/The following graphs depict the motion of an object starting from rest and moving without friction. Describe how you would calculate the object’s acceleration, instantaneous speed, and distance at time “p” from each graph (slope, area-under-curve, etc.). 15. An object is launched at an angle of 450 from the ground of a mystery planet. The object hits the ground 20m away after a total flight time of 4.0s. Assume no air resistance. a. What are the initial vertical and horizontal velocities? b. Calculate the acceleration due to gravity. c. Draw graphs to quantitatively represent the vertical and horizontal velocities for the entire 4.0s of flight. Linear Dynamics 1. A block of mass 3 kg, initially at rest, is pulled along a frictionless, horizontal surface with a force shown as a function of time by the graph above. Calculate the acceleration and speed after 2s. Questions 2-4: Two blocks of masses M and m, with M > m, are connected by a light string. The string passes over a frictionless pulley of negligible mass so that the blocks hang vertically like Atwood’s machine. The blocks are then released from rest as shown above. 2. Draw a free-body diagram for each mass. Compare and contrast the tension on each. 3. Compare and contrast the net-force acting on each block. 4. Draw a free-body diagram for the string holding the pulley. Explain whether the force increases, decreases, or remains the same as the blocks accelerate. Questions 5-6: A ball is released from the top of a curved hill as shown above; the hill has sufficient friction so that the ball rolls as it moves down the hill. 5. What can be inferred about the ball’s linear acceleration and speed as the ball goes from the top to the bottom? (Increase, decrease, or remain the same) 6. Draw a free-body diagram for each location in the diagram to compare the weight, normal, and friction forces as it rolls down hill. Questions 7-8: Consider the above block sitting on a smooth tabletop. It is connected by a light string that passes over a frictionless and massless pulley to a pulling force of 30N downward. 7. Use Newton’s 2nd Law to determine what will happen to the net force, mass, and acceleration of the entire system if the pulling force of 30N is replaced with another block weighing 30N. 8. What will happen to the tension on each body?

/The following graphs depict the motion of an object starting from rest and moving without friction. Describe how you would calculate the object’s acceleration, instantaneous speed, and distance at time “p” from each graph (slope, area-under-curve, etc.). 15. An object is launched at an angle of 450 from the ground of a mystery planet. The object hits the ground 20m away after a total flight time of 4.0s. Assume no air resistance. a. What are the initial vertical and horizontal velocities? b. Calculate the acceleration due to gravity. c. Draw graphs to quantitatively represent the vertical and horizontal velocities for the entire 4.0s of flight. Linear Dynamics 1. A block of mass 3 kg, initially at rest, is pulled along a frictionless, horizontal surface with a force shown as a function of time by the graph above. Calculate the acceleration and speed after 2s. Questions 2-4: Two blocks of masses M and m, with M > m, are connected by a light string. The string passes over a frictionless pulley of negligible mass so that the blocks hang vertically like Atwood’s machine. The blocks are then released from rest as shown above. 2. Draw a free-body diagram for each mass. Compare and contrast the tension on each. 3. Compare and contrast the net-force acting on each block. 4. Draw a free-body diagram for the string holding the pulley. Explain whether the force increases, decreases, or remains the same as the blocks accelerate. Questions 5-6: A ball is released from the top of a curved hill as shown above; the hill has sufficient friction so that the ball rolls as it moves down the hill. 5. What can be inferred about the ball’s linear acceleration and speed as the ball goes from the top to the bottom? (Increase, decrease, or remain the same) 6. Draw a free-body diagram for each location in the diagram to compare the weight, normal, and friction forces as it rolls down hill. Questions 7-8: Consider the above block sitting on a smooth tabletop. It is connected by a light string that passes over a frictionless and massless pulley to a pulling force of 30N downward. 7. Use Newton’s 2nd Law to determine what will happen to the net force, mass, and acceleration of the entire system if the pulling force of 30N is replaced with another block weighing 30N. 8. What will happen to the tension on each body?

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1. The reaction time of a driver to visual stimulus is normally distributed with a mean of 0.2 seconds and a standard deviation of 0.1 seconds. 1‐1. (2 points) What is the probability that a reaction requires more than 0.5 seconds? 1‐2. (2 points) What is the probability that a reaction requires between 0.4 and 0.5 seconds? 1‐3. (2 points) What is the reaction time that is exceeded 95% of the time? 2. Spherical Uniform Distribution (Google! You do not have to explain why): 2‐1. (2 points) How can we pick a set of random points uniformly distributed on the unit circle x12 + x 2=1? 2‐2. (2 points) How can we pick a set of random points uniformly distributed on the 4‐dimensional unit 2 2 2 2 2 sphere x1 + x2 + x3 + x4 + x5 =1? 3. The random variable X has a binomial distribution with n = 19 and p = 0.4. Determine the following probabilities. (You may use computer. But, you have to show the formula.) 3‐1. (2 points) P(X ≤ 12) 3‐2. (2 points) P(X ≥ 18) 3‐3. (2 points) P(13 ≤ X < 15) 4. (2 points) Show the mean and the variance of the triangular distribution with lower limit a, upper limit b and mode c, where a < b and a ≤ c ≤ b. (You must show why.) 5. (2 points) An electronic office product contains 5000 electronic components. Assume that the probability that each component operates without failure during the useful life of the product is 0.999, and assume that the components fail independently. Approximate the probability that 10 or more of the original 5000 components fail during the useful life of the product. 6. Consider the following system made up of functional components in parallel and series. C2 0.80 C1 0.90 C4 0.95 C3 0.85 6‐1. (2 points) What is the probability that the system operates? 6‐2. (2 points) What is the probability that the system fails due to the components in series? Assume parallel components do not fail. 6‐3. (2 points) What is the probability that the system fails due to the components in parallel? Assume series components do not fail. 6‐4. (2 points) Compute and compare the probabilities that the system fails when the probability that component C1 functions is improved to a value of 0.95 and when the probability that component C2 functions is improved to a value of 0.85. Which improvement increases the system reliability more? 7. (2 points) Suppose that the joint distribution of X and Y has probability density function f(x, y) = 0.25xy for 0 < x < 2 and 0 < y < 2. Compute V(2X + 3Y). (Show all your work.)

1. The reaction time of a driver to visual stimulus is normally distributed with a mean of 0.2 seconds and a standard deviation of 0.1 seconds. 1‐1. (2 points) What is the probability that a reaction requires more than 0.5 seconds? 1‐2. (2 points) What is the probability that a reaction requires between 0.4 and 0.5 seconds? 1‐3. (2 points) What is the reaction time that is exceeded 95% of the time? 2. Spherical Uniform Distribution (Google! You do not have to explain why): 2‐1. (2 points) How can we pick a set of random points uniformly distributed on the unit circle x12 + x 2=1? 2‐2. (2 points) How can we pick a set of random points uniformly distributed on the 4‐dimensional unit 2 2 2 2 2 sphere x1 + x2 + x3 + x4 + x5 =1? 3. The random variable X has a binomial distribution with n = 19 and p = 0.4. Determine the following probabilities. (You may use computer. But, you have to show the formula.) 3‐1. (2 points) P(X ≤ 12) 3‐2. (2 points) P(X ≥ 18) 3‐3. (2 points) P(13 ≤ X < 15) 4. (2 points) Show the mean and the variance of the triangular distribution with lower limit a, upper limit b and mode c, where a < b and a ≤ c ≤ b. (You must show why.) 5. (2 points) An electronic office product contains 5000 electronic components. Assume that the probability that each component operates without failure during the useful life of the product is 0.999, and assume that the components fail independently. Approximate the probability that 10 or more of the original 5000 components fail during the useful life of the product. 6. Consider the following system made up of functional components in parallel and series. C2 0.80 C1 0.90 C4 0.95 C3 0.85 6‐1. (2 points) What is the probability that the system operates? 6‐2. (2 points) What is the probability that the system fails due to the components in series? Assume parallel components do not fail. 6‐3. (2 points) What is the probability that the system fails due to the components in parallel? Assume series components do not fail. 6‐4. (2 points) Compute and compare the probabilities that the system fails when the probability that component C1 functions is improved to a value of 0.95 and when the probability that component C2 functions is improved to a value of 0.85. Which improvement increases the system reliability more? 7. (2 points) Suppose that the joint distribution of X and Y has probability density function f(x, y) = 0.25xy for 0 < x < 2 and 0 < y < 2. Compute V(2X + 3Y). (Show all your work.)

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You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Exercise 2.5 Starting from the front door of your ranch house, you walk 60.0 due east to your windmill, and then you turn around and slowly walk 35.0 west to a bench where you sit and watch the sunrise. It takes you 27.0 to walk from your house to the windmill and then 49.0 to walk from the windmill to the bench. Part A For the entire trip from your front door to the bench, what is your average velocity? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B For the entire trip from your front door to the bench, what is your average speed? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Exercise 2.7 A car is stopped at a traffic light. It then travels along a straight road so that its distance from the light is given by , where = 2.40 and = 0.110 . = -0.329 average speed = 1.25 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 1 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Part A Calculate the average velocity of the car for the time interval = 0 to = 10.0 . ANSWER: Correct Part B Calculate the instantaneous velocity of the car at =0. ANSWER: Correct Part C Calculate the instantaneous velocity of the car at =5.00 . ANSWER: Correct Part D Calculate the instantaneous velocity of the car at =10.0 . ANSWER: Correct Part E How long after starting from rest is the car again at rest? ANSWER: = 13.0 = 0 = 15.8 = 15.0 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 2 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Correct Exercise 2.9 A ball moves in a straight line (the x-axis). The graph in the figure shows this ball’s velocity as a function of time. Part A What are the ball’s average velocity during the first 2.8 ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Answer Requested Part B What are the ball’s average speed during the first 2.8 ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct = 14.5 = 2.3 = 2.3 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 3 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Part C Suppose that the ball moved in such a way that the graph segment after 2.0 was -3.0 instead of +3.0 . Find the ball’s and average velocity during the first 2.8 in this case. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: All attempts used; correct answer displayed Part D Suppose that the ball moved in such a way that the graph segment after 2.0 was -3.0 instead of +3.0 . Find the ball’s average speed during the first 2.8 in this case. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Exercise 2.13 Part A The table shows test data for the Bugatti Veyron, the fastest car made. The car is moving in a straight line (the x-axis). Time 0 2.10 20.0 53.0 Speed 0 60.0 205 259 Calculate the car’s average acceleration (in ) between 0 and 2.1 . ANSWER: Correct Part B Calculate the car’s average acceleration (in ) between 2.1 and 20.0 . = 0.57 = 2.3 = 12.8 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 4 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM ANSWER: Correct Part C Calculate the car’s average acceleration (in ) between 20.0 and 53 . ANSWER: Correct Exercise 2.19 An antelope moving with constant acceleration covers the distance 79.0 between two points in time 7.00 . Its speed as it passes the second point is 14.5 . Part A What is its speed at the first point? ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the acceleration? ANSWER: Correct Exercise 2.22 In the fastest measured tennis serve, the ball left the racquet at 73.14 . A served tennis ball is typically in contact with = 3.62 = 0.731 = 8.07 = 0.918 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 5 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM the racquet for 27.0 and starts from rest. Assume constant acceleration. Part A What was the ball’s acceleration during this serve? ANSWER: Correct Part B How far did the ball travel during the serve? ANSWER: Correct Exercise 2.30 A cat walks in a straight line, which we shall call the x-axis with the positive direction to the right. As an observant physicist, you make measurements of this cat’s motion and construct a graph of the feline’s velocity as a function of time (the figure ). Part A Find the cat’s velocity at = 5.0 . Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: = 2710 = 0.987 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 6 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Correct Part B Find the cat’s velocity at = 8.0 . Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the cat’s acceleration at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the cat’s acceleration at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part E What is the cat’s acceleration at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: = 1.3 = -2.7 = -1.3 = -1.3 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 7 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Correct Part F What distance does the cat move during the first 4.5 ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part G What distance does the cat move from to ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part H Sketch clear graph of the cat’s acceleration as function of time, assuming that the cat started at the origin. ANSWER: = -1.3 = 23 = 26 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 8 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Correct Part I Sketch clear graph of the cat’s position as function of time, assuming that the cat started at the origin. ANSWER: Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 9 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM All attempts used; correct answer displayed Exercise 2.35 Part A If a flea can jump straight up to a height of 0.510 , what is its initial speed as it leaves the ground? ANSWER: Correct Part B How long is it in the air? ANSWER: Correct = 3.16 = 0.645 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 10 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Exercise 2.36 A small rock is thrown vertically upward with a speed of 18.0 from the edge of the roof of a 39.0 tall building. The rock doesn’t hit the building on its way back down and lands in the street below. Air resistance can be neglected. Part A What is the speed of the rock just before it hits the street? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How much time elapses from when the rock is thrown until it hits the street? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Exercise 2.38 You throw a glob of putty straight up toward the ceiling, which is 3.00 above the point where the putty leaves your hand. The initial speed of the putty as it leaves your hand is 9.70 . Part A What is the speed of the putty just before it strikes the ceiling? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B = 33.0 = 5.20 = 5.94 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 11 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM How much time from when it leaves your hand does it take the putty to reach the ceiling? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Exercise 3.1 A squirrel has x- and y-coordinates ( 1.2 , 3.3 ) at time and coordinates ( 5.3 , -0.80 ) at time = 2.6 . Part A For this time interval, find the x-component of the average velocity. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part B For this time interval, find the y-component of the average velocity. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part C Find the magnitude of the average velocity. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: = 0.384 = 1.6 = -1.6 = 2.2 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 12 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Correct Part D Find the direction of the average velocity. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Exercise 3.3 A web page designer creates an animation in which a dot on a computer screen has a position of 4.1 2.1 4.7 . Part A Find the average velocity of the dot between and . Give your answer as a pair of components separated by a comma. For example, if you think the x component is 3 and the y component is 4, then you should enter 3,4. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part B Find the instantaneous velocity at . Give your answer as a pair of components separated by a comma. For example, if you think the x component is 3 and the y component is 4, then you should enter 3,4. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part C = 45 below the x-axis = 4.2,4.7 = 0,4.7 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 13 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Find the instantaneous velocity at . Give your answer as a pair of components separated by a comma. For example, if you think the x component is 3 and the y component is 4, then you should enter 3,4. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part D Find the instantaneous velocity at . Give your answer as a pair of components separated by a comma. For example, if you think the x component is 3 and the y component is 4, then you should enter 3,4. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Exercise 3.5 A jet plane is flying at a constant altitude. At time it has components of velocity 89 , 108 . At time 32.5 the components are 165 , 37 . Part A For this time interval calculate the average acceleration. Give your answer as a pair of components separated by a comma. For example, if you think the x component is 3 and the y component is 4, then you should enter 3,4. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part B Find the magnitude of the average acceleration. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: = 4.2,4.7 = 8.4,4.7 = 2.3,-2.2 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 14 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Correct Part C Find the direction of the average acceleration (let the direction be the angle that the vector makes with the +x-axis, measured counterclockwise). ANSWER: Correct Exercise 3.4 The position of a squirrel running in a park is given by . Part A What is , the -component of the velocity of the squirrel, as function of time? ANSWER: Correct Part B What is , the y-component of the velocity of the squirrel, as function of time? ANSWER: = 3.2 = -43.1 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 15 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Correct Part C At 4.51 , how far is the squirrel from its initial position? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: All attempts used; correct answer displayed Part D At 4.51 , what is the magnitude of the squirrel’s velocity? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part E At 4.51 , what is the direction (in degrees counterclockwise from +x-axis) of the squirrel’s velocity? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 90.1%. You received 14.42 out of a possible total of 16 points. = 2.65 = 1.31 = 62.5 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 16 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM

You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Exercise 2.5 Starting from the front door of your ranch house, you walk 60.0 due east to your windmill, and then you turn around and slowly walk 35.0 west to a bench where you sit and watch the sunrise. It takes you 27.0 to walk from your house to the windmill and then 49.0 to walk from the windmill to the bench. Part A For the entire trip from your front door to the bench, what is your average velocity? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B For the entire trip from your front door to the bench, what is your average speed? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Exercise 2.7 A car is stopped at a traffic light. It then travels along a straight road so that its distance from the light is given by , where = 2.40 and = 0.110 . = -0.329 average speed = 1.25 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 1 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Part A Calculate the average velocity of the car for the time interval = 0 to = 10.0 . ANSWER: Correct Part B Calculate the instantaneous velocity of the car at =0. ANSWER: Correct Part C Calculate the instantaneous velocity of the car at =5.00 . ANSWER: Correct Part D Calculate the instantaneous velocity of the car at =10.0 . ANSWER: Correct Part E How long after starting from rest is the car again at rest? ANSWER: = 13.0 = 0 = 15.8 = 15.0 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 2 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Correct Exercise 2.9 A ball moves in a straight line (the x-axis). The graph in the figure shows this ball’s velocity as a function of time. Part A What are the ball’s average velocity during the first 2.8 ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Answer Requested Part B What are the ball’s average speed during the first 2.8 ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct = 14.5 = 2.3 = 2.3 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 3 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Part C Suppose that the ball moved in such a way that the graph segment after 2.0 was -3.0 instead of +3.0 . Find the ball’s and average velocity during the first 2.8 in this case. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: All attempts used; correct answer displayed Part D Suppose that the ball moved in such a way that the graph segment after 2.0 was -3.0 instead of +3.0 . Find the ball’s average speed during the first 2.8 in this case. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Exercise 2.13 Part A The table shows test data for the Bugatti Veyron, the fastest car made. The car is moving in a straight line (the x-axis). Time 0 2.10 20.0 53.0 Speed 0 60.0 205 259 Calculate the car’s average acceleration (in ) between 0 and 2.1 . ANSWER: Correct Part B Calculate the car’s average acceleration (in ) between 2.1 and 20.0 . = 0.57 = 2.3 = 12.8 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 4 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM ANSWER: Correct Part C Calculate the car’s average acceleration (in ) between 20.0 and 53 . ANSWER: Correct Exercise 2.19 An antelope moving with constant acceleration covers the distance 79.0 between two points in time 7.00 . Its speed as it passes the second point is 14.5 . Part A What is its speed at the first point? ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the acceleration? ANSWER: Correct Exercise 2.22 In the fastest measured tennis serve, the ball left the racquet at 73.14 . A served tennis ball is typically in contact with = 3.62 = 0.731 = 8.07 = 0.918 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 5 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM the racquet for 27.0 and starts from rest. Assume constant acceleration. Part A What was the ball’s acceleration during this serve? ANSWER: Correct Part B How far did the ball travel during the serve? ANSWER: Correct Exercise 2.30 A cat walks in a straight line, which we shall call the x-axis with the positive direction to the right. As an observant physicist, you make measurements of this cat’s motion and construct a graph of the feline’s velocity as a function of time (the figure ). Part A Find the cat’s velocity at = 5.0 . Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: = 2710 = 0.987 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 6 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Correct Part B Find the cat’s velocity at = 8.0 . Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the cat’s acceleration at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the cat’s acceleration at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part E What is the cat’s acceleration at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: = 1.3 = -2.7 = -1.3 = -1.3 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 7 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Correct Part F What distance does the cat move during the first 4.5 ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part G What distance does the cat move from to ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part H Sketch clear graph of the cat’s acceleration as function of time, assuming that the cat started at the origin. ANSWER: = -1.3 = 23 = 26 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 8 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Correct Part I Sketch clear graph of the cat’s position as function of time, assuming that the cat started at the origin. ANSWER: Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 9 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM All attempts used; correct answer displayed Exercise 2.35 Part A If a flea can jump straight up to a height of 0.510 , what is its initial speed as it leaves the ground? ANSWER: Correct Part B How long is it in the air? ANSWER: Correct = 3.16 = 0.645 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 10 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Exercise 2.36 A small rock is thrown vertically upward with a speed of 18.0 from the edge of the roof of a 39.0 tall building. The rock doesn’t hit the building on its way back down and lands in the street below. Air resistance can be neglected. Part A What is the speed of the rock just before it hits the street? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How much time elapses from when the rock is thrown until it hits the street? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Exercise 2.38 You throw a glob of putty straight up toward the ceiling, which is 3.00 above the point where the putty leaves your hand. The initial speed of the putty as it leaves your hand is 9.70 . Part A What is the speed of the putty just before it strikes the ceiling? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B = 33.0 = 5.20 = 5.94 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 11 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM How much time from when it leaves your hand does it take the putty to reach the ceiling? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Exercise 3.1 A squirrel has x- and y-coordinates ( 1.2 , 3.3 ) at time and coordinates ( 5.3 , -0.80 ) at time = 2.6 . Part A For this time interval, find the x-component of the average velocity. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part B For this time interval, find the y-component of the average velocity. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part C Find the magnitude of the average velocity. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: = 0.384 = 1.6 = -1.6 = 2.2 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 12 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Correct Part D Find the direction of the average velocity. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Exercise 3.3 A web page designer creates an animation in which a dot on a computer screen has a position of 4.1 2.1 4.7 . Part A Find the average velocity of the dot between and . Give your answer as a pair of components separated by a comma. For example, if you think the x component is 3 and the y component is 4, then you should enter 3,4. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part B Find the instantaneous velocity at . Give your answer as a pair of components separated by a comma. For example, if you think the x component is 3 and the y component is 4, then you should enter 3,4. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part C = 45 below the x-axis = 4.2,4.7 = 0,4.7 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 13 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Find the instantaneous velocity at . Give your answer as a pair of components separated by a comma. For example, if you think the x component is 3 and the y component is 4, then you should enter 3,4. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part D Find the instantaneous velocity at . Give your answer as a pair of components separated by a comma. For example, if you think the x component is 3 and the y component is 4, then you should enter 3,4. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Exercise 3.5 A jet plane is flying at a constant altitude. At time it has components of velocity 89 , 108 . At time 32.5 the components are 165 , 37 . Part A For this time interval calculate the average acceleration. Give your answer as a pair of components separated by a comma. For example, if you think the x component is 3 and the y component is 4, then you should enter 3,4. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part B Find the magnitude of the average acceleration. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: = 4.2,4.7 = 8.4,4.7 = 2.3,-2.2 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 14 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Correct Part C Find the direction of the average acceleration (let the direction be the angle that the vector makes with the +x-axis, measured counterclockwise). ANSWER: Correct Exercise 3.4 The position of a squirrel running in a park is given by . Part A What is , the -component of the velocity of the squirrel, as function of time? ANSWER: Correct Part B What is , the y-component of the velocity of the squirrel, as function of time? ANSWER: = 3.2 = -43.1 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 15 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Correct Part C At 4.51 , how far is the squirrel from its initial position? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: All attempts used; correct answer displayed Part D At 4.51 , what is the magnitude of the squirrel’s velocity? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part E At 4.51 , what is the direction (in degrees counterclockwise from +x-axis) of the squirrel’s velocity? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 90.1%. You received 14.42 out of a possible total of 16 points. = 2.65 = 1.31 = 62.5 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 16 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM

A laser pulse of energy 2.00 mJ has a pulse length of 3.00 ns. If this laser pulse is focused to a spot size of radius r =1.25 mm, find the peak electric field amplitude associated with this pulse. Assume that the pulse is uniform in time and uniform in intensity across the area of the spot.

A laser pulse of energy 2.00 mJ has a pulse length of 3.00 ns. If this laser pulse is focused to a spot size of radius r =1.25 mm, find the peak electric field amplitude associated with this pulse. Assume that the pulse is uniform in time and uniform in intensity across the area of the spot.

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Chapter 6 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, March 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy PSS 6.1 Equilibrium Problems Learning Goal: To practice Problem-Solving Strategy 6.1 for equilibrium problems. A pair of students are lifting a heavy trunk on move-in day. Using two ropes tied to a small ring at the center of the top of the trunk, they pull the trunk straight up at a constant velocity . Each rope makes an angle with respect to the vertical. The gravitational force acting on the trunk has magnitude . Find the tension in each rope. PROBLEM-SOLVING STRATEGY 6.1 Equilibrium problems MODEL: Make simplifying assumptions. VISUALIZE: Establish a coordinate system, define symbols, and identify what the problem is asking you to find. This is the process of translating words into symbols. Identify all forces acting on the object, and show them on a free-body diagram. These elements form the pictorial representation of the problem. SOLVE: The mathematical representation is based on Newton’s first law: . The vector sum of the forces is found directly from the free-body diagram. v  FG T F  = = net i F  i 0 ASSESS: Check if your result has the correct units, is reasonable, and answers the question. Model The trunk is moving at a constant velocity. This means that you can model it as a particle in dynamic equilibrium and apply the strategy above. Furthermore, you can ignore the masses of the ropes and the ring because it is reasonable to assume that their combined weight is much less than the weight of the trunk. Visualize Part A The most convenient coordinate system for this problem is one in which the y axis is vertical and the ropes both lie in the xy plane, as shown below. Identify the forces acting on the trunk, and then draw a free-body diagram of the trunk in the diagram below. The black dot represents the trunk as it is lifted by the students. Draw the vectors starting at the black dot. The location and orientation of the vectors will be graded. The length of the vectors will not be graded. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Solve Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Assess Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). A Gymnast on a Rope A gymnast of mass 70.0 hangs from a vertical rope attached to the ceiling. You can ignore the weight of the rope and assume that the rope does not stretch. Use the value for the acceleration of gravity. Part A Calculate the tension in the rope if the gymnast hangs motionless on the rope. Express your answer in newtons. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Calculate the tension in the rope if the gymnast climbs the rope at a constant rate. Express your answer in newtons. You did not open hints for this part. kg 9.81m/s2 T T = N T ANSWER: Part C Calculate the tension in the rope if the gymnast climbs up the rope with an upward acceleration of magnitude 1.10 . Express your answer in newtons. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D Calculate the tension in the rope if the gymnast slides down the rope with a downward acceleration of magnitude 1.10 . Express your answer in newtons. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: T = N T m/s2 T = N T m/s2 T = N Applying Newton’s 2nd Law Learning Goal: To learn a systematic approach to solving Newton’s 2nd law problems using a simple example. Once you have decided to solve a problem using Newton’s 2nd law, there are steps that will lead you to a solution. One such prescription is the following: Visualize the problem and identify special cases. Isolate each body and draw the forces acting on it. Choose a coordinate system for each body. Apply Newton’s 2nd law to each body. Write equations for the constraints and other given information. Solve the resulting equations symbolically. Check that your answer has the correct dimensions and satisfies special cases. If numbers are given in the problem, plug them in and check that the answer makes sense. Think about generalizations or simplfications of the problem. As an example, we will apply this procedure to find the acceleration of a block of mass that is pulled up a frictionless plane inclined at angle with respect to the horizontal by a perfect string that passes over a perfect pulley to a block of mass that is hanging vertically. Visualize the problem and identify special cases First examine the problem by drawing a picture and visualizing the motion. Apply Newton’s 2nd law, , to each body in your mind. Don’t worry about which quantities are given. Think about the forces on each body: How are these consistent with the direction of the acceleration for that body? Can you think of any special cases that you can solve quickly now and use to test your understanding later? m2  m1 F = ma One special case in this problem is if , in which case block 1 would simply fall freely under the acceleration of gravity: . Part A Consider another special case in which the inclined plane is vertical ( ). In this case, for what value of would the acceleration of the two blocks be equal to zero? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables and . ANSWER: Isolate each body and draw the forces acting on it A force diagram should include only real forces that act on the body and satisfy Newton’s 3rd law. One way to check if the forces are real is to detrmine whether they are part of a Newton’s 3rd law pair, that is, whether they result from a physical interaction that also causes an opposite force on some other body, which may not be part of the problem. Do not decompose the forces into components, and do not include resultant forces that are combinations of other real forces like centripetal force or fictitious forces like the “centrifugal” force. Assign each force a symbol, but don’t start to solve the problem at this point. Part B Which of the four drawings is a correct force diagram for this problem? = 0 m2 = −g a 1 j ^  = /2 m1 m2 g m1 = ANSWER: Choose a coordinate system for each body Newton’s 2nd law, , is a vector equation. To add or subtract vectors it is often easiest to decompose each vector into components. Whereas a particular set of vector components is only valid in a particular coordinate system, the vector equality holds in any coordinate system, giving you freedom to pick a coordinate system that most simplifies the equations that result from the component equations. It’s generally best to pick a coordinate system where the acceleration of the system lies directly on one of the coordinate axes. If there is no acceleration, then pick a coordinate system with as many unknowns as possible along the coordinate axes. Vectors that lie along the axes appear in only one of the equations for each component, rather than in two equations with trigonometric prefactors. Note that it is sometimes advantageous to use different coordinate systems for each body in the problem. In this problem, you should use Cartesian coordinates and your axes should be stationary with respect to the inclined plane. Part C Given the criteria just described, what orientation of the coordinate axes would be best to use in this problem? In the answer options, “tilted” means with the x axis oriented parallel to the plane (i.e., at angle to the horizontal), and “level” means with the x axis horizontal. ANSWER: Apply Newton’s 2nd law to each body a b c d F  = ma  tilted for both block 1 and block 2 tilted for block 1 and level for block 2 level for block 1 and tilted for block 2 level for both block 1 and block 2 Part D What is , the sum of the x components of the forces acting on block 2? Take forces acting up the incline to be positive. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables tension , , the magnitude of the acceleration of gravity , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Lifting a Bucket A 6- bucket of water is being pulled straight up by a string at a constant speed. F2x T m2 g  m2a2x =F2x = kg Part A What is the tension in the rope? ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Friction Force on a Dancer on a Drawbridge A dancer is standing on one leg on a drawbridge that is about to open. The coefficients of static and kinetic friction between the drawbridge and the dancer’s foot are and , respectively. represents the normal force exerted on the dancer by the bridge, and represents the gravitational force exerted on the dancer, as shown in the drawing . For all the questions, we can assume that the bridge is a perfectly flat surface and lacks the curvature characteristic of most bridges. about 42 about 60 about 78 0 because the bucket has no acceleration. N N N N μs μk n F  g Part A Before the drawbridge starts to open, it is perfectly level with the ground. The dancer is standing still on one leg. What is the x component of the friction force, ? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , and/or . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B The drawbridge then starts to rise and the dancer continues to stand on one leg. The drawbridge stops just at the point where the dancer is on the verge of slipping. What is the magnitude of the frictional force now? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , and/or . The angle should not appear in your answer. F  f n μs μk Ff = Ff n μs μk  You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Then, because the bridge is old and poorly designed, it falls a little bit and then jerks. This causes the person to start to slide down the bridge at a constant speed. What is the magnitude of the frictional force now? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , and/or . The angle should not appear in your answer. ANSWER: Part D The bridge starts to come back down again. The dancer stops sliding. However, again because of the age and design of the bridge it never makes it all the way down; rather it stops half a meter short. This half a meter corresponds to an angle degree (see the diagram, which has the angle exaggerated). What is the force of friction now? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , and . Ff = Ff n μs μk  Ff =   1 Ff  n Fg You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Kinetic Friction Ranking Task Below are eight crates of different mass. The crates are attached to massless ropes, as indicated in the picture, where the ropes are marked by letters. Each crate is being pulled to the right at the same constant speed. The coefficient of kinetic friction between each crate and the surface on which it slides is the same for all eight crates. Ff = Part A Rank the ropes on the basis of the force each exerts on the crate immediately to its left. Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Pushing a Block Learning Goal: To understand kinetic and static friction. A block of mass lies on a horizontal table. The coefficient of static friction between the block and the table is . The coefficient of kinetic friction is , with . Part A m μs μk μk < μs If the block is at rest (and the only forces acting on the block are the force due to gravity and the normal force from the table), what is the magnitude of the force due to friction? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Suppose you want to move the block, but you want to push it with the least force possible to get it moving. With what force must you be pushing the block just before the block begins to move? Express the magnitude of in terms of some or all the variables , , and , as well as the acceleration due to gravity . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Suppose you push horizontally with half the force needed to just make the block move. What is the magnitude of the friction force? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , and , as well as the acceleration due to gravity . You did not open hints for this part. Ffriction = F F μs μk m g F = μs μk m g ANSWER: Part D Suppose you push horizontally with precisely enough force to make the block start to move, and you continue to apply the same amount of force even after it starts moving. Find the acceleration of the block after it begins to move. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , and , as well as the acceleration due to gravity . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. Ffriction = a μs μk m g a =

Chapter 6 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, March 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy PSS 6.1 Equilibrium Problems Learning Goal: To practice Problem-Solving Strategy 6.1 for equilibrium problems. A pair of students are lifting a heavy trunk on move-in day. Using two ropes tied to a small ring at the center of the top of the trunk, they pull the trunk straight up at a constant velocity . Each rope makes an angle with respect to the vertical. The gravitational force acting on the trunk has magnitude . Find the tension in each rope. PROBLEM-SOLVING STRATEGY 6.1 Equilibrium problems MODEL: Make simplifying assumptions. VISUALIZE: Establish a coordinate system, define symbols, and identify what the problem is asking you to find. This is the process of translating words into symbols. Identify all forces acting on the object, and show them on a free-body diagram. These elements form the pictorial representation of the problem. SOLVE: The mathematical representation is based on Newton’s first law: . The vector sum of the forces is found directly from the free-body diagram. v  FG T F  = = net i F  i 0 ASSESS: Check if your result has the correct units, is reasonable, and answers the question. Model The trunk is moving at a constant velocity. This means that you can model it as a particle in dynamic equilibrium and apply the strategy above. Furthermore, you can ignore the masses of the ropes and the ring because it is reasonable to assume that their combined weight is much less than the weight of the trunk. Visualize Part A The most convenient coordinate system for this problem is one in which the y axis is vertical and the ropes both lie in the xy plane, as shown below. Identify the forces acting on the trunk, and then draw a free-body diagram of the trunk in the diagram below. The black dot represents the trunk as it is lifted by the students. Draw the vectors starting at the black dot. The location and orientation of the vectors will be graded. The length of the vectors will not be graded. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Solve Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Assess Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). A Gymnast on a Rope A gymnast of mass 70.0 hangs from a vertical rope attached to the ceiling. You can ignore the weight of the rope and assume that the rope does not stretch. Use the value for the acceleration of gravity. Part A Calculate the tension in the rope if the gymnast hangs motionless on the rope. Express your answer in newtons. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Calculate the tension in the rope if the gymnast climbs the rope at a constant rate. Express your answer in newtons. You did not open hints for this part. kg 9.81m/s2 T T = N T ANSWER: Part C Calculate the tension in the rope if the gymnast climbs up the rope with an upward acceleration of magnitude 1.10 . Express your answer in newtons. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D Calculate the tension in the rope if the gymnast slides down the rope with a downward acceleration of magnitude 1.10 . Express your answer in newtons. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: T = N T m/s2 T = N T m/s2 T = N Applying Newton’s 2nd Law Learning Goal: To learn a systematic approach to solving Newton’s 2nd law problems using a simple example. Once you have decided to solve a problem using Newton’s 2nd law, there are steps that will lead you to a solution. One such prescription is the following: Visualize the problem and identify special cases. Isolate each body and draw the forces acting on it. Choose a coordinate system for each body. Apply Newton’s 2nd law to each body. Write equations for the constraints and other given information. Solve the resulting equations symbolically. Check that your answer has the correct dimensions and satisfies special cases. If numbers are given in the problem, plug them in and check that the answer makes sense. Think about generalizations or simplfications of the problem. As an example, we will apply this procedure to find the acceleration of a block of mass that is pulled up a frictionless plane inclined at angle with respect to the horizontal by a perfect string that passes over a perfect pulley to a block of mass that is hanging vertically. Visualize the problem and identify special cases First examine the problem by drawing a picture and visualizing the motion. Apply Newton’s 2nd law, , to each body in your mind. Don’t worry about which quantities are given. Think about the forces on each body: How are these consistent with the direction of the acceleration for that body? Can you think of any special cases that you can solve quickly now and use to test your understanding later? m2  m1 F = ma One special case in this problem is if , in which case block 1 would simply fall freely under the acceleration of gravity: . Part A Consider another special case in which the inclined plane is vertical ( ). In this case, for what value of would the acceleration of the two blocks be equal to zero? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables and . ANSWER: Isolate each body and draw the forces acting on it A force diagram should include only real forces that act on the body and satisfy Newton’s 3rd law. One way to check if the forces are real is to detrmine whether they are part of a Newton’s 3rd law pair, that is, whether they result from a physical interaction that also causes an opposite force on some other body, which may not be part of the problem. Do not decompose the forces into components, and do not include resultant forces that are combinations of other real forces like centripetal force or fictitious forces like the “centrifugal” force. Assign each force a symbol, but don’t start to solve the problem at this point. Part B Which of the four drawings is a correct force diagram for this problem? = 0 m2 = −g a 1 j ^  = /2 m1 m2 g m1 = ANSWER: Choose a coordinate system for each body Newton’s 2nd law, , is a vector equation. To add or subtract vectors it is often easiest to decompose each vector into components. Whereas a particular set of vector components is only valid in a particular coordinate system, the vector equality holds in any coordinate system, giving you freedom to pick a coordinate system that most simplifies the equations that result from the component equations. It’s generally best to pick a coordinate system where the acceleration of the system lies directly on one of the coordinate axes. If there is no acceleration, then pick a coordinate system with as many unknowns as possible along the coordinate axes. Vectors that lie along the axes appear in only one of the equations for each component, rather than in two equations with trigonometric prefactors. Note that it is sometimes advantageous to use different coordinate systems for each body in the problem. In this problem, you should use Cartesian coordinates and your axes should be stationary with respect to the inclined plane. Part C Given the criteria just described, what orientation of the coordinate axes would be best to use in this problem? In the answer options, “tilted” means with the x axis oriented parallel to the plane (i.e., at angle to the horizontal), and “level” means with the x axis horizontal. ANSWER: Apply Newton’s 2nd law to each body a b c d F  = ma  tilted for both block 1 and block 2 tilted for block 1 and level for block 2 level for block 1 and tilted for block 2 level for both block 1 and block 2 Part D What is , the sum of the x components of the forces acting on block 2? Take forces acting up the incline to be positive. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables tension , , the magnitude of the acceleration of gravity , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Lifting a Bucket A 6- bucket of water is being pulled straight up by a string at a constant speed. F2x T m2 g  m2a2x =F2x = kg Part A What is the tension in the rope? ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Friction Force on a Dancer on a Drawbridge A dancer is standing on one leg on a drawbridge that is about to open. The coefficients of static and kinetic friction between the drawbridge and the dancer’s foot are and , respectively. represents the normal force exerted on the dancer by the bridge, and represents the gravitational force exerted on the dancer, as shown in the drawing . For all the questions, we can assume that the bridge is a perfectly flat surface and lacks the curvature characteristic of most bridges. about 42 about 60 about 78 0 because the bucket has no acceleration. N N N N μs μk n F  g Part A Before the drawbridge starts to open, it is perfectly level with the ground. The dancer is standing still on one leg. What is the x component of the friction force, ? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , and/or . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B The drawbridge then starts to rise and the dancer continues to stand on one leg. The drawbridge stops just at the point where the dancer is on the verge of slipping. What is the magnitude of the frictional force now? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , and/or . The angle should not appear in your answer. F  f n μs μk Ff = Ff n μs μk  You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Then, because the bridge is old and poorly designed, it falls a little bit and then jerks. This causes the person to start to slide down the bridge at a constant speed. What is the magnitude of the frictional force now? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , and/or . The angle should not appear in your answer. ANSWER: Part D The bridge starts to come back down again. The dancer stops sliding. However, again because of the age and design of the bridge it never makes it all the way down; rather it stops half a meter short. This half a meter corresponds to an angle degree (see the diagram, which has the angle exaggerated). What is the force of friction now? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , and . Ff = Ff n μs μk  Ff =   1 Ff  n Fg You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Kinetic Friction Ranking Task Below are eight crates of different mass. The crates are attached to massless ropes, as indicated in the picture, where the ropes are marked by letters. Each crate is being pulled to the right at the same constant speed. The coefficient of kinetic friction between each crate and the surface on which it slides is the same for all eight crates. Ff = Part A Rank the ropes on the basis of the force each exerts on the crate immediately to its left. Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Pushing a Block Learning Goal: To understand kinetic and static friction. A block of mass lies on a horizontal table. The coefficient of static friction between the block and the table is . The coefficient of kinetic friction is , with . Part A m μs μk μk < μs If the block is at rest (and the only forces acting on the block are the force due to gravity and the normal force from the table), what is the magnitude of the force due to friction? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Suppose you want to move the block, but you want to push it with the least force possible to get it moving. With what force must you be pushing the block just before the block begins to move? Express the magnitude of in terms of some or all the variables , , and , as well as the acceleration due to gravity . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Suppose you push horizontally with half the force needed to just make the block move. What is the magnitude of the friction force? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , and , as well as the acceleration due to gravity . You did not open hints for this part. Ffriction = F F μs μk m g F = μs μk m g ANSWER: Part D Suppose you push horizontally with precisely enough force to make the block start to move, and you continue to apply the same amount of force even after it starts moving. Find the acceleration of the block after it begins to move. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , and , as well as the acceleration due to gravity . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. Ffriction = a μs μk m g a =

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Question N: (1) Suppose the risk-free rate goes up to 7%. What effect would higher interest rates have on the SML and on the returns required on high – and low – risk securities? (2) Suppose instead that invests risk aversion increased enough to cause the market risk premium to increase to 8% {assume the risk – free rate remains constant}. What effect would this have on the SML and on returns of high and low risk securities ?

Question N: (1) Suppose the risk-free rate goes up to 7%. What effect would higher interest rates have on the SML and on the returns required on high – and low – risk securities? (2) Suppose instead that invests risk aversion increased enough to cause the market risk premium to increase to 8% {assume the risk – free rate remains constant}. What effect would this have on the SML and on returns of high and low risk securities ?

This is the answers: (1) If the risk free rate … Read More...
Calculating Adiabatic Cooling Look at the topographic Profile below and calculate the temperature at the top of the mountain. Assume that the air parcel is forced to rise up and over an 8,000-foot elevation mountain. The initial temperature is 65.5°F at sea level on the Windward (west) side of the mountain. Assume that the Lifting Condensation Level (LCL) is at 3,000 feet elevation where the Dew Point occurs. The Adiabatic Lapse Rate is 3.6°F = 1,000ft in elevation. To simplify, round down to 3°F. Find the difference in elevation from sea level and final elevation. Multiply lapse rate by feet in thousands. (3° x 8”) = 24° F Next, subtract difference in temperature (24°) from sea level temperature to get your apex temperature. (65.5°-24°) = 41.5° F Temperature on top of mountain is 41.5°F Now you try it! * Note: The calculation produces an approximate ambient temperature. Seasonal, diurnal, and other variations should also be considered. 78º 96º 6,000ʼ 9,000ʼʼ ______ º F ______ º F

Calculating Adiabatic Cooling Look at the topographic Profile below and calculate the temperature at the top of the mountain. Assume that the air parcel is forced to rise up and over an 8,000-foot elevation mountain. The initial temperature is 65.5°F at sea level on the Windward (west) side of the mountain. Assume that the Lifting Condensation Level (LCL) is at 3,000 feet elevation where the Dew Point occurs. The Adiabatic Lapse Rate is 3.6°F = 1,000ft in elevation. To simplify, round down to 3°F. Find the difference in elevation from sea level and final elevation. Multiply lapse rate by feet in thousands. (3° x 8”) = 24° F Next, subtract difference in temperature (24°) from sea level temperature to get your apex temperature. (65.5°-24°) = 41.5° F Temperature on top of mountain is 41.5°F Now you try it! * Note: The calculation produces an approximate ambient temperature. Seasonal, diurnal, and other variations should also be considered. 78º 96º 6,000ʼ 9,000ʼʼ ______ º F ______ º F

info@checkyourstudy.com Calculating Adiabatic Cooling Look at the topographic Profile below … Read More...
5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 Problem List 5.1 Total mass of a shell 5.2 Tunnel through the moon 5.3 Gravitational eld above the center of a thin hoop 5.4 Gravitational force near a metal-cored planet surrounded by a gaseous cloud 5.5 Sphere with linearly increasing mass density 5.6 Jumping o Vesta 5.7 Gravitational force between two massive rods 5.8 Potential energy { Check your answer! 5.9 Ways of solving gravitational problems 5.10 Rod with linearly increasing mass density 5.11 Sphere with constant internal gravitational eld 5.12 Throwing a rock o the moon These problems are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Un- ported License. Please share and/or modify. Back to Problem List 1 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.1 Total mass of a shell Given: Marino { Fall 2011 Consider a spherical shell that extends from r = R to r = 2R with a non-uniform density (r) = 0r. What is the total mass of the shell? Back to Problem List 2 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.2 Tunnel through the moon Given: Marino { Fall 2011 Imagine that NASA digs a straight tunnel through the center of the moon (see gure) to access the Moon’s 3He deposits. An astronaut places a rock in the tunnel at the surface of the moon, and releases it (from rest). Show that the rock obeys the force law for a mass connected to a spring. What is the spring constant? Find the oscillation period for this motion if you assume that Moon has a mass of 7.351022 kg and a radius of 1.74106 m. Assume the moon’s density is uniform throughout its volume, and ignore the moon’s rotation. Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 Imagine (in a parallel universe of unlimited budgets) that NASA digs a straight tunnel through the center of the moon (see gure). A robot place a rock in the tunnel at position r = r0 from the center of the moon, and releases it (from rest). Use Newton’s second law to write the equation of motion of the rock and solve for r(t). Explain in words the rock’s motion. Does the rock return to its initial position at any later time? If so, how long does it takes to return to it? (Give a formula, and a number.) Assume the moon’s density is uniform throughout its volume, and ignore the moon’s rotation. Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Now lets consider our (real) planet Earth, with total mass M and radius R which we will approximate as a uniform mass density, (r) = 0. (a) Neglecting rotational and frictional e ects, show that a particle dropped into a hole drilled straight through the center of the earth all the way to the far side will oscillate between the two endpoints. (Hint: you will need to set up, and solve, an ODE for the motion) (b) Find the period of the oscillation of this motion. Get a number (in minutes) as a nal result, using data for the earth’s size and mass. (How does that compare to ying to Perth and back?!) Extra Credit: OK, even with unlimited budgets, digging a tunnel through the center of the earth is preposterous. But, suppose instead that the tunnel is a straight-line \chord” through the earth, say directly from New York to Los Angeles. Show that your nal answer for the time taken does not depend on the location of that chord! This is rather remarkable – look again at the time for a free-fall trip (no energy required, except perhaps to compensate for friction) How long would that trip take? Could this work?! Back to Problem List 3 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.3 Gravitational eld above the center of a thin hoop Given: Pollock { Spring 2011, Spring 2012 Consider a very (in nitesimally!) thin but massive loop, radius R (total mass M), centered around the origin, sitting in the x-y plane. Assume it has a uniform linear mass density  (which has units of kg/m) all around it. (So, it’s like a skinny donut that is mostly hole, centered around the z-axis) (a) What is  in terms of M and R? What is the direction of the gravitational eld generated by this mass distribution at a point in space a distance z above the center of the donut, i.e. at (0; 0; z) Explain your reasoning for the direction carefully, try not to simply \wave your hands.” (The answer is extremely intuitive, but can you justify that it is correct?) (b) Compute the gravitational eld, ~g, at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating Newton’s law of gravity, summing over all in nitesimal \chunks” of mass along the loop. (c) Compute the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating ?Gdm=r, sum- ming over all in nitesimal \chunks” dm along the loop. Then, take the z-component of the gradient of this potential to check that you agree with your result from the previous part. (d) In the two separate limits z << R and z >> R, Taylor expand your g- eld (in the z-direction)out only to the rst non-zero term, and convince us that both limits make good physical sense. (e) Can you use Gauss’ law to gure out the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z)? (If so, do it and check your previous answers. If not, why not?) Extra credit: If you place a small mass a small distance z away from the center, use your Taylor limit for z << R above to write a simple ODE for the equation of motion. Solve it, and discuss the motion Back to Problem List 4 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.4 Gravitational force near a metal-cored planet surrounded by a gaseous cloud Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 Jupiter is composed of a dense spherical core (of liquid metallic hydrogen!) of radius Rc. It is sur- rounded by a spherical cloud of gaseous hydrogen of radius Rg, where Rg > Rc. Let’s assume that the core is of uniform density c and the gaseous cloud is also of uniform density g. What is the gravitational force on an object of mass m that is located at a radius r from the center of Jupiter? Note that you must consider the cases where the object is inside the core, within the gas layer, and outside of the planet. Back to Problem List 5 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.5 Sphere with linearly increasing mass density Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 A planet of mass M and radius R has a nonuniform density that varies with r, the distance from the center according to  = Ar for 0  r  R. (a) What is the constant A in terms of M and R? Does this density pro le strike you as physically plausible, or is just designed as a mathematical exercise? (Brie y, explain) (b) Determine the gravitational force on a satellite of mass m orbiting this planet. In words, please outline the method you plan to use for your solution. (Use the easiest method you can come up with!) In your calculation, you will need to argue that the magnitude of ~g(r; ; ) depends only on r. Be very explicit about this – how do you know that it doesn’t, in fact, depend on  or ? (c) Determine the gravitational force felt by a rock of mass m inside the planet, located at radius r < R. (If the method you use is di erent than in part b, explain why you switched. If not, just proceed!) Explicitly check your result for this part by considering the limits r ! 0 and r ! R. Back to Problem List 6 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.6 Jumping o Vesta Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 You are stranded on the surface of the asteroid Vesta. If the mass of the asteroid is M and its radius is R, how fast would you have to jump o its surface to be able to escape from its gravitational eld? (Your estimate should be based on parameters that characterize the asteroid, not parameters that describe your jumping ability.) Given your formula, look up the approximate mass and radius of the asteroid Vesta 3 and determine a numerical value of the escape velocity. Could you escape in this way? (Brie y, explain) If so, roughly how big in radius is the maximum the asteroid could be, for you to still escape this way? If not, estimate how much smaller an asteroid you would need, to escape from it in this way? Figure 1: Back to Problem List 7 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.7 Gravitational force between two massive rods Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 Consider two identical uniform rods of length L and mass m lying along the same line and having their closest points separated by a distance d as shown in the gure (a) Calculate the mutual force between these rods, both its direction and magnitude. (b) Now do several checks. First, make sure the units worked out (!) The, nd the magnitude of the force in the limit L ! 0. What do you expect? Brie y, discuss. Lastly, nd the magnitude of the force in the limit d ! 1 ? Again, is it what you expect? Brie y, discuss. Figure 2: Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Determining the gravitational force between two rods: (a) Consider a thin, uniform rod of mass m and length L (and negligible other dimensions) lying on the x axis (from x=-L to 0), as shown in g 1a. Derive a formula for the gravitational eld \g" at any arbitrary point x to the right of the origin (but still on the x-axis!) due to this rod. (b) Now suppose a second rod of length L and mass m sits on the x axis as shown in g 1b, with the left edge a distance \d" away. Calculate the mutual gravitational force between these rods. (c) Let's do some checks! Show that the units work out in parts a and b. Find the magnitude of the force in part a, in the limit x >> L: What do you expect? Brie y, discuss! Finally, verify that your answer to part b gives what you expect in the limit d >> L. ( Hint: This is a bit harder! You need to consistently expand everything to second order, not just rst, because of some interesting cancellations) Fig 1a Fig 1b L m +x x=0 L x=0 x=d m Fig 1a Fig 1b L m +x x=0 L +x x=0 x=d L m m Back to Problem List 8 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.8 Potential energy { Check your answer! Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 On the last exam, we had a problem with a at ring, uniform mass per unit area of , inner radius of R, outer radius of 2R. A satellite (mass m) sat a distance z above the center of the ring. We asked for the gravitational potential energy, and the answer was U(z) = ?2Gm( p 4R2 + z2 ? p R2 + z2) (1) (a) If you are far from the disk (on the z axis), what do you expect for the formula for U(z)? (Don’t say \0″ – as usual, we want the functional form of U(z) as you move far away. Also, explicitly state what we mean by \far away”. (Please don’t compare something with units to something without units!) (b) Show explicitly that the formula above does indeed give precisely the functional dependence you expect. Back to Problem List 9 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.9 Ways of solving gravitational problems Given: Pollock { Spring 2011, Spring 2012 Infinite cylinder ρ=cr x z (a) Half-infinite line mass, uniform linear mass density, λ x (b) R z  P Figure 3: (a) An in nite cylinder of radius R centered on the z-axis, with non-uniform volume mass density  = cr, where r is the radius in cylindrical coordinates. (b) A half-in nite line of mass on the x-axis extending from x = 0 to x = +1, with uniform linear mass density . There are two general methods we use to solve gravitational problems (i.e. nd ~g given some distribution of mass). (a) Describe these two methods. We claim one of these methods is easiest to solve for ~g of mass distribution (a) above, and the other method is easiest to solve for ~g of the mass distribution (b) above. Which method goes with which mass distribution? Please justify your answer. (b) Find ~g of the mass distribution (a) above for any arbitrary point outside the cylinder. (c) Find the x component of the gravitational acceleration, gx, generated by the mass distribution labeled (b) above, at a point P a given distance z up the positive z-axis (as shown). Back to Problem List 10 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.10 Rod with linearly increasing mass density Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Consider a very (in nitesimally!) thin but massive rod, length L (total mass M), centered around the origin, sitting along the x-axis. (So the left end is at (-L/2, 0,0) and the right end is at (+L/2,0,0) Assume the mass density  (which has units of kg/m)is not uniform, but instead varies linearly with distance from the origin, (x) = cjxj. (a) What is that constant \c” in terms of M and L? What is the direction of the gravitational eld generated by this mass distribution at a point in space a distance z above the center of the rod, i.e. at (0; 0; z) Explain your reasoning for the direction carefully, try not to simply \wave your hands.” (The answer is extremely intuitive, but can you justify that it is correct?) (b) Compute the gravitational eld, ~g, at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating Newton’s law of gravity, summing over all in nitesimal \chunks” of mass along the rod. (c) Compute the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating ?Gdm=r, sum- ming over all in nitesimal \chunks” dm along the rod. Then, take the z-component of the gradient of this potential to check that you agree with your result from the previous part. (d) In the limit of large z what do you expect for the functional form for gravitational potential? (Hint: Don’t just say it goes to zero! It’s a rod of mass M, when you’re far away what does it look like? How does it go to zero?) What does \large z” mean here? Use the binomial (or Taylor) expansion to verify that your formula does indeed give exactly what you expect. (Hint: you cannot Taylor expand in something BIG, you have to Taylor expand in something small.) (e) Can you use Gauss’ law to gure out the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z)? (If so, do it and check your previous answers. If not, why not?) Back to Problem List 11 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.11 Sphere with constant internal gravitational eld Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 (a) Imagine a planet of total mass M and radius R which has a nonuniform mass density that varies just with r, the distance from the center. For this (admittedly very unusual!) planet, suppose the gravitational eld strength inside the planet turns out to be independent of the radial distance within the sphere. Find the function describing the mass density  = (r) of this planet. (Your nal answer should be written in terms of the given constants.) (b) Now, determine the gravitational force on a satellite of mass m orbiting this planet at distance r > R. (Use the easiest method you can come up with!) Explain your work in words as well as formulas. For instance, in your calculation, you will need to argue that the magnitude of ~g(r; ; ) depends only on r. Be explicit about this – how do you know that it doesn’t, in fact, depend on  or ? (c) As a nal check, explicitly show that your solutions inside and outside the planet (parts a and b) are consistent when r = R. Please also comment on whether this density pro le strikes you as physically plausible, or is it just designed as a mathematical exercise? Defend your reasoning. Back to Problem List 12 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.12 Throwing a rock o the moon Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Assuming that asteroids have roughly the same mass density as the moon, make an estimate of the largest asteroid that an astronaut could be standing on, and still have a chance of throwing a small object (with their arms, no machinery!) so that it completely escapes the asteroid’s gravitational eld. (This minimum speed is called \escape velocity”) Is the size you computed typical for asteroids in our solar system? Back to Problem List 13

5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 Problem List 5.1 Total mass of a shell 5.2 Tunnel through the moon 5.3 Gravitational eld above the center of a thin hoop 5.4 Gravitational force near a metal-cored planet surrounded by a gaseous cloud 5.5 Sphere with linearly increasing mass density 5.6 Jumping o Vesta 5.7 Gravitational force between two massive rods 5.8 Potential energy { Check your answer! 5.9 Ways of solving gravitational problems 5.10 Rod with linearly increasing mass density 5.11 Sphere with constant internal gravitational eld 5.12 Throwing a rock o the moon These problems are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Un- ported License. Please share and/or modify. Back to Problem List 1 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.1 Total mass of a shell Given: Marino { Fall 2011 Consider a spherical shell that extends from r = R to r = 2R with a non-uniform density (r) = 0r. What is the total mass of the shell? Back to Problem List 2 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.2 Tunnel through the moon Given: Marino { Fall 2011 Imagine that NASA digs a straight tunnel through the center of the moon (see gure) to access the Moon’s 3He deposits. An astronaut places a rock in the tunnel at the surface of the moon, and releases it (from rest). Show that the rock obeys the force law for a mass connected to a spring. What is the spring constant? Find the oscillation period for this motion if you assume that Moon has a mass of 7.351022 kg and a radius of 1.74106 m. Assume the moon’s density is uniform throughout its volume, and ignore the moon’s rotation. Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 Imagine (in a parallel universe of unlimited budgets) that NASA digs a straight tunnel through the center of the moon (see gure). A robot place a rock in the tunnel at position r = r0 from the center of the moon, and releases it (from rest). Use Newton’s second law to write the equation of motion of the rock and solve for r(t). Explain in words the rock’s motion. Does the rock return to its initial position at any later time? If so, how long does it takes to return to it? (Give a formula, and a number.) Assume the moon’s density is uniform throughout its volume, and ignore the moon’s rotation. Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Now lets consider our (real) planet Earth, with total mass M and radius R which we will approximate as a uniform mass density, (r) = 0. (a) Neglecting rotational and frictional e ects, show that a particle dropped into a hole drilled straight through the center of the earth all the way to the far side will oscillate between the two endpoints. (Hint: you will need to set up, and solve, an ODE for the motion) (b) Find the period of the oscillation of this motion. Get a number (in minutes) as a nal result, using data for the earth’s size and mass. (How does that compare to ying to Perth and back?!) Extra Credit: OK, even with unlimited budgets, digging a tunnel through the center of the earth is preposterous. But, suppose instead that the tunnel is a straight-line \chord” through the earth, say directly from New York to Los Angeles. Show that your nal answer for the time taken does not depend on the location of that chord! This is rather remarkable – look again at the time for a free-fall trip (no energy required, except perhaps to compensate for friction) How long would that trip take? Could this work?! Back to Problem List 3 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.3 Gravitational eld above the center of a thin hoop Given: Pollock { Spring 2011, Spring 2012 Consider a very (in nitesimally!) thin but massive loop, radius R (total mass M), centered around the origin, sitting in the x-y plane. Assume it has a uniform linear mass density  (which has units of kg/m) all around it. (So, it’s like a skinny donut that is mostly hole, centered around the z-axis) (a) What is  in terms of M and R? What is the direction of the gravitational eld generated by this mass distribution at a point in space a distance z above the center of the donut, i.e. at (0; 0; z) Explain your reasoning for the direction carefully, try not to simply \wave your hands.” (The answer is extremely intuitive, but can you justify that it is correct?) (b) Compute the gravitational eld, ~g, at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating Newton’s law of gravity, summing over all in nitesimal \chunks” of mass along the loop. (c) Compute the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating ?Gdm=r, sum- ming over all in nitesimal \chunks” dm along the loop. Then, take the z-component of the gradient of this potential to check that you agree with your result from the previous part. (d) In the two separate limits z << R and z >> R, Taylor expand your g- eld (in the z-direction)out only to the rst non-zero term, and convince us that both limits make good physical sense. (e) Can you use Gauss’ law to gure out the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z)? (If so, do it and check your previous answers. If not, why not?) Extra credit: If you place a small mass a small distance z away from the center, use your Taylor limit for z << R above to write a simple ODE for the equation of motion. Solve it, and discuss the motion Back to Problem List 4 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.4 Gravitational force near a metal-cored planet surrounded by a gaseous cloud Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 Jupiter is composed of a dense spherical core (of liquid metallic hydrogen!) of radius Rc. It is sur- rounded by a spherical cloud of gaseous hydrogen of radius Rg, where Rg > Rc. Let’s assume that the core is of uniform density c and the gaseous cloud is also of uniform density g. What is the gravitational force on an object of mass m that is located at a radius r from the center of Jupiter? Note that you must consider the cases where the object is inside the core, within the gas layer, and outside of the planet. Back to Problem List 5 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.5 Sphere with linearly increasing mass density Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 A planet of mass M and radius R has a nonuniform density that varies with r, the distance from the center according to  = Ar for 0  r  R. (a) What is the constant A in terms of M and R? Does this density pro le strike you as physically plausible, or is just designed as a mathematical exercise? (Brie y, explain) (b) Determine the gravitational force on a satellite of mass m orbiting this planet. In words, please outline the method you plan to use for your solution. (Use the easiest method you can come up with!) In your calculation, you will need to argue that the magnitude of ~g(r; ; ) depends only on r. Be very explicit about this – how do you know that it doesn’t, in fact, depend on  or ? (c) Determine the gravitational force felt by a rock of mass m inside the planet, located at radius r < R. (If the method you use is di erent than in part b, explain why you switched. If not, just proceed!) Explicitly check your result for this part by considering the limits r ! 0 and r ! R. Back to Problem List 6 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.6 Jumping o Vesta Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 You are stranded on the surface of the asteroid Vesta. If the mass of the asteroid is M and its radius is R, how fast would you have to jump o its surface to be able to escape from its gravitational eld? (Your estimate should be based on parameters that characterize the asteroid, not parameters that describe your jumping ability.) Given your formula, look up the approximate mass and radius of the asteroid Vesta 3 and determine a numerical value of the escape velocity. Could you escape in this way? (Brie y, explain) If so, roughly how big in radius is the maximum the asteroid could be, for you to still escape this way? If not, estimate how much smaller an asteroid you would need, to escape from it in this way? Figure 1: Back to Problem List 7 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.7 Gravitational force between two massive rods Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 Consider two identical uniform rods of length L and mass m lying along the same line and having their closest points separated by a distance d as shown in the gure (a) Calculate the mutual force between these rods, both its direction and magnitude. (b) Now do several checks. First, make sure the units worked out (!) The, nd the magnitude of the force in the limit L ! 0. What do you expect? Brie y, discuss. Lastly, nd the magnitude of the force in the limit d ! 1 ? Again, is it what you expect? Brie y, discuss. Figure 2: Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Determining the gravitational force between two rods: (a) Consider a thin, uniform rod of mass m and length L (and negligible other dimensions) lying on the x axis (from x=-L to 0), as shown in g 1a. Derive a formula for the gravitational eld \g" at any arbitrary point x to the right of the origin (but still on the x-axis!) due to this rod. (b) Now suppose a second rod of length L and mass m sits on the x axis as shown in g 1b, with the left edge a distance \d" away. Calculate the mutual gravitational force between these rods. (c) Let's do some checks! Show that the units work out in parts a and b. Find the magnitude of the force in part a, in the limit x >> L: What do you expect? Brie y, discuss! Finally, verify that your answer to part b gives what you expect in the limit d >> L. ( Hint: This is a bit harder! You need to consistently expand everything to second order, not just rst, because of some interesting cancellations) Fig 1a Fig 1b L m +x x=0 L x=0 x=d m Fig 1a Fig 1b L m +x x=0 L +x x=0 x=d L m m Back to Problem List 8 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.8 Potential energy { Check your answer! Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 On the last exam, we had a problem with a at ring, uniform mass per unit area of , inner radius of R, outer radius of 2R. A satellite (mass m) sat a distance z above the center of the ring. We asked for the gravitational potential energy, and the answer was U(z) = ?2Gm( p 4R2 + z2 ? p R2 + z2) (1) (a) If you are far from the disk (on the z axis), what do you expect for the formula for U(z)? (Don’t say \0″ – as usual, we want the functional form of U(z) as you move far away. Also, explicitly state what we mean by \far away”. (Please don’t compare something with units to something without units!) (b) Show explicitly that the formula above does indeed give precisely the functional dependence you expect. Back to Problem List 9 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.9 Ways of solving gravitational problems Given: Pollock { Spring 2011, Spring 2012 Infinite cylinder ρ=cr x z (a) Half-infinite line mass, uniform linear mass density, λ x (b) R z  P Figure 3: (a) An in nite cylinder of radius R centered on the z-axis, with non-uniform volume mass density  = cr, where r is the radius in cylindrical coordinates. (b) A half-in nite line of mass on the x-axis extending from x = 0 to x = +1, with uniform linear mass density . There are two general methods we use to solve gravitational problems (i.e. nd ~g given some distribution of mass). (a) Describe these two methods. We claim one of these methods is easiest to solve for ~g of mass distribution (a) above, and the other method is easiest to solve for ~g of the mass distribution (b) above. Which method goes with which mass distribution? Please justify your answer. (b) Find ~g of the mass distribution (a) above for any arbitrary point outside the cylinder. (c) Find the x component of the gravitational acceleration, gx, generated by the mass distribution labeled (b) above, at a point P a given distance z up the positive z-axis (as shown). Back to Problem List 10 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.10 Rod with linearly increasing mass density Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Consider a very (in nitesimally!) thin but massive rod, length L (total mass M), centered around the origin, sitting along the x-axis. (So the left end is at (-L/2, 0,0) and the right end is at (+L/2,0,0) Assume the mass density  (which has units of kg/m)is not uniform, but instead varies linearly with distance from the origin, (x) = cjxj. (a) What is that constant \c” in terms of M and L? What is the direction of the gravitational eld generated by this mass distribution at a point in space a distance z above the center of the rod, i.e. at (0; 0; z) Explain your reasoning for the direction carefully, try not to simply \wave your hands.” (The answer is extremely intuitive, but can you justify that it is correct?) (b) Compute the gravitational eld, ~g, at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating Newton’s law of gravity, summing over all in nitesimal \chunks” of mass along the rod. (c) Compute the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating ?Gdm=r, sum- ming over all in nitesimal \chunks” dm along the rod. Then, take the z-component of the gradient of this potential to check that you agree with your result from the previous part. (d) In the limit of large z what do you expect for the functional form for gravitational potential? (Hint: Don’t just say it goes to zero! It’s a rod of mass M, when you’re far away what does it look like? How does it go to zero?) What does \large z” mean here? Use the binomial (or Taylor) expansion to verify that your formula does indeed give exactly what you expect. (Hint: you cannot Taylor expand in something BIG, you have to Taylor expand in something small.) (e) Can you use Gauss’ law to gure out the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z)? (If so, do it and check your previous answers. If not, why not?) Back to Problem List 11 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.11 Sphere with constant internal gravitational eld Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 (a) Imagine a planet of total mass M and radius R which has a nonuniform mass density that varies just with r, the distance from the center. For this (admittedly very unusual!) planet, suppose the gravitational eld strength inside the planet turns out to be independent of the radial distance within the sphere. Find the function describing the mass density  = (r) of this planet. (Your nal answer should be written in terms of the given constants.) (b) Now, determine the gravitational force on a satellite of mass m orbiting this planet at distance r > R. (Use the easiest method you can come up with!) Explain your work in words as well as formulas. For instance, in your calculation, you will need to argue that the magnitude of ~g(r; ; ) depends only on r. Be explicit about this – how do you know that it doesn’t, in fact, depend on  or ? (c) As a nal check, explicitly show that your solutions inside and outside the planet (parts a and b) are consistent when r = R. Please also comment on whether this density pro le strikes you as physically plausible, or is it just designed as a mathematical exercise? Defend your reasoning. Back to Problem List 12 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.12 Throwing a rock o the moon Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Assuming that asteroids have roughly the same mass density as the moon, make an estimate of the largest asteroid that an astronaut could be standing on, and still have a chance of throwing a small object (with their arms, no machinery!) so that it completely escapes the asteroid’s gravitational eld. (This minimum speed is called \escape velocity”) Is the size you computed typical for asteroids in our solar system? Back to Problem List 13