positive. In the US, there are about 8 women in 100,000 who have this cancer. What is the probability that a woman who has been tested positive actually has cervical cancer? Q10. There is a new diagnostic test for a disease that occurs in about 0.05% of the population. The test is not perfect but will detect a person with the disease 99% of the time. It will, however, say that a person without the disease has the disease about 3% of the time. A person is selected at random from the population and the test indicates that this person has the disease. What are the conditional probabilities that The person has the disease The person does not have the disease Q11. Consider two urns: the first contains two white and seven black balls, and the second contains five white and six black balls. We flip a fair coin and then draw a ball from the first urn or the second urn depending on whether the outcome was a head or a tails. What is the conditional probability that the outcome of the toss was heads given that a white ball was selected? Q12. In answering a question on a multiple-choice test a student either knows the answer or guesses. Let p be the probability that she knows the answer. Assume that a student who guesses at the answer will be correct with probability 1/m where m is the number of multiple choice alternatives. What is the conditional probability that a student knew the answer given that she answered it correctly? Q13. A laboratory blood test is 95% effective in detecting a certain disease when it is, in fact, present. However, the test also yields a “false positive” result for 1% of the healthy persons tested (i.e., if a healthy person is tested, then, with probability 0.01, the test result will imply that he has the disease.). If 0.5% of the population actually have the disease, what is the probability a person has the disease given that his test results are positive? Q14. An urn contains b black balls and r red balls. One of the balls is drawn at random, but when it is put back in the urn, c additional balls of the same color are put in it with it. Now suppose that we draw another ball. What is the probability that the first ball drawn was black given that the second ball drawn was red? Random Variables Q15. Suppose an experiment consists of tossing two six sided fair dice and observing the outcomes. What is the sample space? Let Y denote the sum of the two numbers that appear on the dice. Define Y to be a random variable. What are the values that the random variable Y can take? What does it mean if we say Y=7? What does it mean if I say that Y<7? Q16. Suppose an experiment consists of picking a sample of size n from a population of size N. Assume that n≪N. Also, assume that the population contains D defective parts and N-D non defective parts, where n

Laurentian University ENGR 1056: Applied Mechanics I 2015{2016 Assignment #2 Instructions: Complete all the questions. Show your work as marks are given for process. Submit your assignment as a single PDF le to the appropriate dropbox on D2L. You may use the photocopiers in the library as scanners if you do not have access to a scanner. Ensure that the scans are readable. Late assignments will NOT be accepted. Due: Tues. Sept. 29, 2015, 8:30am 2-1. Assuming that: A = 5i ? 3j + 2k B = ?2i + 2k then calculate the following and report your answers to 3 signi cant gures: (a) eA; (b) A  B; (c) B  A; and, (d) the component of A parallel to B. 2-2. Do question 2.159 from your text. Report your answers to four signi cant digits. 2-3. You are given the following directions: start at point A, walk north 5 ft to point B, turn 30 degrees to your right, walk forward for 8 ft to point C, turn 15 degrees to your right, walk forward x ft to point D. If the distance directly from A to D is 16 ft, what is the value of x? What is the angle  between AB and AD? Include a diagram of your route. Label your diagram with points A to D and the angle . Report you answers to 3 signi cant digits. 2-4. Do question 2.165 from your text. Report your answers in newtons to four signi - cant gures. W. Brent Lievers 2015-09-21 Page 1 of 1

Laurentian University ENGR 1056: Applied Mechanics I 2015{2016 Assignment #2 Instructions: Complete all the questions. Show your work as marks are given for process. Submit your assignment as a single PDF le to the appropriate dropbox on D2L. You may use the photocopiers in the library as scanners if you do not have access to a scanner. Ensure that the scans are readable. Late assignments will NOT be accepted. Due: Tues. Sept. 29, 2015, 8:30am 2-1. Assuming that: A = 5i ? 3j + 2k B = ?2i + 2k then calculate the following and report your answers to 3 signi cant gures: (a) eA; (b) A  B; (c) B  A; and, (d) the component of A parallel to B. 2-2. Do question 2.159 from your text. Report your answers to four signi cant digits. 2-3. You are given the following directions: start at point A, walk north 5 ft to point B, turn 30 degrees to your right, walk forward for 8 ft to point C, turn 15 degrees to your right, walk forward x ft to point D. If the distance directly from A to D is 16 ft, what is the value of x? What is the angle  between AB and AD? Include a diagram of your route. Label your diagram with points A to D and the angle . Report you answers to 3 signi cant digits. 2-4. Do question 2.165 from your text. Report your answers in newtons to four signi - cant gures. W. Brent Lievers 2015-09-21 Page 1 of 1

2. According to the video: Semmelweis and Pasteur: Germ Theory (5 points) a) What is childbed fever? infection of womb and cases septicimea. b) What was Semmelweis’s hypothesis as to why more women were dying of childbed fever under the doctor’s care rather than the midwives? chlorine hand wash. c) Why were Semmelweis’s ideas not accepted in 1846? no scientific reasoning. d) Why was Pasteur so concerned with finding out about disease transmission? transmission is to be studied to identify the cure or prevention. e) What industry was he working for? microbiology. f) Pasteur’s experiment led to what theory? Describe this theory. transmission principle. dna is responsible for transmission not the protein. g) Your thoughts: Can all diseases be explained by the germ theory? no, non infectious diseases cannot come under this theory.

2. According to the video: Semmelweis and Pasteur: Germ Theory (5 points) a) What is childbed fever? infection of womb and cases septicimea. b) What was Semmelweis’s hypothesis as to why more women were dying of childbed fever under the doctor’s care rather than the midwives? chlorine hand wash. c) Why were Semmelweis’s ideas not accepted in 1846? no scientific reasoning. d) Why was Pasteur so concerned with finding out about disease transmission? transmission is to be studied to identify the cure or prevention. e) What industry was he working for? microbiology. f) Pasteur’s experiment led to what theory? Describe this theory. transmission principle. dna is responsible for transmission not the protein. g) Your thoughts: Can all diseases be explained by the germ theory? no, non infectious diseases cannot come under this theory.

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do you feel that classical Muslim administration was tolerant of religious and ethnic minorities under their rule? Why or Why not? In addition, do you feel that religious and ethnic minorities are currently tolerated and accepted in present-day Muslim countries? Why or Why not? Why do you think this is the case? MLA Style work cited 500 word

do you feel that classical Muslim administration was tolerant of religious and ethnic minorities under their rule? Why or Why not? In addition, do you feel that religious and ethnic minorities are currently tolerated and accepted in present-day Muslim countries? Why or Why not? Why do you think this is the case? MLA Style work cited 500 word

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HST 102: Paper 7 Formal essay, due in class on the day of the debate No late papers will be accepted. Answer the following inquiry in a typed (and stapled) 2 page essay in the five-paragraph format. Present and describe three of your arguments that you will use to defend your position concerning eugenics. Each argument must be unique (don’t describe the same argument twice from a different angle). Each argument must include at least one quotation from the texts to support your position (a minimum of 3 total). You may discuss your positions and arguments with other people on your side (but not your opponents); however, each student must write their own essay in their own words. Do not copy sentences or paragraphs from another student’s paper, this is plagiarism and will result in a failing grade for the assignment. HST 102: Debate 4 Eugenics For or Against? Basics of the debate: The term ‘Eugenics’ was derived from two Greek words and literally means ‘good genes’. Eugenics is the social philosophy or practice of engineering society based on genes, or promoting the reproduction of good genes while reducing (or prohibiting) the reproduction of bad genes. Your group will argue either for or against the adoption of eugenic policies in your society. Key Terms: Eugenics – The study of or belief in the possibility of improving the qualities of the human species or a human population, especially by such means as discouraging reproduction by persons having genetic defects or presumed to have inheritable undesirable traits (negative eugenics) or encouraging reproduction by persons presumed to have inheritable desirable traits (positive eugenics). Darwinism – The Darwinian theory that species originate by descent, with variation, from parent forms, through the natural selection of those individuals best adapted for the reproductive success of their kind. Social Darwinism – A 19th-century theory, inspired by Darwinism, by which the social order is accounted as the product of natural selection of those persons best suited to existing living conditions. Mendelian Inheritance – Theory proposed by Gregor Johann Mendal in 1865 that became the first theory of genetic inheritance derived from experiments with peas. Birth Control – Any means to artificially prevent biological conception. Euthanasia – A policy of ending the life of an individual for their betterment (for example, because of excessive pain, brain dead, etc.) or society’s benefit. Genocide – A policy of murdering all members of a specific group of people who share a common characteristic. Deductive Logic – Deriving a specific conclusion based on a set of general definitions. Inductive Logic – Deriving a general conclusion based on a number of specific examples. Brief Historical Background: Eugenics was first proposed by Francis Galton in his 1883 work, Inquiries into Human Faculty and its Development. Galton was a cousin of Charles Darwin and an early supporter of Darwin’s theories of natural selection and evolution. Galton defined eugenics as the study of all agencies under human control which can improve or impair the racial quality of future generations. Galton’s work utilized a number of other scientific pursuits at the time including the study of heredity, genes, chromosomes, evolution, social Darwinism, zoology, birth control, sociology, psychology, chemistry, atomic theory and electrodynamics. The number of significant scientific advances was accelerating throughout the 19th century altering what science was and what its role in society could and should be. Galton’s work had a significant influence throughout all areas of society, from scientific communities to politics, culture and literature. A number of organizations were created to explore the science of eugenics and its possible applications to society. Ultimately, eugenics became a means by which to improve society through policies based on scientific study. Most of these policies related to reproductive practices within a society, specifically who could or should not reproduce. Throughout the late 1800s and early 1900s a number of policies were enacted at various levels throughout Europe and the United States aimed at controlling procreation. Some specific policies included compulsory sterilization laws (usually concerning criminals and the mentally ill) as well as banning interracial marriages to prevent ‘cross-racial’ breeding. In the United States a number of individuals and foundations supported the exploration of eugenics as a means to positively influence society, including: the Rockefeller Foundation, the Carnegie Institution, the Race Betterment Foundation of Battle Creek, MI, the Eugenics Record Office, the American Breeders Association, the Euthanasia Society of America; and individuals such as Charles Davenport, Madison Grant, Alexander Graham Bell, Irving Fisher, John D. Rockefeller, Margaret Sanger, Marie Stopes, David Starr Jordan, Vernon Kellogg, H. G. Wells (though he later changed sides) Winston Churchill, George Bernard Shaw, John Maynard Keynes, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes and Presidents Woodrow Wilson, Herbert Hoover and Theodore Roosevelt. Some early critics of eugenics included: Dr. John Haycroft, Halliday Sutherland, Lancelot Hogben, Franz Boaz, Lester Ward, G. K. Chesterton, J. B. S. Haldane, and R. A. Fisher. In 1911 the Carnegie Institute recommended constructing gas chambers around the country to euthanize certain elements of the American population (primarily the poor and criminals) considered to be harmful to the future of society as a possible eugenic solution. President Woodrow Wilson signed the first Sterilization Act in US history. In the 1920s and 30s, 30 states passed various eugenics laws, some of which were overturned by the Supreme Court. Eugenics of various forms was a founding principle of the Progressive Party, strongly supported by the first progressive president Theodore Roosevelt, and would continue to play an important part in influencing progressive policies into at least the 1940s. Many American individuals and societies supported German research on eugenics that would eventually be used to develop and justify the policies utilized by the NAZI party against minority groups including Jews, Africans, gypsies and others that ultimately led to programs of genocide and the holocaust. Following WWII and worldwide exposure of the holocaust eugenics generally fell out of favor among the public, though various lesser forms of eugenics are still advocated for today by such individuals as Dottie Lamm, Geoffrey Miller, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg, John Glad and Richard Dawson. Eugenics still influences many modern debates including: capital punishment, over-population, global warming, medicine (disease control and genetic disorders), birth control, abortion, artificial insemination, evolution, social engineering, and education. Key Points to discuss during the debate: • Individual rights vs. collective rights • The pros and cons of genetically engineering society • The practicality of genetically engineering society • Methods used to determine ‘good traits’ and ‘bad traits’ • Who determines which people are ‘fit’ or ‘unfit’ for future society • The role of science in society • Methods used to derive scientific conclusions • Ability of scientists to determine the future hereditary conditions of individuals • The value/accuracy of scientific conclusions • The role of the government to implement eugenic policies • Some possible eugenic political policies or laws • The ways these policies may be used effectively or abused • The relationship between eugenics and individual rights • The role of ethics in science and eugenics Strategies: 1. Use this guide to help you (particularly the key points). 2. Read all of the texts. 3. If needed, read secondary analysis concerning eugenics. 4. Identify key quotations as you read each text. Perhaps make a list of them to print out and/or group quotes by topic or point. 5. Develop multiple arguments to defend your position. 6. Prioritize your arguments from most persuasive to least persuasive and from most evidence to least evidence. 7. Anticipate the arguments of your opponents and develop counter-arguments for them. 8. Anticipate counter-arguments to your own arguments and develop responses to them.

HST 102: Paper 7 Formal essay, due in class on the day of the debate No late papers will be accepted. Answer the following inquiry in a typed (and stapled) 2 page essay in the five-paragraph format. Present and describe three of your arguments that you will use to defend your position concerning eugenics. Each argument must be unique (don’t describe the same argument twice from a different angle). Each argument must include at least one quotation from the texts to support your position (a minimum of 3 total). You may discuss your positions and arguments with other people on your side (but not your opponents); however, each student must write their own essay in their own words. Do not copy sentences or paragraphs from another student’s paper, this is plagiarism and will result in a failing grade for the assignment. HST 102: Debate 4 Eugenics For or Against? Basics of the debate: The term ‘Eugenics’ was derived from two Greek words and literally means ‘good genes’. Eugenics is the social philosophy or practice of engineering society based on genes, or promoting the reproduction of good genes while reducing (or prohibiting) the reproduction of bad genes. Your group will argue either for or against the adoption of eugenic policies in your society. Key Terms: Eugenics – The study of or belief in the possibility of improving the qualities of the human species or a human population, especially by such means as discouraging reproduction by persons having genetic defects or presumed to have inheritable undesirable traits (negative eugenics) or encouraging reproduction by persons presumed to have inheritable desirable traits (positive eugenics). Darwinism – The Darwinian theory that species originate by descent, with variation, from parent forms, through the natural selection of those individuals best adapted for the reproductive success of their kind. Social Darwinism – A 19th-century theory, inspired by Darwinism, by which the social order is accounted as the product of natural selection of those persons best suited to existing living conditions. Mendelian Inheritance – Theory proposed by Gregor Johann Mendal in 1865 that became the first theory of genetic inheritance derived from experiments with peas. Birth Control – Any means to artificially prevent biological conception. Euthanasia – A policy of ending the life of an individual for their betterment (for example, because of excessive pain, brain dead, etc.) or society’s benefit. Genocide – A policy of murdering all members of a specific group of people who share a common characteristic. Deductive Logic – Deriving a specific conclusion based on a set of general definitions. Inductive Logic – Deriving a general conclusion based on a number of specific examples. Brief Historical Background: Eugenics was first proposed by Francis Galton in his 1883 work, Inquiries into Human Faculty and its Development. Galton was a cousin of Charles Darwin and an early supporter of Darwin’s theories of natural selection and evolution. Galton defined eugenics as the study of all agencies under human control which can improve or impair the racial quality of future generations. Galton’s work utilized a number of other scientific pursuits at the time including the study of heredity, genes, chromosomes, evolution, social Darwinism, zoology, birth control, sociology, psychology, chemistry, atomic theory and electrodynamics. The number of significant scientific advances was accelerating throughout the 19th century altering what science was and what its role in society could and should be. Galton’s work had a significant influence throughout all areas of society, from scientific communities to politics, culture and literature. A number of organizations were created to explore the science of eugenics and its possible applications to society. Ultimately, eugenics became a means by which to improve society through policies based on scientific study. Most of these policies related to reproductive practices within a society, specifically who could or should not reproduce. Throughout the late 1800s and early 1900s a number of policies were enacted at various levels throughout Europe and the United States aimed at controlling procreation. Some specific policies included compulsory sterilization laws (usually concerning criminals and the mentally ill) as well as banning interracial marriages to prevent ‘cross-racial’ breeding. In the United States a number of individuals and foundations supported the exploration of eugenics as a means to positively influence society, including: the Rockefeller Foundation, the Carnegie Institution, the Race Betterment Foundation of Battle Creek, MI, the Eugenics Record Office, the American Breeders Association, the Euthanasia Society of America; and individuals such as Charles Davenport, Madison Grant, Alexander Graham Bell, Irving Fisher, John D. Rockefeller, Margaret Sanger, Marie Stopes, David Starr Jordan, Vernon Kellogg, H. G. Wells (though he later changed sides) Winston Churchill, George Bernard Shaw, John Maynard Keynes, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes and Presidents Woodrow Wilson, Herbert Hoover and Theodore Roosevelt. Some early critics of eugenics included: Dr. John Haycroft, Halliday Sutherland, Lancelot Hogben, Franz Boaz, Lester Ward, G. K. Chesterton, J. B. S. Haldane, and R. A. Fisher. In 1911 the Carnegie Institute recommended constructing gas chambers around the country to euthanize certain elements of the American population (primarily the poor and criminals) considered to be harmful to the future of society as a possible eugenic solution. President Woodrow Wilson signed the first Sterilization Act in US history. In the 1920s and 30s, 30 states passed various eugenics laws, some of which were overturned by the Supreme Court. Eugenics of various forms was a founding principle of the Progressive Party, strongly supported by the first progressive president Theodore Roosevelt, and would continue to play an important part in influencing progressive policies into at least the 1940s. Many American individuals and societies supported German research on eugenics that would eventually be used to develop and justify the policies utilized by the NAZI party against minority groups including Jews, Africans, gypsies and others that ultimately led to programs of genocide and the holocaust. Following WWII and worldwide exposure of the holocaust eugenics generally fell out of favor among the public, though various lesser forms of eugenics are still advocated for today by such individuals as Dottie Lamm, Geoffrey Miller, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg, John Glad and Richard Dawson. Eugenics still influences many modern debates including: capital punishment, over-population, global warming, medicine (disease control and genetic disorders), birth control, abortion, artificial insemination, evolution, social engineering, and education. Key Points to discuss during the debate: • Individual rights vs. collective rights • The pros and cons of genetically engineering society • The practicality of genetically engineering society • Methods used to determine ‘good traits’ and ‘bad traits’ • Who determines which people are ‘fit’ or ‘unfit’ for future society • The role of science in society • Methods used to derive scientific conclusions • Ability of scientists to determine the future hereditary conditions of individuals • The value/accuracy of scientific conclusions • The role of the government to implement eugenic policies • Some possible eugenic political policies or laws • The ways these policies may be used effectively or abused • The relationship between eugenics and individual rights • The role of ethics in science and eugenics Strategies: 1. Use this guide to help you (particularly the key points). 2. Read all of the texts. 3. If needed, read secondary analysis concerning eugenics. 4. Identify key quotations as you read each text. Perhaps make a list of them to print out and/or group quotes by topic or point. 5. Develop multiple arguments to defend your position. 6. Prioritize your arguments from most persuasive to least persuasive and from most evidence to least evidence. 7. Anticipate the arguments of your opponents and develop counter-arguments for them. 8. Anticipate counter-arguments to your own arguments and develop responses to them.