HST 102: Paper 7 Formal essay, due in class on the day of the debate No late papers will be accepted. Answer the following inquiry in a typed (and stapled) 2 page essay in the five-paragraph format. Present and describe three of your arguments that you will use to defend your position concerning eugenics. Each argument must be unique (don’t describe the same argument twice from a different angle). Each argument must include at least one quotation from the texts to support your position (a minimum of 3 total). You may discuss your positions and arguments with other people on your side (but not your opponents); however, each student must write their own essay in their own words. Do not copy sentences or paragraphs from another student’s paper, this is plagiarism and will result in a failing grade for the assignment. HST 102: Debate 4 Eugenics For or Against? Basics of the debate: The term ‘Eugenics’ was derived from two Greek words and literally means ‘good genes’. Eugenics is the social philosophy or practice of engineering society based on genes, or promoting the reproduction of good genes while reducing (or prohibiting) the reproduction of bad genes. Your group will argue either for or against the adoption of eugenic policies in your society. Key Terms: Eugenics – The study of or belief in the possibility of improving the qualities of the human species or a human population, especially by such means as discouraging reproduction by persons having genetic defects or presumed to have inheritable undesirable traits (negative eugenics) or encouraging reproduction by persons presumed to have inheritable desirable traits (positive eugenics). Darwinism – The Darwinian theory that species originate by descent, with variation, from parent forms, through the natural selection of those individuals best adapted for the reproductive success of their kind. Social Darwinism – A 19th-century theory, inspired by Darwinism, by which the social order is accounted as the product of natural selection of those persons best suited to existing living conditions. Mendelian Inheritance – Theory proposed by Gregor Johann Mendal in 1865 that became the first theory of genetic inheritance derived from experiments with peas. Birth Control – Any means to artificially prevent biological conception. Euthanasia – A policy of ending the life of an individual for their betterment (for example, because of excessive pain, brain dead, etc.) or society’s benefit. Genocide – A policy of murdering all members of a specific group of people who share a common characteristic. Deductive Logic – Deriving a specific conclusion based on a set of general definitions. Inductive Logic – Deriving a general conclusion based on a number of specific examples. Brief Historical Background: Eugenics was first proposed by Francis Galton in his 1883 work, Inquiries into Human Faculty and its Development. Galton was a cousin of Charles Darwin and an early supporter of Darwin’s theories of natural selection and evolution. Galton defined eugenics as the study of all agencies under human control which can improve or impair the racial quality of future generations. Galton’s work utilized a number of other scientific pursuits at the time including the study of heredity, genes, chromosomes, evolution, social Darwinism, zoology, birth control, sociology, psychology, chemistry, atomic theory and electrodynamics. The number of significant scientific advances was accelerating throughout the 19th century altering what science was and what its role in society could and should be. Galton’s work had a significant influence throughout all areas of society, from scientific communities to politics, culture and literature. A number of organizations were created to explore the science of eugenics and its possible applications to society. Ultimately, eugenics became a means by which to improve society through policies based on scientific study. Most of these policies related to reproductive practices within a society, specifically who could or should not reproduce. Throughout the late 1800s and early 1900s a number of policies were enacted at various levels throughout Europe and the United States aimed at controlling procreation. Some specific policies included compulsory sterilization laws (usually concerning criminals and the mentally ill) as well as banning interracial marriages to prevent ‘cross-racial’ breeding. In the United States a number of individuals and foundations supported the exploration of eugenics as a means to positively influence society, including: the Rockefeller Foundation, the Carnegie Institution, the Race Betterment Foundation of Battle Creek, MI, the Eugenics Record Office, the American Breeders Association, the Euthanasia Society of America; and individuals such as Charles Davenport, Madison Grant, Alexander Graham Bell, Irving Fisher, John D. Rockefeller, Margaret Sanger, Marie Stopes, David Starr Jordan, Vernon Kellogg, H. G. Wells (though he later changed sides) Winston Churchill, George Bernard Shaw, John Maynard Keynes, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes and Presidents Woodrow Wilson, Herbert Hoover and Theodore Roosevelt. Some early critics of eugenics included: Dr. John Haycroft, Halliday Sutherland, Lancelot Hogben, Franz Boaz, Lester Ward, G. K. Chesterton, J. B. S. Haldane, and R. A. Fisher. In 1911 the Carnegie Institute recommended constructing gas chambers around the country to euthanize certain elements of the American population (primarily the poor and criminals) considered to be harmful to the future of society as a possible eugenic solution. President Woodrow Wilson signed the first Sterilization Act in US history. In the 1920s and 30s, 30 states passed various eugenics laws, some of which were overturned by the Supreme Court. Eugenics of various forms was a founding principle of the Progressive Party, strongly supported by the first progressive president Theodore Roosevelt, and would continue to play an important part in influencing progressive policies into at least the 1940s. Many American individuals and societies supported German research on eugenics that would eventually be used to develop and justify the policies utilized by the NAZI party against minority groups including Jews, Africans, gypsies and others that ultimately led to programs of genocide and the holocaust. Following WWII and worldwide exposure of the holocaust eugenics generally fell out of favor among the public, though various lesser forms of eugenics are still advocated for today by such individuals as Dottie Lamm, Geoffrey Miller, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg, John Glad and Richard Dawson. Eugenics still influences many modern debates including: capital punishment, over-population, global warming, medicine (disease control and genetic disorders), birth control, abortion, artificial insemination, evolution, social engineering, and education. Key Points to discuss during the debate: • Individual rights vs. collective rights • The pros and cons of genetically engineering society • The practicality of genetically engineering society • Methods used to determine ‘good traits’ and ‘bad traits’ • Who determines which people are ‘fit’ or ‘unfit’ for future society • The role of science in society • Methods used to derive scientific conclusions • Ability of scientists to determine the future hereditary conditions of individuals • The value/accuracy of scientific conclusions • The role of the government to implement eugenic policies • Some possible eugenic political policies or laws • The ways these policies may be used effectively or abused • The relationship between eugenics and individual rights • The role of ethics in science and eugenics Strategies: 1. Use this guide to help you (particularly the key points). 2. Read all of the texts. 3. If needed, read secondary analysis concerning eugenics. 4. Identify key quotations as you read each text. Perhaps make a list of them to print out and/or group quotes by topic or point. 5. Develop multiple arguments to defend your position. 6. Prioritize your arguments from most persuasive to least persuasive and from most evidence to least evidence. 7. Anticipate the arguments of your opponents and develop counter-arguments for them. 8. Anticipate counter-arguments to your own arguments and develop responses to them.

HST 102: Paper 7 Formal essay, due in class on the day of the debate No late papers will be accepted. Answer the following inquiry in a typed (and stapled) 2 page essay in the five-paragraph format. Present and describe three of your arguments that you will use to defend your position concerning eugenics. Each argument must be unique (don’t describe the same argument twice from a different angle). Each argument must include at least one quotation from the texts to support your position (a minimum of 3 total). You may discuss your positions and arguments with other people on your side (but not your opponents); however, each student must write their own essay in their own words. Do not copy sentences or paragraphs from another student’s paper, this is plagiarism and will result in a failing grade for the assignment. HST 102: Debate 4 Eugenics For or Against? Basics of the debate: The term ‘Eugenics’ was derived from two Greek words and literally means ‘good genes’. Eugenics is the social philosophy or practice of engineering society based on genes, or promoting the reproduction of good genes while reducing (or prohibiting) the reproduction of bad genes. Your group will argue either for or against the adoption of eugenic policies in your society. Key Terms: Eugenics – The study of or belief in the possibility of improving the qualities of the human species or a human population, especially by such means as discouraging reproduction by persons having genetic defects or presumed to have inheritable undesirable traits (negative eugenics) or encouraging reproduction by persons presumed to have inheritable desirable traits (positive eugenics). Darwinism – The Darwinian theory that species originate by descent, with variation, from parent forms, through the natural selection of those individuals best adapted for the reproductive success of their kind. Social Darwinism – A 19th-century theory, inspired by Darwinism, by which the social order is accounted as the product of natural selection of those persons best suited to existing living conditions. Mendelian Inheritance – Theory proposed by Gregor Johann Mendal in 1865 that became the first theory of genetic inheritance derived from experiments with peas. Birth Control – Any means to artificially prevent biological conception. Euthanasia – A policy of ending the life of an individual for their betterment (for example, because of excessive pain, brain dead, etc.) or society’s benefit. Genocide – A policy of murdering all members of a specific group of people who share a common characteristic. Deductive Logic – Deriving a specific conclusion based on a set of general definitions. Inductive Logic – Deriving a general conclusion based on a number of specific examples. Brief Historical Background: Eugenics was first proposed by Francis Galton in his 1883 work, Inquiries into Human Faculty and its Development. Galton was a cousin of Charles Darwin and an early supporter of Darwin’s theories of natural selection and evolution. Galton defined eugenics as the study of all agencies under human control which can improve or impair the racial quality of future generations. Galton’s work utilized a number of other scientific pursuits at the time including the study of heredity, genes, chromosomes, evolution, social Darwinism, zoology, birth control, sociology, psychology, chemistry, atomic theory and electrodynamics. The number of significant scientific advances was accelerating throughout the 19th century altering what science was and what its role in society could and should be. Galton’s work had a significant influence throughout all areas of society, from scientific communities to politics, culture and literature. A number of organizations were created to explore the science of eugenics and its possible applications to society. Ultimately, eugenics became a means by which to improve society through policies based on scientific study. Most of these policies related to reproductive practices within a society, specifically who could or should not reproduce. Throughout the late 1800s and early 1900s a number of policies were enacted at various levels throughout Europe and the United States aimed at controlling procreation. Some specific policies included compulsory sterilization laws (usually concerning criminals and the mentally ill) as well as banning interracial marriages to prevent ‘cross-racial’ breeding. In the United States a number of individuals and foundations supported the exploration of eugenics as a means to positively influence society, including: the Rockefeller Foundation, the Carnegie Institution, the Race Betterment Foundation of Battle Creek, MI, the Eugenics Record Office, the American Breeders Association, the Euthanasia Society of America; and individuals such as Charles Davenport, Madison Grant, Alexander Graham Bell, Irving Fisher, John D. Rockefeller, Margaret Sanger, Marie Stopes, David Starr Jordan, Vernon Kellogg, H. G. Wells (though he later changed sides) Winston Churchill, George Bernard Shaw, John Maynard Keynes, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes and Presidents Woodrow Wilson, Herbert Hoover and Theodore Roosevelt. Some early critics of eugenics included: Dr. John Haycroft, Halliday Sutherland, Lancelot Hogben, Franz Boaz, Lester Ward, G. K. Chesterton, J. B. S. Haldane, and R. A. Fisher. In 1911 the Carnegie Institute recommended constructing gas chambers around the country to euthanize certain elements of the American population (primarily the poor and criminals) considered to be harmful to the future of society as a possible eugenic solution. President Woodrow Wilson signed the first Sterilization Act in US history. In the 1920s and 30s, 30 states passed various eugenics laws, some of which were overturned by the Supreme Court. Eugenics of various forms was a founding principle of the Progressive Party, strongly supported by the first progressive president Theodore Roosevelt, and would continue to play an important part in influencing progressive policies into at least the 1940s. Many American individuals and societies supported German research on eugenics that would eventually be used to develop and justify the policies utilized by the NAZI party against minority groups including Jews, Africans, gypsies and others that ultimately led to programs of genocide and the holocaust. Following WWII and worldwide exposure of the holocaust eugenics generally fell out of favor among the public, though various lesser forms of eugenics are still advocated for today by such individuals as Dottie Lamm, Geoffrey Miller, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg, John Glad and Richard Dawson. Eugenics still influences many modern debates including: capital punishment, over-population, global warming, medicine (disease control and genetic disorders), birth control, abortion, artificial insemination, evolution, social engineering, and education. Key Points to discuss during the debate: • Individual rights vs. collective rights • The pros and cons of genetically engineering society • The practicality of genetically engineering society • Methods used to determine ‘good traits’ and ‘bad traits’ • Who determines which people are ‘fit’ or ‘unfit’ for future society • The role of science in society • Methods used to derive scientific conclusions • Ability of scientists to determine the future hereditary conditions of individuals • The value/accuracy of scientific conclusions • The role of the government to implement eugenic policies • Some possible eugenic political policies or laws • The ways these policies may be used effectively or abused • The relationship between eugenics and individual rights • The role of ethics in science and eugenics Strategies: 1. Use this guide to help you (particularly the key points). 2. Read all of the texts. 3. If needed, read secondary analysis concerning eugenics. 4. Identify key quotations as you read each text. Perhaps make a list of them to print out and/or group quotes by topic or point. 5. Develop multiple arguments to defend your position. 6. Prioritize your arguments from most persuasive to least persuasive and from most evidence to least evidence. 7. Anticipate the arguments of your opponents and develop counter-arguments for them. 8. Anticipate counter-arguments to your own arguments and develop responses to them.

Argument essay Argue for or aganist the advisability of getting involved in trying to help others.Support your position with details/examples from your experience. + 500 words ————————————— 3 creative topics related to your major (my major is Mechanical engineering) 3-5 pages

Argument essay Argue for or aganist the advisability of getting involved in trying to help others.Support your position with details/examples from your experience. + 500 words ————————————— 3 creative topics related to your major (my major is Mechanical engineering) 3-5 pages

Homework #8  Consider the veracity or falsehood of each of the following statements. For bonus, argue for those that you believe are true while providing a counterexample for those that you believe are false.  If the first and third rows of A are equal, then det A 0.  If P is a projection, then uCP if and only if Pu  u.  If P is a projection, and detP  0, then P  I .  If A has determinant 10, then 1 A has determinant 1 10 .  If B is invertible, 1 1 det(A B ) det A (detB) .  If P is a projection, and R  2P I , then 2 R  I .  If P is a projection, and P  I , then detP  0 .  Short Computations. All of the following do not involve long computations:  Suppose 1 2 1 5 1 8 A                  and 1 9 2 4 3 1 A                   . Compute 7 13 19 A         .  Compute               0 8 7 1 0 2 3 4 5 3 0 9 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 9 3 2 0 det .  Use Cramer’s Rule to find 5 x (hint: you do not need your calculator). 1 2 3 4 5 5x 2x 8x x 3x 13 1 3 3x 5x 0 1 3 5 3x 3x 3x 9 1 2 3 5 3x 2x x 2x 7 1 3 x 4x 0 Let A 1 2 3 4 1 3 4 6 2 5 13 15 4 10 15 31 . Given is that det A  61. Do the following:  1 1 2 4 2 3 5 10 3 4 13 15 4 6 15 31 det  det2A  1 3 4 6 2 4 6 8 2 5 13 15 4 10 15 31 det  1 3 4 6 2 5 13 15 4 10 15 31 1 2 3 4 det  Consider the matrix A  0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 2 1           . Use row (or column) expansion to compute det(xI A) .  The matrix 4 1 1 2 1 1 1 4 1 1 2 1 1 1 4 1 1 2 2 1 1 4 1 1 1 2 1 1 4 1 1 1 2 1 1 4 1 6 P is the projection matrix for the column space of matrix A. This matrix A is also known to be of full rank. Answer the following, giving reasons for your answers.  Find a transparent basis and the dimension for the column space of P.  Find a basis and the dimension for the column space of A .  What size is the matrix A ?  Find a transparent basis and the dimension for the null space of P.  Find a transparent basis and the dimension for the row space of P.  Find a basis and the dimension for the null space of A.  For which of the following b can you find a solution to the system Ax b ? This does not mean you should find a solution, only whether one could or not. 10 17 19 14 10 17 19 14 13 10 17 19 14 13 23 1 1 1 1 1 1 .  It is known that certain vector u is a solution to the system Ax c . Give all solutions to Ax c .  It is also known that 1 2 3 4 5 6 Ax does not have a solution. How would you change the constant vector so that there would be a solution? Extra Problems.  Fill in the blank with the best possible expression to complete the sentence truthfully. Only that one will be counted correct. 1. matrix with two equal columns will have zero determinant. 1 2 3 Some Every No 2. If A is invertible, then A commute with its inverse. 1 2 3 must always can will not 3. If A is 6  9 , then the columns of A be linearly independent. While in AT , the columns be linearly independent. 1 2 3 can have to cannot 4. Let A be square, and suppose Ax  0 has a nontrivial solution. Then detA equal 0. 1 2 3 may cannot must 5. Let A and B be 3 3. Then det (AB) equal det(A)det(B) . 1 2 3 could must couldn’t 6. Let A be square and suppose detA  0. Then have an inverse 1 2 3 will not may must always 7. Let A and B be 2  2 . Then det (A B) equal det(A)  det(B) . 1 2 3 could must could not 8. exist a 6  6 matrix all of whose entries are whole numbers and its determinant is 2 5 . 1 2 3 There does There does not There might Bonus: Consider the matrix 0 0 1 0 2 0 n 0 . Give its determinant as a function of n.

Homework #8  Consider the veracity or falsehood of each of the following statements. For bonus, argue for those that you believe are true while providing a counterexample for those that you believe are false.  If the first and third rows of A are equal, then det A 0.  If P is a projection, then uCP if and only if Pu  u.  If P is a projection, and detP  0, then P  I .  If A has determinant 10, then 1 A has determinant 1 10 .  If B is invertible, 1 1 det(A B ) det A (detB) .  If P is a projection, and R  2P I , then 2 R  I .  If P is a projection, and P  I , then detP  0 .  Short Computations. All of the following do not involve long computations:  Suppose 1 2 1 5 1 8 A                  and 1 9 2 4 3 1 A                   . Compute 7 13 19 A         .  Compute               0 8 7 1 0 2 3 4 5 3 0 9 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 9 3 2 0 det .  Use Cramer’s Rule to find 5 x (hint: you do not need your calculator). 1 2 3 4 5 5x 2x 8x x 3x 13 1 3 3x 5x 0 1 3 5 3x 3x 3x 9 1 2 3 5 3x 2x x 2x 7 1 3 x 4x 0 Let A 1 2 3 4 1 3 4 6 2 5 13 15 4 10 15 31 . Given is that det A  61. Do the following:  1 1 2 4 2 3 5 10 3 4 13 15 4 6 15 31 det  det2A  1 3 4 6 2 4 6 8 2 5 13 15 4 10 15 31 det  1 3 4 6 2 5 13 15 4 10 15 31 1 2 3 4 det  Consider the matrix A  0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 2 1           . Use row (or column) expansion to compute det(xI A) .  The matrix 4 1 1 2 1 1 1 4 1 1 2 1 1 1 4 1 1 2 2 1 1 4 1 1 1 2 1 1 4 1 1 1 2 1 1 4 1 6 P is the projection matrix for the column space of matrix A. This matrix A is also known to be of full rank. Answer the following, giving reasons for your answers.  Find a transparent basis and the dimension for the column space of P.  Find a basis and the dimension for the column space of A .  What size is the matrix A ?  Find a transparent basis and the dimension for the null space of P.  Find a transparent basis and the dimension for the row space of P.  Find a basis and the dimension for the null space of A.  For which of the following b can you find a solution to the system Ax b ? This does not mean you should find a solution, only whether one could or not. 10 17 19 14 10 17 19 14 13 10 17 19 14 13 23 1 1 1 1 1 1 .  It is known that certain vector u is a solution to the system Ax c . Give all solutions to Ax c .  It is also known that 1 2 3 4 5 6 Ax does not have a solution. How would you change the constant vector so that there would be a solution? Extra Problems.  Fill in the blank with the best possible expression to complete the sentence truthfully. Only that one will be counted correct. 1. matrix with two equal columns will have zero determinant. 1 2 3 Some Every No 2. If A is invertible, then A commute with its inverse. 1 2 3 must always can will not 3. If A is 6  9 , then the columns of A be linearly independent. While in AT , the columns be linearly independent. 1 2 3 can have to cannot 4. Let A be square, and suppose Ax  0 has a nontrivial solution. Then detA equal 0. 1 2 3 may cannot must 5. Let A and B be 3 3. Then det (AB) equal det(A)det(B) . 1 2 3 could must couldn’t 6. Let A be square and suppose detA  0. Then have an inverse 1 2 3 will not may must always 7. Let A and B be 2  2 . Then det (A B) equal det(A)  det(B) . 1 2 3 could must could not 8. exist a 6  6 matrix all of whose entries are whole numbers and its determinant is 2 5 . 1 2 3 There does There does not There might Bonus: Consider the matrix 0 0 1 0 2 0 n 0 . Give its determinant as a function of n.

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Capital Punishment For this paper, please read both the Ernest Van den Haag article and the Larry Tifft article. PICK A SIDE, either pro-capital punishment (death penalty) or abolitionist (anti-death penalty). This IS an ARGUMENTATIVE PAPER!!!!!!!!!!!! Using both the articles, your text book, (and a general source if you wish such as the Bible or dictionary), argue for your stance. You may also use the Marx/Durkheim handouts if you so wish, so long as there are SOCIOLOGY TERMS in your paper! You must: 1. Provide three points to back up your argument and include them in your thesis paragraph and explain them in the body of the paper; 2. Give voice to the opposing side. If you’re abolitionist, bring up any validity to Van den Haag, if you’re pro-capital punishment, bring up any validity to Tifft’s argument. 3. Use both a thesis opening paragraph and a solid conclusion paragraph. 4. Use SOCIOLOGY TERMS! 5. NO PERSONAL PRONOUNS! TECH requirements: • 12 point, Arial or Times Roman Numeral font. • 3 page long NOT including cover sheet and references page • Double spaced

Capital Punishment For this paper, please read both the Ernest Van den Haag article and the Larry Tifft article. PICK A SIDE, either pro-capital punishment (death penalty) or abolitionist (anti-death penalty). This IS an ARGUMENTATIVE PAPER!!!!!!!!!!!! Using both the articles, your text book, (and a general source if you wish such as the Bible or dictionary), argue for your stance. You may also use the Marx/Durkheim handouts if you so wish, so long as there are SOCIOLOGY TERMS in your paper! You must: 1. Provide three points to back up your argument and include them in your thesis paragraph and explain them in the body of the paper; 2. Give voice to the opposing side. If you’re abolitionist, bring up any validity to Van den Haag, if you’re pro-capital punishment, bring up any validity to Tifft’s argument. 3. Use both a thesis opening paragraph and a solid conclusion paragraph. 4. Use SOCIOLOGY TERMS! 5. NO PERSONAL PRONOUNS! TECH requirements: • 12 point, Arial or Times Roman Numeral font. • 3 page long NOT including cover sheet and references page • Double spaced

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UnKEFSVAiNQ Watch the video, and then answer the questions below. According to realism, which of the following represents something that states would NOT seek? A. security B. prestige C. autonomy D. wealth E. permanent cooperation Schweller suggests that realists are wary of interdependence. If that is true, which of the following might be the most acceptable to a realist? A. creating a permanent pact of nonviolence with all English-speaking countries B. establishing an alliance to defend the U.S. against an invading country C. turning North America into something similar to the European Union, with a unified currency D. permitting the United Nations to run a global military so that the U.S. can reduce its military spending E. entering into a global production agreement in which the U.S. only manufactures computers Based on the video, which of the following statements about realists would seem to be false? A. Realists see the world as perpetually violent and full of war. B. Realists see humans as basically self-interested. C. Realists believe that the absence of a threat means a country should retrench. D. Realists believe that intervening in other countries to spread democracy is dangerous. E. Realists believe that autonomy is better than interdependence. What does Schweller mean by his statement that “there is no 911”? A. There is no global authority that is guaranteed to help any state in trouble. B. The world needs a central government to provide a universal social safety net. C. States need to cooperate more with each other in order to provide greater security for all. D. The United Nations is terrible at dealing with international emergencies. E. Islamic terrorists were not responsible for the attacks of September 11, 2001. Which of the following would be the best way to convince a realist to go to war? A. argue that we signed a treaty to protect that country B. argue that the country we are helping to defend was an ally in a prior war C. argue that it will provide the world with a chance at long-term peace and stability D. argue that the other country is a direct threat to our interests E. argue that if we do not intervene, the United Nations will

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UnKEFSVAiNQ Watch the video, and then answer the questions below. According to realism, which of the following represents something that states would NOT seek? A. security B. prestige C. autonomy D. wealth E. permanent cooperation Schweller suggests that realists are wary of interdependence. If that is true, which of the following might be the most acceptable to a realist? A. creating a permanent pact of nonviolence with all English-speaking countries B. establishing an alliance to defend the U.S. against an invading country C. turning North America into something similar to the European Union, with a unified currency D. permitting the United Nations to run a global military so that the U.S. can reduce its military spending E. entering into a global production agreement in which the U.S. only manufactures computers Based on the video, which of the following statements about realists would seem to be false? A. Realists see the world as perpetually violent and full of war. B. Realists see humans as basically self-interested. C. Realists believe that the absence of a threat means a country should retrench. D. Realists believe that intervening in other countries to spread democracy is dangerous. E. Realists believe that autonomy is better than interdependence. What does Schweller mean by his statement that “there is no 911”? A. There is no global authority that is guaranteed to help any state in trouble. B. The world needs a central government to provide a universal social safety net. C. States need to cooperate more with each other in order to provide greater security for all. D. The United Nations is terrible at dealing with international emergencies. E. Islamic terrorists were not responsible for the attacks of September 11, 2001. Which of the following would be the best way to convince a realist to go to war? A. argue that we signed a treaty to protect that country B. argue that the country we are helping to defend was an ally in a prior war C. argue that it will provide the world with a chance at long-term peace and stability D. argue that the other country is a direct threat to our interests E. argue that if we do not intervene, the United Nations will

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UnKEFSVAiNQ   Watch the video, and then answer the questions … Read More...
How Soccer Explains the World Essay Prompt Foer argues that studying soccer different parts of the soccer world helps us understand globalization. He examines teams, fans, criminal groups, ownership, and the spread of soccer as ways to look at the international system. Each chapter is a different part of the soccer world and a different explanation of globalization. Chose 1 team or team rivalry or aspect of the soccer world he covers, and briefly summarize it, whether it be the team club, the fan base, or whatever part of the soccer world he is trying to explain. What does the team or fan base he is studying explain? What is the history involved and how are people reacting to it? What do the songs fans sing, or the owners of teams, or the way a community relates with the team tell us about the world, according to Foer? What are the fans or the team doing, and why? And what does he argue it tells us about international politics? You should explain the history of the team, the community, or the fan base, if provided. You should address the nature of a rivalry and on what basis this rivalry exists. Be sure to identify what feature of globalization Foer is trying to explain by looking at that particular part of the soccer world. Is it corruption? Cultural influence? The rise and fall of nationalism? Is it ancient ethnic, racial, or religious hatreds? Economic disparity? Summarize the story Foer is trying to tell by looking at the part of the soccer world you have decided to write about. You can choose any aspect of the soccer world Foer writes about- any team, any fan group, any ownership, or any soccer trend on which he writes. Just chose one, and recount Foer’s argument about it. 5 pages, double spaced. In text citation of Foer’s book required No other outside sources are required, but you may use them if you desire Due 30 OCT in class or in my office by 5 pm (NOTE THE SCHEDULE CHANGE) Hard copy only. Typed. Double spaced. Stapled. Spelling and Grammar count. See syllabus. No electronic submission. You must bring it to class on or before 30 OCT OR turn it into my office (JT 621) by 5pm 30 OCT.

How Soccer Explains the World Essay Prompt Foer argues that studying soccer different parts of the soccer world helps us understand globalization. He examines teams, fans, criminal groups, ownership, and the spread of soccer as ways to look at the international system. Each chapter is a different part of the soccer world and a different explanation of globalization. Chose 1 team or team rivalry or aspect of the soccer world he covers, and briefly summarize it, whether it be the team club, the fan base, or whatever part of the soccer world he is trying to explain. What does the team or fan base he is studying explain? What is the history involved and how are people reacting to it? What do the songs fans sing, or the owners of teams, or the way a community relates with the team tell us about the world, according to Foer? What are the fans or the team doing, and why? And what does he argue it tells us about international politics? You should explain the history of the team, the community, or the fan base, if provided. You should address the nature of a rivalry and on what basis this rivalry exists. Be sure to identify what feature of globalization Foer is trying to explain by looking at that particular part of the soccer world. Is it corruption? Cultural influence? The rise and fall of nationalism? Is it ancient ethnic, racial, or religious hatreds? Economic disparity? Summarize the story Foer is trying to tell by looking at the part of the soccer world you have decided to write about. You can choose any aspect of the soccer world Foer writes about- any team, any fan group, any ownership, or any soccer trend on which he writes. Just chose one, and recount Foer’s argument about it. 5 pages, double spaced. In text citation of Foer’s book required No other outside sources are required, but you may use them if you desire Due 30 OCT in class or in my office by 5 pm (NOTE THE SCHEDULE CHANGE) Hard copy only. Typed. Double spaced. Stapled. Spelling and Grammar count. See syllabus. No electronic submission. You must bring it to class on or before 30 OCT OR turn it into my office (JT 621) by 5pm 30 OCT.

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ENGL 1102 1st Essay Assignment Directions: For one of the following topics, write a well-organized, clearly thought through, logically and textually supported, and MLA style/formatted essay. Examples for the type of essay you should be writing are found on pages (38-40), (115-118), and (232-235). Be sure to have a clearly stated, single sentence (not question) thesis and clearly stated topic sentences that reference and through their very words work with the thesis. Your argument must be supported with textual evidence within each support paragraph using MLA parenthetical citations and with proper introductions and incorporation of quotes within your own writing. For examples of all of this, see your textbook. If you have questions, ask them. • Write an essay in which you argue how the narrator of “A Rose for Emily” creates a sense of mystery around Emily Grierson? • Write an essay in which you argue for Emily’s assistant’s purpose or effect in the short story “A Rose for Emily” • Write an essay in which you argue whether the husband (the narrator) of “Cathedrals” is jealous or insecure. • Write an essay characterizing the relationship between the wife of the narrator and Robert in “Cathedrals.” • Write an essay in which you argue that the ending of “The Lottery” should not be a surprise to readers. • Write an essay in which you argue about the mental stability of the narrator of “The Yellow Wallpaper.” Does the narrator decline as the story progresses? Is she unstable from the beginning? • Write an essay in which you argue for the reasons of the narrator’s state(s) of mind throughout the story “The Yellow Wallpaper” • Write an essay explaining/describing the relationship between men and women in “A Jury of Her Peers.” • Think of the different ways that the narrator portrays men and women in the story – what does such portrayal imply/convey? • Write an essay thoroughly explaining why Mrs. Wright might have killed Mr. Wright. In other words argue for a motive for her to kill Mr. Wright. • Write an essay arguing for why Mrs. Hale and Mrs. Peters conceal what they think they know about Mrs. Wright.

ENGL 1102 1st Essay Assignment Directions: For one of the following topics, write a well-organized, clearly thought through, logically and textually supported, and MLA style/formatted essay. Examples for the type of essay you should be writing are found on pages (38-40), (115-118), and (232-235). Be sure to have a clearly stated, single sentence (not question) thesis and clearly stated topic sentences that reference and through their very words work with the thesis. Your argument must be supported with textual evidence within each support paragraph using MLA parenthetical citations and with proper introductions and incorporation of quotes within your own writing. For examples of all of this, see your textbook. If you have questions, ask them. • Write an essay in which you argue how the narrator of “A Rose for Emily” creates a sense of mystery around Emily Grierson? • Write an essay in which you argue for Emily’s assistant’s purpose or effect in the short story “A Rose for Emily” • Write an essay in which you argue whether the husband (the narrator) of “Cathedrals” is jealous or insecure. • Write an essay characterizing the relationship between the wife of the narrator and Robert in “Cathedrals.” • Write an essay in which you argue that the ending of “The Lottery” should not be a surprise to readers. • Write an essay in which you argue about the mental stability of the narrator of “The Yellow Wallpaper.” Does the narrator decline as the story progresses? Is she unstable from the beginning? • Write an essay in which you argue for the reasons of the narrator’s state(s) of mind throughout the story “The Yellow Wallpaper” • Write an essay explaining/describing the relationship between men and women in “A Jury of Her Peers.” • Think of the different ways that the narrator portrays men and women in the story – what does such portrayal imply/convey? • Write an essay thoroughly explaining why Mrs. Wright might have killed Mr. Wright. In other words argue for a motive for her to kill Mr. Wright. • Write an essay arguing for why Mrs. Hale and Mrs. Peters conceal what they think they know about Mrs. Wright.

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Many experts argue that when the government bails out a private financial institution it creates a problem called “moral hazard,” meaning that if the institution knows it will be saved, it actually has an incentive to take on more risk, not less. What do you think?

Many experts argue that when the government bails out a private financial institution it creates a problem called “moral hazard,” meaning that if the institution knows it will be saved, it actually has an incentive to take on more risk, not less. What do you think?

I agree. It is human character to press limits, and … Read More...
COMM 1311: Written Communication Assignment 5 Argumentation Essay (Chapter 10, pp. 218-232, Arlov) Purpose of Assignment • The purpose of this assignment is to enable the student to write an essay with a compelling argumentation that shows critical thinking. A persuasive essay is a writer’s attempt to convince readers of the validity of a particular opinion on a controversial issue. Objectives • The student will be able to correctly structure an essay and bring forward a compelling thesis and argument. • The student will understand the creativity of the writing process and use his own ideas. • The student will be able to craft a compelling essay and show critical thinking. • The student will show that he is able to argue both sides of a topic and is willing to acknowledge a different opinion. Instructions 1. Establish a subject Choose a topic that interests you. An argument does not have to be a burning issue, but it must be a debatable topic. It can be anything you feel strongly about but it has to be approved by the instructor. 2. Present a clear thesis and identify the controversy Your thesis should inform readers of your purpose and how you will proceed in your argumentation. 3. Follow an organizational pattern and provide support The body paragraphs of the essay should provide specific support. These supports may include personal experience, statistics, facts, or experts’ opinions. They may be garnered from scientific journals, magazines, books, newspapers, textbooks, studies, or interviews. Select only the facts that are relevant. 4. Consider differing opinions A persuasive essay may be strengthened by acknowledging conflict viewpoints and discussing them. 4. Draw a conclusion Restate your position in different words from the introduction. Do not introduce new material in the conclusion. You may want to conclude by encouraging some specific call to action. Requirements The essay topic must meet the approval of the instructor: • Have a complete cover page • have at least 500 words • use full sentences (and no bullet points) • must have page numbers • must have a reference page Example writing (not a complete essay): Boxing: Countdown to Injury A left hook smashes into the fighter’s jaw. A following right slams his head the opposite direction. An uppercut to the jaw snaps his head back, momentarily stopping the blood flow to his brain. The boxer drops, hitting the mat with a thud. His brain bounces off his skull for the second time in a matter of seconds. Is this what we should call a sport? Because of injuries, neurological damage, and ring deaths, the rules of professional boxing should be changed. Boxing has always been a brutal sport. The ancient Greeks used gloves studded with metal spikes, which slashed the face and body and split skulls. Although gloves are no longer spiked, boxers today sustain injuries ranging from cuts and bruises to broken bones. It is not uncommon to see a boxer leave the ring with a cut on his face, an eye swollen shut, and a nose enlarged and bloody. Often, healing in is incomplete because these areas receive the same blows again and again in other matches. In fact, repeated blows almost cost Sugar Ray Leonard his sight when his retina detached in his left eye. Besides superficial injuries, boxers suffer short-term neurological damage as a result of staggering blows to the head. A knockout punch, for example, is often delivered with such force that the brain smashes against the skull, tearing nerve fibers and blood vessels, resulting in a concussion. Even a blow to the neck can close the carotid artery, the main artery to the brain, whereby oxygen and blood to the brain are disrupted, resulting in dizziness and confusion. Later, the boxers often have no memory of the moments before or after a knockout blow. Submission Criteria Due Date: Sunday, December 6, 2015. Late assignments will receive an automatic ZERO grade. Where to deliver hard copies: In class Assessment Criteria CRITERIA Assessment Rubric Argumentation Essay SCORES Introduction Introduces the issue and its importance, says what your essay will cover 2 Organization The sound structure of the essay 1 Expression Sentences, phrases, metaphors, verbs etc. The strength of the language used 4 Conclusion Restate the issue, summarizes the strength of the arguments in the essays, gives your opinion about which essay is the strongest with supporting reasons 1 Mechanics Followed guidelines, professional format, punctuation, spelling, and capitalization are correct, use of headings, no bullet points 2 TOTAL 10% Plagiarism, copying from the internet or any other sources without citation will result in an automatic ZERO grade and a procedure of Academic Misconduct will filed against you. The complete essay has to be created and written by you alone. Prior assignments CAN NOT be used.

COMM 1311: Written Communication Assignment 5 Argumentation Essay (Chapter 10, pp. 218-232, Arlov) Purpose of Assignment • The purpose of this assignment is to enable the student to write an essay with a compelling argumentation that shows critical thinking. A persuasive essay is a writer’s attempt to convince readers of the validity of a particular opinion on a controversial issue. Objectives • The student will be able to correctly structure an essay and bring forward a compelling thesis and argument. • The student will understand the creativity of the writing process and use his own ideas. • The student will be able to craft a compelling essay and show critical thinking. • The student will show that he is able to argue both sides of a topic and is willing to acknowledge a different opinion. Instructions 1. Establish a subject Choose a topic that interests you. An argument does not have to be a burning issue, but it must be a debatable topic. It can be anything you feel strongly about but it has to be approved by the instructor. 2. Present a clear thesis and identify the controversy Your thesis should inform readers of your purpose and how you will proceed in your argumentation. 3. Follow an organizational pattern and provide support The body paragraphs of the essay should provide specific support. These supports may include personal experience, statistics, facts, or experts’ opinions. They may be garnered from scientific journals, magazines, books, newspapers, textbooks, studies, or interviews. Select only the facts that are relevant. 4. Consider differing opinions A persuasive essay may be strengthened by acknowledging conflict viewpoints and discussing them. 4. Draw a conclusion Restate your position in different words from the introduction. Do not introduce new material in the conclusion. You may want to conclude by encouraging some specific call to action. Requirements The essay topic must meet the approval of the instructor: • Have a complete cover page • have at least 500 words • use full sentences (and no bullet points) • must have page numbers • must have a reference page Example writing (not a complete essay): Boxing: Countdown to Injury A left hook smashes into the fighter’s jaw. A following right slams his head the opposite direction. An uppercut to the jaw snaps his head back, momentarily stopping the blood flow to his brain. The boxer drops, hitting the mat with a thud. His brain bounces off his skull for the second time in a matter of seconds. Is this what we should call a sport? Because of injuries, neurological damage, and ring deaths, the rules of professional boxing should be changed. Boxing has always been a brutal sport. The ancient Greeks used gloves studded with metal spikes, which slashed the face and body and split skulls. Although gloves are no longer spiked, boxers today sustain injuries ranging from cuts and bruises to broken bones. It is not uncommon to see a boxer leave the ring with a cut on his face, an eye swollen shut, and a nose enlarged and bloody. Often, healing in is incomplete because these areas receive the same blows again and again in other matches. In fact, repeated blows almost cost Sugar Ray Leonard his sight when his retina detached in his left eye. Besides superficial injuries, boxers suffer short-term neurological damage as a result of staggering blows to the head. A knockout punch, for example, is often delivered with such force that the brain smashes against the skull, tearing nerve fibers and blood vessels, resulting in a concussion. Even a blow to the neck can close the carotid artery, the main artery to the brain, whereby oxygen and blood to the brain are disrupted, resulting in dizziness and confusion. Later, the boxers often have no memory of the moments before or after a knockout blow. Submission Criteria Due Date: Sunday, December 6, 2015. Late assignments will receive an automatic ZERO grade. Where to deliver hard copies: In class Assessment Criteria CRITERIA Assessment Rubric Argumentation Essay SCORES Introduction Introduces the issue and its importance, says what your essay will cover 2 Organization The sound structure of the essay 1 Expression Sentences, phrases, metaphors, verbs etc. The strength of the language used 4 Conclusion Restate the issue, summarizes the strength of the arguments in the essays, gives your opinion about which essay is the strongest with supporting reasons 1 Mechanics Followed guidelines, professional format, punctuation, spelling, and capitalization are correct, use of headings, no bullet points 2 TOTAL 10% Plagiarism, copying from the internet or any other sources without citation will result in an automatic ZERO grade and a procedure of Academic Misconduct will filed against you. The complete essay has to be created and written by you alone. Prior assignments CAN NOT be used.

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