Define: 41 Things Philosophy is: 1. Ignorant 2. Selfish 3. Ironic 4. Plain 5. Misunderstood 6. A failure 7. Poor 8. Unscientific 9. Unteachable 10. Foolish 11. Abnormal 12. Divine trickery 13. Egalitarian 14. A divine calling 15. Laborious 16. Countercultural 17. Uncomfortable 18. Virtuous 19. Dangerous 20. Simplistic<br />21. Polemical 22. Therapeutic 23. “conformist” 24. Embarrassi ng 25. Invulnerable 26. Annoying 27. Pneumatic 28. Apolitic al 29. Docile/teachable 30. Messianic 31. Pious 32. Impract ical 33. Happy 34. Necessary 35. Death-defying 36. Fallible 37. Immortal 38. Confident 39. Painful 40. agnostic</br

Define: 41 Things Philosophy is: 1. Ignorant 2. Selfish 3. Ironic 4. Plain 5. Misunderstood 6. A failure 7. Poor 8. Unscientific 9. Unteachable 10. Foolish 11. Abnormal 12. Divine trickery 13. Egalitarian 14. A divine calling 15. Laborious 16. Countercultural 17. Uncomfortable 18. Virtuous 19. Dangerous 20. Simplistic
21. Polemical 22. Therapeutic 23. “conformist” 24. Embarrassi ng 25. Invulnerable 26. Annoying 27. Pneumatic 28. Apolitic al 29. Docile/teachable 30. Messianic 31. Pious 32. Impract ical 33. Happy 34. Necessary 35. Death-defying 36. Fallible 37. Immortal 38. Confident 39. Painful 40. agnostic

Ignorant- A person is said to be ignorant if he … Read More...
unit 6 only Part 1: Analysis of a unit of work (1000-1500) Part 1 requires you to critically evaluate a unit of work given in terms of: • the range of approaches and methodologies to language learning and teaching this unit of work encompasses. Discuss whether there is a focus on a particular approach, eg, are the students asked to memorise / rote learn/ repeat (audio-lingual); are students required to complete a task (task based learning) or an information-gap type activity (communicative language learning); is there a focus on a specific genre? 300 – 400 • the clarity of the objectives and target language/ exponents being taught 200-300 • the selection and sequencing of the activities 200 – 300 • to what extent language exponents and skills are integrated in the activities 200 -300 • the learner group, their needs and their language level for which the unit of work would be most appropriate 100 Describe the learner group this unit is designed for: ESL students, students of English as an international language etc; what language level the unit assumes and; the students language learning needs. Part 2: Extension, addition, omission and substitution (1500 – 2000) This section of the assignment requires you to focus on the unit of work: • Comment on any extensions, additions, omissions or substitutions you would make if you were teaching this unit to the learner group you identified in Part 1, above. 500 • Give reasons for your decisions. 500 • Describe how you will assess student learning. 300 • Describe how you will evaluate the success of the unit of work. 200 • Identify any problems you anticipate in carrying out the unit of work and suggest how you would go about overcoming these. 300 • For added or substituted activities, list the resources you will need for these, and reference the materials you have used or drawn on. 200

unit 6 only Part 1: Analysis of a unit of work (1000-1500) Part 1 requires you to critically evaluate a unit of work given in terms of: • the range of approaches and methodologies to language learning and teaching this unit of work encompasses. Discuss whether there is a focus on a particular approach, eg, are the students asked to memorise / rote learn/ repeat (audio-lingual); are students required to complete a task (task based learning) or an information-gap type activity (communicative language learning); is there a focus on a specific genre? 300 – 400 • the clarity of the objectives and target language/ exponents being taught 200-300 • the selection and sequencing of the activities 200 – 300 • to what extent language exponents and skills are integrated in the activities 200 -300 • the learner group, their needs and their language level for which the unit of work would be most appropriate 100 Describe the learner group this unit is designed for: ESL students, students of English as an international language etc; what language level the unit assumes and; the students language learning needs. Part 2: Extension, addition, omission and substitution (1500 – 2000) This section of the assignment requires you to focus on the unit of work: • Comment on any extensions, additions, omissions or substitutions you would make if you were teaching this unit to the learner group you identified in Part 1, above. 500 • Give reasons for your decisions. 500 • Describe how you will assess student learning. 300 • Describe how you will evaluate the success of the unit of work. 200 • Identify any problems you anticipate in carrying out the unit of work and suggest how you would go about overcoming these. 300 • For added or substituted activities, list the resources you will need for these, and reference the materials you have used or drawn on. 200

info@checkyourstudy.com
Systemic theory assumes that a client’s problematic behavior may serve a purpose for the family member; be a function of the family’s inability to operate productively and be a symptom of dysfunctional patterns across multi-genrations.

Systemic theory assumes that a client’s problematic behavior may serve a purpose for the family member; be a function of the family’s inability to operate productively and be a symptom of dysfunctional patterns across multi-genrations.

FALSE
in dual federalism, __________, 1. the federal government assumes greater fiscal responsibility, 2. power are shared between states and the federal government, 3. there are only two branches of government, 4. state and the national government each remain supreme within their own spheres, 5. the state government assume greater fiscal responsibility.

in dual federalism, __________, 1. the federal government assumes greater fiscal responsibility, 2. power are shared between states and the federal government, 3. there are only two branches of government, 4. state and the national government each remain supreme within their own spheres, 5. the state government assume greater fiscal responsibility.

4. states and national government——– own spheres
EE118 FALL 2012 SAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY Department of Electrical Engineering TEST 2 — Digital Design I October 24, 2012 10:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. — Closed Book & Closed Notes — — No Crib Sheet Allowed — STUDENT NAME: (Last) Claussen , (First) Matthew STUDENT ID NUMBER (LAST 4 DIGITS): No interpretation of test problems will be given during the test. If you are not sure of what is intended, make appropriate assumptions and continue. Do not unstaple !!! Problems 1-14(4 points each) TOTAL Problems 15 – 17 (15 pts each) 1203 2 For the next 14 problems, circle the correct answer. No partial credit will be given. PROBLEM 1 (4 points) Which statement is not true? A. Any combinational circuit may be designed using multiplexers only. B. Any combinational circuit may be designed using decoders only. C. All Sequential circuits are based on cross-coupled NAND or NOR gates. D. A hazard in a digital system is an undesirable effect caused by either a deficiency in the system or external influences. E. None of the above PROBLEM 2 (4 points) For a 2-bit comparator comparing 2-bit numbers A = (a1 a0) and B = (b1 b0), what is the proper function for the f(A>B) output through logical reasoning? A. a1 b1’ + (a1 b1 + a1’b1’ ) a0 b0’ B. a1 b1’ + (a1 b1’+ a1’b1 ) a0 b0 C. a1 a0’ + (a1 a0 + b1’b0’ ) b1 b0’ D. a1 a0 + (a1 a0’+ b1’b0 ) b1 b0 PROBLEM 3 (4 points) What is the priority scheme of this encoder? Inputs Outputs I3 I2 I1 I0 O1 O 0 d d 1 d 0 1 d d 0 1 0 0 d 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 A. I3 > I2 > I1 >I0 B. I0 > I1 > I2 >I3 C. I1 > I0 > I2 >I3 D. I2 > I1 > I3 >I0 3 PROBLEM 4 (4 points) Which is the correct binary representation of the decimal number 46.625? A. 101101.001 B. 101000.01 C. 111001.001 D. 101110.101 PROBLEM 5 (4 points) Which is the decimal equivalent number of the sum of the two 8-bit 2’s complement numbers FB16 and 3748? A. 3 B. 5 C. 7 D. 9 PROBLEM 6 (4 points) For the MUX-based circuit shown below, f(X,Y,Z) = ? X Y Z f A. X’Y’ + Y’Z’ B. X’Y’Z’ + YZ’ C. XYZ’ + Y’Z D. X’Y’Z’ + YZ 1 0 MUX 4 PROBLEM 7 (4 points) Which is the correct output F of this circuit? E C B D F A A. (A’E+AB)(C’D) B. (AE+A’B)(C’+D) C. (A’E+AB)(C’D’+CD’+CD) D. (A’E+AB)(CD’)’ PROBLEM 8 (5 points) In order to correctly perform 2910  14510, how many bits are required to represent the numbers? A 8 B 9 C 10 D 11 PROBLEM 9 (4 points) Which is the negative 2’s complement equivalent of the 8-bit number 01001101? A. 11001101 B. 10111100 C. 10110000 D. 10110011 0 2-1 1 MUX 0 0 1 1 2-4 decoder 2 EN 3 5 PROBLEM 10 (4 points) Which is the correct statement describing the behavior of the following Verilog code? module whatisthis(hmm, X, Y); output [3:0] hmm; input [3:0] X, Y; assign hmm = (X < Y) ? X : Y; endmodule A. If X>Y, hmm becomes 1111. B. hmm assumes min(X,Y). C. If X<Y, hmm becomes 1111. D. hmm assumes max(X,Y). PROBLEM 11 (4 points) Which Boolean expression corresponds to the function g(W,X,Y,Z) implemented by the following “non-priority” encoder-based circuit? Assume that one and only one input is high at any time. f W X g Y Z A. Y + Z B. W + Y C. X + Y D. X + Z PROBLEM 12 (4 points) Which Boolean expression corresponds to the output of the following logic diagram? (/B = B’) A. Z = ( A(B’ + C)’ )’ + ( (B’ + C)’ + D )’ B. Z= A(B C’) + (B C’ + D) C. Z = (A(B’ + C)(B’ + C + D) )’ D. Z = A(B’ + C)’ + (B’ + C + D)’ 0 0 1 1 2 3 Encoder 6 PROBLEM 13 (4 points) Which is the correct gate-level circuit in minimal SOP form for the following circuit? A F = Y’X’ + W’ZY’X B F = YX’ + W’Z’Y’X C F = YX’ + W’ZY’X D F = Y’X + W’ZY’X’ PROBLEM 14 (4 points) For the following flow map of a certain cross-coupled gate circuit, the circuit is currently in the underlined state. If the inputs YZ change to 11, the circuit becomes meta-stable. Between which two states (WX) does the circuit oscillate ? A 00  11 B 01  10 C 11  10 D 10  00 YZ WX 00 01 11 10 00 00 11 00 10 01 10 10 10 01 11 00 00 11 01 10 10 01 01 10 G1 Y0 G2A Y1 G2B Y2 Y3 A Y4 B Y5 C Y6 Y7 G1 Y0 G2A Y1 G2B Y2 Y3 A Y4 B Y5 C Y6 Y7 OR W X Y Z X Y Z F + 5 V 7 For each of the next 3 problems, show all your work. Partial credits will be given. PROBLEM 15 (15 points) 1) Which logic variable causes the hazard for the circuit given by the K-map below? 2) Using the timing diagram, clearly show how the hazard occurs. 3) Find the best hazard-free logic function. YZ WX 00 01 11 10 00 0 0 1 1 01 0 0 0 0 11 1 0 0 0 10 1 0 1 1 8 PROBLEM 16(15 points) Analyze the following cross-coupled NAND gates by showing: (a) flow map with stable states circled and with meta-stability condition shown by arrows, (b) state table, and (c) completed timing diagram below. Note that d is the propagation delay of each gate. XY G1(t)G2(t) 00 01 11 10 00 01 11 10 Inputs  XY=00 XY=01 XY=11 XY=10 Present States  X Y G1(t) G2(t) 0 d 2d 3d 4d 5d 6d 7d 8d 9d X Y G1 G2 9 PROBLEM 17 (15 points) Using Quine-McCluskey algorithm, find the minimal SOP for the following minterm list. f(A, B, C) = (1,2,3,4,6,7) w(j) j Match I Match II 0 1 2 3 PI Covering Table

EE118 FALL 2012 SAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY Department of Electrical Engineering TEST 2 — Digital Design I October 24, 2012 10:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. — Closed Book & Closed Notes — — No Crib Sheet Allowed — STUDENT NAME: (Last) Claussen , (First) Matthew STUDENT ID NUMBER (LAST 4 DIGITS): No interpretation of test problems will be given during the test. If you are not sure of what is intended, make appropriate assumptions and continue. Do not unstaple !!! Problems 1-14(4 points each) TOTAL Problems 15 – 17 (15 pts each) 1203 2 For the next 14 problems, circle the correct answer. No partial credit will be given. PROBLEM 1 (4 points) Which statement is not true? A. Any combinational circuit may be designed using multiplexers only. B. Any combinational circuit may be designed using decoders only. C. All Sequential circuits are based on cross-coupled NAND or NOR gates. D. A hazard in a digital system is an undesirable effect caused by either a deficiency in the system or external influences. E. None of the above PROBLEM 2 (4 points) For a 2-bit comparator comparing 2-bit numbers A = (a1 a0) and B = (b1 b0), what is the proper function for the f(A>B) output through logical reasoning? A. a1 b1’ + (a1 b1 + a1’b1’ ) a0 b0’ B. a1 b1’ + (a1 b1’+ a1’b1 ) a0 b0 C. a1 a0’ + (a1 a0 + b1’b0’ ) b1 b0’ D. a1 a0 + (a1 a0’+ b1’b0 ) b1 b0 PROBLEM 3 (4 points) What is the priority scheme of this encoder? Inputs Outputs I3 I2 I1 I0 O1 O 0 d d 1 d 0 1 d d 0 1 0 0 d 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 A. I3 > I2 > I1 >I0 B. I0 > I1 > I2 >I3 C. I1 > I0 > I2 >I3 D. I2 > I1 > I3 >I0 3 PROBLEM 4 (4 points) Which is the correct binary representation of the decimal number 46.625? A. 101101.001 B. 101000.01 C. 111001.001 D. 101110.101 PROBLEM 5 (4 points) Which is the decimal equivalent number of the sum of the two 8-bit 2’s complement numbers FB16 and 3748? A. 3 B. 5 C. 7 D. 9 PROBLEM 6 (4 points) For the MUX-based circuit shown below, f(X,Y,Z) = ? X Y Z f A. X’Y’ + Y’Z’ B. X’Y’Z’ + YZ’ C. XYZ’ + Y’Z D. X’Y’Z’ + YZ 1 0 MUX 4 PROBLEM 7 (4 points) Which is the correct output F of this circuit? E C B D F A A. (A’E+AB)(C’D) B. (AE+A’B)(C’+D) C. (A’E+AB)(C’D’+CD’+CD) D. (A’E+AB)(CD’)’ PROBLEM 8 (5 points) In order to correctly perform 2910  14510, how many bits are required to represent the numbers? A 8 B 9 C 10 D 11 PROBLEM 9 (4 points) Which is the negative 2’s complement equivalent of the 8-bit number 01001101? A. 11001101 B. 10111100 C. 10110000 D. 10110011 0 2-1 1 MUX 0 0 1 1 2-4 decoder 2 EN 3 5 PROBLEM 10 (4 points) Which is the correct statement describing the behavior of the following Verilog code? module whatisthis(hmm, X, Y); output [3:0] hmm; input [3:0] X, Y; assign hmm = (X < Y) ? X : Y; endmodule A. If X>Y, hmm becomes 1111. B. hmm assumes min(X,Y). C. If X

info@checkyourstudy.com Operations Team Whatsapp( +91 9911743277)
Engineering Risk Management Special topic: Beer Game Copyright Old Dominion University, 2017 All rights reserved Revised Class Schedule Lac-Megantic Case Study Part 1: Timeline of events Part 2: Timeline + causal chain of events Part 3: Instructions Evaluate your causal-chain (network) Which are the root causes? Which events have the most causes? What are the relationship of the causes? Which causes have the most influence? Part 4: Instructions Consider these recommendations from TSB Which nodes in your causal chain will be addressed by which of these recommendations? Recap How would you summarize the steps in conducting post-event analysis of an accident? Beer Game Case Study The beer game was developed at MIT in the 1960s. It is an experiential learning business simulation game created by a group of professors at MIT Sloan School of Management in early 1960s to demonstrate a number of key principles of supply chain management. The game is played by teams of four players, often in heated competition, and takes at least one hour to complete.  Beer Game Case Study Beer Game Case Study A truck driver delivers beer once each week to the retailer. Then the retailer places an order with the trucker who returns the order to the wholesaler. There’s a four week lag between ordering and receiving the beer. The retailer and wholesaler do not communicate directly. The retailer sells hundreds of products and the wholesaler distributes many products to a large number of customers. Beer Game Case Study The Retailer Week 1: Lover’s Beer is not very popular but the retailer sells four cases per week on average. Because the lead time is four weeks, the retailer attempts to keep twelve cases in the store by ordering four cases each Monday when the trucker makes a delivery. Week 2: The retailer’s sales of Lover’s beer doubles to eight cases, so on Monday, he orders 8 cases. Week 3: The retailer sells 8 cases. The trucker delivers four cases. To be safe, the retailer decides to order 12 cases of Lover’s beer. Week 4: The retailer learns from some of his younger customers that a music video appearing on TV shows a group singing “I’ll take on last sip of Lover’s beer and run into the sun.” The retailer assumes that this explains the increased demand for the product. The trucker delivers 5 cases. The retailer is nearly sold out, so he orders 16 cases. Beer Game Case Study The Retailer Week 5: The retailer sells the last case, but receives 7 cases. All 7 cases are sold by the end of the week. So again on Monday the retailer orders 16 cases. Week 6: Customers are looking for Lover’s beer. Some put their names on a list to be called when the beer comes in. The trucker delivers only 6 cases and all are sold by the weekend. The retailer orders another 16 cases. Week 7: The trucker delivers 7 cases. The retailer is frustrated, but orders another 16 cases. Week 8: The trucker delivers 5 cases and tells the retailer the beer is backlogged. The retailer is really getting irritated with the wholesaler, but orders 24 cases. Beer Game Case Study The Wholesaler The wholesaler distributes many brands of beer to a large number of retailers, but he is the only distributor of Lover’s beer. The wholesaler orders 4 truckloads from the brewery truck driver each week and receives the beer after a 4 week lag. The wholesaler’s policy is to keep 12 truckloads in inventory on a continuous basis. Week 6: By week 6 the wholesaler is out of Lover’s beer and responds by ordering 30 truckloads from the brewery. Week 8: By the 8th week most stores are ordering 3 or 4 times more Lovers’ beer than their regular amounts. Week 9: The wholesaler orders more Lover’s beer, but gets only 6 truckloads. Week 10: Only 8 truckloads are delivered, so the wholesaler orders 40. Week 11: Only 12 truckloads are received, and there are 77 truckloads in backlog, so the wholesaler orders 40 more truckloads. Beer Game Case Study The Wholesaler Week 12: The wholesaler orders 60 more truckloads of Lover’s beer. It appears that the beer is becoming more popular from week to week. Week 13: There is still a huge backlog. Weeks 14-15: The wholesaler receives larger shipments from the brewery, but orders from retailers begin to drop off. Week 16: The trucker delivers 55 truckloads from the brewery, but the wholesaler gets zero orders from retailers. So he stops ordering from the brewery. Week 17: The wholesaler receives another 60 truckloads. Retailers order zero. The wholesaler orders zero. The brewery keeps sending beer. Beer Game Case Study The Brewery The brewery is small but has a reputation for producing high quality beer. Lover’s beer is only one of several products produced at the brewery. Week 6: New orders come in for 40 gross. It takes two weeks to brew the beer. Week 14: Orders continue to come in and the brewery has not been able to catch up on the backlogged orders. The marketing manager begins to wonder how much bonus he will get for increasing sales so dramatically. Week 16: The brewery catches up on the backlog, but orders begin to drop off. Week 18: By week 18 there are no new orders for Lover’s beer. Week 19: The brewery has 100 gross of Lover’s beer in stock, but no orders. So the brewery stops producing Lover’s beer. Weeks 20-23. No orders. Beer Game Case Study At this point all the players blame each other for the excess inventory. Conversations with wholesale and retailer reveal an inventory of 93 cases at the retailer and 220 truckloads at the wholesaler. The marketing manager figures it will take the wholesaler a year to sell the Lover’s beer he has in stock. The retailers must be the problem. The retailer explains that demand increased from 4 cases per week to 8 cases. The wholesaler and marketing manager think demand mushroomed after that, and then fell off, but the retailer explains that didn’t happen. Demand stayed at 8 cases per week. Since he didn’t get the beer he ordered, he kept ordering more in an attempt to keep up with the demand. The marketing manager plans his resignation. Homework 4 Read the case and answer 1+6 questions. 0th What should go right? 1st What can go wrong? 2nd What are the causes and consequences? 3rd What is the likelihood of occurrence? 4rd What can be done to detect, control, and manage them? 5th What are the alternatives? 6th What are the effects beyond this particular time? Homework 4 In 500 words or less, summarize lessons learned in this beer game as it relates to supply chain risk management. Apply one of the tools (CCA, HAZOP, FMEA, etc.) to the case. Work individually and submit before Monday midnight (Feb. 20th). No class on Monday (Feb. 20th).

Engineering Risk Management Special topic: Beer Game Copyright Old Dominion University, 2017 All rights reserved Revised Class Schedule Lac-Megantic Case Study Part 1: Timeline of events Part 2: Timeline + causal chain of events Part 3: Instructions Evaluate your causal-chain (network) Which are the root causes? Which events have the most causes? What are the relationship of the causes? Which causes have the most influence? Part 4: Instructions Consider these recommendations from TSB Which nodes in your causal chain will be addressed by which of these recommendations? Recap How would you summarize the steps in conducting post-event analysis of an accident? Beer Game Case Study The beer game was developed at MIT in the 1960s. It is an experiential learning business simulation game created by a group of professors at MIT Sloan School of Management in early 1960s to demonstrate a number of key principles of supply chain management. The game is played by teams of four players, often in heated competition, and takes at least one hour to complete.  Beer Game Case Study Beer Game Case Study A truck driver delivers beer once each week to the retailer. Then the retailer places an order with the trucker who returns the order to the wholesaler. There’s a four week lag between ordering and receiving the beer. The retailer and wholesaler do not communicate directly. The retailer sells hundreds of products and the wholesaler distributes many products to a large number of customers. Beer Game Case Study The Retailer Week 1: Lover’s Beer is not very popular but the retailer sells four cases per week on average. Because the lead time is four weeks, the retailer attempts to keep twelve cases in the store by ordering four cases each Monday when the trucker makes a delivery. Week 2: The retailer’s sales of Lover’s beer doubles to eight cases, so on Monday, he orders 8 cases. Week 3: The retailer sells 8 cases. The trucker delivers four cases. To be safe, the retailer decides to order 12 cases of Lover’s beer. Week 4: The retailer learns from some of his younger customers that a music video appearing on TV shows a group singing “I’ll take on last sip of Lover’s beer and run into the sun.” The retailer assumes that this explains the increased demand for the product. The trucker delivers 5 cases. The retailer is nearly sold out, so he orders 16 cases. Beer Game Case Study The Retailer Week 5: The retailer sells the last case, but receives 7 cases. All 7 cases are sold by the end of the week. So again on Monday the retailer orders 16 cases. Week 6: Customers are looking for Lover’s beer. Some put their names on a list to be called when the beer comes in. The trucker delivers only 6 cases and all are sold by the weekend. The retailer orders another 16 cases. Week 7: The trucker delivers 7 cases. The retailer is frustrated, but orders another 16 cases. Week 8: The trucker delivers 5 cases and tells the retailer the beer is backlogged. The retailer is really getting irritated with the wholesaler, but orders 24 cases. Beer Game Case Study The Wholesaler The wholesaler distributes many brands of beer to a large number of retailers, but he is the only distributor of Lover’s beer. The wholesaler orders 4 truckloads from the brewery truck driver each week and receives the beer after a 4 week lag. The wholesaler’s policy is to keep 12 truckloads in inventory on a continuous basis. Week 6: By week 6 the wholesaler is out of Lover’s beer and responds by ordering 30 truckloads from the brewery. Week 8: By the 8th week most stores are ordering 3 or 4 times more Lovers’ beer than their regular amounts. Week 9: The wholesaler orders more Lover’s beer, but gets only 6 truckloads. Week 10: Only 8 truckloads are delivered, so the wholesaler orders 40. Week 11: Only 12 truckloads are received, and there are 77 truckloads in backlog, so the wholesaler orders 40 more truckloads. Beer Game Case Study The Wholesaler Week 12: The wholesaler orders 60 more truckloads of Lover’s beer. It appears that the beer is becoming more popular from week to week. Week 13: There is still a huge backlog. Weeks 14-15: The wholesaler receives larger shipments from the brewery, but orders from retailers begin to drop off. Week 16: The trucker delivers 55 truckloads from the brewery, but the wholesaler gets zero orders from retailers. So he stops ordering from the brewery. Week 17: The wholesaler receives another 60 truckloads. Retailers order zero. The wholesaler orders zero. The brewery keeps sending beer. Beer Game Case Study The Brewery The brewery is small but has a reputation for producing high quality beer. Lover’s beer is only one of several products produced at the brewery. Week 6: New orders come in for 40 gross. It takes two weeks to brew the beer. Week 14: Orders continue to come in and the brewery has not been able to catch up on the backlogged orders. The marketing manager begins to wonder how much bonus he will get for increasing sales so dramatically. Week 16: The brewery catches up on the backlog, but orders begin to drop off. Week 18: By week 18 there are no new orders for Lover’s beer. Week 19: The brewery has 100 gross of Lover’s beer in stock, but no orders. So the brewery stops producing Lover’s beer. Weeks 20-23. No orders. Beer Game Case Study At this point all the players blame each other for the excess inventory. Conversations with wholesale and retailer reveal an inventory of 93 cases at the retailer and 220 truckloads at the wholesaler. The marketing manager figures it will take the wholesaler a year to sell the Lover’s beer he has in stock. The retailers must be the problem. The retailer explains that demand increased from 4 cases per week to 8 cases. The wholesaler and marketing manager think demand mushroomed after that, and then fell off, but the retailer explains that didn’t happen. Demand stayed at 8 cases per week. Since he didn’t get the beer he ordered, he kept ordering more in an attempt to keep up with the demand. The marketing manager plans his resignation. Homework 4 Read the case and answer 1+6 questions. 0th What should go right? 1st What can go wrong? 2nd What are the causes and consequences? 3rd What is the likelihood of occurrence? 4rd What can be done to detect, control, and manage them? 5th What are the alternatives? 6th What are the effects beyond this particular time? Homework 4 In 500 words or less, summarize lessons learned in this beer game as it relates to supply chain risk management. Apply one of the tools (CCA, HAZOP, FMEA, etc.) to the case. Work individually and submit before Monday midnight (Feb. 20th). No class on Monday (Feb. 20th).

checkyourstudy.com Whatsapp +919911743277