Define: 41 Things Philosophy is: 1. Ignorant 2. Selfish 3. Ironic 4. Plain 5. Misunderstood 6. A failure 7. Poor 8. Unscientific 9. Unteachable 10. Foolish 11. Abnormal 12. Divine trickery 13. Egalitarian 14. A divine calling 15. Laborious 16. Countercultural 17. Uncomfortable 18. Virtuous 19. Dangerous 20. Simplistic<br />21. Polemical 22. Therapeutic 23. “conformist” 24. Embarrassi ng 25. Invulnerable 26. Annoying 27. Pneumatic 28. Apolitic al 29. Docile/teachable 30. Messianic 31. Pious 32. Impract ical 33. Happy 34. Necessary 35. Death-defying 36. Fallible 37. Immortal 38. Confident 39. Painful 40. agnostic</br

Define: 41 Things Philosophy is: 1. Ignorant 2. Selfish 3. Ironic 4. Plain 5. Misunderstood 6. A failure 7. Poor 8. Unscientific 9. Unteachable 10. Foolish 11. Abnormal 12. Divine trickery 13. Egalitarian 14. A divine calling 15. Laborious 16. Countercultural 17. Uncomfortable 18. Virtuous 19. Dangerous 20. Simplistic
21. Polemical 22. Therapeutic 23. “conformist” 24. Embarrassi ng 25. Invulnerable 26. Annoying 27. Pneumatic 28. Apolitic al 29. Docile/teachable 30. Messianic 31. Pious 32. Impract ical 33. Happy 34. Necessary 35. Death-defying 36. Fallible 37. Immortal 38. Confident 39. Painful 40. agnostic

Ignorant- A person is said to be ignorant if he … Read More...
The human body converts internal chemical energy into work and heat at rates of 60 to 125W (called the basal metabolic rate). This energy comes from food and is usually measured in kilocalories [1 kcal = 4.186 kJ]. (Note that the nutritional ‘Calorie’ listed on packaged food actually equals 1 kilocalorie). How many kilocalories of food energy does a person with a metoblic rate of 103.0 W require per day? Enter the numerical answer without units.

The human body converts internal chemical energy into work and heat at rates of 60 to 125W (called the basal metabolic rate). This energy comes from food and is usually measured in kilocalories [1 kcal = 4.186 kJ]. (Note that the nutritional ‘Calorie’ listed on packaged food actually equals 1 kilocalorie). How many kilocalories of food energy does a person with a metoblic rate of 103.0 W require per day? Enter the numerical answer without units.

The human body converts internal chemical energy into work and … Read More...
Which of the following is true regarding a woman’s body cells? Question 2 options: Women have one X and one Y chromosome. Women have two Z chromosomes. Women have two Y chromosomes. Women have two X chromosomes.

Which of the following is true regarding a woman’s body cells? Question 2 options: Women have one X and one Y chromosome. Women have two Z chromosomes. Women have two Y chromosomes. Women have two X chromosomes.

Which of the following is true regarding a woman’s body … Read More...
The plate in figure is uniform and weigh 300 Ib. It is supported in a horizontal position by a hinge in the middle of CD and by a cable at point B. a) Draw a complete free body diagram for the plate . b) Determine the tension in the cable .

The plate in figure is uniform and weigh 300 Ib. It is supported in a horizontal position by a hinge in the middle of CD and by a cable at point B. a) Draw a complete free body diagram for the plate . b) Determine the tension in the cable .

 
The 300 kg mass, m, is supported at point C by cables CA and CB. A 200 N force, F, is also applied to the supporting hook at point C. The direction of F is given in the figure. The coordinates of points A, B, and C are also shown. . For all answers, use the x,y coordinate system shown. a. Draw the fiee body diagram (FBD) of the supporting hook at C. This FBD must I be a new figure; do not do it on top of the figure shown, (10 points). b. Write the cable force vector, Tcq, in Cartesian vector form, where the magnitude of the force vector is left as a variable (10 points). c. Write the cable force vector TCB, in Cartesian vector form, where the magnitude of the force vector is left as a variable (1 0 points). d. Determine the unit vector, ec~f,io m point C to B (10 points). e. Using the vector dot product, calculate the angle, a, between the two cables (1 0 points). f. Write (but do not solve) the two equations needed to calculate the tensions in the

The 300 kg mass, m, is supported at point C by cables CA and CB. A 200 N force, F, is also applied to the supporting hook at point C. The direction of F is given in the figure. The coordinates of points A, B, and C are also shown. . For all answers, use the x,y coordinate system shown. a. Draw the fiee body diagram (FBD) of the supporting hook at C. This FBD must I be a new figure; do not do it on top of the figure shown, (10 points). b. Write the cable force vector, Tcq, in Cartesian vector form, where the magnitude of the force vector is left as a variable (10 points). c. Write the cable force vector TCB, in Cartesian vector form, where the magnitude of the force vector is left as a variable (1 0 points). d. Determine the unit vector, ec~f,io m point C to B (10 points). e. Using the vector dot product, calculate the angle, a, between the two cables (1 0 points). f. Write (but do not solve) the two equations needed to calculate the tensions in the

 
Extra Credit Due: 11:59pm on Thursday, May 15, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy A Man Running to Catch a Bus A man is running at speed (much less than the speed of light) to catch a bus already at a stop. At , when he is a distance from the door to the bus, the bus starts moving with the positive acceleration . Use a coordinate system with at the door of the stopped bus. Part A What is , the position of the man as a function of time? Answer symbolically in terms of the variables , , and . Hint 1. Which equation should you use for the man’s speed? Because the man’s speed is constant, you may use . ANSWER: c t = 0 b a x = 0 xman(t) b c t x(t) = x(0) + vt xman(t) = −b + ct Correct Part B What is , the position of the bus as a function of time? Answer symbolically in terms of and . Hint 1. Which equation should you use for the bus’s acceleration? Because the bus has constant acceleration, you may use . Recall that . ANSWER: Correct Part C What condition is necessary for the man to catch the bus? Assume he catches it at time . Hint 1. How to approach this problem If the man is to catch the bus, then at some moment in time , the man must arrive at the position of the door of the bus. How would you express this condition mathematically? ANSWER: xbus(t) a t x(t) = x(0) + v(0)t + (1/2)at2 vbus(0) = 0 xbus = 1 a 2 t2 tcatch tcatch Typesetting math: 15% Correct Part D Inserting the formulas you found for and into the condition , you obtain the following: , or . Intuitively, the man will not catch the bus unless he is running fast enough. In mathematical terms, there is a constraint on the man’s speed so that the equation above gives a solution for that is a real positive number. Find , the minimum value of for which the man will catch the bus. Express the minimum value for the man’s speed in terms of and . Hint 1. Consider the discriminant Use the quadratic equation to solve: . What is the discriminant (the part under the radical) of the solution for ? xman(tcatch) > xbus(tcatch) xman(tcatch) = xbus(tcatch) xman(tcatch) < xbus(tcatch) c = a  tcatch xman(t) xbus(t) xman(tcatch) = xbus(tcatch) −b+ct = a catch 1 2 t2 catch 1 a −c +b = 0 2 t2 catch tcatch c tcatch cmin c a b 1 a − c + b = 0 2 t2 catch tcatch tcatch Typesetting math: 15% Hint 1. The quadratic formula Recall: If then ANSWER: Hint 2. What is the constraint? To get a real value for , the discriminant must be greater then or equal to zero. This condition yields a constraint that exceed . ANSWER: Correct Part E Assume that the man misses getting aboard when he first meets up with the bus. Does he get a second chance if he continues to run at the constant speed ? Hint 1. What is the general quadratic equation? The general quadratic equation is , where , \texttip{B}{B}, and \texttip{C}{C} are constants. Depending on the value of the discriminant, \Delta = c^2-2ab, the equation may have Ax2 + Bx + C = 0 x = −B±B2−4AC 2A  = cc − 2ab tcatch c cmin cmin = (2ab) −−−−  c > cmin Ax2 + Bx + C = 0 A Typesetting math: 15% two real valued solutions 1. if \Delta > 0, 2. one real valued solution if \Delta = 0, or 3. two complex valued solutions if \Delta < 0. In this case, every real valued solution corresponds to a time at which the man is at the same position as the door of the bus. ANSWER: Correct Adding and Subtracting Vectors Conceptual Question Six vectors (A to F) have the magnitudes and directions indicated in the figure. Part A No; there is no chance he is going to get aboard. Yes; he will get a second chance Typesetting math: 15% Which two vectors, when added, will have the largest (positive) x component? Hint 1. Largest x component The two vectors with the largest x components will, when combined, give the resultant with the largest x component. Keep in mind that positive x components are larger than negative x components. ANSWER: Correct Part B Which two vectors, when added, will have the largest (positive) y component? Hint 1. Largest y component The two vectors with the largest y components will, when combined, give the resultant with the largest y component. Keep in mind that positive y components are larger than negative y components. ANSWER: C and E E and F A and F C and D B and D Typesetting math: 15% Correct Part C Which two vectors, when subtracted (i.e., when one vector is subtracted from the other), will have the largest magnitude? Hint 1. Subtracting vectors To subtract two vectors, add a vector with the same magnitude but opposite direction of one of the vectors to the other vector. ANSWER: Correct Tactics Box 3.1 Determining the Components of a Vector Learning Goal: C and D A and F E and F A and B E and D A and F A and E D and B C and D E and F Typesetting math: 15% To practice Tactics Box 3.1 Determining the Components of a Vector. When a vector \texttip{\vec{A}}{A_vec} is decomposed into component vectors \texttip{\vec{A}_{\mit x}}{A_vec_x} and \texttip{\vec{A}_{\mit y}}{A_vec_y} parallel to the coordinate axes, we can describe each component vector with a single number (a scalar) called the component. This tactics box describes how to determine the x component and y component of vector \texttip{\vec{A}}{A_vec}, denoted \texttip{A_{\mit x}}{A_x} and \texttip{A_{\mit y}}{A_y}. TACTICS BOX 3.1 Determining the components of a vector The absolute value |A_x| of the x component \texttip{A_{\mit x}}{A_x} is the magnitude of the component vector \texttip{\vec{A}_{\1. mit x}}{A_vec_x}. The sign of \texttip{A_{\mit x}}{A_x} is positive if \texttip{\vec{A}_{\mit x}}{A_vec_x} points in the positive x direction; it is negative if \texttip{\vec{A}_{\mit x}}{A_vec_x} points in the negative x direction. 2. 3. The y component \texttip{A_{\mit y}}{A_y} is determined similarly. Part A What is the magnitude of the component vector \texttip{\vec{A}_{\mit x}}{A_vec_x} shown in the figure? Express your answer in meters to one significant figure. ANSWER: Correct |A_x| = 5 \rm m Typesetting math: 15% Part B What is the sign of the y component \texttip{A_{\mit y}}{A_y} of vector \texttip{\vec{A}}{A_vec} shown in the figure? ANSWER: Correct Part C Now, combine the information given in the tactics box above to find the x and y components, \texttip{B_{\mit x}}{B_x} and \texttip{B_{\mit y}}{B_y}, of vector \texttip{\vec{B}}{B_vec} shown in the figure. Express your answers, separated by a comma, in meters to one significant figure. positive negative Typesetting math: 15% ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Problem about Projectile Motion Learning Goal: To understand projectile motion by considering horizontal constant velocity motion and vertical constant acceleration motion independently. Projectile motion refers to the motion of unpowered objects (called projectiles) such as balls or stones moving near the surface of the earth under the influence of the earth's gravity alone. In this analysis we assume that air resistance can be neglected. An object undergoing projectile motion near the surface of the earth obeys the following rules: An object undergoing projectile motion travels horizontally at a constant rate. That is, the x component of its velocity, \texttip{v_{\mit x}}{1. v_x}, is constant. An object undergoing projectile motion moves vertically with a constant downward acceleration whose magnitude, denoted by \texttip{g}{g}, is equal to 9.80 \rm{m/s^2} near the surface of the earth. Hence, the y component of its velocity, \texttip{v_{\mit y}}{v_y}, changes continuously. 2. An object undergoing projectile motion will undergo the horizontal and vertical motions described above from the instant it is launched until the instant it strikes the ground again. Even though the horizontal and vertical motions can be treated independently, they are related by the fact that they occur for exactly the same amount of time, namely the time \texttip{t}{t} the projectile is in the air. 3. The figure shows the trajectory (i.e., the path) of a ball undergoing projectile motion over level ground. The time t_0 = 0\;\rm{s} corresponds to the moment just after the ball is launched from position x_0 = 0\;\rm{m} and y_0 = 0\;\rm{m}. Its launch velocity, also called the initial velocity, is \texttip{\vec{v}_{\rm 0}}{v_vec_0}. Two other points along the trajectory are indicated in the figure. One is the moment the ball reaches the peak of its trajectory, at time \texttip{t_{\rm 1}}{t_1} with velocity \texttip{\vec{v}_{\rm 1}}{v_1_vec}. Its position at this moment is denoted by (x_1, y_1) or (x_1, y_{\max}) since it is at its maximum \texttip{B_{\mit x}}{B_x}, \texttip{B_{\mit y}}{B_y} = -2,-5 \rm m, \rm m Typesetting math: 15% The other point, at time \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} with velocity \texttip{\vec{v}_{\rm 2}}{v_2_vec}, corresponds to the moment just before the ball strikes the ground on the way back down. At this time its position is (x_2, y_2), also known as (x_{\max}, y_2) since it is at its maximum horizontal range. Projectile motion is symmetric about the peak, provided the object lands at the same vertical height from which is was launched, as is the case here. Hence y_2 = y_0 = 0\;\rm{m}. Part A How do the speeds \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0}, \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1}, and \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} (at times \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0}, \texttip{t_{\rm 1}}{t_1}, and \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2}) compare? ANSWER: Correct Here \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} equals \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} by symmetry and both exceed \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1}. This is because \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} and \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} include vertical speed as well as the constant horizontal speed. Consider a diagram of the ball at time \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0}. Recall that \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0} refers to the instant just after the ball has been launched, so it is still at ground level (x_0 = y_0= 0\;\rm{m}). However, it is already moving with initial velocity \texttip{\vec{v}_{\rm 0}}{v_0_vec}, whose magnitude is v_0 = 30.0\;{\rm m/s} and direction is \theta = 60.0\;{\rm degrees} counterclockwise from the positive x direction. \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} = \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1} = \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} > 0 \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} = \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} > \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1} = 0 \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} = \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} > \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1} > 0 \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} > \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1} > \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} > 0 \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} > \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} > \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1} = 0 Typesetting math: 15% Part B What are the values of the intial velocity vector components \texttip{v_{0,x}}{v_0, x} and \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y} (both in \rm{m/s}) as well as the acceleration vector components \texttip{a_{0,x}}{a_0, x} and \texttip{a_{0,y}}{a_0, y} (both in \rm{m/s^2})? Here the subscript 0 means “at time \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0}.” Hint 1. Determining components of a vector that is aligned with an axis If a vector points along a single axis direction, such as in the positive x direction, its x component will be its full magnitude, whereas its y component will be zero since the vector is perpendicular to the y direction. If the vector points in the negative x direction, its x component will be the negative of its full magnitude. Hint 2. Calculating the components of the initial velocity Notice that the vector \texttip{\vec{v}_{\rm 0}}{v_0_vec} points up and to the right. Since “up” is the positive y axis direction and “to the right” is the positive x axis direction, \texttip{v_{0,x}}{v_0, x} and \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y} will both be positive. As shown in the figure, \texttip{v_{0,x}}{v_0, x}, \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y}, and \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} are three sides of a right triangle, one angle of which is \texttip{\theta }{theta}. Thus \texttip{v_{0,x}}{v_0, x} and \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y} can be found using the definition of the sine and cosine functions given below. Recall that v_0 = 30.0\;\rm{m/s} and \theta = 60.0\;\rm{degrees} and note that \large{\sin(\theta) = \frac{\rm{length\;of\;opposite\;side}}{\rm{length\;of\;hypotenuse}}} \large{= \frac{v_{0, y}}{v_0}}, \large{\cos(\theta) = \frac{\rm{length\;of\;adjacent\;side}}{\rm{length\;of\;hypotenuse}}} \large{= \frac{v_{0, x}}{v_0}.} What are the values of \texttip{v_{0,x}}{v_0, x} and \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y}? Enter your answers numerically in meters per second separated by a comma. ANSWER: ANSWER: 15.0,26.0 \rm{m/s} Typesetting math: 15% Correct Also notice that at time \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2}, just before the ball lands, its velocity components are v_{2, x} = 15\;\rm{m/s} (the same as always) and v_{2, y} = – 26.0\;\rm{m/s} (the same size but opposite sign from \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y} by symmetry). The acceleration at time \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} will have components (0, -9.80 \rm{m/s^2}), exactly the same as at \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0}, as required by Rule 2. The peak of the trajectory occurs at time \texttip{t_{\rm 1}}{t_1}. This is the point where the ball reaches its maximum height \texttip{y_{\rm max}}{y_max}. At the peak the ball switches from moving up to moving down, even as it continues to travel horizontally at a constant rate. Part C What are the values of the velocity vector components \texttip{v_{1,x}}{v_1, x} and \texttip{v_{1,y}}{v_1, y} (both in \rm{m/s}) as well as the acceleration vector components \texttip{a_{1,x}}{a_1, x} and \texttip{a_{1,y}}{a_1, y} (both in \rm{m/s^2})? Here the subscript 1 means that these are all at time \texttip{t_{\rm 1}}{t_1}. ANSWER: 30.0, 0, 0, 0 0, 30.0, 0, 0 15.0, 26.0, 0, 0 30.0, 0, 0, -9.80 0, 30.0, 0, -9.80 15.0, 26.0, 0, -9.80 15.0, 26.0, 0, +9.80 Typesetting math: 15% Correct At the peak of its trajectory the ball continues traveling horizontally at a constant rate. However, at this moment it stops moving up and is about to move back down. This constitutes a downward-directed change in velocity, so the ball is accelerating downward even at the peak. The flight time refers to the total amount of time the ball is in the air, from just after it is launched (\texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0}) until just before it lands (\texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2}). Hence the flight time can be calculated as t_2 – t_0, or just \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} in this particular situation since t_0 = 0. Because the ball lands at the same height from which it was launched, by symmetry it spends half its flight time traveling up to the peak and the other half traveling back down. The flight time is determined by the initial vertical component of the velocity and by the acceleration. The flight time does not depend on whether the object is moving horizontally while it is in the air. Part D If a second ball were dropped from rest from height \texttip{y_{\rm max}}{y_max}, how long would it take to reach the ground? Ignore air resistance. Check all that apply. Hint 1. Kicking a ball of cliff; a related problem Consider two balls, one of which is dropped from rest off the edge of a cliff at the same moment that the other is kicked horizontally off the edge of the cliff. Which ball reaches the level ground at the base of the cliff first? Ignore air resistance. Hint 1. Comparing position, velocity, and acceleration of the two balls Both balls start at the same height and have the same initial y velocity (v_{0,y} = 0) as well as the same acceleration (\vec a = g downward). They differ only in their x velocity (one is 0, 0, 0, 0 0, 0, 0, -9.80 15.0, 0, 0, 0 15.0, 0, 0, -9.80 0, 26.0, 0, 0 0, 26.0, 0, -9.80 15.0, 26.0, 0, 0 15.0, 26.0, 0, -9.80 Typesetting math: 15% zero, the other nonzero). This difference will affect their x motion but not their y motion. ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct In projectile motion over level ground, it takes an object just as long to rise from the ground to the peak as it takes for it to fall from the peak back to the ground. The range \texttip{R}{R} of the ball refers to how far it moves horizontally, from just after it is launched until just before it lands. Range is defined as x_2 – x_0, or just \texttip{x_{\rm 2}}{x_2} in this particular situation since x_0 = 0. Range can be calculated as the product of the flight time \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} and the x component of the velocity \texttip{v_{\mit x}}{v_x} (which is the same at all times, so v_x = v_{0,x}). The value of \texttip{v_{\mit x}}{v_x} can be found from the launch speed \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} and the launch angle \texttip{\theta }{theta} using trigonometric functions, as was done in Part B. The flight time is related to the initial y component of the velocity, which may also be found from \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} and \texttip{\theta }{theta} using trig functions. The following equations may be useful in solving projectile motion problems, but these equations apply only to a projectile launched over level ground from position (x_0 = y_0 = 0) at time t_0 = 0 with initial speed \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} and launch angle \texttip{\theta }{theta} measured from the horizontal. As was the case above, \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} refers to the flight time and \texttip{R}{R} refers to the range of the projectile. flight time: \large{t_2 = \frac{2 v_{0, y}}{g} = \frac{2 v_0 \sin(\theta)}{g}} range: \large{R = v_x t_2 = \frac{v_0^2 \sin(2\theta)}{g}} The ball that falls straight down strikes the ground first. The ball that was kicked so it moves horizontally as it falls strikes the ground first. Both balls strike the ground at the same time. \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0} t_1 – t_0 \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} t_2 – t_1 \large{\frac{t_2 – t_0}{2}} Typesetting math: 15% In general, a high launch angle yields a long flight time but a small horizontal speed and hence little range. A low launch angle gives a larger horizontal speed, but less flight time in which to accumulate range. The launch angle that achieves the maximum range for projectile motion over level ground is 45 degrees. Part E Which of the following changes would increase the range of the ball shown in the original figure? Check all that apply. ANSWER: Correct A solid understanding of the concepts of projectile motion will take you far, including giving you additional insight into the solution of projectile motion problems numerically. Even when the object does not land at the same height from which is was launched, the rules given in the introduction will still be useful. Recall that air resistance is assumed to be negligible here, so this projectile motion analysis may not be the best choice for describing things like frisbees or feathers, whose motion is strongly influenced by air. The value of the gravitational free-fall acceleration \texttip{g}{g} is also assumed to be constant, which may not be appropriate for objects that move vertically through distances of hundreds of kilometers, like rockets or missiles. However, for problems that involve relatively dense projectiles moving close to the surface of the earth, these assumptions are reasonable. A World-Class Sprinter World-class sprinters can accelerate out of the starting blocks with an acceleration that is nearly horizontal and has magnitude 15 \;{\rm m}/{\rm s}^{2}. Part A How much horizontal force \texttip{F}{F} must a sprinter of mass 64{\rm kg} exert on the starting blocks to produce this acceleration? Express your answer in newtons using two significant figures. Increase \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} above 30 \rm{m/s}. Reduce \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} below 30 \rm{m/s}. Reduce \texttip{\theta }{theta} from 60 \rm{degrees} to 45 \rm{degrees}. Reduce \texttip{\theta }{theta} from 60 \rm{degrees} to less than 30 \rm{degrees}. Increase \texttip{\theta }{theta} from 60 \rm{degrees} up toward 90 \rm{degrees}. Typesetting math: 15% Hint 1. Newton’s 2nd law of motion According to Newton’s 2nd law of motion, if a net external force \texttip{F_{\rm net}}{F_net} acts on a body, the body accelerates, and the net force is equal to the mass \texttip{m}{m} of the body times the acceleration \texttip{a}{a} of the body: F_{\rm net} = ma. ANSWER: Co

Extra Credit Due: 11:59pm on Thursday, May 15, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy A Man Running to Catch a Bus A man is running at speed (much less than the speed of light) to catch a bus already at a stop. At , when he is a distance from the door to the bus, the bus starts moving with the positive acceleration . Use a coordinate system with at the door of the stopped bus. Part A What is , the position of the man as a function of time? Answer symbolically in terms of the variables , , and . Hint 1. Which equation should you use for the man’s speed? Because the man’s speed is constant, you may use . ANSWER: c t = 0 b a x = 0 xman(t) b c t x(t) = x(0) + vt xman(t) = −b + ct Correct Part B What is , the position of the bus as a function of time? Answer symbolically in terms of and . Hint 1. Which equation should you use for the bus’s acceleration? Because the bus has constant acceleration, you may use . Recall that . ANSWER: Correct Part C What condition is necessary for the man to catch the bus? Assume he catches it at time . Hint 1. How to approach this problem If the man is to catch the bus, then at some moment in time , the man must arrive at the position of the door of the bus. How would you express this condition mathematically? ANSWER: xbus(t) a t x(t) = x(0) + v(0)t + (1/2)at2 vbus(0) = 0 xbus = 1 a 2 t2 tcatch tcatch Typesetting math: 15% Correct Part D Inserting the formulas you found for and into the condition , you obtain the following: , or . Intuitively, the man will not catch the bus unless he is running fast enough. In mathematical terms, there is a constraint on the man’s speed so that the equation above gives a solution for that is a real positive number. Find , the minimum value of for which the man will catch the bus. Express the minimum value for the man’s speed in terms of and . Hint 1. Consider the discriminant Use the quadratic equation to solve: . What is the discriminant (the part under the radical) of the solution for ? xman(tcatch) > xbus(tcatch) xman(tcatch) = xbus(tcatch) xman(tcatch) < xbus(tcatch) c = a  tcatch xman(t) xbus(t) xman(tcatch) = xbus(tcatch) −b+ct = a catch 1 2 t2 catch 1 a −c +b = 0 2 t2 catch tcatch c tcatch cmin c a b 1 a − c + b = 0 2 t2 catch tcatch tcatch Typesetting math: 15% Hint 1. The quadratic formula Recall: If then ANSWER: Hint 2. What is the constraint? To get a real value for , the discriminant must be greater then or equal to zero. This condition yields a constraint that exceed . ANSWER: Correct Part E Assume that the man misses getting aboard when he first meets up with the bus. Does he get a second chance if he continues to run at the constant speed ? Hint 1. What is the general quadratic equation? The general quadratic equation is , where , \texttip{B}{B}, and \texttip{C}{C} are constants. Depending on the value of the discriminant, \Delta = c^2-2ab, the equation may have Ax2 + Bx + C = 0 x = −B±B2−4AC 2A  = cc − 2ab tcatch c cmin cmin = (2ab) −−−−  c > cmin Ax2 + Bx + C = 0 A Typesetting math: 15% two real valued solutions 1. if \Delta > 0, 2. one real valued solution if \Delta = 0, or 3. two complex valued solutions if \Delta < 0. In this case, every real valued solution corresponds to a time at which the man is at the same position as the door of the bus. ANSWER: Correct Adding and Subtracting Vectors Conceptual Question Six vectors (A to F) have the magnitudes and directions indicated in the figure. Part A No; there is no chance he is going to get aboard. Yes; he will get a second chance Typesetting math: 15% Which two vectors, when added, will have the largest (positive) x component? Hint 1. Largest x component The two vectors with the largest x components will, when combined, give the resultant with the largest x component. Keep in mind that positive x components are larger than negative x components. ANSWER: Correct Part B Which two vectors, when added, will have the largest (positive) y component? Hint 1. Largest y component The two vectors with the largest y components will, when combined, give the resultant with the largest y component. Keep in mind that positive y components are larger than negative y components. ANSWER: C and E E and F A and F C and D B and D Typesetting math: 15% Correct Part C Which two vectors, when subtracted (i.e., when one vector is subtracted from the other), will have the largest magnitude? Hint 1. Subtracting vectors To subtract two vectors, add a vector with the same magnitude but opposite direction of one of the vectors to the other vector. ANSWER: Correct Tactics Box 3.1 Determining the Components of a Vector Learning Goal: C and D A and F E and F A and B E and D A and F A and E D and B C and D E and F Typesetting math: 15% To practice Tactics Box 3.1 Determining the Components of a Vector. When a vector \texttip{\vec{A}}{A_vec} is decomposed into component vectors \texttip{\vec{A}_{\mit x}}{A_vec_x} and \texttip{\vec{A}_{\mit y}}{A_vec_y} parallel to the coordinate axes, we can describe each component vector with a single number (a scalar) called the component. This tactics box describes how to determine the x component and y component of vector \texttip{\vec{A}}{A_vec}, denoted \texttip{A_{\mit x}}{A_x} and \texttip{A_{\mit y}}{A_y}. TACTICS BOX 3.1 Determining the components of a vector The absolute value |A_x| of the x component \texttip{A_{\mit x}}{A_x} is the magnitude of the component vector \texttip{\vec{A}_{\1. mit x}}{A_vec_x}. The sign of \texttip{A_{\mit x}}{A_x} is positive if \texttip{\vec{A}_{\mit x}}{A_vec_x} points in the positive x direction; it is negative if \texttip{\vec{A}_{\mit x}}{A_vec_x} points in the negative x direction. 2. 3. The y component \texttip{A_{\mit y}}{A_y} is determined similarly. Part A What is the magnitude of the component vector \texttip{\vec{A}_{\mit x}}{A_vec_x} shown in the figure? Express your answer in meters to one significant figure. ANSWER: Correct |A_x| = 5 \rm m Typesetting math: 15% Part B What is the sign of the y component \texttip{A_{\mit y}}{A_y} of vector \texttip{\vec{A}}{A_vec} shown in the figure? ANSWER: Correct Part C Now, combine the information given in the tactics box above to find the x and y components, \texttip{B_{\mit x}}{B_x} and \texttip{B_{\mit y}}{B_y}, of vector \texttip{\vec{B}}{B_vec} shown in the figure. Express your answers, separated by a comma, in meters to one significant figure. positive negative Typesetting math: 15% ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Problem about Projectile Motion Learning Goal: To understand projectile motion by considering horizontal constant velocity motion and vertical constant acceleration motion independently. Projectile motion refers to the motion of unpowered objects (called projectiles) such as balls or stones moving near the surface of the earth under the influence of the earth's gravity alone. In this analysis we assume that air resistance can be neglected. An object undergoing projectile motion near the surface of the earth obeys the following rules: An object undergoing projectile motion travels horizontally at a constant rate. That is, the x component of its velocity, \texttip{v_{\mit x}}{1. v_x}, is constant. An object undergoing projectile motion moves vertically with a constant downward acceleration whose magnitude, denoted by \texttip{g}{g}, is equal to 9.80 \rm{m/s^2} near the surface of the earth. Hence, the y component of its velocity, \texttip{v_{\mit y}}{v_y}, changes continuously. 2. An object undergoing projectile motion will undergo the horizontal and vertical motions described above from the instant it is launched until the instant it strikes the ground again. Even though the horizontal and vertical motions can be treated independently, they are related by the fact that they occur for exactly the same amount of time, namely the time \texttip{t}{t} the projectile is in the air. 3. The figure shows the trajectory (i.e., the path) of a ball undergoing projectile motion over level ground. The time t_0 = 0\;\rm{s} corresponds to the moment just after the ball is launched from position x_0 = 0\;\rm{m} and y_0 = 0\;\rm{m}. Its launch velocity, also called the initial velocity, is \texttip{\vec{v}_{\rm 0}}{v_vec_0}. Two other points along the trajectory are indicated in the figure. One is the moment the ball reaches the peak of its trajectory, at time \texttip{t_{\rm 1}}{t_1} with velocity \texttip{\vec{v}_{\rm 1}}{v_1_vec}. Its position at this moment is denoted by (x_1, y_1) or (x_1, y_{\max}) since it is at its maximum \texttip{B_{\mit x}}{B_x}, \texttip{B_{\mit y}}{B_y} = -2,-5 \rm m, \rm m Typesetting math: 15% The other point, at time \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} with velocity \texttip{\vec{v}_{\rm 2}}{v_2_vec}, corresponds to the moment just before the ball strikes the ground on the way back down. At this time its position is (x_2, y_2), also known as (x_{\max}, y_2) since it is at its maximum horizontal range. Projectile motion is symmetric about the peak, provided the object lands at the same vertical height from which is was launched, as is the case here. Hence y_2 = y_0 = 0\;\rm{m}. Part A How do the speeds \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0}, \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1}, and \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} (at times \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0}, \texttip{t_{\rm 1}}{t_1}, and \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2}) compare? ANSWER: Correct Here \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} equals \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} by symmetry and both exceed \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1}. This is because \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} and \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} include vertical speed as well as the constant horizontal speed. Consider a diagram of the ball at time \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0}. Recall that \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0} refers to the instant just after the ball has been launched, so it is still at ground level (x_0 = y_0= 0\;\rm{m}). However, it is already moving with initial velocity \texttip{\vec{v}_{\rm 0}}{v_0_vec}, whose magnitude is v_0 = 30.0\;{\rm m/s} and direction is \theta = 60.0\;{\rm degrees} counterclockwise from the positive x direction. \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} = \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1} = \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} > 0 \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} = \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} > \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1} = 0 \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} = \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} > \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1} > 0 \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} > \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1} > \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} > 0 \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} > \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} > \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1} = 0 Typesetting math: 15% Part B What are the values of the intial velocity vector components \texttip{v_{0,x}}{v_0, x} and \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y} (both in \rm{m/s}) as well as the acceleration vector components \texttip{a_{0,x}}{a_0, x} and \texttip{a_{0,y}}{a_0, y} (both in \rm{m/s^2})? Here the subscript 0 means “at time \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0}.” Hint 1. Determining components of a vector that is aligned with an axis If a vector points along a single axis direction, such as in the positive x direction, its x component will be its full magnitude, whereas its y component will be zero since the vector is perpendicular to the y direction. If the vector points in the negative x direction, its x component will be the negative of its full magnitude. Hint 2. Calculating the components of the initial velocity Notice that the vector \texttip{\vec{v}_{\rm 0}}{v_0_vec} points up and to the right. Since “up” is the positive y axis direction and “to the right” is the positive x axis direction, \texttip{v_{0,x}}{v_0, x} and \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y} will both be positive. As shown in the figure, \texttip{v_{0,x}}{v_0, x}, \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y}, and \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} are three sides of a right triangle, one angle of which is \texttip{\theta }{theta}. Thus \texttip{v_{0,x}}{v_0, x} and \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y} can be found using the definition of the sine and cosine functions given below. Recall that v_0 = 30.0\;\rm{m/s} and \theta = 60.0\;\rm{degrees} and note that \large{\sin(\theta) = \frac{\rm{length\;of\;opposite\;side}}{\rm{length\;of\;hypotenuse}}} \large{= \frac{v_{0, y}}{v_0}}, \large{\cos(\theta) = \frac{\rm{length\;of\;adjacent\;side}}{\rm{length\;of\;hypotenuse}}} \large{= \frac{v_{0, x}}{v_0}.} What are the values of \texttip{v_{0,x}}{v_0, x} and \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y}? Enter your answers numerically in meters per second separated by a comma. ANSWER: ANSWER: 15.0,26.0 \rm{m/s} Typesetting math: 15% Correct Also notice that at time \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2}, just before the ball lands, its velocity components are v_{2, x} = 15\;\rm{m/s} (the same as always) and v_{2, y} = – 26.0\;\rm{m/s} (the same size but opposite sign from \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y} by symmetry). The acceleration at time \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} will have components (0, -9.80 \rm{m/s^2}), exactly the same as at \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0}, as required by Rule 2. The peak of the trajectory occurs at time \texttip{t_{\rm 1}}{t_1}. This is the point where the ball reaches its maximum height \texttip{y_{\rm max}}{y_max}. At the peak the ball switches from moving up to moving down, even as it continues to travel horizontally at a constant rate. Part C What are the values of the velocity vector components \texttip{v_{1,x}}{v_1, x} and \texttip{v_{1,y}}{v_1, y} (both in \rm{m/s}) as well as the acceleration vector components \texttip{a_{1,x}}{a_1, x} and \texttip{a_{1,y}}{a_1, y} (both in \rm{m/s^2})? Here the subscript 1 means that these are all at time \texttip{t_{\rm 1}}{t_1}. ANSWER: 30.0, 0, 0, 0 0, 30.0, 0, 0 15.0, 26.0, 0, 0 30.0, 0, 0, -9.80 0, 30.0, 0, -9.80 15.0, 26.0, 0, -9.80 15.0, 26.0, 0, +9.80 Typesetting math: 15% Correct At the peak of its trajectory the ball continues traveling horizontally at a constant rate. However, at this moment it stops moving up and is about to move back down. This constitutes a downward-directed change in velocity, so the ball is accelerating downward even at the peak. The flight time refers to the total amount of time the ball is in the air, from just after it is launched (\texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0}) until just before it lands (\texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2}). Hence the flight time can be calculated as t_2 – t_0, or just \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} in this particular situation since t_0 = 0. Because the ball lands at the same height from which it was launched, by symmetry it spends half its flight time traveling up to the peak and the other half traveling back down. The flight time is determined by the initial vertical component of the velocity and by the acceleration. The flight time does not depend on whether the object is moving horizontally while it is in the air. Part D If a second ball were dropped from rest from height \texttip{y_{\rm max}}{y_max}, how long would it take to reach the ground? Ignore air resistance. Check all that apply. Hint 1. Kicking a ball of cliff; a related problem Consider two balls, one of which is dropped from rest off the edge of a cliff at the same moment that the other is kicked horizontally off the edge of the cliff. Which ball reaches the level ground at the base of the cliff first? Ignore air resistance. Hint 1. Comparing position, velocity, and acceleration of the two balls Both balls start at the same height and have the same initial y velocity (v_{0,y} = 0) as well as the same acceleration (\vec a = g downward). They differ only in their x velocity (one is 0, 0, 0, 0 0, 0, 0, -9.80 15.0, 0, 0, 0 15.0, 0, 0, -9.80 0, 26.0, 0, 0 0, 26.0, 0, -9.80 15.0, 26.0, 0, 0 15.0, 26.0, 0, -9.80 Typesetting math: 15% zero, the other nonzero). This difference will affect their x motion but not their y motion. ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct In projectile motion over level ground, it takes an object just as long to rise from the ground to the peak as it takes for it to fall from the peak back to the ground. The range \texttip{R}{R} of the ball refers to how far it moves horizontally, from just after it is launched until just before it lands. Range is defined as x_2 – x_0, or just \texttip{x_{\rm 2}}{x_2} in this particular situation since x_0 = 0. Range can be calculated as the product of the flight time \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} and the x component of the velocity \texttip{v_{\mit x}}{v_x} (which is the same at all times, so v_x = v_{0,x}). The value of \texttip{v_{\mit x}}{v_x} can be found from the launch speed \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} and the launch angle \texttip{\theta }{theta} using trigonometric functions, as was done in Part B. The flight time is related to the initial y component of the velocity, which may also be found from \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} and \texttip{\theta }{theta} using trig functions. The following equations may be useful in solving projectile motion problems, but these equations apply only to a projectile launched over level ground from position (x_0 = y_0 = 0) at time t_0 = 0 with initial speed \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} and launch angle \texttip{\theta }{theta} measured from the horizontal. As was the case above, \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} refers to the flight time and \texttip{R}{R} refers to the range of the projectile. flight time: \large{t_2 = \frac{2 v_{0, y}}{g} = \frac{2 v_0 \sin(\theta)}{g}} range: \large{R = v_x t_2 = \frac{v_0^2 \sin(2\theta)}{g}} The ball that falls straight down strikes the ground first. The ball that was kicked so it moves horizontally as it falls strikes the ground first. Both balls strike the ground at the same time. \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0} t_1 – t_0 \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} t_2 – t_1 \large{\frac{t_2 – t_0}{2}} Typesetting math: 15% In general, a high launch angle yields a long flight time but a small horizontal speed and hence little range. A low launch angle gives a larger horizontal speed, but less flight time in which to accumulate range. The launch angle that achieves the maximum range for projectile motion over level ground is 45 degrees. Part E Which of the following changes would increase the range of the ball shown in the original figure? Check all that apply. ANSWER: Correct A solid understanding of the concepts of projectile motion will take you far, including giving you additional insight into the solution of projectile motion problems numerically. Even when the object does not land at the same height from which is was launched, the rules given in the introduction will still be useful. Recall that air resistance is assumed to be negligible here, so this projectile motion analysis may not be the best choice for describing things like frisbees or feathers, whose motion is strongly influenced by air. The value of the gravitational free-fall acceleration \texttip{g}{g} is also assumed to be constant, which may not be appropriate for objects that move vertically through distances of hundreds of kilometers, like rockets or missiles. However, for problems that involve relatively dense projectiles moving close to the surface of the earth, these assumptions are reasonable. A World-Class Sprinter World-class sprinters can accelerate out of the starting blocks with an acceleration that is nearly horizontal and has magnitude 15 \;{\rm m}/{\rm s}^{2}. Part A How much horizontal force \texttip{F}{F} must a sprinter of mass 64{\rm kg} exert on the starting blocks to produce this acceleration? Express your answer in newtons using two significant figures. Increase \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} above 30 \rm{m/s}. Reduce \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} below 30 \rm{m/s}. Reduce \texttip{\theta }{theta} from 60 \rm{degrees} to 45 \rm{degrees}. Reduce \texttip{\theta }{theta} from 60 \rm{degrees} to less than 30 \rm{degrees}. Increase \texttip{\theta }{theta} from 60 \rm{degrees} up toward 90 \rm{degrees}. Typesetting math: 15% Hint 1. Newton’s 2nd law of motion According to Newton’s 2nd law of motion, if a net external force \texttip{F_{\rm net}}{F_net} acts on a body, the body accelerates, and the net force is equal to the mass \texttip{m}{m} of the body times the acceleration \texttip{a}{a} of the body: F_{\rm net} = ma. ANSWER: Co

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1) Can two different forces, acting through the same point, produce the same torque on an object? Answer: Yes, as long as the component of the force perpendicular to the line joining the axis to the force is the same for both forces. 2) If you stand with your back towards a wall and your heels touching the wall, you cannot lean over to touch your toes. Why? Answer: As you bend over your center of gravity moves forward and eventually is beyond the area of the floor in touch with your feet. This does not happen when you do it away from the wall because part of your body moves back and the center of mass remains over your feet. 3) Two equal forces are applied to a door at the doorknob. The first force is applied perpendicular to the door; the second force is applied at 30° to the plane of the door. Which force exerts the greater torque? A) the first applied perpendicular to the door B) the second applied at an angle C) both exert equal non-zero torques D) both exert zero torques E) Additional information is needed. 4) A heavy boy and a lightweight girl are balanced on a massless seesaw. If they both move forward so that they are one-half their original distance from the pivot point, what will happen to the seesaw? A) It is impossible to say without knowing the masses. B) It is impossible to say without knowing the distances. C) The side the boy is sitting on will tilt downward. D) Nothing, the seesaw will still be balanced. E) The side the girl is sitting on will tilt downward. 5) A figure skater is spinning slowly with arms outstretched. She brings her arms in close to her body and her angular speed increases dramatically. The speed increase is a demonstration of A) conservation of energy: her moment of inertia is decreased, and so her angular speed must increase to conserve energy. B) conservation of angular momentum: her moment of inertia is decreased, and so her angular speed must increase to conserve angular momentum. C) Newton’s second law for rotational motion: she exerts a torque and so her angular speed increases. D) This has nothing to do with mechanics, it is simply a result of her natural ability to perform. 6) A girl weighing 450. N sits on one end of a seesaw that is 3.0 m long and is pivoted 1.3 m from the girl. If the seesaw is just balanced when a boy sits at the opposite end, what is his weight? Neglect the weight of the seesaw. 7) An 82.0 kg painter stands on a long horizontal board 1.55 m from one end. The 15.5 kg board is 5.50 m long. The board is supported at each end. (a) What is the total force provided by both supports? (b) With what force does the support, closest to the painter, push upward? FIGURE 11-4 8) The mobile shown in Figure 11-4 is perfectly balanced. What must be the masses of m1, m2, and m3?

1) Can two different forces, acting through the same point, produce the same torque on an object? Answer: Yes, as long as the component of the force perpendicular to the line joining the axis to the force is the same for both forces. 2) If you stand with your back towards a wall and your heels touching the wall, you cannot lean over to touch your toes. Why? Answer: As you bend over your center of gravity moves forward and eventually is beyond the area of the floor in touch with your feet. This does not happen when you do it away from the wall because part of your body moves back and the center of mass remains over your feet. 3) Two equal forces are applied to a door at the doorknob. The first force is applied perpendicular to the door; the second force is applied at 30° to the plane of the door. Which force exerts the greater torque? A) the first applied perpendicular to the door B) the second applied at an angle C) both exert equal non-zero torques D) both exert zero torques E) Additional information is needed. 4) A heavy boy and a lightweight girl are balanced on a massless seesaw. If they both move forward so that they are one-half their original distance from the pivot point, what will happen to the seesaw? A) It is impossible to say without knowing the masses. B) It is impossible to say without knowing the distances. C) The side the boy is sitting on will tilt downward. D) Nothing, the seesaw will still be balanced. E) The side the girl is sitting on will tilt downward. 5) A figure skater is spinning slowly with arms outstretched. She brings her arms in close to her body and her angular speed increases dramatically. The speed increase is a demonstration of A) conservation of energy: her moment of inertia is decreased, and so her angular speed must increase to conserve energy. B) conservation of angular momentum: her moment of inertia is decreased, and so her angular speed must increase to conserve angular momentum. C) Newton’s second law for rotational motion: she exerts a torque and so her angular speed increases. D) This has nothing to do with mechanics, it is simply a result of her natural ability to perform. 6) A girl weighing 450. N sits on one end of a seesaw that is 3.0 m long and is pivoted 1.3 m from the girl. If the seesaw is just balanced when a boy sits at the opposite end, what is his weight? Neglect the weight of the seesaw. 7) An 82.0 kg painter stands on a long horizontal board 1.55 m from one end. The 15.5 kg board is 5.50 m long. The board is supported at each end. (a) What is the total force provided by both supports? (b) With what force does the support, closest to the painter, push upward? FIGURE 11-4 8) The mobile shown in Figure 11-4 is perfectly balanced. What must be the masses of m1, m2, and m3?

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Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture Spring 2015 Look through popular magazines, and see if you can find advertisements that objectify women in order to sell a product. Alternately, you may use an advertisement on television (but make sure to provide a link to the ad so I can see it!). Study these images then write a paper about objectification that deals with all or some of the following: • What effect(s), if any, do you think the objectification of women’s bodies has on our culture? • Jean Kilbourne states “turning a human being into a thing is almost always the first step toward justifying violence against that person.” What do you think she means by this? Do you agree with her reasoning? Why or why not? • Some people would argue that depicting a woman’s body as an object is a form of art. What is your opinion of this point of view? Explain your reasoning. • Why do you think that women are objectified more often than men are? • How does sexualization and objectification play out differently across racial lines? • Kilbourne explains that the consequences of being objectified are different – and more serious – for women than for men. Do you agree? How is the world different for women than it is for men? How do objectified images of women interact with those in our culture differently from the way images of men do? Why is it important to look at images in the context of the culture? • What is the difference between sexual objectification and sexual subjectification? (Ros Gill ) • How do ads construct violent white masculinity and how does that vision of masculinity hurt both men and women? Throughout your written analysis, be sure to make clear and specific reference to the images you selected, and please submit these images with your paper. Make sure you engage with and reference to at least 4 of the following authors: Kilbourne, Bordo, Hunter & Soto, Rose, Durham, Gill, Katz, Schuchardt, Ono and Buescher. Guidelines:  Keep your content focused on structural, systemic, institutional factors rather than the individual: BE ANALYTICAL NOT ANECDOTAL.  Avoid using the first person or including personal stories/reactions. You must make sure to actively engage with your readings: these essays need to be informed and framed by the theoretical material you have been reading this semester.  Keep within the 4-6 page limit; use 12-point font, double spacing and 1-inch margins.  Use formal writing conventions (introduction/thesis statement, body, conclusion) and correct grammar. Resources may be cited within the text of your paper, i.e. (Walters, 2013).

Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture Spring 2015 Look through popular magazines, and see if you can find advertisements that objectify women in order to sell a product. Alternately, you may use an advertisement on television (but make sure to provide a link to the ad so I can see it!). Study these images then write a paper about objectification that deals with all or some of the following: • What effect(s), if any, do you think the objectification of women’s bodies has on our culture? • Jean Kilbourne states “turning a human being into a thing is almost always the first step toward justifying violence against that person.” What do you think she means by this? Do you agree with her reasoning? Why or why not? • Some people would argue that depicting a woman’s body as an object is a form of art. What is your opinion of this point of view? Explain your reasoning. • Why do you think that women are objectified more often than men are? • How does sexualization and objectification play out differently across racial lines? • Kilbourne explains that the consequences of being objectified are different – and more serious – for women than for men. Do you agree? How is the world different for women than it is for men? How do objectified images of women interact with those in our culture differently from the way images of men do? Why is it important to look at images in the context of the culture? • What is the difference between sexual objectification and sexual subjectification? (Ros Gill ) • How do ads construct violent white masculinity and how does that vision of masculinity hurt both men and women? Throughout your written analysis, be sure to make clear and specific reference to the images you selected, and please submit these images with your paper. Make sure you engage with and reference to at least 4 of the following authors: Kilbourne, Bordo, Hunter & Soto, Rose, Durham, Gill, Katz, Schuchardt, Ono and Buescher. Guidelines:  Keep your content focused on structural, systemic, institutional factors rather than the individual: BE ANALYTICAL NOT ANECDOTAL.  Avoid using the first person or including personal stories/reactions. You must make sure to actively engage with your readings: these essays need to be informed and framed by the theoretical material you have been reading this semester.  Keep within the 4-6 page limit; use 12-point font, double spacing and 1-inch margins.  Use formal writing conventions (introduction/thesis statement, body, conclusion) and correct grammar. Resources may be cited within the text of your paper, i.e. (Walters, 2013).

The objectification of women has been a very controversial topic … Read More...
/The following graphs depict the motion of an object starting from rest and moving without friction. Describe how you would calculate the object’s acceleration, instantaneous speed, and distance at time “p” from each graph (slope, area-under-curve, etc.). 15. An object is launched at an angle of 450 from the ground of a mystery planet. The object hits the ground 20m away after a total flight time of 4.0s. Assume no air resistance. a. What are the initial vertical and horizontal velocities? b. Calculate the acceleration due to gravity. c. Draw graphs to quantitatively represent the vertical and horizontal velocities for the entire 4.0s of flight. Linear Dynamics 1. A block of mass 3 kg, initially at rest, is pulled along a frictionless, horizontal surface with a force shown as a function of time by the graph above. Calculate the acceleration and speed after 2s. Questions 2-4: Two blocks of masses M and m, with M > m, are connected by a light string. The string passes over a frictionless pulley of negligible mass so that the blocks hang vertically like Atwood’s machine. The blocks are then released from rest as shown above. 2. Draw a free-body diagram for each mass. Compare and contrast the tension on each. 3. Compare and contrast the net-force acting on each block. 4. Draw a free-body diagram for the string holding the pulley. Explain whether the force increases, decreases, or remains the same as the blocks accelerate. Questions 5-6: A ball is released from the top of a curved hill as shown above; the hill has sufficient friction so that the ball rolls as it moves down the hill. 5. What can be inferred about the ball’s linear acceleration and speed as the ball goes from the top to the bottom? (Increase, decrease, or remain the same) 6. Draw a free-body diagram for each location in the diagram to compare the weight, normal, and friction forces as it rolls down hill. Questions 7-8: Consider the above block sitting on a smooth tabletop. It is connected by a light string that passes over a frictionless and massless pulley to a pulling force of 30N downward. 7. Use Newton’s 2nd Law to determine what will happen to the net force, mass, and acceleration of the entire system if the pulling force of 30N is replaced with another block weighing 30N. 8. What will happen to the tension on each body?

/The following graphs depict the motion of an object starting from rest and moving without friction. Describe how you would calculate the object’s acceleration, instantaneous speed, and distance at time “p” from each graph (slope, area-under-curve, etc.). 15. An object is launched at an angle of 450 from the ground of a mystery planet. The object hits the ground 20m away after a total flight time of 4.0s. Assume no air resistance. a. What are the initial vertical and horizontal velocities? b. Calculate the acceleration due to gravity. c. Draw graphs to quantitatively represent the vertical and horizontal velocities for the entire 4.0s of flight. Linear Dynamics 1. A block of mass 3 kg, initially at rest, is pulled along a frictionless, horizontal surface with a force shown as a function of time by the graph above. Calculate the acceleration and speed after 2s. Questions 2-4: Two blocks of masses M and m, with M > m, are connected by a light string. The string passes over a frictionless pulley of negligible mass so that the blocks hang vertically like Atwood’s machine. The blocks are then released from rest as shown above. 2. Draw a free-body diagram for each mass. Compare and contrast the tension on each. 3. Compare and contrast the net-force acting on each block. 4. Draw a free-body diagram for the string holding the pulley. Explain whether the force increases, decreases, or remains the same as the blocks accelerate. Questions 5-6: A ball is released from the top of a curved hill as shown above; the hill has sufficient friction so that the ball rolls as it moves down the hill. 5. What can be inferred about the ball’s linear acceleration and speed as the ball goes from the top to the bottom? (Increase, decrease, or remain the same) 6. Draw a free-body diagram for each location in the diagram to compare the weight, normal, and friction forces as it rolls down hill. Questions 7-8: Consider the above block sitting on a smooth tabletop. It is connected by a light string that passes over a frictionless and massless pulley to a pulling force of 30N downward. 7. Use Newton’s 2nd Law to determine what will happen to the net force, mass, and acceleration of the entire system if the pulling force of 30N is replaced with another block weighing 30N. 8. What will happen to the tension on each body?

info@checkyourstudy.com The following graphs depict the motion of an object … Read More...