Ch 2 Questions that might be on the test. If you cannot answer them, check your class notes or the textbook. 1. A mineral is a naturally occurring substance formed through geological processes that has: a) a characteristic chemical composition, b) a highly ordered atomic structure c) specific physical properties d) all of the above 2. There are currently more than ______ known minerals, according to the International Mineralogical Association, a) 40 b) 400 c) 4000 d) 40 000 3. Some minerals, like quartz, mica or feldspar are: a) rare b) common c) valuable d) priceless 4. Rocks from which minerals are mined for economic purposes are referred to as: a) gangue b) tailings c) ores d) granite 5. Electrons, which have a _____ charge, a size which is so small as to be currently unmeasurable, and which are the least massive of the three types of basic particles. a) positive b) negative c) neutral 6. Both protons and neutrons are themselves now thought to be composed of even more elementary particles called: a) quarks b) quakes c) parsons d) megans 7. In processes which change the number of protons in a nucleus, the atom becomes an atom of a different chemical: a) isotope b) compound c) element d) planet 8. Atoms which have either a deficit or a surplus of electrons are called: a) elements b) isotopes c) ions d) molecules 9. In the Bohr model of the atom, electrons can only orbit the nucleus in particular circular orbits with fixed angular momentum and energy, their distances from the nucleus being proportional to their respective energies. They can only make _____ leaps between the fixed energy levels. a) tiny b) quantum c) gradual 10. It is impossible to simultaneously derive precise values for both the position and momentum of a particle for any given point in time; this became known as the ______ principle. a) Bohr b) Einstein c) uncertainty d) quantum 11. The modern model of the atom describes the positions of electrons in an atom in terms of: a) quantum levels b) orbital paths c) probabilities d) GPS 12. Isotopes of an element have nuclei with the same number of protons (the same atomic number) but different numbers of: a) electrons b) neutrons c) ions d) photons 13. In helium-3 (or 3He), how many protons are present? a) 1 b) 2 c) 3 d) 4 14. In helium-3 (or 3He), how many neutrons are present? a) 1 b) 2 c) 3 d) 4 15. The relative abundance of an isotope is strongly correlated with its tendency toward nuclear _____, short-lived nuclides quickly go away, while their long-lived counterparts endure. a) fission b) fusion c) decay d) bombardment 16. The isotopic composition of elements is different on different planets. a) True b) False 17. As a general rule, the fewer electrons in an atom’s valence shell, the ____ reactive it is. Lithium, sodium, and potassium have one electron in their outer shells. a) more b) less 18. Every atom is much more stable, or less reactive, with a ____ valence shell. a) partly full b) completely full 19. A positively-charged ion, which has fewer electrons than protons, is known as a: a) anion b) cation c) fermion d) bation 20. Bonds vary widely in their strength. Generally covalent and ionic bonds are often described as “strong”, whereas ______ bonds are generally considered to be “weak”. a) van der Waals b) Faradays c) van Neumans 21. This bonding involves sharing of electrons in which the positively charged nuclei of two or more atoms simultaneously attract the negatively charged electrons that are being shared a) ionic b) covalent c) van der Waals d) metallic 22. This bond results from electrostatic attraction between atoms: a) ionic b) covalent c) van der Waals d) metallic 23. A sea of delocalized electrons causes this bonding: a) ionic b) covalent c) van der Waals d) metallic 24. The chemical composition of minerals may vary between end members of a mineral system. For example the ______ feldspars comprise a continuous series from sodiumrich albite to calcium-rich anorthite. a) plagioclase b) orthoclase c) alkaline d) acidic 25. Crystal structure is based on ____ internal atomic arrangement. a) irregular b) regular c) random d) curvilinear 26. Pyrite and marcasite are both _______, but their arrangement of atoms differs. a) iron sulfide b) lead sulfide c) copper silfide d) silver sulfide 27. The carbon atoms in ______ are arranged into sheets which can slide easily past each other, while the carbon atoms in diamond form a strong, interlocking three-dimensional network. a) sapphire b) graphite c) aluminum d) carbonate 28. TGCFAOQTCD a) Crystal habit b) Hardness scale c) Luster scale 29. Dull to metallic, submetallic, adamantine, vitreous, pearly, resinous, or silky. a) Crystal habit b) Hardness scale c) Luster scale d) Heft scale 30. The color of the powder a mineral leaves after rubbing it on unglazed porcelain. a) color b) streak c) lustre d) iridescense 31. Describes the way a mineral may split apart along various planes. a) fracture b) streak c) lustre d) cleavage 32. In modern physics, the position of electrons about a nucleus are defined in terms of: a) probabilities b) circles c) ellipses d) chromodomes 33. The symbol H+ suggests a: a) hydrogen atom b) hydrogen isotope c) hydrogen cation d) hydrogen anion 34. The tabulated atomic mass of natural carbon is not exactly 12 because carbon in nature always has multiple ________ present. a) electrons b) isotopes c) quarks d) protons 35. This type of bonding due to delocalized electrons leads to malleability, ductility, and high melting points: a) covalent b) ionic c) van der Waals d) metallic 36. The mineral ___________ is 3 on Mohs Scale whereas the mineral ___________ is 9. a) calcite, corundum b) corundum, calcite c) caliche, calcite d) chalcedony, quartz 37. In hand specimens, geologists identify most minerals based on: a) physical properties b) chemical analyses c) xray diffraction 38. This type of chemical bonding is the weakest but occurs in all substances. a) covalent b) ionic c) metallic d) none of the above 39. Quartz, feldspar, mica, chlorite, kaolin, calcite, epidote, olivine, augite, hornblende, magnetite, hematite, limonite: these minerals are: a) common in rocks b) occasionally found c) rare d) extremely rare 40. Characteristics of a mineral do NOT include: a) naturally occurring b) characteristic chemical formula c) crystalline d) organic e) all of the above 41. The chemical composition of a particular mineral may vary between end members. For example, the common mineral plagioclase feldspar varies from being _______-rich to being _________-rich. a) sodium, calcium b) potassium, sodium c) iron, magnesium d) carbon, oxygen 42. Sharing of electrons typifies the __________ bond whereas electrostatic attraction typifies the _______ bond. a) ionic, covalent b) ionic, triclinic c) covalent, ionic d) triclinic, covalent 43. If number of protons does not equal the number of electrons, the atom is a(n) : a) isotope b) ion c) quark d) simplex e) google 44. Atoms generally consist of: a) electrons b) protons c) neutrons d) all of the above 45. Not counting rare minerals, about how many mineral species are at least occasionally encountered in rocks? a) 20 b) 200 c) 2000 46. Carbon is atomic number 6. Carbon-13 has _______ protons and _______ neutrons. a) thirteen, six b) six, seven c) twelve, twenty-five d) twelve, twelve 47. Which of these particles are not nucleons? a) electrons b) neutrons c) protons 48. A mineral with visibly recognizable crystals is said to have good crystal habit; otherwise the mineral is said to be: a) massive b) granular c) compact d) any of the above 49. In chemical bonding, two atoms become linked by moving or sharing __________. a) neutrons b) protons c) electrons 50. The name of an element is determined by the number of ______ present in the ______ of an atom. a) electrons, nucleus b) neutrons, nucleus c) protons, nucleus d) protons, electron cloud e) neutrons, electron cloud 51. Generally ________ and ____________ bonds are strong whereas the ______________ bond is weak. a) covalent, ionic, van der Waals b) van der Waals, covalent, ionic c) ionic, van der Waals, covalent 52. Which of the following are held together by chemical bonds? a) molecules b) crystals c) diatomic gases 53. An ion with fewer electrons than protons is called an ______ and it carries a _________ electric charge. a) cation, positive b) anion, negative c) cation, negative d) anion, positive 54. Two or more minerals may have the same _________ composition but different _______ structure. These are called polymorphs. a) crystal, chemical b) chemical, crystal 55. Industrial minerals are: a) gem quality b) commercially valuable c) tailings d) worthless 56. All minerals are crystalline. If the crystals are too small to see, they can be detected by: a) x-ray diffraction b) cosmic rays c) sound waves d) odor 57. If two atomes have the same number of protons but different numbers of neutrons, the atoms are _______ of the same _________. a) elements, mineral b) atoms, isotope c) elements, isotope d) isotopes, element 58. Modern physics recognizes that electrons show both particle and ______ behavior. a) wave b) emotional c) thermal d) revolting 59. Sodium and potassium have one ______ electron in their outer shells and are extremely ________. a) valence, stable b) inverted, reactive c) valence, reactive d) contaminated, inactive 60. The luster of _______ would be described as ________. a) glass, vitreous b) diamond, dull c) pyrite, silky d) graphite, resinous 61. The minerals ________ and __________ are polymorphs of carbon. a) diamond, graphite b) calcite, silicate c) bonite, bronzite 62. In the ______ atom based on _______ physics, electrons were restricted to circular orbits of fixed energy levels. a) Bohr , quantum b) Rutherford, classical c) Bohr, classical d) Rutherford, quantum 63. Virtually all elements other than ______ and _______ were formed in stars and supernovae long after the Big Bang. a) hydrogen, helium b) carbon, phosphorus c) carbon, oxygen d) silica, carbon 64. Physicist Werner _________ developed the ___________ principle which means that it is impossible to know exactly the position and momentum of a particle. a) Heisenberg, certainty b) Heisenberg, uncertainty c) Bohr, uncertainty d) Bohr, certainty

Ch 2 Questions that might be on the test. If you cannot answer them, check your class notes or the textbook. 1. A mineral is a naturally occurring substance formed through geological processes that has: a) a characteristic chemical composition, b) a highly ordered atomic structure c) specific physical properties d) all of the above 2. There are currently more than ______ known minerals, according to the International Mineralogical Association, a) 40 b) 400 c) 4000 d) 40 000 3. Some minerals, like quartz, mica or feldspar are: a) rare b) common c) valuable d) priceless 4. Rocks from which minerals are mined for economic purposes are referred to as: a) gangue b) tailings c) ores d) granite 5. Electrons, which have a _____ charge, a size which is so small as to be currently unmeasurable, and which are the least massive of the three types of basic particles. a) positive b) negative c) neutral 6. Both protons and neutrons are themselves now thought to be composed of even more elementary particles called: a) quarks b) quakes c) parsons d) megans 7. In processes which change the number of protons in a nucleus, the atom becomes an atom of a different chemical: a) isotope b) compound c) element d) planet 8. Atoms which have either a deficit or a surplus of electrons are called: a) elements b) isotopes c) ions d) molecules 9. In the Bohr model of the atom, electrons can only orbit the nucleus in particular circular orbits with fixed angular momentum and energy, their distances from the nucleus being proportional to their respective energies. They can only make _____ leaps between the fixed energy levels. a) tiny b) quantum c) gradual 10. It is impossible to simultaneously derive precise values for both the position and momentum of a particle for any given point in time; this became known as the ______ principle. a) Bohr b) Einstein c) uncertainty d) quantum 11. The modern model of the atom describes the positions of electrons in an atom in terms of: a) quantum levels b) orbital paths c) probabilities d) GPS 12. Isotopes of an element have nuclei with the same number of protons (the same atomic number) but different numbers of: a) electrons b) neutrons c) ions d) photons 13. In helium-3 (or 3He), how many protons are present? a) 1 b) 2 c) 3 d) 4 14. In helium-3 (or 3He), how many neutrons are present? a) 1 b) 2 c) 3 d) 4 15. The relative abundance of an isotope is strongly correlated with its tendency toward nuclear _____, short-lived nuclides quickly go away, while their long-lived counterparts endure. a) fission b) fusion c) decay d) bombardment 16. The isotopic composition of elements is different on different planets. a) True b) False 17. As a general rule, the fewer electrons in an atom’s valence shell, the ____ reactive it is. Lithium, sodium, and potassium have one electron in their outer shells. a) more b) less 18. Every atom is much more stable, or less reactive, with a ____ valence shell. a) partly full b) completely full 19. A positively-charged ion, which has fewer electrons than protons, is known as a: a) anion b) cation c) fermion d) bation 20. Bonds vary widely in their strength. Generally covalent and ionic bonds are often described as “strong”, whereas ______ bonds are generally considered to be “weak”. a) van der Waals b) Faradays c) van Neumans 21. This bonding involves sharing of electrons in which the positively charged nuclei of two or more atoms simultaneously attract the negatively charged electrons that are being shared a) ionic b) covalent c) van der Waals d) metallic 22. This bond results from electrostatic attraction between atoms: a) ionic b) covalent c) van der Waals d) metallic 23. A sea of delocalized electrons causes this bonding: a) ionic b) covalent c) van der Waals d) metallic 24. The chemical composition of minerals may vary between end members of a mineral system. For example the ______ feldspars comprise a continuous series from sodiumrich albite to calcium-rich anorthite. a) plagioclase b) orthoclase c) alkaline d) acidic 25. Crystal structure is based on ____ internal atomic arrangement. a) irregular b) regular c) random d) curvilinear 26. Pyrite and marcasite are both _______, but their arrangement of atoms differs. a) iron sulfide b) lead sulfide c) copper silfide d) silver sulfide 27. The carbon atoms in ______ are arranged into sheets which can slide easily past each other, while the carbon atoms in diamond form a strong, interlocking three-dimensional network. a) sapphire b) graphite c) aluminum d) carbonate 28. TGCFAOQTCD a) Crystal habit b) Hardness scale c) Luster scale 29. Dull to metallic, submetallic, adamantine, vitreous, pearly, resinous, or silky. a) Crystal habit b) Hardness scale c) Luster scale d) Heft scale 30. The color of the powder a mineral leaves after rubbing it on unglazed porcelain. a) color b) streak c) lustre d) iridescense 31. Describes the way a mineral may split apart along various planes. a) fracture b) streak c) lustre d) cleavage 32. In modern physics, the position of electrons about a nucleus are defined in terms of: a) probabilities b) circles c) ellipses d) chromodomes 33. The symbol H+ suggests a: a) hydrogen atom b) hydrogen isotope c) hydrogen cation d) hydrogen anion 34. The tabulated atomic mass of natural carbon is not exactly 12 because carbon in nature always has multiple ________ present. a) electrons b) isotopes c) quarks d) protons 35. This type of bonding due to delocalized electrons leads to malleability, ductility, and high melting points: a) covalent b) ionic c) van der Waals d) metallic 36. The mineral ___________ is 3 on Mohs Scale whereas the mineral ___________ is 9. a) calcite, corundum b) corundum, calcite c) caliche, calcite d) chalcedony, quartz 37. In hand specimens, geologists identify most minerals based on: a) physical properties b) chemical analyses c) xray diffraction 38. This type of chemical bonding is the weakest but occurs in all substances. a) covalent b) ionic c) metallic d) none of the above 39. Quartz, feldspar, mica, chlorite, kaolin, calcite, epidote, olivine, augite, hornblende, magnetite, hematite, limonite: these minerals are: a) common in rocks b) occasionally found c) rare d) extremely rare 40. Characteristics of a mineral do NOT include: a) naturally occurring b) characteristic chemical formula c) crystalline d) organic e) all of the above 41. The chemical composition of a particular mineral may vary between end members. For example, the common mineral plagioclase feldspar varies from being _______-rich to being _________-rich. a) sodium, calcium b) potassium, sodium c) iron, magnesium d) carbon, oxygen 42. Sharing of electrons typifies the __________ bond whereas electrostatic attraction typifies the _______ bond. a) ionic, covalent b) ionic, triclinic c) covalent, ionic d) triclinic, covalent 43. If number of protons does not equal the number of electrons, the atom is a(n) : a) isotope b) ion c) quark d) simplex e) google 44. Atoms generally consist of: a) electrons b) protons c) neutrons d) all of the above 45. Not counting rare minerals, about how many mineral species are at least occasionally encountered in rocks? a) 20 b) 200 c) 2000 46. Carbon is atomic number 6. Carbon-13 has _______ protons and _______ neutrons. a) thirteen, six b) six, seven c) twelve, twenty-five d) twelve, twelve 47. Which of these particles are not nucleons? a) electrons b) neutrons c) protons 48. A mineral with visibly recognizable crystals is said to have good crystal habit; otherwise the mineral is said to be: a) massive b) granular c) compact d) any of the above 49. In chemical bonding, two atoms become linked by moving or sharing __________. a) neutrons b) protons c) electrons 50. The name of an element is determined by the number of ______ present in the ______ of an atom. a) electrons, nucleus b) neutrons, nucleus c) protons, nucleus d) protons, electron cloud e) neutrons, electron cloud 51. Generally ________ and ____________ bonds are strong whereas the ______________ bond is weak. a) covalent, ionic, van der Waals b) van der Waals, covalent, ionic c) ionic, van der Waals, covalent 52. Which of the following are held together by chemical bonds? a) molecules b) crystals c) diatomic gases 53. An ion with fewer electrons than protons is called an ______ and it carries a _________ electric charge. a) cation, positive b) anion, negative c) cation, negative d) anion, positive 54. Two or more minerals may have the same _________ composition but different _______ structure. These are called polymorphs. a) crystal, chemical b) chemical, crystal 55. Industrial minerals are: a) gem quality b) commercially valuable c) tailings d) worthless 56. All minerals are crystalline. If the crystals are too small to see, they can be detected by: a) x-ray diffraction b) cosmic rays c) sound waves d) odor 57. If two atomes have the same number of protons but different numbers of neutrons, the atoms are _______ of the same _________. a) elements, mineral b) atoms, isotope c) elements, isotope d) isotopes, element 58. Modern physics recognizes that electrons show both particle and ______ behavior. a) wave b) emotional c) thermal d) revolting 59. Sodium and potassium have one ______ electron in their outer shells and are extremely ________. a) valence, stable b) inverted, reactive c) valence, reactive d) contaminated, inactive 60. The luster of _______ would be described as ________. a) glass, vitreous b) diamond, dull c) pyrite, silky d) graphite, resinous 61. The minerals ________ and __________ are polymorphs of carbon. a) diamond, graphite b) calcite, silicate c) bonite, bronzite 62. In the ______ atom based on _______ physics, electrons were restricted to circular orbits of fixed energy levels. a) Bohr , quantum b) Rutherford, classical c) Bohr, classical d) Rutherford, quantum 63. Virtually all elements other than ______ and _______ were formed in stars and supernovae long after the Big Bang. a) hydrogen, helium b) carbon, phosphorus c) carbon, oxygen d) silica, carbon 64. Physicist Werner _________ developed the ___________ principle which means that it is impossible to know exactly the position and momentum of a particle. a) Heisenberg, certainty b) Heisenberg, uncertainty c) Bohr, uncertainty d) Bohr, certainty

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According to the text, what are possible selves? our various levels on each of the Big Five personality traits the ways in which our identity shifts from childhood to adulthood the various social roles we hold the images we construct of the other ways we might be

According to the text, what are possible selves? our various levels on each of the Big Five personality traits the ways in which our identity shifts from childhood to adulthood the various social roles we hold the images we construct of the other ways we might be

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Question 2 0 / 1 point The formation of our solar system began when electrons settled into orbit around hydrogen nuclei water condensed into an icy body a shock wave from a nearby exploding star started a cloud of dust and gas spinning all matter and energy exploded from a tiny singularity in the big bang

Question 2 0 / 1 point The formation of our solar system began when electrons settled into orbit around hydrogen nuclei water condensed into an icy body a shock wave from a nearby exploding star started a cloud of dust and gas spinning all matter and energy exploded from a tiny singularity in the big bang

According to the text, what was the main controversy in personality psychology that became a major contributor to the new edition of the DSM? how to define personality disorders whether or not to include the big five traits how to classify multi-personality disorder how long the DSM should be

According to the text, what was the main controversy in personality psychology that became a major contributor to the new edition of the DSM? how to define personality disorders whether or not to include the big five traits how to classify multi-personality disorder how long the DSM should be

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CS 180 Term Project 10% of course grade Due midnight on Dec 8, 2015 The purpose of this project is to implement a general purpose big integer library that can handle common arithmetic operations for big integers. 1. The class should be named WKUBigInt 2. You should support the following (public) methods: a. constructors: WKUBigInt(int value) and WKUBigInt(String value) b. add(WKUBigInt another) c. sub(WKUBigInt another) d. mult(WKUBigInt another) e. toString(), which will return the String representation f. div(WKUBigInt another) for integer divisions g. mod(WKUBigInt another) div and mod are for those students who would like to have more challenges and are not required. Internally, you should use a long array to represent the value of a big integer. Each element in the array is used to represent a chunk of the integer. To make the project more manageable, you are required to have a detailed description on how to implement each method. The descriptions of the methods should be part of the final report. Even though the final report is due at the end, it is expected that you will complete these descriptions before you implement your idea. The final report should have the following sections: 1. Description of each method. The description should be detailed enough to show HOW the implementation can be done.. 2. Discuss what type of testing you have done to ensure the correctness of your implementation. 3. Have a table to count the number of arithmetic operations that are needed for each operation using input data set from the instructor. This also implies additional requirements in your implementation. Submit your source code and a final report in a word document before the due date.

CS 180 Term Project 10% of course grade Due midnight on Dec 8, 2015 The purpose of this project is to implement a general purpose big integer library that can handle common arithmetic operations for big integers. 1. The class should be named WKUBigInt 2. You should support the following (public) methods: a. constructors: WKUBigInt(int value) and WKUBigInt(String value) b. add(WKUBigInt another) c. sub(WKUBigInt another) d. mult(WKUBigInt another) e. toString(), which will return the String representation f. div(WKUBigInt another) for integer divisions g. mod(WKUBigInt another) div and mod are for those students who would like to have more challenges and are not required. Internally, you should use a long array to represent the value of a big integer. Each element in the array is used to represent a chunk of the integer. To make the project more manageable, you are required to have a detailed description on how to implement each method. The descriptions of the methods should be part of the final report. Even though the final report is due at the end, it is expected that you will complete these descriptions before you implement your idea. The final report should have the following sections: 1. Description of each method. The description should be detailed enough to show HOW the implementation can be done.. 2. Discuss what type of testing you have done to ensure the correctness of your implementation. 3. Have a table to count the number of arithmetic operations that are needed for each operation using input data set from the instructor. This also implies additional requirements in your implementation. Submit your source code and a final report in a word document before the due date.

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Speech of Introduction Example Outline I. Introduction A. Acknowledge Audience: Good morning/afternoon alumni, faculty, students and friends of Troy University. B. Acknowledge Occasion: Welcome to Troy University’s WWII Symposium C. Attention getter: (title, accomplishment, quote, joke, adjectives, etc.) I’m proud to introduce a man who is fondly referred to as the “Walking Encyclopedia of Film” D. Thesis: I’d like to introduce the fascinating Dr. Jim Vickrey E. Preview: We’ll examine his multi-dimensional career and his love of the big screen. (Note: Preview and main points in the body should match in number and sequence.) II. Body A. Career 1. Previous Chair of the Department of Speech & Theatre- Troy 2. Current Professor of Communication Studies- Troy/Montgomery 3. Lawyer 4. Mediator 5. Radio Commentator 6. Speaker & Writer Transition: (Statement to smoothly move you from point to point). Now that we’ve discussed his multi-dimensional career, let’s his love of the big screen. ***B. Film 1. Number of films- over 5,000 2. Radio talk show a. Film reviewer b. Film critic Note: One of your main points should make your speaker credible to talk about his/her topic. Dr. Vickrey is credible to talk about WWII films, because he has his own radio talk show where he critiques and reviews film. Do not make your person credible by stating that they are majoring in the topic or taking classes. They could be straight “F” students for all we know. Use experience, awards, honors, etc. to build credibility. III. Conclusion A. Cue: In conclusion . . . B. Review: Now that you have some idea of the multi-talents and multi-career interests of our distinguished speaker. C. Welcome/Topic: Please help me welcome Dr. Jim Vickrey addressing American Film & WWII.

Speech of Introduction Example Outline I. Introduction A. Acknowledge Audience: Good morning/afternoon alumni, faculty, students and friends of Troy University. B. Acknowledge Occasion: Welcome to Troy University’s WWII Symposium C. Attention getter: (title, accomplishment, quote, joke, adjectives, etc.) I’m proud to introduce a man who is fondly referred to as the “Walking Encyclopedia of Film” D. Thesis: I’d like to introduce the fascinating Dr. Jim Vickrey E. Preview: We’ll examine his multi-dimensional career and his love of the big screen. (Note: Preview and main points in the body should match in number and sequence.) II. Body A. Career 1. Previous Chair of the Department of Speech & Theatre- Troy 2. Current Professor of Communication Studies- Troy/Montgomery 3. Lawyer 4. Mediator 5. Radio Commentator 6. Speaker & Writer Transition: (Statement to smoothly move you from point to point). Now that we’ve discussed his multi-dimensional career, let’s his love of the big screen. ***B. Film 1. Number of films- over 5,000 2. Radio talk show a. Film reviewer b. Film critic Note: One of your main points should make your speaker credible to talk about his/her topic. Dr. Vickrey is credible to talk about WWII films, because he has his own radio talk show where he critiques and reviews film. Do not make your person credible by stating that they are majoring in the topic or taking classes. They could be straight “F” students for all we know. Use experience, awards, honors, etc. to build credibility. III. Conclusion A. Cue: In conclusion . . . B. Review: Now that you have some idea of the multi-talents and multi-career interests of our distinguished speaker. C. Welcome/Topic: Please help me welcome Dr. Jim Vickrey addressing American Film & WWII.

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For this assignment, you will compose a letter designed to recruit students to join and support the agenda of one of three nonexistent student organizations that, were they to exist, would likely be very unpopular. The student organization for which you will be recruiting is determined by your last name: The first letter of your last name is… Your student organization assignment is… A – F The SETS Collective: SETS (Skip the Elevator, Take the Stairs) is dedicated to energy conservation on campus, particularly by eliminating elevator usage by pedestrians in any buildings on the UT-Austin campus. G – N O – Z Your recruiting letter must include eight (8) different persuasive strategies. Each strategy must be used in the service of encouraging students to join the organization and/or endorse its cause. In addition to your recruiting letter, you will also submit a commentary describing the different strategies you used in the recruiting letter. In this course, we utilize the TurnItIn tool. This service helps educators prevent plagiarism by detecting unoriginal content in student papers. In addition to acting as a plagiarism deterrent, it also has features designed to aid in educating students about plagiarism and importance of proper attribution of any borrowed content. For more information, please visit http://turnitin.com/. Below are a series of requirements for the paper assignment. Failure to satisfy these requirements will result in substantial point penalties. Also, failure to abide by the academic honesty policy described in the syllabus and maintained by the CMS department, the Moody College of Communication, and/or The University of Texas will result in a grade of F on the assignment and referral to the Dean of Students. Assignment Requirements • You must portray yourself as a recruiting officer (or Secretary of Recruitment) – not the President, VP, etc. – of the organization described in your letter. As a recruiting officer, you are not authorized to offer any rewards or bribes (gifts in the form of sports tickets, free meals, etc.) to people as an incentive to join the organization, nor are you allowed to make up fictional incentives (e.g., OBC students will enjoy an opportunity to participate in international conferences). Your letter should focus exclusively on the merits of joining the organization based on commitment to its cause. • Assume that organization has just been formed – i.e., do not portray it as having existed prior to the Spring of 2017. • You may also assume that there are currently only three members of the organization, the president, vice-president, and yourself (the Secretary of Recruitment). You CANNOT claim that there are “many members.” • You must use the following format for the recruiting letter AND the commentary: 12-point Times New Roman font, single-spaced (NOT double-spaced) on 8.5 X 11-inch white paper with 1-inch margins on all sides. • The recruiting letter must be no shorter than 2 nor longer than 3 pages; the commentary must be no longer than 2 pages. • Your recruiting letter must include only 8 (eight) DIFFERENT strategies discussed in the lectures and/or readings. You may use any principle/theory we have discussed EXCEPT for balance theory (which is too obvious) or deception (which isn’t persuasion per se). • Your commentary must identify the name OR what you did for of each strategy (e.g., Door In Face or Foot In The Door) used in your letter and describe the specific purpose(s) the strategy was used to achieve. At a minimum, your description of each strategy should consist of at least two complete sentences (16 sentences total). • Each strategy explanation in your commentary should be bulleted or numbered for easy identification • You may not lie under any circumstances. Lies include falsifications and/or distortions of the truth about the student organization (e.g., SURF is endorsed by the Fellowship of Christian Athletes). Also, you may not offer recruits bribes in any form (tickets, discounts, free food, cash, etc.) as an incentive for joining the organization. • Your completed assignment (recruiting letter + commentary) must be turned in on April 13th (a Thursday) at or before 9:30 a.m. Grading Rubric We will use the following rubric to evaluate and grade your letter + commentary. Assignment Component Possible Points Obtained Points Format, Spelling, Grammar, Coherence Are the letter and commentary written in the proper format? Do they consist of grammatical, coherent English sentences? Has the assignment been spell-checked? 4 Strategy 1 Example/Commentary Is the example an acceptable instance of the strategy? Is it different from the other strategies used? Is the strategy correctly identified and adequately explained in the commentary? 2 Strategy 2 Example/Commentary 2 Strategy 3 Example/Commentary 2 Strategy 4 Example/Commentary 2 Strategy 5 Example/Commentary 2 Strategy 6 Example/ Commentary 2 Strategy 7 Example/ Commentary 2 Strategy 8 Example/ Commentary 2 Lies/Deception/Bribes (-3 pts per instance) -3 (per instance) Total Score 20 Cannot use strategy of Balance Theory, Lie Write a persuasive essay and a commentary Commentary is about 8 strategies in letter • 8 bullets separate from the letter “foot-in-the-door” – “door-in-the-face” (rejection then retreat) o 1. Make a large (but reasonable) request to target  World you lend me $50? o 2. After request is rejected, make a smaller request  Well then, could you lend me $10? o Creating a “big” favor out of thin air! “low-balling” • An advantage is offered that induces a favorable purchase decision. Then, sometime after the decision has been made, but before the bargain is sealed, the original purchase buyer is deftly removed. 1.) Loss framing: Loss aversion 2.) Restriction: scarcity 3.) Positive self-feeling: Principle commitment 4.) Identification: Social Proof 5.) “Using Rhymes” is what you would write instead of Stroop effect: Fluency 6.) Virtual ownership: Endowment effect 7.) That’s not all: reciprocity 8.) Flattery: Likability 9.) Expertise strategy: Authority principle 10.) Inducing dissonance reduction: Norm of consistency 11.) Conformity concession: social proof 12.) Association similarity: Liking & Association principle Strategies – Use 8 (Cannot use Balance Theory or deception) Strategy Principle Sources/Notes Door in the Face Reciprocity 9/16 lecture Foot in the Door Consistency Norm 9/30 lecture That’s not all Reciprocity 9/16 lecture Flattery Likability Could someone give an example for Flattery?! I’m a little stuck… “Providing a statistic” Social Proof? why is this yellow? What principle is this? How did you use this as a strategy?? plz help AUTHORITY it depends how you use it ID-ing yourself as a student Likability <in cialdini chapter 5 they are talked about as 2 different things, so if you can argue it your way,Cialdini can support it what is the strategy for this? Perceptual Contrast What is this for? Low-Balling Might be considered lying. Soft-Sell Humor appeal did anyone use this?? Anyone??? What principle is this? Hard-sell ???????? Seek-and-Hide Fear Appeal ???? What principle does this fall under???? Pump and Dump social proof 10/9 lecture Bait-and-switch this kind of seems like deception, can we use it? Moral Appeal Commitment Rebecca’s Lecture 10/2 Voluntary instead of Mandatory Consistency Norm 9/30 lecture herd mentality social proof 10/14 lecture Loss framing Loss Aversion Endowment Effect this is a principle FYI Mere ownership Scarcity Dissonance Reduction Positive/negative self feelings Commitment to gain compliance Rebecca’s Lecture Principles Name STRATEGIES/Ideas Source/Notes Reciprocity That’s not all! Likability/Association Flattery, agreeing with said person, state similar social standings, “work with” them, show evidence of “good things” likeability/association ppt Consistency/Commitment Foot in the door, positive self-feelings, moral appeal, Social Proof/Conformity norm works when someone is uncertain about the right thing to do, and when the person they are watching is similar to them. Provide target with “evidence” that compliance is a common/frequent response among desired social group “we made other people happy, we’ll make you happy too” Priming the pump (tip jar example) Pump and dump (Scam, could be considered deception) Conformity and social proff ppt Authority Wearing a uniform, Titles, books, diplomas, awards, success, using a spokesperson, Scarcity/Supply and demand “Only a certain number of students allowed in” “only for college students” “Exclusive except to X” “Only a certain number of seats” Scarcity ppt Psychological Reactance Restricting access, censoring something, implying scarcity, Scarcity ppt Attractiveness Similarity Mentioning you are a student Perceptual Contrast Loss aversion gain or loss framing Scarcity ppt Balance Theory We aren’t allowed to use this Judgement Heuristic Price = product quality Use of long unfamilar words = intelligence fluency = trustworthinesss Fluency ppt Availability Heuristic Can you think of one example (out of ten) (for us) vs Can you think of then for the competitor - here’s our ten. Fluency ppt

For this assignment, you will compose a letter designed to recruit students to join and support the agenda of one of three nonexistent student organizations that, were they to exist, would likely be very unpopular. The student organization for which you will be recruiting is determined by your last name: The first letter of your last name is… Your student organization assignment is… A – F The SETS Collective: SETS (Skip the Elevator, Take the Stairs) is dedicated to energy conservation on campus, particularly by eliminating elevator usage by pedestrians in any buildings on the UT-Austin campus. G – N O – Z Your recruiting letter must include eight (8) different persuasive strategies. Each strategy must be used in the service of encouraging students to join the organization and/or endorse its cause. In addition to your recruiting letter, you will also submit a commentary describing the different strategies you used in the recruiting letter. In this course, we utilize the TurnItIn tool. This service helps educators prevent plagiarism by detecting unoriginal content in student papers. In addition to acting as a plagiarism deterrent, it also has features designed to aid in educating students about plagiarism and importance of proper attribution of any borrowed content. For more information, please visit http://turnitin.com/. Below are a series of requirements for the paper assignment. Failure to satisfy these requirements will result in substantial point penalties. Also, failure to abide by the academic honesty policy described in the syllabus and maintained by the CMS department, the Moody College of Communication, and/or The University of Texas will result in a grade of F on the assignment and referral to the Dean of Students. Assignment Requirements • You must portray yourself as a recruiting officer (or Secretary of Recruitment) – not the President, VP, etc. – of the organization described in your letter. As a recruiting officer, you are not authorized to offer any rewards or bribes (gifts in the form of sports tickets, free meals, etc.) to people as an incentive to join the organization, nor are you allowed to make up fictional incentives (e.g., OBC students will enjoy an opportunity to participate in international conferences). Your letter should focus exclusively on the merits of joining the organization based on commitment to its cause. • Assume that organization has just been formed – i.e., do not portray it as having existed prior to the Spring of 2017. • You may also assume that there are currently only three members of the organization, the president, vice-president, and yourself (the Secretary of Recruitment). You CANNOT claim that there are “many members.” • You must use the following format for the recruiting letter AND the commentary: 12-point Times New Roman font, single-spaced (NOT double-spaced) on 8.5 X 11-inch white paper with 1-inch margins on all sides. • The recruiting letter must be no shorter than 2 nor longer than 3 pages; the commentary must be no longer than 2 pages. • Your recruiting letter must include only 8 (eight) DIFFERENT strategies discussed in the lectures and/or readings. You may use any principle/theory we have discussed EXCEPT for balance theory (which is too obvious) or deception (which isn’t persuasion per se). • Your commentary must identify the name OR what you did for of each strategy (e.g., Door In Face or Foot In The Door) used in your letter and describe the specific purpose(s) the strategy was used to achieve. At a minimum, your description of each strategy should consist of at least two complete sentences (16 sentences total). • Each strategy explanation in your commentary should be bulleted or numbered for easy identification • You may not lie under any circumstances. Lies include falsifications and/or distortions of the truth about the student organization (e.g., SURF is endorsed by the Fellowship of Christian Athletes). Also, you may not offer recruits bribes in any form (tickets, discounts, free food, cash, etc.) as an incentive for joining the organization. • Your completed assignment (recruiting letter + commentary) must be turned in on April 13th (a Thursday) at or before 9:30 a.m. Grading Rubric We will use the following rubric to evaluate and grade your letter + commentary. Assignment Component Possible Points Obtained Points Format, Spelling, Grammar, Coherence Are the letter and commentary written in the proper format? Do they consist of grammatical, coherent English sentences? Has the assignment been spell-checked? 4 Strategy 1 Example/Commentary Is the example an acceptable instance of the strategy? Is it different from the other strategies used? Is the strategy correctly identified and adequately explained in the commentary? 2 Strategy 2 Example/Commentary 2 Strategy 3 Example/Commentary 2 Strategy 4 Example/Commentary 2 Strategy 5 Example/Commentary 2 Strategy 6 Example/ Commentary 2 Strategy 7 Example/ Commentary 2 Strategy 8 Example/ Commentary 2 Lies/Deception/Bribes (-3 pts per instance) -3 (per instance) Total Score 20 Cannot use strategy of Balance Theory, Lie Write a persuasive essay and a commentary Commentary is about 8 strategies in letter • 8 bullets separate from the letter “foot-in-the-door” – “door-in-the-face” (rejection then retreat) o 1. Make a large (but reasonable) request to target  World you lend me $50? o 2. After request is rejected, make a smaller request  Well then, could you lend me $10? o Creating a “big” favor out of thin air! “low-balling” • An advantage is offered that induces a favorable purchase decision. Then, sometime after the decision has been made, but before the bargain is sealed, the original purchase buyer is deftly removed. 1.) Loss framing: Loss aversion 2.) Restriction: scarcity 3.) Positive self-feeling: Principle commitment 4.) Identification: Social Proof 5.) “Using Rhymes” is what you would write instead of Stroop effect: Fluency 6.) Virtual ownership: Endowment effect 7.) That’s not all: reciprocity 8.) Flattery: Likability 9.) Expertise strategy: Authority principle 10.) Inducing dissonance reduction: Norm of consistency 11.) Conformity concession: social proof 12.) Association similarity: Liking & Association principle Strategies – Use 8 (Cannot use Balance Theory or deception) Strategy Principle Sources/Notes Door in the Face Reciprocity 9/16 lecture Foot in the Door Consistency Norm 9/30 lecture That’s not all Reciprocity 9/16 lecture Flattery Likability Could someone give an example for Flattery?! I’m a little stuck… “Providing a statistic” Social Proof? why is this yellow? What principle is this? How did you use this as a strategy?? plz help AUTHORITY it depends how you use it ID-ing yourself as a student Likability

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English 1 Professor Nielsen Essay One Topic and Guidelines The Context You are a non-profit organization Director of Fundraising, and your goal is to convince a wealthy individual to make a substantial donation to your cause. Choose from one of the following projects derived from the social issues from the course readings below: 1. The Prison Project: Reducing the incarceration rate and numbers in the U.S. 2. Birth Control Advocacy and Access: Supporting a birth control education and free product distribution in the U.S and/or internationally. 3. LGBT Advocacy: Funding education, campaigning, and lobbying for LGBT rights in the U.S. 4. Equality in Education: Supporting funding and scholarships for schools and individuals from less advantaged populations. 5. Migrant Welfare and Protection: Creating safe housing, food, and education for refugees. 6. Something else related to social justice?????? (See me if you have your own project idea). (animal welfare, women’s advocacy, housing, student loans and tuition affordability, etc.) Make a case for a donation of $2 million dollars to your cause by writing a funding request letter to the potential donor. This request is essentially a persuasive essay designed to convince your reader to support your cause. Below is a suggested format for organizing your letter, as well as guidelines for your work. I. The Basics Due: Tuesday, September 29, at Start of Class (Rough Draft). And Tuesday, October 6, at Start of Class (Final Draft) Length: 3-4 Pgs., double spaced in the correct format (see sample paper format template at the end of this document for format.) Font: Times New Roman, 12PT. Margins: 1 inch all around. See sample format at the end of this document for further formatting information. You are required to submit using this format. Check the sample on page five of this document carefully. Editing: Be sure to use the proofreading guide. In particular, avoid the big five errors. Revising: Read over your draft carefully several times. We will work toward revision together in class, but you will also need to revise on your own. Visit the Learning center if you need extra support. II. Organization and Content (Sample Outline Follows.) Use an organized format for your essay. The best way to ensure strong organization is to map out a plan for the content of your essay, using an outline, clustering, or other graphic representation of your key ideas. One potential format follows. Sample Method of Organizing Your Funding Letter: A. The Opening Paragraph 1. Start with some brief striking details to provide the initial background to your letter: facts, figures, brief description of one aspect of the problem- something compelling. 2. End your paragraph with a statement that briefly announces/introduces your organization without yet going into detail about your mission. State that you are requesting a donation and that your letter will describe the need for this donation. (Your Thesis) B. Body of the Letter: The Problem Make a stronger case for the problem your organization seeks to address by describing several aspects of it, using examples and details, as well as quotes from relevant class readings (be sure to cite these correctly). C. Body of the Letter: What Your Organization Will Do Describe some points of actions your group will take and ways that you will spend donor funds to address aspects of the problem you have already described. Choose three to five specific courses of action. Do not make these two extensive. They should be manageable and practical. D. Your Summary and Conclusion: Asking for Money 1. Briefly restate the problem and your organization’s goals using new wording when possible. 2. Connect the funds you need to your organization’s goals 3. Make your request for money. 4. End with a final compelling statement of why the donor should give. III. Strategies and Guidelines 1. Use the writing process steps to help you through your letter. 2. Use the proofreading guide to help you edit and the Learning Center on campus for support. 5. Cite all quotes with the author and page number. Create a works cited page at the end of your essay for the works you discuss. (See the MLA guide and sample student essays in your textbook for examples and step-by-step help with MLA. You may also pick up a guide at the campus writing center and ask them for extra help.) 6. This is NOT a research essay. Most background information should come from common knowledge, your own prior knowledge and experience, and the readings from class/the text. However, you may choose to include up one additional research source if necessary, provided this is a reliable source that you can cite correctly. Please visit OWL at Purdue University for a complete MLA citation guide. You text also has a chapter on MLA citation. 7. Follow the correct essay format for font, spacing, margins, heading, etc. (SEE sample in this document.) IV. Formatting: You are required to format your essay in the way that follows to receive full credit. • Page number in upper right-hand corner (Use “Insert” and “Pg. #”) • Times New Roman 12 Pt. font • Heading in left corner with title, student name, essay 1 (or 2, etc.), Eng 2, and date • Heading is single spaced • Skip two lines to start typing body of text • Body of text is double spaced • Margins remain at 1 inch all around. • DO NOT skip lines between paragraphs • Indent each paragraph five lines • Use MLA format for citation Continue to the next page for format sample. Title of Your Campaign Project (Choose something compelling.) Student Name Essay 1 English 1 Date Dear _______, Start typing your essay here, two lines down from heading. The body of your essay is double spaced, but the heading is only single spaced. Note the page number in the upper right-hand corner. Note the exact content of the heading. There is no title page for short essays, nor is there a title across the top. For short essays of just a few pages, this format is standard. The title goes at the top of the heading. All words in the title are capitalized except pronouns, prepositions, and articles. Do not make your margins greater that one inch. Make sure you use Times New Roman 12 Point font. Do not include graphics or images of any kind in most essays for this class (see me if you think you have an exception). When you reach the end of your paragraph, just hit return and continue typing. Do not skip lines between your paragraphs or over-indent your paragraphs; indent only five lines as marked in the ruler. Do not attempt to write less for your essay by enlarging the font, margins, or spacing. This paragraph demonstrates a good length for an introduction. You next paragraph should start here. This is the way your essay should look. You may use this template to help you format your essay by saving it to your desktop and keeping the settings. You will, of course, have two to three pages when you finish, but this is what the first page would look like roughly. If you include a quote, be sure to cite the author and page number and to include a works cited page at the end of your essay.

English 1 Professor Nielsen Essay One Topic and Guidelines The Context You are a non-profit organization Director of Fundraising, and your goal is to convince a wealthy individual to make a substantial donation to your cause. Choose from one of the following projects derived from the social issues from the course readings below: 1. The Prison Project: Reducing the incarceration rate and numbers in the U.S. 2. Birth Control Advocacy and Access: Supporting a birth control education and free product distribution in the U.S and/or internationally. 3. LGBT Advocacy: Funding education, campaigning, and lobbying for LGBT rights in the U.S. 4. Equality in Education: Supporting funding and scholarships for schools and individuals from less advantaged populations. 5. Migrant Welfare and Protection: Creating safe housing, food, and education for refugees. 6. Something else related to social justice?????? (See me if you have your own project idea). (animal welfare, women’s advocacy, housing, student loans and tuition affordability, etc.) Make a case for a donation of $2 million dollars to your cause by writing a funding request letter to the potential donor. This request is essentially a persuasive essay designed to convince your reader to support your cause. Below is a suggested format for organizing your letter, as well as guidelines for your work. I. The Basics Due: Tuesday, September 29, at Start of Class (Rough Draft). And Tuesday, October 6, at Start of Class (Final Draft) Length: 3-4 Pgs., double spaced in the correct format (see sample paper format template at the end of this document for format.) Font: Times New Roman, 12PT. Margins: 1 inch all around. See sample format at the end of this document for further formatting information. You are required to submit using this format. Check the sample on page five of this document carefully. Editing: Be sure to use the proofreading guide. In particular, avoid the big five errors. Revising: Read over your draft carefully several times. We will work toward revision together in class, but you will also need to revise on your own. Visit the Learning center if you need extra support. II. Organization and Content (Sample Outline Follows.) Use an organized format for your essay. The best way to ensure strong organization is to map out a plan for the content of your essay, using an outline, clustering, or other graphic representation of your key ideas. One potential format follows. Sample Method of Organizing Your Funding Letter: A. The Opening Paragraph 1. Start with some brief striking details to provide the initial background to your letter: facts, figures, brief description of one aspect of the problem- something compelling. 2. End your paragraph with a statement that briefly announces/introduces your organization without yet going into detail about your mission. State that you are requesting a donation and that your letter will describe the need for this donation. (Your Thesis) B. Body of the Letter: The Problem Make a stronger case for the problem your organization seeks to address by describing several aspects of it, using examples and details, as well as quotes from relevant class readings (be sure to cite these correctly). C. Body of the Letter: What Your Organization Will Do Describe some points of actions your group will take and ways that you will spend donor funds to address aspects of the problem you have already described. Choose three to five specific courses of action. Do not make these two extensive. They should be manageable and practical. D. Your Summary and Conclusion: Asking for Money 1. Briefly restate the problem and your organization’s goals using new wording when possible. 2. Connect the funds you need to your organization’s goals 3. Make your request for money. 4. End with a final compelling statement of why the donor should give. III. Strategies and Guidelines 1. Use the writing process steps to help you through your letter. 2. Use the proofreading guide to help you edit and the Learning Center on campus for support. 5. Cite all quotes with the author and page number. Create a works cited page at the end of your essay for the works you discuss. (See the MLA guide and sample student essays in your textbook for examples and step-by-step help with MLA. You may also pick up a guide at the campus writing center and ask them for extra help.) 6. This is NOT a research essay. Most background information should come from common knowledge, your own prior knowledge and experience, and the readings from class/the text. However, you may choose to include up one additional research source if necessary, provided this is a reliable source that you can cite correctly. Please visit OWL at Purdue University for a complete MLA citation guide. You text also has a chapter on MLA citation. 7. Follow the correct essay format for font, spacing, margins, heading, etc. (SEE sample in this document.) IV. Formatting: You are required to format your essay in the way that follows to receive full credit. • Page number in upper right-hand corner (Use “Insert” and “Pg. #”) • Times New Roman 12 Pt. font • Heading in left corner with title, student name, essay 1 (or 2, etc.), Eng 2, and date • Heading is single spaced • Skip two lines to start typing body of text • Body of text is double spaced • Margins remain at 1 inch all around. • DO NOT skip lines between paragraphs • Indent each paragraph five lines • Use MLA format for citation Continue to the next page for format sample. Title of Your Campaign Project (Choose something compelling.) Student Name Essay 1 English 1 Date Dear _______, Start typing your essay here, two lines down from heading. The body of your essay is double spaced, but the heading is only single spaced. Note the page number in the upper right-hand corner. Note the exact content of the heading. There is no title page for short essays, nor is there a title across the top. For short essays of just a few pages, this format is standard. The title goes at the top of the heading. All words in the title are capitalized except pronouns, prepositions, and articles. Do not make your margins greater that one inch. Make sure you use Times New Roman 12 Point font. Do not include graphics or images of any kind in most essays for this class (see me if you think you have an exception). When you reach the end of your paragraph, just hit return and continue typing. Do not skip lines between your paragraphs or over-indent your paragraphs; indent only five lines as marked in the ruler. Do not attempt to write less for your essay by enlarging the font, margins, or spacing. This paragraph demonstrates a good length for an introduction. You next paragraph should start here. This is the way your essay should look. You may use this template to help you format your essay by saving it to your desktop and keeping the settings. You will, of course, have two to three pages when you finish, but this is what the first page would look like roughly. If you include a quote, be sure to cite the author and page number and to include a works cited page at the end of your essay.

Researchers recently investigated whether or not coffee prevented the development of high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) in laboratory mice. The mice used in this experiment have a mutation that makes them become diabetic. Read about this research study in this article published on the Science Daily web-site New Evidence That Drinking Coffee May Reduce the Risk of Diabetes as well as the following summary: A group of 11 mice was given water, and another group of 10 mice was supplied with diluted black coffee (coffee:water 1:1) as drinking fluids for five weeks. The composition of the diets and living conditions were similar for both groups of mice. Blood glucose was monitored weekly for all mice. After five weeks, there was no change in average body weight between groups. Results indicated that blood glucose concentrations increased significantly in the mice that drank water compared with those that were supplied with coffee. Finally, blood glucose concentration in the coffee group exhibited a 30 percent decrease compared with that in the water group. In the original paper, the investigators acknowledged that the coffee for the experiment was supplied as a gift from a corporation. Then answer the following questions in your own words: 1. Identify and describe the steps of the scientific method. Which observations do you think the scientists made leading up to this research study? Given your understanding of the experimental design, formulate a specific hypothesis that is being tested in this experiment. Describe the experimental design including control and treatment group(s), and dependent and independent variables. Summarize the results and the conclusion (50 points) 2. Criticize the research described. Things to consider: Were the test subjects and treatments relevant and appropriate? Was the sample size large enough? Were the methods used appropriate? Can you think of a potential bias in a research study like this? What are the limitations of the conclusions made in this research study? Address at least two of these questions in your critique of the research study (20 points). 3. Discuss the relevance of this type of research, both for the world in general and for you personally (20 points). 4. Write answers in your own words with proper grammar and spelling (10 points)

Researchers recently investigated whether or not coffee prevented the development of high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) in laboratory mice. The mice used in this experiment have a mutation that makes them become diabetic. Read about this research study in this article published on the Science Daily web-site New Evidence That Drinking Coffee May Reduce the Risk of Diabetes as well as the following summary: A group of 11 mice was given water, and another group of 10 mice was supplied with diluted black coffee (coffee:water 1:1) as drinking fluids for five weeks. The composition of the diets and living conditions were similar for both groups of mice. Blood glucose was monitored weekly for all mice. After five weeks, there was no change in average body weight between groups. Results indicated that blood glucose concentrations increased significantly in the mice that drank water compared with those that were supplied with coffee. Finally, blood glucose concentration in the coffee group exhibited a 30 percent decrease compared with that in the water group. In the original paper, the investigators acknowledged that the coffee for the experiment was supplied as a gift from a corporation. Then answer the following questions in your own words: 1. Identify and describe the steps of the scientific method. Which observations do you think the scientists made leading up to this research study? Given your understanding of the experimental design, formulate a specific hypothesis that is being tested in this experiment. Describe the experimental design including control and treatment group(s), and dependent and independent variables. Summarize the results and the conclusion (50 points) 2. Criticize the research described. Things to consider: Were the test subjects and treatments relevant and appropriate? Was the sample size large enough? Were the methods used appropriate? Can you think of a potential bias in a research study like this? What are the limitations of the conclusions made in this research study? Address at least two of these questions in your critique of the research study (20 points). 3. Discuss the relevance of this type of research, both for the world in general and for you personally (20 points). 4. Write answers in your own words with proper grammar and spelling (10 points)

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