Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture Spring 2015 Look through popular magazines, and see if you can find advertisements that objectify women in order to sell a product. Alternately, you may use an advertisement on television (but make sure to provide a link to the ad so I can see it!). Study these images then write a paper about objectification that deals with all or some of the following: • What effect(s), if any, do you think the objectification of women’s bodies has on our culture? • Jean Kilbourne states “turning a human being into a thing is almost always the first step toward justifying violence against that person.” What do you think she means by this? Do you agree with her reasoning? Why or why not? • Some people would argue that depicting a woman’s body as an object is a form of art. What is your opinion of this point of view? Explain your reasoning. • Why do you think that women are objectified more often than men are? • How does sexualization and objectification play out differently across racial lines? • Kilbourne explains that the consequences of being objectified are different – and more serious – for women than for men. Do you agree? How is the world different for women than it is for men? How do objectified images of women interact with those in our culture differently from the way images of men do? Why is it important to look at images in the context of the culture? • What is the difference between sexual objectification and sexual subjectification? (Ros Gill ) • How do ads construct violent white masculinity and how does that vision of masculinity hurt both men and women? Throughout your written analysis, be sure to make clear and specific reference to the images you selected, and please submit these images with your paper. Make sure you engage with and reference to at least 4 of the following authors: Kilbourne, Bordo, Hunter & Soto, Rose, Durham, Gill, Katz, Schuchardt, Ono and Buescher. Guidelines:  Keep your content focused on structural, systemic, institutional factors rather than the individual: BE ANALYTICAL NOT ANECDOTAL.  Avoid using the first person or including personal stories/reactions. You must make sure to actively engage with your readings: these essays need to be informed and framed by the theoretical material you have been reading this semester.  Keep within the 4-6 page limit; use 12-point font, double spacing and 1-inch margins.  Use formal writing conventions (introduction/thesis statement, body, conclusion) and correct grammar. Resources may be cited within the text of your paper, i.e. (Walters, 2013).

Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture Spring 2015 Look through popular magazines, and see if you can find advertisements that objectify women in order to sell a product. Alternately, you may use an advertisement on television (but make sure to provide a link to the ad so I can see it!). Study these images then write a paper about objectification that deals with all or some of the following: • What effect(s), if any, do you think the objectification of women’s bodies has on our culture? • Jean Kilbourne states “turning a human being into a thing is almost always the first step toward justifying violence against that person.” What do you think she means by this? Do you agree with her reasoning? Why or why not? • Some people would argue that depicting a woman’s body as an object is a form of art. What is your opinion of this point of view? Explain your reasoning. • Why do you think that women are objectified more often than men are? • How does sexualization and objectification play out differently across racial lines? • Kilbourne explains that the consequences of being objectified are different – and more serious – for women than for men. Do you agree? How is the world different for women than it is for men? How do objectified images of women interact with those in our culture differently from the way images of men do? Why is it important to look at images in the context of the culture? • What is the difference between sexual objectification and sexual subjectification? (Ros Gill ) • How do ads construct violent white masculinity and how does that vision of masculinity hurt both men and women? Throughout your written analysis, be sure to make clear and specific reference to the images you selected, and please submit these images with your paper. Make sure you engage with and reference to at least 4 of the following authors: Kilbourne, Bordo, Hunter & Soto, Rose, Durham, Gill, Katz, Schuchardt, Ono and Buescher. Guidelines:  Keep your content focused on structural, systemic, institutional factors rather than the individual: BE ANALYTICAL NOT ANECDOTAL.  Avoid using the first person or including personal stories/reactions. You must make sure to actively engage with your readings: these essays need to be informed and framed by the theoretical material you have been reading this semester.  Keep within the 4-6 page limit; use 12-point font, double spacing and 1-inch margins.  Use formal writing conventions (introduction/thesis statement, body, conclusion) and correct grammar. Resources may be cited within the text of your paper, i.e. (Walters, 2013).

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Book review The Shareholder Value Myth: How Putting Shareholders First Harms Investors, Corporations, and the Public by Lynn Stout Provide 1) a 900 word review of this book (word range 900-1,200) and 2) a 350 word reflection where you force yourself to relate the message of the book . As per the format of the review, I like the ones done by the folks of the WSJ. This is an example: http://forums.delphiforums.com/diversecity/messages?msg=17531.1264 or http://www.wsj.com/articles/book-review-how-adam-smith-can-change-your-life-by-russ-roberts-1413846808?KEYWORDS=book+reviews

Book review The Shareholder Value Myth: How Putting Shareholders First Harms Investors, Corporations, and the Public by Lynn Stout Provide 1) a 900 word review of this book (word range 900-1,200) and 2) a 350 word reflection where you force yourself to relate the message of the book . As per the format of the review, I like the ones done by the folks of the WSJ. This is an example: http://forums.delphiforums.com/diversecity/messages?msg=17531.1264 or http://www.wsj.com/articles/book-review-how-adam-smith-can-change-your-life-by-russ-roberts-1413846808?KEYWORDS=book+reviews

The Shareholder Value Myth: How Putting Shareholders First Harms Investors, … Read More...
What is meant by the term viscoelasticity

What is meant by the term viscoelasticity

In actuality all materials depart from Hooke’s law in numerous … Read More...
HST 102: Paper 7 Formal essay, due in class on the day of the debate No late papers will be accepted. Answer the following inquiry in a typed (and stapled) 2 page essay in the five-paragraph format. Present and describe three of your arguments that you will use to defend your position concerning eugenics. Each argument must be unique (don’t describe the same argument twice from a different angle). Each argument must include at least one quotation from the texts to support your position (a minimum of 3 total). You may discuss your positions and arguments with other people on your side (but not your opponents); however, each student must write their own essay in their own words. Do not copy sentences or paragraphs from another student’s paper, this is plagiarism and will result in a failing grade for the assignment. HST 102: Debate 4 Eugenics For or Against? Basics of the debate: The term ‘Eugenics’ was derived from two Greek words and literally means ‘good genes’. Eugenics is the social philosophy or practice of engineering society based on genes, or promoting the reproduction of good genes while reducing (or prohibiting) the reproduction of bad genes. Your group will argue either for or against the adoption of eugenic policies in your society. Key Terms: Eugenics – The study of or belief in the possibility of improving the qualities of the human species or a human population, especially by such means as discouraging reproduction by persons having genetic defects or presumed to have inheritable undesirable traits (negative eugenics) or encouraging reproduction by persons presumed to have inheritable desirable traits (positive eugenics). Darwinism – The Darwinian theory that species originate by descent, with variation, from parent forms, through the natural selection of those individuals best adapted for the reproductive success of their kind. Social Darwinism – A 19th-century theory, inspired by Darwinism, by which the social order is accounted as the product of natural selection of those persons best suited to existing living conditions. Mendelian Inheritance – Theory proposed by Gregor Johann Mendal in 1865 that became the first theory of genetic inheritance derived from experiments with peas. Birth Control – Any means to artificially prevent biological conception. Euthanasia – A policy of ending the life of an individual for their betterment (for example, because of excessive pain, brain dead, etc.) or society’s benefit. Genocide – A policy of murdering all members of a specific group of people who share a common characteristic. Deductive Logic – Deriving a specific conclusion based on a set of general definitions. Inductive Logic – Deriving a general conclusion based on a number of specific examples. Brief Historical Background: Eugenics was first proposed by Francis Galton in his 1883 work, Inquiries into Human Faculty and its Development. Galton was a cousin of Charles Darwin and an early supporter of Darwin’s theories of natural selection and evolution. Galton defined eugenics as the study of all agencies under human control which can improve or impair the racial quality of future generations. Galton’s work utilized a number of other scientific pursuits at the time including the study of heredity, genes, chromosomes, evolution, social Darwinism, zoology, birth control, sociology, psychology, chemistry, atomic theory and electrodynamics. The number of significant scientific advances was accelerating throughout the 19th century altering what science was and what its role in society could and should be. Galton’s work had a significant influence throughout all areas of society, from scientific communities to politics, culture and literature. A number of organizations were created to explore the science of eugenics and its possible applications to society. Ultimately, eugenics became a means by which to improve society through policies based on scientific study. Most of these policies related to reproductive practices within a society, specifically who could or should not reproduce. Throughout the late 1800s and early 1900s a number of policies were enacted at various levels throughout Europe and the United States aimed at controlling procreation. Some specific policies included compulsory sterilization laws (usually concerning criminals and the mentally ill) as well as banning interracial marriages to prevent ‘cross-racial’ breeding. In the United States a number of individuals and foundations supported the exploration of eugenics as a means to positively influence society, including: the Rockefeller Foundation, the Carnegie Institution, the Race Betterment Foundation of Battle Creek, MI, the Eugenics Record Office, the American Breeders Association, the Euthanasia Society of America; and individuals such as Charles Davenport, Madison Grant, Alexander Graham Bell, Irving Fisher, John D. Rockefeller, Margaret Sanger, Marie Stopes, David Starr Jordan, Vernon Kellogg, H. G. Wells (though he later changed sides) Winston Churchill, George Bernard Shaw, John Maynard Keynes, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes and Presidents Woodrow Wilson, Herbert Hoover and Theodore Roosevelt. Some early critics of eugenics included: Dr. John Haycroft, Halliday Sutherland, Lancelot Hogben, Franz Boaz, Lester Ward, G. K. Chesterton, J. B. S. Haldane, and R. A. Fisher. In 1911 the Carnegie Institute recommended constructing gas chambers around the country to euthanize certain elements of the American population (primarily the poor and criminals) considered to be harmful to the future of society as a possible eugenic solution. President Woodrow Wilson signed the first Sterilization Act in US history. In the 1920s and 30s, 30 states passed various eugenics laws, some of which were overturned by the Supreme Court. Eugenics of various forms was a founding principle of the Progressive Party, strongly supported by the first progressive president Theodore Roosevelt, and would continue to play an important part in influencing progressive policies into at least the 1940s. Many American individuals and societies supported German research on eugenics that would eventually be used to develop and justify the policies utilized by the NAZI party against minority groups including Jews, Africans, gypsies and others that ultimately led to programs of genocide and the holocaust. Following WWII and worldwide exposure of the holocaust eugenics generally fell out of favor among the public, though various lesser forms of eugenics are still advocated for today by such individuals as Dottie Lamm, Geoffrey Miller, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg, John Glad and Richard Dawson. Eugenics still influences many modern debates including: capital punishment, over-population, global warming, medicine (disease control and genetic disorders), birth control, abortion, artificial insemination, evolution, social engineering, and education. Key Points to discuss during the debate: • Individual rights vs. collective rights • The pros and cons of genetically engineering society • The practicality of genetically engineering society • Methods used to determine ‘good traits’ and ‘bad traits’ • Who determines which people are ‘fit’ or ‘unfit’ for future society • The role of science in society • Methods used to derive scientific conclusions • Ability of scientists to determine the future hereditary conditions of individuals • The value/accuracy of scientific conclusions • The role of the government to implement eugenic policies • Some possible eugenic political policies or laws • The ways these policies may be used effectively or abused • The relationship between eugenics and individual rights • The role of ethics in science and eugenics Strategies: 1. Use this guide to help you (particularly the key points). 2. Read all of the texts. 3. If needed, read secondary analysis concerning eugenics. 4. Identify key quotations as you read each text. Perhaps make a list of them to print out and/or group quotes by topic or point. 5. Develop multiple arguments to defend your position. 6. Prioritize your arguments from most persuasive to least persuasive and from most evidence to least evidence. 7. Anticipate the arguments of your opponents and develop counter-arguments for them. 8. Anticipate counter-arguments to your own arguments and develop responses to them.

HST 102: Paper 7 Formal essay, due in class on the day of the debate No late papers will be accepted. Answer the following inquiry in a typed (and stapled) 2 page essay in the five-paragraph format. Present and describe three of your arguments that you will use to defend your position concerning eugenics. Each argument must be unique (don’t describe the same argument twice from a different angle). Each argument must include at least one quotation from the texts to support your position (a minimum of 3 total). You may discuss your positions and arguments with other people on your side (but not your opponents); however, each student must write their own essay in their own words. Do not copy sentences or paragraphs from another student’s paper, this is plagiarism and will result in a failing grade for the assignment. HST 102: Debate 4 Eugenics For or Against? Basics of the debate: The term ‘Eugenics’ was derived from two Greek words and literally means ‘good genes’. Eugenics is the social philosophy or practice of engineering society based on genes, or promoting the reproduction of good genes while reducing (or prohibiting) the reproduction of bad genes. Your group will argue either for or against the adoption of eugenic policies in your society. Key Terms: Eugenics – The study of or belief in the possibility of improving the qualities of the human species or a human population, especially by such means as discouraging reproduction by persons having genetic defects or presumed to have inheritable undesirable traits (negative eugenics) or encouraging reproduction by persons presumed to have inheritable desirable traits (positive eugenics). Darwinism – The Darwinian theory that species originate by descent, with variation, from parent forms, through the natural selection of those individuals best adapted for the reproductive success of their kind. Social Darwinism – A 19th-century theory, inspired by Darwinism, by which the social order is accounted as the product of natural selection of those persons best suited to existing living conditions. Mendelian Inheritance – Theory proposed by Gregor Johann Mendal in 1865 that became the first theory of genetic inheritance derived from experiments with peas. Birth Control – Any means to artificially prevent biological conception. Euthanasia – A policy of ending the life of an individual for their betterment (for example, because of excessive pain, brain dead, etc.) or society’s benefit. Genocide – A policy of murdering all members of a specific group of people who share a common characteristic. Deductive Logic – Deriving a specific conclusion based on a set of general definitions. Inductive Logic – Deriving a general conclusion based on a number of specific examples. Brief Historical Background: Eugenics was first proposed by Francis Galton in his 1883 work, Inquiries into Human Faculty and its Development. Galton was a cousin of Charles Darwin and an early supporter of Darwin’s theories of natural selection and evolution. Galton defined eugenics as the study of all agencies under human control which can improve or impair the racial quality of future generations. Galton’s work utilized a number of other scientific pursuits at the time including the study of heredity, genes, chromosomes, evolution, social Darwinism, zoology, birth control, sociology, psychology, chemistry, atomic theory and electrodynamics. The number of significant scientific advances was accelerating throughout the 19th century altering what science was and what its role in society could and should be. Galton’s work had a significant influence throughout all areas of society, from scientific communities to politics, culture and literature. A number of organizations were created to explore the science of eugenics and its possible applications to society. Ultimately, eugenics became a means by which to improve society through policies based on scientific study. Most of these policies related to reproductive practices within a society, specifically who could or should not reproduce. Throughout the late 1800s and early 1900s a number of policies were enacted at various levels throughout Europe and the United States aimed at controlling procreation. Some specific policies included compulsory sterilization laws (usually concerning criminals and the mentally ill) as well as banning interracial marriages to prevent ‘cross-racial’ breeding. In the United States a number of individuals and foundations supported the exploration of eugenics as a means to positively influence society, including: the Rockefeller Foundation, the Carnegie Institution, the Race Betterment Foundation of Battle Creek, MI, the Eugenics Record Office, the American Breeders Association, the Euthanasia Society of America; and individuals such as Charles Davenport, Madison Grant, Alexander Graham Bell, Irving Fisher, John D. Rockefeller, Margaret Sanger, Marie Stopes, David Starr Jordan, Vernon Kellogg, H. G. Wells (though he later changed sides) Winston Churchill, George Bernard Shaw, John Maynard Keynes, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes and Presidents Woodrow Wilson, Herbert Hoover and Theodore Roosevelt. Some early critics of eugenics included: Dr. John Haycroft, Halliday Sutherland, Lancelot Hogben, Franz Boaz, Lester Ward, G. K. Chesterton, J. B. S. Haldane, and R. A. Fisher. In 1911 the Carnegie Institute recommended constructing gas chambers around the country to euthanize certain elements of the American population (primarily the poor and criminals) considered to be harmful to the future of society as a possible eugenic solution. President Woodrow Wilson signed the first Sterilization Act in US history. In the 1920s and 30s, 30 states passed various eugenics laws, some of which were overturned by the Supreme Court. Eugenics of various forms was a founding principle of the Progressive Party, strongly supported by the first progressive president Theodore Roosevelt, and would continue to play an important part in influencing progressive policies into at least the 1940s. Many American individuals and societies supported German research on eugenics that would eventually be used to develop and justify the policies utilized by the NAZI party against minority groups including Jews, Africans, gypsies and others that ultimately led to programs of genocide and the holocaust. Following WWII and worldwide exposure of the holocaust eugenics generally fell out of favor among the public, though various lesser forms of eugenics are still advocated for today by such individuals as Dottie Lamm, Geoffrey Miller, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg, John Glad and Richard Dawson. Eugenics still influences many modern debates including: capital punishment, over-population, global warming, medicine (disease control and genetic disorders), birth control, abortion, artificial insemination, evolution, social engineering, and education. Key Points to discuss during the debate: • Individual rights vs. collective rights • The pros and cons of genetically engineering society • The practicality of genetically engineering society • Methods used to determine ‘good traits’ and ‘bad traits’ • Who determines which people are ‘fit’ or ‘unfit’ for future society • The role of science in society • Methods used to derive scientific conclusions • Ability of scientists to determine the future hereditary conditions of individuals • The value/accuracy of scientific conclusions • The role of the government to implement eugenic policies • Some possible eugenic political policies or laws • The ways these policies may be used effectively or abused • The relationship between eugenics and individual rights • The role of ethics in science and eugenics Strategies: 1. Use this guide to help you (particularly the key points). 2. Read all of the texts. 3. If needed, read secondary analysis concerning eugenics. 4. Identify key quotations as you read each text. Perhaps make a list of them to print out and/or group quotes by topic or point. 5. Develop multiple arguments to defend your position. 6. Prioritize your arguments from most persuasive to least persuasive and from most evidence to least evidence. 7. Anticipate the arguments of your opponents and develop counter-arguments for them. 8. Anticipate counter-arguments to your own arguments and develop responses to them.

COMP 4440/5440 – Dr. Erdemir Mobile Robotics Project (DUE 12/02/2015) HONOR CODE I pledge my honor that I have neither given nor received aid on this work. Do not sign until after you have completed your assignment. Name: Signature: 1. (Prerequisite) Given the asset package (it is in mytsu under assignments folder) download it, open a new project (don’t double click on the file, it won’t open), go to Assets/Import Package/Custom Package, select the asset package given to you (project.unitypackage). After the import is completed, you will see main scene in the assets folder of your project. Double click on it, and choose “Don’t Save” option if it asks for save. 2. Print this page and attach it to your code and your snapshot of your final scene (5 points) 3. After the class starts, instructor will come next to you and you are supposed to show him your code running (10 points) 4. When you run the code you will see, your robot (red cube that we used in the class) is trying to reach the targets but it can’t due to an obstacle between your robot and the targets. Write a code that makes this robot to avoid from the obstacles and reach the targets. Your code will read the collision and intelligently avoid from other moving robots and fixed obstacles and get the three targets. (50 points) 5. Maximum time is 2 minutes, your robot shall get the targets in 2 minutes (10 points) 6. Your robot shall escape from the blue robot and not collide them. (10 Points) 7. Anything extra (up to 20 points) ? Moving objects, new sensor, Artificial Intelligence or other techniques. 8. YOU CAN NOT USE TRANSLATE FUNCTION. USE ONLY AddRelativeForce FUNCTION IN THE FORWARD DIRECTION AS ALL THE MOBILE ROBOTS WORK.

COMP 4440/5440 – Dr. Erdemir Mobile Robotics Project (DUE 12/02/2015) HONOR CODE I pledge my honor that I have neither given nor received aid on this work. Do not sign until after you have completed your assignment. Name: Signature: 1. (Prerequisite) Given the asset package (it is in mytsu under assignments folder) download it, open a new project (don’t double click on the file, it won’t open), go to Assets/Import Package/Custom Package, select the asset package given to you (project.unitypackage). After the import is completed, you will see main scene in the assets folder of your project. Double click on it, and choose “Don’t Save” option if it asks for save. 2. Print this page and attach it to your code and your snapshot of your final scene (5 points) 3. After the class starts, instructor will come next to you and you are supposed to show him your code running (10 points) 4. When you run the code you will see, your robot (red cube that we used in the class) is trying to reach the targets but it can’t due to an obstacle between your robot and the targets. Write a code that makes this robot to avoid from the obstacles and reach the targets. Your code will read the collision and intelligently avoid from other moving robots and fixed obstacles and get the three targets. (50 points) 5. Maximum time is 2 minutes, your robot shall get the targets in 2 minutes (10 points) 6. Your robot shall escape from the blue robot and not collide them. (10 Points) 7. Anything extra (up to 20 points) ? Moving objects, new sensor, Artificial Intelligence or other techniques. 8. YOU CAN NOT USE TRANSLATE FUNCTION. USE ONLY AddRelativeForce FUNCTION IN THE FORWARD DIRECTION AS ALL THE MOBILE ROBOTS WORK.

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Chapter 04 Homework Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 23, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Activity: Investigating Survivorship Curves Click here to complete this activity. Then answer the questions. Part A Which of these species typically has a mortality rate that remains fairly constant over an individual’s life span? ANSWER: Correct The mortality rate of robins remains relatively constant throughout their life span. Part B Oyster populations are primarily, if not exclusively, composed of _____. ANSWER: Correct Young oysters have a very high mortality rate; older oysters have a much lower mortality rate. Thus, most oyster populations consist primarily of older individuals. Part C Which of these organisms has a survivorship curve similar to that of oysters? ANSWER: grasses oysters elephants robins humans juveniles adults prereproductive oysters larval and juvenile oysters larvae Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 1 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Correct Grasses, like oysters, have a relatively high mortality rate early in their life span, after which the mortality rate decreases. Part D Which of these organisms has a survivorship curve similar to that of humans? ANSWER: Correct The mortality rate of elephants, like that of humans, remains relatively low for much of their life span and then dramatically increases for older individuals. BioFlix Quiz: Population Ecology Watch the animation at left before answering the questions below. cats robins elephants grasses humans cats oysters grasses robins elephants Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 2 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Part A An ideal habitat with unlimited resources is associated with Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for Population Ecology ANSWER: Correct Populations grow exponentially with unlimited resources. Part B The maximum population a habitat can support is its Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for Population Ecology ANSWER: Correct Part C Logistic growth involves Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for Population Ecology ANSWER: Both exponential growth and logistic growth. Population crashes. Exponential growth. Logistic growth. Neither exponential growth nor logistic growth. Logistic growth. Death rate. Birth rate. Carrying capacity. Exponential growth. A population crash. Population growth continuing forever. Population growth reaching carrying capacity and then speeding up. Population size decreasing to zero. Population growth slowing down as the population approaches carrying capacity. Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 3 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Correct Part D In exponential growth Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for Population Ecology ANSWER: Correct Part E Which of the following would NOT cause population size to decrease? Hint 1. Review the animation. ANSWER: Correct An increased birth rate would cause population size to increase. BioFlix Activity: Photosynthesis — Inputs and Outputs Can you fill in the photosynthesis equation? To review photosynthesis, watch this BioFlix animation: Photosynthesis. Part A – Photosynthesis equation Drag the labels onto the equation to identify the inputs and outputs of photosynthesis. ANSWER: Population size grows more and more slowly as the population gets bigger. Population size grows faster and faster as the population gets bigger. Population size stays constant. Population growth slows as the population gets close to its carrying capacity. None of these are correct. Increased death rate A exponentially growing population outgrowing its food supply and crashing Poor weather, resulting in less food being available Increase in the number of predators Increased birth rate Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 4 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM BioFlix Activity: Cellular Respiration and Photosynthesis — Energy Flow Can you identify how energy flows through an ecosystem? To review energy flow in cellular respiration and photosynthesis, watch these BioFlix animations: Cellular Respiration and Photosynthesis. Part A – Energy flow through an ecosystem Drag the labels onto the diagram to identify how energy flows through an ecosystem. ANSWER: BioFlix Activity: Cellular Respiration and Photosynthesis — Chemical Cycling Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 5 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Can you identify how chemicals cycle in an ecosystem? To review the chemical inputs and outputs of cellular respiration and photosynthesis, watch these BioFlix animations: Cellular Respiration and Photosynthesis. Part A – Chemical cycling in an ecosystem Drag the labels onto the diagram to identify how chemicals cycle in an ecosystem. ANSWER: BioFlix Activity: Cellular Respiration — Inputs and Outputs Can you fill in the cellular respiration equation? To review cellular respiration, watch this BioFlix animation: Cellular Respiration. Part A – Cellular respiration equation Drag the labels onto the equation to identify the inputs and outputs of cellular respiration. ANSWER: Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 6 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM BioFlix Activity: Population Ecology — Types of Population Growth Can you identify the different ways in which populations grow? To review types of population growth, watch this BioFlix animation: Population Ecology. Part A – Types of population growth Drag the correct label under each graph to identify the type of population growth shown. ANSWER: Concept Review: Calculating Doubling Time Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 7 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Can you calculate doubling times and growth rates for exponentially growing populations? Remember that the doubling time (in years) for an exponentially growing population is estimated by dividing 70 by the growth rate of the population (as a percentage): Doubling time (in years) = 70 / annual growth rate (%) Part A Drag the values on the left to the appropriate blanks on the right to complete the sentences. Not all values will be used. ANSWER: Concept Review: Calculating Population Growth Rates Populations grow larger from births and immigration and grow smaller from deaths and emigration. The growth rate for a population is determined by adding the birth rate and the immigration rate, and then subtracting the death rate and the emigration rate (all rates expressed as the number per 1,000 individuals per year): (birth rate + immigration rate) (death rate + emigration rate) = growth rate Positive population growth rates lead to population increases, and negative population growth rates lead to population declines. Part A Suppose you are studying a population with the following characteristics: Birth rate = 14 per 1,000/year Death rate = 6 per 1,000/year Immigration rate = 5 per 1,000/year Emigration rate = 1 per 1,000/year What is the growth rate for this population? ANSWER: Part B Suppose you are studying a population with the following characteristics: 4 per 1,000/year 12 per 1,000/year 14 per 1,000/year 26 per 1,000/year Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 8 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Birth rate = 11 per 1,000/year Death rate = 10 per 1,000/year Immigration rate = 4 per 1,000/year Emigration rate = 3 per 1,000/year What is the growth rate for this population? ANSWER: Part C Suppose you are studying a population with the following characteristics: Birth rate = 10 per 1,000/year Death rate = 12 per 1,000/year Immigration rate = 2 per 1,000/year Emigration rate = 3 per 1,000/year What is the growth rate for this population? ANSWER: Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Concept Review: Levels of Ecological Organization Can you identify the example that corresponds to each level of ecological organization? Part A Drag the labels to the appropriate targets in the table. ANSWER: 0 per 1,000/year 2 per 1,000/year 14 per 1,000/year 28 per 1,000/year 3 per 1,000/year 1 per 1,000/year 17 per 1,000/year 27 per 1,000/year Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 9 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM BioFlix Activity: Mechanisms of Evolution — Natural Selection: Pesticides Can you identify the process by which natural selection acts on an insect population exposed to pesticides? To review the process of natural selection, watch this BioFlix animation: Mechanisms of Evolution: Natural Selection. Part A – Natural selection: Pesticides Drag the labels onto the flowchart to place them in the correct sequence. ANSWER: Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 10 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM ABC News Video: Protecting the Galapagos Islands Watch the ABC News video (2:07 minutes). Then answer the questions below. Part A Where are the Galapagos Islands located? ANSWER: Part B Which of the following sets of animals are likely to be found on the Galapagos Islands? ANSWER: near the tip of South Africa northeast of Australia along the Great Barrier Reef 600 miles west of Ecuador, near the equator in the Mediterranean Sea, as part of the Greek Islands frogs, lungfish, mountain goats tortoises, finches, blue-footed boobies ostriches, cougars, porcupines beaver, snakes, armadillos Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 11 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Part C Which species is threatening the natural wildlife on the Galapagos Islands? ANSWER: Part D The Galapagos Islands were the first place on Earth to _____. ANSWER: Part E Tourism on the Galapagos Islands is being restricted by requiring tourists to _____. ANSWER: Current Events: A Surplus Washington Could Do Without: A Capital Park’s Rapacious Deer (New York Times, 2/28/2012) Read this New York Times article and then answer the questions. A Surplus Washington Could Do Without: A Capital Park’s Rapacious Deer (2/28/2012) Registration with The New York Times provides instant access to breaking news on NYTimes.com. To register, go to http://www.nytimes.com/register. Visit http://www.nytimes.com/content/help/rights/terms/terms-of-service.html to review the current NYT Terms of Service. Part A Which of the following is true? ANSWER: Part B What predator currently feeds on deer in Rock Creek Park? humans zebra mussels Asian carp mountain lions suffer the complete extinction of all native species be declared off-limits to all humans be declared a world heritage site be invaded by human-introduced species visit each island in groups of only ten individuals at a time view the islands only from the water be escorted by trained guides at all times stay at least 100 feet away from all animals on the islands Deer have always been a problem in Rock Creek Park. Deer are not a problem in Rock Creek Park. Deer are not native to Rock Creek Park, and have been a problem since they were introduced in 1952. Deer were once absent from Rock Creek Park, and have only become a problem in the last 20 years. Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 12 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM ANSWER: Part C Why isn’t the deer population controlled by hunting in Rock Creek Park? ANSWER: Part D It is hoped that the deer herd can be reduced by how much? ANSWER: Part E Which of the following is true? ANSWER: Part F Because the park is changing in response to the increasing deer population, this is an example of ______________. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 21.2%. You received 9.1 out of a possible total of 43 points. There are no predators of deer in Rock Creek Park. mountain lion coyote wolf Hunting has been attempted in the park, but the trees are too thick. Hunting is prohibited in the park. There is no public interest in hunting in the park. Deer are a protected species. one-quarter one-half three-quarters the entire herd Animals cannot be killed on federally managed public lands. Only Congress can decide to have animals killed on federally managed public lands. The federal agency in charge of management of the land in question decides if animals should be killed. Only the National Park Service can decide to have animals killed on federally managed public lands. succession artificial selection recession progression Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 13 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM

Chapter 04 Homework Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 23, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Activity: Investigating Survivorship Curves Click here to complete this activity. Then answer the questions. Part A Which of these species typically has a mortality rate that remains fairly constant over an individual’s life span? ANSWER: Correct The mortality rate of robins remains relatively constant throughout their life span. Part B Oyster populations are primarily, if not exclusively, composed of _____. ANSWER: Correct Young oysters have a very high mortality rate; older oysters have a much lower mortality rate. Thus, most oyster populations consist primarily of older individuals. Part C Which of these organisms has a survivorship curve similar to that of oysters? ANSWER: grasses oysters elephants robins humans juveniles adults prereproductive oysters larval and juvenile oysters larvae Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 1 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Correct Grasses, like oysters, have a relatively high mortality rate early in their life span, after which the mortality rate decreases. Part D Which of these organisms has a survivorship curve similar to that of humans? ANSWER: Correct The mortality rate of elephants, like that of humans, remains relatively low for much of their life span and then dramatically increases for older individuals. BioFlix Quiz: Population Ecology Watch the animation at left before answering the questions below. cats robins elephants grasses humans cats oysters grasses robins elephants Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 2 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Part A An ideal habitat with unlimited resources is associated with Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for Population Ecology ANSWER: Correct Populations grow exponentially with unlimited resources. Part B The maximum population a habitat can support is its Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for Population Ecology ANSWER: Correct Part C Logistic growth involves Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for Population Ecology ANSWER: Both exponential growth and logistic growth. Population crashes. Exponential growth. Logistic growth. Neither exponential growth nor logistic growth. Logistic growth. Death rate. Birth rate. Carrying capacity. Exponential growth. A population crash. Population growth continuing forever. Population growth reaching carrying capacity and then speeding up. Population size decreasing to zero. Population growth slowing down as the population approaches carrying capacity. Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 3 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Correct Part D In exponential growth Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for Population Ecology ANSWER: Correct Part E Which of the following would NOT cause population size to decrease? Hint 1. Review the animation. ANSWER: Correct An increased birth rate would cause population size to increase. BioFlix Activity: Photosynthesis — Inputs and Outputs Can you fill in the photosynthesis equation? To review photosynthesis, watch this BioFlix animation: Photosynthesis. Part A – Photosynthesis equation Drag the labels onto the equation to identify the inputs and outputs of photosynthesis. ANSWER: Population size grows more and more slowly as the population gets bigger. Population size grows faster and faster as the population gets bigger. Population size stays constant. Population growth slows as the population gets close to its carrying capacity. None of these are correct. Increased death rate A exponentially growing population outgrowing its food supply and crashing Poor weather, resulting in less food being available Increase in the number of predators Increased birth rate Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 4 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM BioFlix Activity: Cellular Respiration and Photosynthesis — Energy Flow Can you identify how energy flows through an ecosystem? To review energy flow in cellular respiration and photosynthesis, watch these BioFlix animations: Cellular Respiration and Photosynthesis. Part A – Energy flow through an ecosystem Drag the labels onto the diagram to identify how energy flows through an ecosystem. ANSWER: BioFlix Activity: Cellular Respiration and Photosynthesis — Chemical Cycling Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 5 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Can you identify how chemicals cycle in an ecosystem? To review the chemical inputs and outputs of cellular respiration and photosynthesis, watch these BioFlix animations: Cellular Respiration and Photosynthesis. Part A – Chemical cycling in an ecosystem Drag the labels onto the diagram to identify how chemicals cycle in an ecosystem. ANSWER: BioFlix Activity: Cellular Respiration — Inputs and Outputs Can you fill in the cellular respiration equation? To review cellular respiration, watch this BioFlix animation: Cellular Respiration. Part A – Cellular respiration equation Drag the labels onto the equation to identify the inputs and outputs of cellular respiration. ANSWER: Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 6 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM BioFlix Activity: Population Ecology — Types of Population Growth Can you identify the different ways in which populations grow? To review types of population growth, watch this BioFlix animation: Population Ecology. Part A – Types of population growth Drag the correct label under each graph to identify the type of population growth shown. ANSWER: Concept Review: Calculating Doubling Time Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 7 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Can you calculate doubling times and growth rates for exponentially growing populations? Remember that the doubling time (in years) for an exponentially growing population is estimated by dividing 70 by the growth rate of the population (as a percentage): Doubling time (in years) = 70 / annual growth rate (%) Part A Drag the values on the left to the appropriate blanks on the right to complete the sentences. Not all values will be used. ANSWER: Concept Review: Calculating Population Growth Rates Populations grow larger from births and immigration and grow smaller from deaths and emigration. The growth rate for a population is determined by adding the birth rate and the immigration rate, and then subtracting the death rate and the emigration rate (all rates expressed as the number per 1,000 individuals per year): (birth rate + immigration rate) (death rate + emigration rate) = growth rate Positive population growth rates lead to population increases, and negative population growth rates lead to population declines. Part A Suppose you are studying a population with the following characteristics: Birth rate = 14 per 1,000/year Death rate = 6 per 1,000/year Immigration rate = 5 per 1,000/year Emigration rate = 1 per 1,000/year What is the growth rate for this population? ANSWER: Part B Suppose you are studying a population with the following characteristics: 4 per 1,000/year 12 per 1,000/year 14 per 1,000/year 26 per 1,000/year Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 8 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Birth rate = 11 per 1,000/year Death rate = 10 per 1,000/year Immigration rate = 4 per 1,000/year Emigration rate = 3 per 1,000/year What is the growth rate for this population? ANSWER: Part C Suppose you are studying a population with the following characteristics: Birth rate = 10 per 1,000/year Death rate = 12 per 1,000/year Immigration rate = 2 per 1,000/year Emigration rate = 3 per 1,000/year What is the growth rate for this population? ANSWER: Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Concept Review: Levels of Ecological Organization Can you identify the example that corresponds to each level of ecological organization? Part A Drag the labels to the appropriate targets in the table. ANSWER: 0 per 1,000/year 2 per 1,000/year 14 per 1,000/year 28 per 1,000/year 3 per 1,000/year 1 per 1,000/year 17 per 1,000/year 27 per 1,000/year Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 9 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM BioFlix Activity: Mechanisms of Evolution — Natural Selection: Pesticides Can you identify the process by which natural selection acts on an insect population exposed to pesticides? To review the process of natural selection, watch this BioFlix animation: Mechanisms of Evolution: Natural Selection. Part A – Natural selection: Pesticides Drag the labels onto the flowchart to place them in the correct sequence. ANSWER: Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 10 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM ABC News Video: Protecting the Galapagos Islands Watch the ABC News video (2:07 minutes). Then answer the questions below. Part A Where are the Galapagos Islands located? ANSWER: Part B Which of the following sets of animals are likely to be found on the Galapagos Islands? ANSWER: near the tip of South Africa northeast of Australia along the Great Barrier Reef 600 miles west of Ecuador, near the equator in the Mediterranean Sea, as part of the Greek Islands frogs, lungfish, mountain goats tortoises, finches, blue-footed boobies ostriches, cougars, porcupines beaver, snakes, armadillos Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 11 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Part C Which species is threatening the natural wildlife on the Galapagos Islands? ANSWER: Part D The Galapagos Islands were the first place on Earth to _____. ANSWER: Part E Tourism on the Galapagos Islands is being restricted by requiring tourists to _____. ANSWER: Current Events: A Surplus Washington Could Do Without: A Capital Park’s Rapacious Deer (New York Times, 2/28/2012) Read this New York Times article and then answer the questions. A Surplus Washington Could Do Without: A Capital Park’s Rapacious Deer (2/28/2012) Registration with The New York Times provides instant access to breaking news on NYTimes.com. To register, go to http://www.nytimes.com/register. Visit http://www.nytimes.com/content/help/rights/terms/terms-of-service.html to review the current NYT Terms of Service. Part A Which of the following is true? ANSWER: Part B What predator currently feeds on deer in Rock Creek Park? humans zebra mussels Asian carp mountain lions suffer the complete extinction of all native species be declared off-limits to all humans be declared a world heritage site be invaded by human-introduced species visit each island in groups of only ten individuals at a time view the islands only from the water be escorted by trained guides at all times stay at least 100 feet away from all animals on the islands Deer have always been a problem in Rock Creek Park. Deer are not a problem in Rock Creek Park. Deer are not native to Rock Creek Park, and have been a problem since they were introduced in 1952. Deer were once absent from Rock Creek Park, and have only become a problem in the last 20 years. Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 12 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM ANSWER: Part C Why isn’t the deer population controlled by hunting in Rock Creek Park? ANSWER: Part D It is hoped that the deer herd can be reduced by how much? ANSWER: Part E Which of the following is true? ANSWER: Part F Because the park is changing in response to the increasing deer population, this is an example of ______________. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 21.2%. You received 9.1 out of a possible total of 43 points. There are no predators of deer in Rock Creek Park. mountain lion coyote wolf Hunting has been attempted in the park, but the trees are too thick. Hunting is prohibited in the park. There is no public interest in hunting in the park. Deer are a protected species. one-quarter one-half three-quarters the entire herd Animals cannot be killed on federally managed public lands. Only Congress can decide to have animals killed on federally managed public lands. The federal agency in charge of management of the land in question decides if animals should be killed. Only the National Park Service can decide to have animals killed on federally managed public lands. succession artificial selection recession progression Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 13 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM

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Microbial Homework 13 points Must be turned in through blackboard, typed, using a word process, and preferably using Microsoft Word. 1. (3pts) Are viruses alive? Justify your answer by indicating whether they meet the criteria of the each of the defining properties of life discussed in chapter 1. 2. (2pts)Explain why Kingdom Protista is considered an artificial grouping. 3. (3pts) Are fungi plants? How are fungi similar to and different from plants? 4.(5pts) Research a product (e.g. food or medicine) made using bacteria or fungus, and describe how the bacteria or fungus is involved in the process. (No more than three paragraphs long, get to the point). The products mentioned in the text (e.g. penicillin and cheese) and edible mushrooms do not count. CITE YOUR SOURCES!! Format doesn’t matter as long as all the necessary information is there.

Microbial Homework 13 points Must be turned in through blackboard, typed, using a word process, and preferably using Microsoft Word. 1. (3pts) Are viruses alive? Justify your answer by indicating whether they meet the criteria of the each of the defining properties of life discussed in chapter 1. 2. (2pts)Explain why Kingdom Protista is considered an artificial grouping. 3. (3pts) Are fungi plants? How are fungi similar to and different from plants? 4.(5pts) Research a product (e.g. food or medicine) made using bacteria or fungus, and describe how the bacteria or fungus is involved in the process. (No more than three paragraphs long, get to the point). The products mentioned in the text (e.g. penicillin and cheese) and edible mushrooms do not count. CITE YOUR SOURCES!! Format doesn’t matter as long as all the necessary information is there.

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