1. (2 marks total) a. Multiply 109 x 309 b. Divide 1988 by 16 exactly 2. (4 marks total) a. Write 2/11 as a decimal to 2 decimal places b. Calculate 35% of 62 c. Add 103/4 to 92/3 d. Subtract 79.04 from 115.225 giving your answer correct to 2 decimal places 3. Circle the fractions in the list which are equivalent to 0.80 (2 marks) 2/7 32/40 8/10 8/20 8/25 9/24 36/45 40/50 4. Write the numerical value of: 3-3 (2 marks total) 5. Simplify z + 67 = 3z + 33 (1 mark total) 6. Solve to 1 decimal place 3y – 34 = 2y + 89 (1 mark total) 7. Solve the following equations to 2 decimal places (3 marks total) a. 37x + 1 = 35 b. 27 – a = 7.45 c. 3(y + 2) = 14 8. A 7-sided polygon is called a Heptagon. (3 marks total) a. What is the total of a Heptagon’s interior angles? b. If the Heptagon is regular (all angles the same), calculate the size of each interior angle to 2 decimal places. 9. Calculate the size of angle a and angle b. (2 mark total) 10. How many centilitres are there in 1.25 litres? (1 mark total) 11. The diagram below shows a stone carving with a hole on it; determine its volume (not including hole), if its thickness is 8 cm. Give your answer in cm3 to 2 decimal points. Assume π = 3.14 (6 marks total) 12. The diagram below shows a piece of alloy plate with a hole in it made from aluminium, copper and magnesium with a mass ratio of 35:3:2. Calculate the following to 2 decimal places. All measurements are in cm. (7 marks total) a. Using the formula A = 1/2(a+b)h calculate the height of the shape below. b. The volume of the solid part (not including the hole) of the shape below to 3 decimal places if it was 0.25cm thick. c. The mass of each material if the total mass of the plate is 62 kg. 10 cm Hole dia = 3 cm Cross sectional area of solid (not including hole) = 28.935 cm2 8 cm 13. A 66kg boy is running at 3 m/s. Calculate his Kinetic Energy using the formula KE = 1/2mv2 (2 marks total) 14. A rocket has a mass of 2,000 kg. What is its acceleration if the forces of its engines are 50kN? Show working out to receive full marks. (1 marks total) 250,000,000 m/s² 25 m/s² 25,000 m/s² 15. In the diagram below a force of 125N (F1) is applied to a lever 20cm (D1) away from the fulcrum, (4 marks total) Fulcrum (a) How far away in metres would a force of 5N (F2) need to be to balance the load? (b) How much force (F2) would need to be applied 0.7m away to balance the same load (F1)? 16. For the circuit shown in the diagram below, calculate: (3 mark total) a. The total circuit resistance. b. The value of the current I. c. Calculate the voltage of the battery cell if the current was 3amp and the resistors stayed the same. 17. In the diagram of a hydraulic system, the area of piston A is 8cm2 and the area of piston B is 48cm2. (2 mark total) If the Force IN is 16 N, calculate the force OUT. 18. Plot the graph 2y = x3 – 4 using a value range for x from 0 to 3 (3 marks total) 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 -2 Choosing appropriate scale (1 mark) Accurately plotting y values (1 mark) X 0 1 2 3 Y Accurately plotting line of best fit. (1 mark) SPARE PAPER

1. (2 marks total) a. Multiply 109 x 309 b. Divide 1988 by 16 exactly 2. (4 marks total) a. Write 2/11 as a decimal to 2 decimal places b. Calculate 35% of 62 c. Add 103/4 to 92/3 d. Subtract 79.04 from 115.225 giving your answer correct to 2 decimal places 3. Circle the fractions in the list which are equivalent to 0.80 (2 marks) 2/7 32/40 8/10 8/20 8/25 9/24 36/45 40/50 4. Write the numerical value of: 3-3 (2 marks total) 5. Simplify z + 67 = 3z + 33 (1 mark total) 6. Solve to 1 decimal place 3y – 34 = 2y + 89 (1 mark total) 7. Solve the following equations to 2 decimal places (3 marks total) a. 37x + 1 = 35 b. 27 – a = 7.45 c. 3(y + 2) = 14 8. A 7-sided polygon is called a Heptagon. (3 marks total) a. What is the total of a Heptagon’s interior angles? b. If the Heptagon is regular (all angles the same), calculate the size of each interior angle to 2 decimal places. 9. Calculate the size of angle a and angle b. (2 mark total) 10. How many centilitres are there in 1.25 litres? (1 mark total) 11. The diagram below shows a stone carving with a hole on it; determine its volume (not including hole), if its thickness is 8 cm. Give your answer in cm3 to 2 decimal points. Assume π = 3.14 (6 marks total) 12. The diagram below shows a piece of alloy plate with a hole in it made from aluminium, copper and magnesium with a mass ratio of 35:3:2. Calculate the following to 2 decimal places. All measurements are in cm. (7 marks total) a. Using the formula A = 1/2(a+b)h calculate the height of the shape below. b. The volume of the solid part (not including the hole) of the shape below to 3 decimal places if it was 0.25cm thick. c. The mass of each material if the total mass of the plate is 62 kg. 10 cm Hole dia = 3 cm Cross sectional area of solid (not including hole) = 28.935 cm2 8 cm 13. A 66kg boy is running at 3 m/s. Calculate his Kinetic Energy using the formula KE = 1/2mv2 (2 marks total) 14. A rocket has a mass of 2,000 kg. What is its acceleration if the forces of its engines are 50kN? Show working out to receive full marks. (1 marks total) 250,000,000 m/s² 25 m/s² 25,000 m/s² 15. In the diagram below a force of 125N (F1) is applied to a lever 20cm (D1) away from the fulcrum, (4 marks total) Fulcrum (a) How far away in metres would a force of 5N (F2) need to be to balance the load? (b) How much force (F2) would need to be applied 0.7m away to balance the same load (F1)? 16. For the circuit shown in the diagram below, calculate: (3 mark total) a. The total circuit resistance. b. The value of the current I. c. Calculate the voltage of the battery cell if the current was 3amp and the resistors stayed the same. 17. In the diagram of a hydraulic system, the area of piston A is 8cm2 and the area of piston B is 48cm2. (2 mark total) If the Force IN is 16 N, calculate the force OUT. 18. Plot the graph 2y = x3 – 4 using a value range for x from 0 to 3 (3 marks total) 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 -2 Choosing appropriate scale (1 mark) Accurately plotting y values (1 mark) X 0 1 2 3 Y Accurately plotting line of best fit. (1 mark) SPARE PAPER

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Question 1 1. When males reach puberty, _________ increases their muscle mass and skeletal development. A. prolactin B. protein C. androgen D. adipose tissue E. estrogen 3 points Question 2 1. Which of the following is the only 100percent effective method of fertility control and STI protection? A. Abstinence B. Condoms and spermicide together C. Condoms and a hormonal contraceptive together D. Oral contraceptives E. Condoms 3 points Question 3 1. The efficacy rate for implants is less than ________ pregnancy per 100 users per year. A. 1 B. 10 C. 11 D. 17 E. 4 3 points Question 4 1. Over-the-counter medications are ________ A. sold legally without a prescription. B. safe for pregnant women to use. C. sold illegally without a prescription. D. the safest drugs for self-medication purposes. E. harmful even when approved by the pregnant women’s physician. 3 points Question 5 1. The ________ activates the autonomic nervous system and the endocrine system through messages sent via nerves or substances released into the bloodstream. A. cerebral cortex B. pons C. thalamus D. subcortex E. hypothalamus 3 points Question 6 1. Ovulation methods center around ______ A. a female’s basal body temperature. B. a female’s cervical secretions. C. a female tracking her menstrual cycle by using a calendar. D. A and B. E. A and C. 3 points Question 7 1. Emergency contraception ______ A. can be used as a regular contraception method. B. provides protection against STDs. C. is the only method available if unprotected intercourse has occurred when fertility is likely. D. is significantly more effective than other contraceptive methods. E. All of the above 3 points Question 8 1. Although a simultaneous orgasm between sexual partners is an exciting event, it _______ A. is a relatively uncommon event and can actually detract from the coital experience if one is preoccupied by sharing this experience. B. is common and should be a priority as far as coitus is concerned. C. is of no particular importance. D. is immensely overrated. E. None of the above 3 points Question 9 1. Cervical caps are similar to ________, but the cervical cap is smaller. A. IUDs B. diaphragms C. Norplant D. oral contraceptives E. Depo-Provera 3 points Question 10 1. Which of the following increases the risk of having a low-birth-weight baby? A. The mother does not eat well during pregnancy. B. The mother does not take care of herself. C. The mother does not receive comprehensive prenatal care. D. The mother smokes. E. All of the above 3 points Question 11 1. An advantage to using IUDs and IUSs is that they ______ A. remain in place, so planning before sexual intercourse is unnecessary. B. have a high level of effectiveness. C. allow fertility to return immediately after they are removed. D. can remain in place during a woman’s period. E. all of the above 3 points Question 12 1. Contraception is the means of preventing _______ from occurring during sexual intercourse. A. conception B. pain C. infertility D. STDs E. pleasure 3 points Question 13 1. ________ is the contraceptive method of removing the penis from the vagina before ejaculation. A. Abstinence B. Sterilization C. Avoidance D. Withdrawal E. Monogamy 3 points Question 14 1. Compared to men, women employed full time __________ A. spend fewer hours on household tasks. B. work more hours in the workplace. C. work a proportionate number of hours on household tasks. D. spend more hours on household tasks. E. work fewer hours in the workplace. 3 points Question 15 1. At ________, the female central nervous system (CNS) is typically more advanced than the male CNS. A. birth B. conception C. adolescence D. adulthood E. puberty 3 points Question 16 1. Females sometimes experience a sexual response cycle similar to that of males, EXCEPT A. when they are menstruating. B. they can have multiple orgasms without a refractory period. C. they can have multiple orgasms with a refractory period. D. the resolution phase is shorter in duration than in males. E. they generally move from excitement to plateau and then to orgasm. 3 points Question 17 1. Fertilization normally takes place in the ________ A. ovary. B. cervix. C. vagina. D. uterus. E. fallopian tubes. 3 points Question 18 1. ________ come in the form of foam, gels, films, suppositories, creams, sponges, and tablets. A. Condoms B. Diaphragms C. Spermicides D. IUDs E. Sterilization agents 3 points Question 19 1. The three major settings in the United States where labor and delivery occur are ________ A. the hospital, health-care clinics, and the home. B. the home, the hospital, and the birthing room. C. free-standing birth centers, the home, and health-care clinics. D. the hospital, the home, and free-standing birth centers. E. the birthing room, the hospital, and free-standing birth centers. 3 points Question 20 1. Mode, a fashion magazine, _______ A. was developed for women who wear normal and large sizes. B. was developed for women who wear over a size 16. C. shows only pictures of clothing, with no models. D. was sued by a group of women who claimed the magazine contributed to their bouts with eating disorders. E. none of the above 3 points Question 21 1. All of the following are advantages to breastfeeding EXCEPT that: A. over-the-counter medications do not affect breast milk. B. babies are less likely to contract respiratory infection. C. mothers’ milk provides antibodies against disease. D. encourages bonding of infant and mother. E. breast milk is cheaper than formula. 3 points Question 22 1. Kaplan’s Triphasic Model consists of the A. excitement, plateau, and resolution phases. B. desire, plateau, and orgasm phases. C. plateau, orgasm, and resolution phases. D. desire, excitement, and resolution phases. E. desire, excitement, and orgasm phases. 3 points Question 23 1. The unique component of Kaplan’s triphasic model is the ______phase—a psychological, prephysical sexual response stage. A. excitement B. desire C. resolution D. plateau E. None of the above 3 points Question 24 1. Together, the ________ and the ______ form the lifeline between the mother and the fetus. A. placenta, cervix B. cervix, uterus C. umbilical cord, vagina D. fallopiantubes, vagina E. placenta, umbilical cord 3 points Question 25 1. When an employee switches genders, which of the following is a difficult issue that employers may face? A. How clients might react B. How others will handle a transitioning employee using the restroom C. How an employee informs coworkers about switching genders D. All of the above E. None of the above 3 points Question 26 1. In men, sex flush occurs during the ________ phase, whereas in women it occurs during the ________ phase. A. refractory, excitement B. excitement, resolution C. excitement, plateau D. plateau, excitement E. plateau, resolution 3 points Question 27 1. The process that results in vaginal lubrication during the excitement phase is: A. myotonia. B. uterine orgasm. C. orgasmic platform. D. transudation. E. tachycardia. 3 points Question 28 1. The ________ is the waxy protective substance that coats the fetus. A. amniotic sac B. amniocentesis C. amniotic fluid D. vernixcaseosa. E. chorionic fluid 3 points Question 29 1. ________ adolescent females seem to be happier with their bodies and less likely to diet than ________ adolescent females. A. Hispanic, European Americans B. Asian American; African American C. African American, European American D. European American, Hispanic 3 points Question 30 1. Intrauterine devices (IUDs) and intrauterine systems (IUSs) are ______ methods of contraception. A. not B. permanent C. effective D. reversible E. both c and d 3 points Question 31 1. In early adolescence, girls outperform boys at which of the following types of tasks? A. Visual-spatial B. Math C. Physical D. Language and verbal E. None of the above 3 points Question 32 1. Which of the following are common signs that a person may have an eating disorder? A. The person wears tight clothes to show off his or her “new” body. B. A female may quit menstruating C. Excessive exercise D. B and C E. A and C 3 points Question 33 1. The ________ is the valve that prevents urine from entering the urethra and sperm from entering the bladder during ejaculation. A. orgasmic platform B. vasocongestive valve C. sex flush D. internal urethral sphincter E. None of the above 3 points Question 34 1. Which of the following statements reflect gender bias? A. Boys in school will “act out.” B. Girls in school will be docile. C. Girls are neat. D. All of the above. E. None of the above 3 points Question 35 1. The calendar method and ovulation methods are examples of ______ A. natural planning. B. fertility awareness methods. C. natural family planning. D. fertility planning. E. both B and C 3 points Question 36 1. Dieting during pregnancy can be harmful because the breakdown of fat produces toxic substances called ______ A. fibers. B. pheromones. C. ketones. D. monosaccharides. E. hormones. 3 points Question 37 1. Oral contraceptives _____ A. suppress ovulation. B. mimic the changes that occur in pregnancy. C. can be taken by both males and females. D. A and B E. A and C 3 points Question 38 1. According to Fisher (2001), men usually _______, whereas women ________. A. cut straight to the point, see issues as a part of a larger whole B. discuss their feelings, are more stoic C. mull things over, tend to speak their mind D. waiver while making decisions, mull things over E. None of the above 3 points Question 39 1. The increase in heart rate that occurs during sexual activity is known as _______ A. hyperventilation. B. vasocongestion. C. myotonia. D. tachycardia. E. sex flush. 3 points Question 40 1. Women earned about _________ of all college degrees in 2008. A. 10% B. 35% C. 57% D. 85% E. None of the above

Question 1 1. When males reach puberty, _________ increases their muscle mass and skeletal development. A. prolactin B. protein C. androgen D. adipose tissue E. estrogen 3 points Question 2 1. Which of the following is the only 100percent effective method of fertility control and STI protection? A. Abstinence B. Condoms and spermicide together C. Condoms and a hormonal contraceptive together D. Oral contraceptives E. Condoms 3 points Question 3 1. The efficacy rate for implants is less than ________ pregnancy per 100 users per year. A. 1 B. 10 C. 11 D. 17 E. 4 3 points Question 4 1. Over-the-counter medications are ________ A. sold legally without a prescription. B. safe for pregnant women to use. C. sold illegally without a prescription. D. the safest drugs for self-medication purposes. E. harmful even when approved by the pregnant women’s physician. 3 points Question 5 1. The ________ activates the autonomic nervous system and the endocrine system through messages sent via nerves or substances released into the bloodstream. A. cerebral cortex B. pons C. thalamus D. subcortex E. hypothalamus 3 points Question 6 1. Ovulation methods center around ______ A. a female’s basal body temperature. B. a female’s cervical secretions. C. a female tracking her menstrual cycle by using a calendar. D. A and B. E. A and C. 3 points Question 7 1. Emergency contraception ______ A. can be used as a regular contraception method. B. provides protection against STDs. C. is the only method available if unprotected intercourse has occurred when fertility is likely. D. is significantly more effective than other contraceptive methods. E. All of the above 3 points Question 8 1. Although a simultaneous orgasm between sexual partners is an exciting event, it _______ A. is a relatively uncommon event and can actually detract from the coital experience if one is preoccupied by sharing this experience. B. is common and should be a priority as far as coitus is concerned. C. is of no particular importance. D. is immensely overrated. E. None of the above 3 points Question 9 1. Cervical caps are similar to ________, but the cervical cap is smaller. A. IUDs B. diaphragms C. Norplant D. oral contraceptives E. Depo-Provera 3 points Question 10 1. Which of the following increases the risk of having a low-birth-weight baby? A. The mother does not eat well during pregnancy. B. The mother does not take care of herself. C. The mother does not receive comprehensive prenatal care. D. The mother smokes. E. All of the above 3 points Question 11 1. An advantage to using IUDs and IUSs is that they ______ A. remain in place, so planning before sexual intercourse is unnecessary. B. have a high level of effectiveness. C. allow fertility to return immediately after they are removed. D. can remain in place during a woman’s period. E. all of the above 3 points Question 12 1. Contraception is the means of preventing _______ from occurring during sexual intercourse. A. conception B. pain C. infertility D. STDs E. pleasure 3 points Question 13 1. ________ is the contraceptive method of removing the penis from the vagina before ejaculation. A. Abstinence B. Sterilization C. Avoidance D. Withdrawal E. Monogamy 3 points Question 14 1. Compared to men, women employed full time __________ A. spend fewer hours on household tasks. B. work more hours in the workplace. C. work a proportionate number of hours on household tasks. D. spend more hours on household tasks. E. work fewer hours in the workplace. 3 points Question 15 1. At ________, the female central nervous system (CNS) is typically more advanced than the male CNS. A. birth B. conception C. adolescence D. adulthood E. puberty 3 points Question 16 1. Females sometimes experience a sexual response cycle similar to that of males, EXCEPT A. when they are menstruating. B. they can have multiple orgasms without a refractory period. C. they can have multiple orgasms with a refractory period. D. the resolution phase is shorter in duration than in males. E. they generally move from excitement to plateau and then to orgasm. 3 points Question 17 1. Fertilization normally takes place in the ________ A. ovary. B. cervix. C. vagina. D. uterus. E. fallopian tubes. 3 points Question 18 1. ________ come in the form of foam, gels, films, suppositories, creams, sponges, and tablets. A. Condoms B. Diaphragms C. Spermicides D. IUDs E. Sterilization agents 3 points Question 19 1. The three major settings in the United States where labor and delivery occur are ________ A. the hospital, health-care clinics, and the home. B. the home, the hospital, and the birthing room. C. free-standing birth centers, the home, and health-care clinics. D. the hospital, the home, and free-standing birth centers. E. the birthing room, the hospital, and free-standing birth centers. 3 points Question 20 1. Mode, a fashion magazine, _______ A. was developed for women who wear normal and large sizes. B. was developed for women who wear over a size 16. C. shows only pictures of clothing, with no models. D. was sued by a group of women who claimed the magazine contributed to their bouts with eating disorders. E. none of the above 3 points Question 21 1. All of the following are advantages to breastfeeding EXCEPT that: A. over-the-counter medications do not affect breast milk. B. babies are less likely to contract respiratory infection. C. mothers’ milk provides antibodies against disease. D. encourages bonding of infant and mother. E. breast milk is cheaper than formula. 3 points Question 22 1. Kaplan’s Triphasic Model consists of the A. excitement, plateau, and resolution phases. B. desire, plateau, and orgasm phases. C. plateau, orgasm, and resolution phases. D. desire, excitement, and resolution phases. E. desire, excitement, and orgasm phases. 3 points Question 23 1. The unique component of Kaplan’s triphasic model is the ______phase—a psychological, prephysical sexual response stage. A. excitement B. desire C. resolution D. plateau E. None of the above 3 points Question 24 1. Together, the ________ and the ______ form the lifeline between the mother and the fetus. A. placenta, cervix B. cervix, uterus C. umbilical cord, vagina D. fallopiantubes, vagina E. placenta, umbilical cord 3 points Question 25 1. When an employee switches genders, which of the following is a difficult issue that employers may face? A. How clients might react B. How others will handle a transitioning employee using the restroom C. How an employee informs coworkers about switching genders D. All of the above E. None of the above 3 points Question 26 1. In men, sex flush occurs during the ________ phase, whereas in women it occurs during the ________ phase. A. refractory, excitement B. excitement, resolution C. excitement, plateau D. plateau, excitement E. plateau, resolution 3 points Question 27 1. The process that results in vaginal lubrication during the excitement phase is: A. myotonia. B. uterine orgasm. C. orgasmic platform. D. transudation. E. tachycardia. 3 points Question 28 1. The ________ is the waxy protective substance that coats the fetus. A. amniotic sac B. amniocentesis C. amniotic fluid D. vernixcaseosa. E. chorionic fluid 3 points Question 29 1. ________ adolescent females seem to be happier with their bodies and less likely to diet than ________ adolescent females. A. Hispanic, European Americans B. Asian American; African American C. African American, European American D. European American, Hispanic 3 points Question 30 1. Intrauterine devices (IUDs) and intrauterine systems (IUSs) are ______ methods of contraception. A. not B. permanent C. effective D. reversible E. both c and d 3 points Question 31 1. In early adolescence, girls outperform boys at which of the following types of tasks? A. Visual-spatial B. Math C. Physical D. Language and verbal E. None of the above 3 points Question 32 1. Which of the following are common signs that a person may have an eating disorder? A. The person wears tight clothes to show off his or her “new” body. B. A female may quit menstruating C. Excessive exercise D. B and C E. A and C 3 points Question 33 1. The ________ is the valve that prevents urine from entering the urethra and sperm from entering the bladder during ejaculation. A. orgasmic platform B. vasocongestive valve C. sex flush D. internal urethral sphincter E. None of the above 3 points Question 34 1. Which of the following statements reflect gender bias? A. Boys in school will “act out.” B. Girls in school will be docile. C. Girls are neat. D. All of the above. E. None of the above 3 points Question 35 1. The calendar method and ovulation methods are examples of ______ A. natural planning. B. fertility awareness methods. C. natural family planning. D. fertility planning. E. both B and C 3 points Question 36 1. Dieting during pregnancy can be harmful because the breakdown of fat produces toxic substances called ______ A. fibers. B. pheromones. C. ketones. D. monosaccharides. E. hormones. 3 points Question 37 1. Oral contraceptives _____ A. suppress ovulation. B. mimic the changes that occur in pregnancy. C. can be taken by both males and females. D. A and B E. A and C 3 points Question 38 1. According to Fisher (2001), men usually _______, whereas women ________. A. cut straight to the point, see issues as a part of a larger whole B. discuss their feelings, are more stoic C. mull things over, tend to speak their mind D. waiver while making decisions, mull things over E. None of the above 3 points Question 39 1. The increase in heart rate that occurs during sexual activity is known as _______ A. hyperventilation. B. vasocongestion. C. myotonia. D. tachycardia. E. sex flush. 3 points Question 40 1. Women earned about _________ of all college degrees in 2008. A. 10% B. 35% C. 57% D. 85% E. None of the above

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Recalling a situation from a recent or past experience in which you were called upon or felt the need to persuade someone or some group to do something they didn’t have to do, describe how you went about it, what result you achieved, and what having reviewed some ‘rules of the road’ for effective persuasion, you might have included in your persuasive communication. (You may have ‘instinctively’ or naturally used many of the concepts we’ve reviewed-you can cite them as well)

Recalling a situation from a recent or past experience in which you were called upon or felt the need to persuade someone or some group to do something they didn’t have to do, describe how you went about it, what result you achieved, and what having reviewed some ‘rules of the road’ for effective persuasion, you might have included in your persuasive communication. (You may have ‘instinctively’ or naturally used many of the concepts we’ve reviewed-you can cite them as well)

Every day we are tackled by persuasion. For instance, Food … Read More...
http://www.constitution.org/mac/prince17.htm How does Machiavelli feel about cruelty versus clemency? A. Machiavelli equates clemency with being loved and cruelty with being despised, and suggests that being despised is acceptable. B. Machiavelli suggests that cruelty doesn’t always result in being despised and winning the love of your subjects is the most important thing. C. Machiavelli says that cruelty, when applied in a prudent manner, will be held in more esteem than too much mercy. D. Cruelty and clemency are identical; being merciful to one person means that you must be cruel to another. E. Clemency is equated with happiness, and a happy set of subjects is the ultimate goal of a successful leader. What is the difference between hatred and fear? A. Fear makes people respect you. Hatred makes them work against you. B. Fear and hatred follow one another. If you create fear you will eventually create hatred. All leaders should avoid this. C. Hatred from external powers breeds nationalism within your country, causing people to fear external powers. D. Fear and hatred are opposites. E. Hatred follows love; fear follows clemency. http://www.constitution.org/mac/prince23.htm According to Machiavelli, what is a flatterer? A. Someone who wants to lavish gifts upon you in exchange for power. B. An external power that wants to ally with you. C. Someone who will tell you what you think rather than giving their own opinion. D. Someone who tests your opinions against their own to make a good argument. E. An external power that wants to make strong trade alliances to weaken you over time. According to Machiavelli, what is the best way to seek truth from advisers? A. Advisors should present any complaints to you as a group. B. Advisors should be called upon when the leader has a question, otherwise they are to remain silent. C. An advisor should involve the public, allowing them to call the leader to court to listen to their opinions. D. The leader should listen carefully to one private advisor with whom he always disagrees. E. Machiavelli thinks that advisors are not helpful because they will always try to flatter their leader.

http://www.constitution.org/mac/prince17.htm How does Machiavelli feel about cruelty versus clemency? A. Machiavelli equates clemency with being loved and cruelty with being despised, and suggests that being despised is acceptable. B. Machiavelli suggests that cruelty doesn’t always result in being despised and winning the love of your subjects is the most important thing. C. Machiavelli says that cruelty, when applied in a prudent manner, will be held in more esteem than too much mercy. D. Cruelty and clemency are identical; being merciful to one person means that you must be cruel to another. E. Clemency is equated with happiness, and a happy set of subjects is the ultimate goal of a successful leader. What is the difference between hatred and fear? A. Fear makes people respect you. Hatred makes them work against you. B. Fear and hatred follow one another. If you create fear you will eventually create hatred. All leaders should avoid this. C. Hatred from external powers breeds nationalism within your country, causing people to fear external powers. D. Fear and hatred are opposites. E. Hatred follows love; fear follows clemency. http://www.constitution.org/mac/prince23.htm According to Machiavelli, what is a flatterer? A. Someone who wants to lavish gifts upon you in exchange for power. B. An external power that wants to ally with you. C. Someone who will tell you what you think rather than giving their own opinion. D. Someone who tests your opinions against their own to make a good argument. E. An external power that wants to make strong trade alliances to weaken you over time. According to Machiavelli, what is the best way to seek truth from advisers? A. Advisors should present any complaints to you as a group. B. Advisors should be called upon when the leader has a question, otherwise they are to remain silent. C. An advisor should involve the public, allowing them to call the leader to court to listen to their opinions. D. The leader should listen carefully to one private advisor with whom he always disagrees. E. Machiavelli thinks that advisors are not helpful because they will always try to flatter their leader.

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Assignment 11 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, April 30, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 13.2 The gravitational force of a star on orbiting planet 1 is . Planet 2, which is twice as massive as planet 1 and orbits at twice the distance from the star, experiences gravitational force . Part A What is the ratio ? ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 13.3 A 1500 satellite and a 2200 satellite follow exactly the same orbit around the earth. Part A What is the ratio of the force on the first satellite to that on the second satellite? ANSWER: Correct F1 F2 F1 F2 = 2 F1 F2 kg kg F1 F2 = 0.682 F1 F2 Part B What is the ratio of the acceleration of the first satellite to that of the second satellite? ANSWER: Correct Problem 13.2 The centers of a 15.0 lead ball and a 90.0 lead ball are separated by 9.00 . Part A What gravitational force does each exert on the other? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the ratio of this gravitational force to the weight of the 90.0 ball? ANSWER: a1 a2 = 1 a1 a2 kg g cm 1.11×10−8 N g 1.26×10−8 Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 13.6 The space shuttle orbits 310 above the surface of the earth. Part A What is the gravitational force on a 7.5 sphere inside the space shuttle? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct ± A Satellite in Orbit A satellite used in a cellular telephone network has a mass of 2310 and is in a circular orbit at a height of 650 above the surface of the earth. Part A What is the gravitational force on the satellite? Take the gravitational constant to be = 6.67×10−11 , the mass of the earth to be = 5.97×1024 , and the radius of the Earth to be = 6.38×106 . Express your answer in newtons. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Use the equation for the law of gravitation to calculate the force on the satellite. Be careful about the units when performing the calculations. km kg Fe on s = 67.0 N kg km Fgrav G N m2/kg2 me kg re m Typesetting math: 100% Hint 2. Law of gravitation According to Newton’s law of gravitation, , where is the gravitational constant, and are the masses of the two objects, and is the distance between the centers of mass of the two objects. Hint 3. Calculate the distance between the centers of mass What is the distance from the center of mass of the satellite to the center of mass of the earth? Express your answer in meters. ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B What fraction is this of the satellite’s weight at the surface of the earth? Take the free-fall acceleration at the surface of the earth to be = 9.80 . Hint 1. How to approach the problem All you need to do is to take the ratio of the gravitational force on the satellite to the weight of the satellite at ground level. There are two ways to do this, depending on how you define the force of gravity at the surface of the earth. ANSWER: F = Gm1m2/r2 G m1 m2 r r = 7.03×10r 6 m = 1.86×10Fgrav 4 N g m/s2 0.824 Typesetting math: 100% Correct Although it is easy to find the weight of the satellite using the constant acceleration due to gravity, it is instructional to consider the weight calculated using the law of gravitation: . Dividing the gravitational force on the satellite by , we find that the ratio of the forces due to the earth’s gravity is simply the square of the ratio of the earth’s radius to the sum of the earth’s radius and the height of the orbit of the satellite above the earth, . This will also be the fraction of the weight of, say, an astronaut in an orbit at the same altitude. Notice that an astronaut’s weight is never zero. When people speak of “weightlessness” in space, what they really mean is “free fall.” Problem 13.8 Part A What is the free-fall acceleration at the surface of the moon? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the free-fall acceleration at the surface of the Jupiter? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct w = G m/ me r2e Fgrav = Gmem/(re + h)2 w [re/(re + h)]2 gmoon = 1.62 m s2 gJupiter = 25.9 m s2 Typesetting math: 100% Enhanced EOC: Problem 13.14 A rocket is launched straight up from the earth’s surface at a speed of 1.90×104 . You may want to review ( pages 362 – 365) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Mathematical Expressions Involving Squares Part A What is its speed when it is very far away from the earth? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is conserved in this problem? What is the rocket’s initial kinetic energy in terms of its unknown mass, ? What is the rocket’s initial gravitational potential energy in terms of its unknown mass, ? When the rocket is very far away from the Earth, what is its gravitational potential energy? Using conservation of energy, what is the rocket’s kinetic energy when it is very far away from the Earth? Therefore, what is the rocket’s velocity when it is very far away from the Earth? ANSWER: Correct Problem 13.13 Part A m/s m m 1.54×104 ms Typesetting math: 100% What is the escape speed from Venus? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 13.17 The asteroid belt circles the sun between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. One asteroid has a period of 4.2 earth years. Part A What is the asteroid’s orbital radius? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the asteroid’s orbital speed? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: vescape = 10.4 km s = 3.89×1011 R m = 1.85×104 v ms Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 13.32 Part A At what height above the earth is the acceleration due to gravity 15.0% of its value at the surface? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the speed of a satellite orbiting at that height? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 13.36 Two meteoroids are heading for earth. Their speeds as they cross the moon’s orbit are 2 . 1.01×107 m 4920 ms km/s Typesetting math: 100% Part A The first meteoroid is heading straight for earth. What is its speed of impact? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B The second misses the earth by 5500 . What is its speed at its closest point? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Problem 14.2 An air-track glider attached to a spring oscillates between the 11.0 mark and the 67.0 mark on the track. The glider completes 11.0 oscillations in 32.0 . Part A What is the period of the oscillations? Express your answer with the appropriate units. v1 = 11.3 km s km v2 = cm cm s Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the frequency of the oscillations? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the angular frequency of the oscillations? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the amplitude? Express your answer with the appropriate units. 2.91 s 0.344 Hz 2.16 rad s Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Part E What is the maximum speed of the glider? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Good Vibes: Introduction to Oscillations Learning Goal: To learn the basic terminology and relationships among the main characteristics of simple harmonic motion. Motion that repeats itself over and over is called periodic motion. There are many examples of periodic motion: the earth revolving around the sun, an elastic ball bouncing up and down, or a block attached to a spring oscillating back and forth. The last example differs from the first two, in that it represents a special kind of periodic motion called simple harmonic motion. The conditions that lead to simple harmonic motion are as follows: There must be a position of stable equilibrium. There must be a restoring force acting on the oscillating object. The direction of this force must always point toward the equilibrium, and its magnitude must be directly proportional to the magnitude of the object’s displacement from its equilibrium position. Mathematically, the restoring force is given by , where is the displacement from equilibrium and is a constant that depends on the properties of the oscillating system. The resistive forces in the system must be reasonably small. In this problem, we will introduce some of the basic quantities that describe oscillations and the relationships among them. Consider a block of mass attached to a spring with force constant , as shown in the figure. The spring can be either stretched or compressed. The block slides on a frictionless horizontal surface, as shown. When the spring is relaxed, the block is located at . If the 28.0 cm 60.5 cms F  F = −kx x k m k x = 0 Typesetting math: 100% block is pulled to the right a distance and then released, will be the amplitude of the resulting oscillations. Assume that the mechanical energy of the block-spring system remains unchanged in the subsequent motion of the block. Part A After the block is released from , it will ANSWER: Correct As the block begins its motion to the left, it accelerates. Although the restoring force decreases as the block approaches equilibrium, it still pulls the block to the left, so by the time the equilibrium position is reached, the block has gained some speed. It will, therefore, pass the equilibrium position and keep moving, compressing the spring. The spring will now be pushing the block to the right, and the block will slow down, temporarily coming to rest at . After is reached, the block will begin its motion to the right, pushed by the spring. The block will pass the equilibrium position and continue until it reaches , completing one cycle of motion. The motion will then repeat; if, as we’ve assumed, there is no friction, the motion will repeat indefinitely. The time it takes the block to complete one cycle is called the period. Usually, the period is denoted and is measured in seconds. The frequency, denoted , is the number of cycles that are completed per unit of time: . In SI units, is measured in inverse seconds, or hertz ( ). A A x = A remain at rest. move to the left until it reaches equilibrium and stop there. move to the left until it reaches and stop there. move to the left until it reaches and then begin to move to the right. x = −A x = −A x = −A x = −A x = A T f f = 1/T f Hz Typesetting math: 100% Part B If the period is doubled, the frequency is ANSWER: Correct Part C An oscillating object takes 0.10 to complete one cycle; that is, its period is 0.10 . What is its frequency ? Express your answer in hertz. ANSWER: Correct unchanged. doubled. halved. s s f f = 10 Hz Typesetting math: 100% Part D If the frequency is 40 , what is the period ? Express your answer in seconds. ANSWER: Correct The following questions refer to the figure that graphically depicts the oscillations of the block on the spring. Note that the vertical axis represents the x coordinate of the oscillating object, and the horizontal axis represents time. Part E Which points on the x axis are located a distance from the equilibrium position? ANSWER: Hz T T = 0.025 s A Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part F Suppose that the period is . Which of the following points on the t axis are separated by the time interval ? ANSWER: Correct Now assume for the remaining Parts G – J, that the x coordinate of point R is 0.12 and the t coordinate of point K is 0.0050 . Part G What is the period ? Express your answer in seconds. Hint 1. How to approach the problem In moving from the point to the point K, what fraction of a full wavelength is covered? Call that fraction . Then you can set . Dividing by the fraction will give the R only Q only both R and Q T T K and L K and M K and P L and N M and P m s T t = 0 a aT = 0.005 s a Typesetting math: 100% period . ANSWER: Correct Part H How much time does the block take to travel from the point of maximum displacement to the opposite point of maximum displacement? Express your answer in seconds. ANSWER: Correct Part I What distance does the object cover during one period of oscillation? Express your answer in meters. ANSWER: Correct Part J What distance does the object cover between the moments labeled K and N on the graph? T T = 0.02 s t t = 0.01 s d d = 0.48 m d Typesetting math: 100% Express your answer in meters. ANSWER: Correct Problem 14.4 Part A What is the amplitude of the oscillation shown in the figure? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct d = 0.36 m A = 20.0 cm Typesetting math: 100% Part B What is the frequency of this oscillation? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the phase constant? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Problem 14.10 An air-track glider attached to a spring oscillates with a period of 1.50 . At the glider is 4.60 left of the equilibrium position and moving to the right at 33.4 . Part A What is the phase constant? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: f = 0.25 Hz 0 = s t = 0 s cm cm/s Typesetting math: 100% Incorrect; Try Again Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Problem 14.12 A 140 air-track glider is attached to a spring. The glider is pushed in 12.2 and released. A student with a stopwatch finds that 14.0 oscillations take 19.0 . Part A What is the spring constant? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: 0 = g cm s Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 14.14 The position of a 50 g oscillating mass is given by , where is in s. If necessary, round your answers to three significant figures. Determine: Part A The amplitude. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B The period. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C 3.00 Nm x(t) = (2.0 cm)cos(10t − /4) t 2.00 cm 0.628 s Typesetting math: 100% The spring constant. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part D The phase constant. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G Typesetting math: 100% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part I This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Enhanced EOC: Problem 14.17 A spring with spring constant 16 hangs from the ceiling. A ball is attached to the spring and allowed to come to rest. It is then pulled down 4.0 and released. The ball makes 35 oscillations in 18 seconds. You may want to review ( pages 389 – 391) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Differentiation of Trigonometric Functions Part A What is its the mass of the ball? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is the period of oscillation? What is the angular frequency of the oscillations? How is the angular frequency related to the mass and spring constant? What is the mass? N/m cm s Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Part B What is its maximum speed? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is the amplitude of the oscillations? How is the maximum speed related to the amplitude of the oscillations and the angular frequency? ANSWER: Correct Changing the Period of a Pendulum A simple pendulum consisting of a bob of mass attached to a string of length swings with a period . Part A If the bob’s mass is doubled, approximately what will the pendulum’s new period be? Hint 1. Period of a simple pendulum The period of a simple pendulum of length is given by m = 110 g vmax = 49 cms m L T Typesetting math: 10T0% L , where is the acceleration due to gravity. ANSWER: Correct Part B If the pendulum is brought on the moon where the gravitational acceleration is about , approximately what will its period now be? Hint 1. How to approach the problem Recall the formula of the period of a simple pendulum. Since the gravitational acceleration appears in the denominator, the period must increase when the gravitational acceleration decreases. ANSWER: T = 2 Lg −−  g T/2 T &2T 2T g/6 T/6 T/&6 &6T 6T Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part C If the pendulum is taken into the orbiting space station what will happen to the bob? Hint 1. How to approach the problem Recall that the oscillations of a simple pendulum occur when a pendulum bob is raised above its equilibrium position and let go, causing the pendulum bob to fall. The gravitational force acts to bring the bob back to its equilibrium position. In the space station, the earth’s gravity acts on both the station and everything inside it, giving them the same acceleration. These objects are said to be in free fall. ANSWER: Correct In the space station, where all objects undergo the same acceleration due to the earth’s gravity, the tension in the string is zero and the bob does not fall relative to the point to which the string is attached. Problem 14.20 A 175 ball is tied to a string. It is pulled to an angle of 8.0 and released to swing as a pendulum. A student with a stopwatch finds that 15 oscillations take 13 . Part A How long is the string? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. It will continue to oscillate in a vertical plane with the same period. It will no longer oscillate because there is no gravity in space. It will no longer oscillate because both the pendulum and the point to which it is attached are in free fall. It will oscillate much faster with a period that approaches zero. g ( s Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Problem 14.22 Part A What is the length of a pendulum whose period on the moon matches the period of a 2.1- -long pendulum on the earth? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 14.42 An ultrasonic transducer, of the type used in medical ultrasound imaging, is a very thin disk ( = 0.17 ) driven back and forth in SHM at by an electromagnetic coil. Part A The maximum restoring force that can be applied to the disk without breaking it is 4.4×104 . What is the maximum oscillation amplitude that won’t rupture the disk? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: L = 19 cm m lmoon = 0.35 m m g 1.0 MHz N amax = 6.6 μm Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part B What is the disk’s maximum speed at this amplitude? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 81.4%. You received 117.25 out of a possible total of 144 points. vmax = 41 ms

Assignment 11 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, April 30, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 13.2 The gravitational force of a star on orbiting planet 1 is . Planet 2, which is twice as massive as planet 1 and orbits at twice the distance from the star, experiences gravitational force . Part A What is the ratio ? ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 13.3 A 1500 satellite and a 2200 satellite follow exactly the same orbit around the earth. Part A What is the ratio of the force on the first satellite to that on the second satellite? ANSWER: Correct F1 F2 F1 F2 = 2 F1 F2 kg kg F1 F2 = 0.682 F1 F2 Part B What is the ratio of the acceleration of the first satellite to that of the second satellite? ANSWER: Correct Problem 13.2 The centers of a 15.0 lead ball and a 90.0 lead ball are separated by 9.00 . Part A What gravitational force does each exert on the other? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the ratio of this gravitational force to the weight of the 90.0 ball? ANSWER: a1 a2 = 1 a1 a2 kg g cm 1.11×10−8 N g 1.26×10−8 Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 13.6 The space shuttle orbits 310 above the surface of the earth. Part A What is the gravitational force on a 7.5 sphere inside the space shuttle? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct ± A Satellite in Orbit A satellite used in a cellular telephone network has a mass of 2310 and is in a circular orbit at a height of 650 above the surface of the earth. Part A What is the gravitational force on the satellite? Take the gravitational constant to be = 6.67×10−11 , the mass of the earth to be = 5.97×1024 , and the radius of the Earth to be = 6.38×106 . Express your answer in newtons. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Use the equation for the law of gravitation to calculate the force on the satellite. Be careful about the units when performing the calculations. km kg Fe on s = 67.0 N kg km Fgrav G N m2/kg2 me kg re m Typesetting math: 100% Hint 2. Law of gravitation According to Newton’s law of gravitation, , where is the gravitational constant, and are the masses of the two objects, and is the distance between the centers of mass of the two objects. Hint 3. Calculate the distance between the centers of mass What is the distance from the center of mass of the satellite to the center of mass of the earth? Express your answer in meters. ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B What fraction is this of the satellite’s weight at the surface of the earth? Take the free-fall acceleration at the surface of the earth to be = 9.80 . Hint 1. How to approach the problem All you need to do is to take the ratio of the gravitational force on the satellite to the weight of the satellite at ground level. There are two ways to do this, depending on how you define the force of gravity at the surface of the earth. ANSWER: F = Gm1m2/r2 G m1 m2 r r = 7.03×10r 6 m = 1.86×10Fgrav 4 N g m/s2 0.824 Typesetting math: 100% Correct Although it is easy to find the weight of the satellite using the constant acceleration due to gravity, it is instructional to consider the weight calculated using the law of gravitation: . Dividing the gravitational force on the satellite by , we find that the ratio of the forces due to the earth’s gravity is simply the square of the ratio of the earth’s radius to the sum of the earth’s radius and the height of the orbit of the satellite above the earth, . This will also be the fraction of the weight of, say, an astronaut in an orbit at the same altitude. Notice that an astronaut’s weight is never zero. When people speak of “weightlessness” in space, what they really mean is “free fall.” Problem 13.8 Part A What is the free-fall acceleration at the surface of the moon? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the free-fall acceleration at the surface of the Jupiter? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct w = G m/ me r2e Fgrav = Gmem/(re + h)2 w [re/(re + h)]2 gmoon = 1.62 m s2 gJupiter = 25.9 m s2 Typesetting math: 100% Enhanced EOC: Problem 13.14 A rocket is launched straight up from the earth’s surface at a speed of 1.90×104 . You may want to review ( pages 362 – 365) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Mathematical Expressions Involving Squares Part A What is its speed when it is very far away from the earth? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is conserved in this problem? What is the rocket’s initial kinetic energy in terms of its unknown mass, ? What is the rocket’s initial gravitational potential energy in terms of its unknown mass, ? When the rocket is very far away from the Earth, what is its gravitational potential energy? Using conservation of energy, what is the rocket’s kinetic energy when it is very far away from the Earth? Therefore, what is the rocket’s velocity when it is very far away from the Earth? ANSWER: Correct Problem 13.13 Part A m/s m m 1.54×104 ms Typesetting math: 100% What is the escape speed from Venus? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 13.17 The asteroid belt circles the sun between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. One asteroid has a period of 4.2 earth years. Part A What is the asteroid’s orbital radius? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the asteroid’s orbital speed? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: vescape = 10.4 km s = 3.89×1011 R m = 1.85×104 v ms Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 13.32 Part A At what height above the earth is the acceleration due to gravity 15.0% of its value at the surface? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the speed of a satellite orbiting at that height? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 13.36 Two meteoroids are heading for earth. Their speeds as they cross the moon’s orbit are 2 . 1.01×107 m 4920 ms km/s Typesetting math: 100% Part A The first meteoroid is heading straight for earth. What is its speed of impact? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B The second misses the earth by 5500 . What is its speed at its closest point? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Problem 14.2 An air-track glider attached to a spring oscillates between the 11.0 mark and the 67.0 mark on the track. The glider completes 11.0 oscillations in 32.0 . Part A What is the period of the oscillations? Express your answer with the appropriate units. v1 = 11.3 km s km v2 = cm cm s Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the frequency of the oscillations? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the angular frequency of the oscillations? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the amplitude? Express your answer with the appropriate units. 2.91 s 0.344 Hz 2.16 rad s Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Part E What is the maximum speed of the glider? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Good Vibes: Introduction to Oscillations Learning Goal: To learn the basic terminology and relationships among the main characteristics of simple harmonic motion. Motion that repeats itself over and over is called periodic motion. There are many examples of periodic motion: the earth revolving around the sun, an elastic ball bouncing up and down, or a block attached to a spring oscillating back and forth. The last example differs from the first two, in that it represents a special kind of periodic motion called simple harmonic motion. The conditions that lead to simple harmonic motion are as follows: There must be a position of stable equilibrium. There must be a restoring force acting on the oscillating object. The direction of this force must always point toward the equilibrium, and its magnitude must be directly proportional to the magnitude of the object’s displacement from its equilibrium position. Mathematically, the restoring force is given by , where is the displacement from equilibrium and is a constant that depends on the properties of the oscillating system. The resistive forces in the system must be reasonably small. In this problem, we will introduce some of the basic quantities that describe oscillations and the relationships among them. Consider a block of mass attached to a spring with force constant , as shown in the figure. The spring can be either stretched or compressed. The block slides on a frictionless horizontal surface, as shown. When the spring is relaxed, the block is located at . If the 28.0 cm 60.5 cms F  F = −kx x k m k x = 0 Typesetting math: 100% block is pulled to the right a distance and then released, will be the amplitude of the resulting oscillations. Assume that the mechanical energy of the block-spring system remains unchanged in the subsequent motion of the block. Part A After the block is released from , it will ANSWER: Correct As the block begins its motion to the left, it accelerates. Although the restoring force decreases as the block approaches equilibrium, it still pulls the block to the left, so by the time the equilibrium position is reached, the block has gained some speed. It will, therefore, pass the equilibrium position and keep moving, compressing the spring. The spring will now be pushing the block to the right, and the block will slow down, temporarily coming to rest at . After is reached, the block will begin its motion to the right, pushed by the spring. The block will pass the equilibrium position and continue until it reaches , completing one cycle of motion. The motion will then repeat; if, as we’ve assumed, there is no friction, the motion will repeat indefinitely. The time it takes the block to complete one cycle is called the period. Usually, the period is denoted and is measured in seconds. The frequency, denoted , is the number of cycles that are completed per unit of time: . In SI units, is measured in inverse seconds, or hertz ( ). A A x = A remain at rest. move to the left until it reaches equilibrium and stop there. move to the left until it reaches and stop there. move to the left until it reaches and then begin to move to the right. x = −A x = −A x = −A x = −A x = A T f f = 1/T f Hz Typesetting math: 100% Part B If the period is doubled, the frequency is ANSWER: Correct Part C An oscillating object takes 0.10 to complete one cycle; that is, its period is 0.10 . What is its frequency ? Express your answer in hertz. ANSWER: Correct unchanged. doubled. halved. s s f f = 10 Hz Typesetting math: 100% Part D If the frequency is 40 , what is the period ? Express your answer in seconds. ANSWER: Correct The following questions refer to the figure that graphically depicts the oscillations of the block on the spring. Note that the vertical axis represents the x coordinate of the oscillating object, and the horizontal axis represents time. Part E Which points on the x axis are located a distance from the equilibrium position? ANSWER: Hz T T = 0.025 s A Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part F Suppose that the period is . Which of the following points on the t axis are separated by the time interval ? ANSWER: Correct Now assume for the remaining Parts G – J, that the x coordinate of point R is 0.12 and the t coordinate of point K is 0.0050 . Part G What is the period ? Express your answer in seconds. Hint 1. How to approach the problem In moving from the point to the point K, what fraction of a full wavelength is covered? Call that fraction . Then you can set . Dividing by the fraction will give the R only Q only both R and Q T T K and L K and M K and P L and N M and P m s T t = 0 a aT = 0.005 s a Typesetting math: 100% period . ANSWER: Correct Part H How much time does the block take to travel from the point of maximum displacement to the opposite point of maximum displacement? Express your answer in seconds. ANSWER: Correct Part I What distance does the object cover during one period of oscillation? Express your answer in meters. ANSWER: Correct Part J What distance does the object cover between the moments labeled K and N on the graph? T T = 0.02 s t t = 0.01 s d d = 0.48 m d Typesetting math: 100% Express your answer in meters. ANSWER: Correct Problem 14.4 Part A What is the amplitude of the oscillation shown in the figure? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct d = 0.36 m A = 20.0 cm Typesetting math: 100% Part B What is the frequency of this oscillation? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the phase constant? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Problem 14.10 An air-track glider attached to a spring oscillates with a period of 1.50 . At the glider is 4.60 left of the equilibrium position and moving to the right at 33.4 . Part A What is the phase constant? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: f = 0.25 Hz 0 = s t = 0 s cm cm/s Typesetting math: 100% Incorrect; Try Again Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Problem 14.12 A 140 air-track glider is attached to a spring. The glider is pushed in 12.2 and released. A student with a stopwatch finds that 14.0 oscillations take 19.0 . Part A What is the spring constant? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: 0 = g cm s Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 14.14 The position of a 50 g oscillating mass is given by , where is in s. If necessary, round your answers to three significant figures. Determine: Part A The amplitude. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B The period. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C 3.00 Nm x(t) = (2.0 cm)cos(10t − /4) t 2.00 cm 0.628 s Typesetting math: 100% The spring constant. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part D The phase constant. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G Typesetting math: 100% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part I This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Enhanced EOC: Problem 14.17 A spring with spring constant 16 hangs from the ceiling. A ball is attached to the spring and allowed to come to rest. It is then pulled down 4.0 and released. The ball makes 35 oscillations in 18 seconds. You may want to review ( pages 389 – 391) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Differentiation of Trigonometric Functions Part A What is its the mass of the ball? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is the period of oscillation? What is the angular frequency of the oscillations? How is the angular frequency related to the mass and spring constant? What is the mass? N/m cm s Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Part B What is its maximum speed? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is the amplitude of the oscillations? How is the maximum speed related to the amplitude of the oscillations and the angular frequency? ANSWER: Correct Changing the Period of a Pendulum A simple pendulum consisting of a bob of mass attached to a string of length swings with a period . Part A If the bob’s mass is doubled, approximately what will the pendulum’s new period be? Hint 1. Period of a simple pendulum The period of a simple pendulum of length is given by m = 110 g vmax = 49 cms m L T Typesetting math: 10T0% L , where is the acceleration due to gravity. ANSWER: Correct Part B If the pendulum is brought on the moon where the gravitational acceleration is about , approximately what will its period now be? Hint 1. How to approach the problem Recall the formula of the period of a simple pendulum. Since the gravitational acceleration appears in the denominator, the period must increase when the gravitational acceleration decreases. ANSWER: T = 2 Lg −−  g T/2 T &2T 2T g/6 T/6 T/&6 &6T 6T Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part C If the pendulum is taken into the orbiting space station what will happen to the bob? Hint 1. How to approach the problem Recall that the oscillations of a simple pendulum occur when a pendulum bob is raised above its equilibrium position and let go, causing the pendulum bob to fall. The gravitational force acts to bring the bob back to its equilibrium position. In the space station, the earth’s gravity acts on both the station and everything inside it, giving them the same acceleration. These objects are said to be in free fall. ANSWER: Correct In the space station, where all objects undergo the same acceleration due to the earth’s gravity, the tension in the string is zero and the bob does not fall relative to the point to which the string is attached. Problem 14.20 A 175 ball is tied to a string. It is pulled to an angle of 8.0 and released to swing as a pendulum. A student with a stopwatch finds that 15 oscillations take 13 . Part A How long is the string? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. It will continue to oscillate in a vertical plane with the same period. It will no longer oscillate because there is no gravity in space. It will no longer oscillate because both the pendulum and the point to which it is attached are in free fall. It will oscillate much faster with a period that approaches zero. g ( s Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Problem 14.22 Part A What is the length of a pendulum whose period on the moon matches the period of a 2.1- -long pendulum on the earth? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 14.42 An ultrasonic transducer, of the type used in medical ultrasound imaging, is a very thin disk ( = 0.17 ) driven back and forth in SHM at by an electromagnetic coil. Part A The maximum restoring force that can be applied to the disk without breaking it is 4.4×104 . What is the maximum oscillation amplitude that won’t rupture the disk? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: L = 19 cm m lmoon = 0.35 m m g 1.0 MHz N amax = 6.6 μm Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part B What is the disk’s maximum speed at this amplitude? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 81.4%. You received 117.25 out of a possible total of 144 points. vmax = 41 ms

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Lectorial 5: The Gravitron The Gravitron (shown in figure 1 [1]) is a carnival ride designed to simulate the experience of zero gravity. The ride consists of a 15 metre diameter circular chamber which spins around a centre shaft. The spinning motion applies a force to the occupants of the ride pinning them up against their seat. Figure 1: The Gravitron carnival ride. For this lectorial task we want to study the forces being applied to the ride’s occupants and determine the g-forces they would be experiencing. According to physics, the rules for uniform circular motion are: where: 1. If the ride has a maximum rotational speed of 24 revolutions per minute (rpm), determine the force being applied to the ride’s occupants. What gforces are the people experiencing (assume occupants are 65 kg adults)? [1] “Gravitron” used under Creative Commons licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/). Photo by: bobdole369 Newtons 2 r v F = ma = m angular speed in radians per second rotational speed in revolutions per second (or Hz) radius of the Gravitron tangential velocity of the Gravitron mass of occupant = = = = = w f r v m -1 v = wr ms w = 2pf rad/sec Typically the Gravitron ride takes approximately 20 seconds to reach its maximum rotational speed of 24 rpms and the whole ride lasts for around 80 seconds. This means the ride’s occupants are exposed to non-uniform circular motion meaning there is changing linear velocity at certain parts of the ride. For non-uniform circular motion the following formulae are useful: where: A GPS tracking device was attached to a person in the Gravitron and data was obtained about their x,y displacement vs. time over the 80 second duration of the ride. The data was saved in a .csv file called ‘gravitron.csv.’ This file contains three columns: time, x-displacement and y-displacement, e.g.: Time, sec x-displacement y-displacement 0.00 0.10 0.20 … 2. Download this .csv file from Blackboard. Find the g-forces being applied to the ride’s occupants for the whole 80 second duration of the ride. Again assume the occupants are 65 kg adults. Think about how you could effectively present these results. -2 2 ms r v -1 a = 2 2 ms     +     = dt dy dt dx v centripetal acceleration time in seconds displacement in y direction displacement in x direction = = = = a t y x

Lectorial 5: The Gravitron The Gravitron (shown in figure 1 [1]) is a carnival ride designed to simulate the experience of zero gravity. The ride consists of a 15 metre diameter circular chamber which spins around a centre shaft. The spinning motion applies a force to the occupants of the ride pinning them up against their seat. Figure 1: The Gravitron carnival ride. For this lectorial task we want to study the forces being applied to the ride’s occupants and determine the g-forces they would be experiencing. According to physics, the rules for uniform circular motion are: where: 1. If the ride has a maximum rotational speed of 24 revolutions per minute (rpm), determine the force being applied to the ride’s occupants. What gforces are the people experiencing (assume occupants are 65 kg adults)? [1] “Gravitron” used under Creative Commons licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/). Photo by: bobdole369 Newtons 2 r v F = ma = m angular speed in radians per second rotational speed in revolutions per second (or Hz) radius of the Gravitron tangential velocity of the Gravitron mass of occupant = = = = = w f r v m -1 v = wr ms w = 2pf rad/sec Typically the Gravitron ride takes approximately 20 seconds to reach its maximum rotational speed of 24 rpms and the whole ride lasts for around 80 seconds. This means the ride’s occupants are exposed to non-uniform circular motion meaning there is changing linear velocity at certain parts of the ride. For non-uniform circular motion the following formulae are useful: where: A GPS tracking device was attached to a person in the Gravitron and data was obtained about their x,y displacement vs. time over the 80 second duration of the ride. The data was saved in a .csv file called ‘gravitron.csv.’ This file contains three columns: time, x-displacement and y-displacement, e.g.: Time, sec x-displacement y-displacement 0.00 0.10 0.20 … 2. Download this .csv file from Blackboard. Find the g-forces being applied to the ride’s occupants for the whole 80 second duration of the ride. Again assume the occupants are 65 kg adults. Think about how you could effectively present these results. -2 2 ms r v -1 a = 2 2 ms     +     = dt dy dt dx v centripetal acceleration time in seconds displacement in y direction displacement in x direction = = = = a t y x

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Morgan Extra Pages Graphing with Excel to be carried out in a computer lab, 3rd floor Calloway Hall or elsewhere The Excel spreadsheet consists of vertical columns and horizontal rows; a column and row intersect at a cell. A cell can contain data for use in calculations of all sorts. The Name Box shows the currently selected cell (Fig. 1). In the Excel 2007 and 2010 versions the drop-down menus familiar in most software screens have been replaced by tabs with horizontally-arranged command buttons of various categories (Fig. 2) ___________________________________________________________________ Open Excel, click on the Microsoft circle, upper left, and Save As your surname. xlsx on the desktop. Before leaving the lab e-mail the file to yourself and/or save to a flash drive. Also e-mail it to your instructor. Figure 1. Parts of an Excel spreadsheet. Name Box Figure 2. Tabs. Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com EXERCISE 1: BASIC OPERATIONS Click Save often as you work. 1. Type the heading “Edge Length” in Cell A1 and double click the crack between the A and B column heading for automatic widening of column A. Similarly, write headings for columns B and C and enter numbers in Cells A2 and A3 as in Fig. 3. Highlight Cells A2 and A3 by dragging the cursor (chunky plus-shape) over the two of them and letting go. 2. Note that there are three types of cursor crosses: chunky for selecting, barbed for moving entries or blocks of entries from cell to cell, and tiny (appearing only at the little square in the lower-right corner of a cell). Obtain a tiny arrow for Cell A3 and perform a plus-drag down Column A until the cells are filled up to 40 (in Cell A8). Note that the two highlighted cells set both the starting value of the fill and the intervals. 3. Click on Cell B2 and enter a formula for face area of a cube as follows: type =, click on Cell A2, type ^2, and press Enter (note the formula bar in Fig. 4). 4. Enter the formula for cube volume in Cell C2 (same procedure, but “=, click on A2, ^3, Enter”). 5. Highlight Cells B2 and C2; plus-drag down to Row 8 (Fig. 5). Do the numbers look correct? Click on some cells in the newly filled area and notice how Excel steps the row designations as it moves down the column (it can do it for horizontal plusdrags along rows also). This is the major programming development that has led to the popularity of spreadsheets. Figure 3. Entries. Figure 4. A formula. Figure 5. Plus-dragging formulas. Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com 6. Now let’s graph the Face Area versus Edge Length: select Cells A1 through B8, choose the Insert tab, and click the Scatter drop-down menu and select “Scatter with only Markers” (Fig. 6). 7. Move the graph (Excel calls it a “chart”) that appears up alongside your number table and dress it up as follows: a. Note that some Chart Layouts have appeared above. Click Layout 1 and alter each title to read Face Area for the vertical axis, Edge Length for the horizontal and Face Area vs. Edge Length for the Graph Title. b. Activate the Excel Least squares routine, called “fitting a trendline” in the program: right click any of the data markers and click Add Trendline. Choose Power and also check “Display equation on chart” and “Display R-squared value on chart.” Fig. 7 shows what the graph will look like at this point. c. The titles are explicit, so the legend is unnecessary. Click on it and press the delete button to remove it. Figure 6. Creating a scatter graph. Figure 7. A graph with a fitted curve. Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com 8. Now let’s overlay the Volume vs. Edge Length curve onto the same graph (optional for 203L/205L): Make a copy of your graph by clicking on the outer white area, clicking ctrl-c (or right click, copy), and pasting the copy somewhere else (ctrl-v). If you wish, delete the trendline as in Fig. 8. a. Right click on the outer white space, choose Select Data and click the Add button. b. You can type in the cell ranges by hand in the dialog box that comes up, but it is easier to click the red, white, and blue button on the right of each space and highlight what you want to go in. Click the red, white, and blue of the bar that has appeared, and you will bounce back to the Add dialog box. Use the Edge Length column for the x’s and Volume for the y’s. c. Right-click on any volume data point and choose Format Data Series. Clicking Secondary Axis will place its scale on the right of the graph as in Fig. 8. d. Dress up your graph with two axis titles (Layout-Labels-Axis Titles), etc. Figure 8. Adding a second curve and y-axis to the graph Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com EXERCISE 2: INTERPRETING A LINEAR GRAPH Introduction: Many experiments are repeated a number of times with one of the parameters involved varied from run to run. Often the goal is to measure the rate of change of a dependent variable, rather than a particular value. If the dependent variable can be expressed as a linear function of the independent parameter, then the slope and yintercept of an appropriate graph will give the rate of change and a particular value, respectively. An example of such an experiment in PHYS.203L/205L is the first part of Lab 20, in which weights are added to the bottom of a suspended spring (Figure 9). This experiment shows that a spring exerts a force Fs proportional to the distance stretched y = (y-yo), a relationship known as Hooke’s Law: Fs = – k(y – yo) (Eq. 1) where k is called the Hooke’s Law constant. The minus sign shows that the spring opposes any push or pull on it. In Lab 20 Fs is equal to (- Mg) and y is given by the reading on a meter stick. Masses were added to the bottom of the spring in 50-g increments giving weights in newtons of 0.49, 0.98, etc. The weight pan was used as the pointer for reading y and had a mass of 50 g, so yo could not be directly measured. For convenient graphing Equation 1 can be rewritten: -(Mg) = – ky + kyo Or (Mg) = ky – kyo (Eq. 1′) Procedure 1. On your spreadsheet note the tabs at the bottom left and double-click Sheet1. Type in “Basics,” and then click the Sheet2 tab to bring up a fresh worksheet. Change the sheet name to “Linear Fit” and fill in data as in this table. Hooke’s Law Experiment y (m) -Fs = Mg (N) 0.337 0.49 0.388 0.98 0.446 1.47 0.498 1.96 0.550 2.45 2. Highlight the cells with the numbers, and graph (Mg) versus y as in Steps 6 and 7 of the Basics section. Your Trendline this time will be Linear of course. If you are having trouble remembering what’s versus what, “y” looks like “v”, so what comes before the “v” of “versus” goes on the y (vertical) axis. Yes, this graph is confusing: the horizontal (“x”) axis is distance y, and the “y” axis is something else. 3. Click on the Equation/R2 box on the graph and highlight just the slope, that is, only the number that comes before the “x.” Copy it (control-c is a fast way to Figure 9. A spring with a weight stretching it Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com do it) and paste it (control-v) into an empty cell. Do likewise for the intercept (including the minus sign). SAVE YOUR FILE! 5. The next steps use the standard procedure for obtaining information from linear data. Write the general equation for a straight line immediately below a hand-written copy of Equation 1′ then circle matching items: (Mg) = k y + (- k yo) (Eq. 1′) y = m x + b Note the parentheses around the intercept term of Equation 1′ to emphasize that the minus sign is part of it. Equating above and below, you can create two useful new equations: slope m = k (Eq. 2) y-intercept b = -kyo (Eq. 3) 6. Solve Equation 2 for k, that is, rewrite left to right. Then substitute the value for slope m from your graph, and you have an experimental value for the Hooke’s Law constant k. Next solve Equation 3 for yo, substitute the value for intercept b from your graph and the value of k that you just found, and calculate yo. 7. Examine your linear graph for clues to finding the units of the slope and the yintercept. Use these units to find the units of k and yo. 8. Present your values of k and yo with their units neatly at the bottom of your spreadsheet. 9. R2 in Excel, like r in our lab manual and Corr. in the LoggerPro software, is a measure of how well the calculated line matches the data points. 1.00 would indicate a perfect match. State how good a match you think was made in this case? 10. Do the Homework, Further Exercises on Interpreting Linear Graphs, on the following pages. Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Eq.1 M m f M a g               , (Eq.2) M slope m g       (Eq.3) M b f        Morgan Extra Pages Homework: Graph Interpretation Exercises EXAMPLE WITH COMPLETE SOLUTION In PHYS.203L and 205L we do Lab 9 Newton’s Second Law on Atwood’s Machine using a photogate sensor (Fig. 1). The Atwood’s apparatus can slow the rate of fall enough to be measured even with primitive timing devices. In our experiment LoggerPro software automatically collects and analyzes the data giving reliable measurements of g, the acceleration of gravity. The equation governing motion for Atwood’s Machine can be written: where a is the acceleration of the masses and string, g is the acceleration of gravity, M is the total mass at both ends of the string, m is the difference between the masses, and f is the frictional force at the hub of the pulley wheel. In this exercise you are given a graph of a vs. m obtained in this experiment with the values of M and the slope and intercept (Fig. 2). The goal is to extract values for acceleration of gravity g and frictional force f from this information. To analyze the graph we write y = mx + b, the general equation for a straight line, directly under Equation 1 and match up the various parameters: Equating above and below, you can create two new equations: and y m x b M m f M a g                Figure 1. The Atwood’s Machine setup (from the LoggerPro handout). Figure 2. Graph of acceleration versus mass difference; data from a Physics I experiment. Atwood’s Machine M = 0.400 kg a = 24.4 m – 0.018 R2 = 0.998 0.00 0.20 0.40 0.60 0.80 1.00 1.20 1.40 0.000 0.010 0.020 0.030 0.040 0.050 0.060  m (kg) a (m/s2) Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com 2 2 9.76 / 0.400 24.4 /( ) m s kg m kg s g Mm      To handle Equation 2 it pays to consider what the units of the slope are. A slope is “the rise over the run,“ so its units must be the units of the vertical axis divided by those of the horizontal axis. In this case: Now let’s solve Equation 2 for g and substitute the values of total mass M and of the slope m from the graph: Using 9.80 m/s2 as the Baltimore accepted value for g, we can calculate the percent error: A similar process with Equation 3 leads to a value for f, the frictional force at the hub of the pulley wheel. Note that the units of intercept b are simply whatever the vertical axis units are, m/s2 in this case. Solving Equation 3 for f: EXERCISE 1 The Picket Fence experiment makes use of LoggerPro software to calculate velocities at regular time intervals as the striped plate passes through the photogate (Fig. 3). The theoretical equation is v = vi + at (Eq. 4) where vi = 0 (the fence is dropped from rest) and a = g. a. Write Equation 4 with y = mx + b under it and circle matching factors as in the Example. b. What is the experimental value of the acceleration of gravity? What is its percent error from the accepted value for Baltimore, 9.80 m/s2? c. Does the value of the y-intercept make sense? d. How well did the straight Trendline match the data? 2 / 2 kg s m kg m s   0.4% 100 9.80 9.76 9.80 100 . . . %        Acc Exp Acc Error kg m s mN kg m s f Mb 7.2 10 / 7.2 0.400 ( 0.018 / ) 3 2 2           Figure 3. Graph of speed versus time as calculated by LoggerPro as a picket fence falls freely through a photogate. Picket Fence Drop y = 9.8224x + 0.0007 R2 = 0.9997 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 t (s) v (m/s) Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com EXERCISE 2 This is an electrical example from PHYS.204L/206L, potential difference, V, versus current, I (Fig. 4). The theoretical equation is V = IR (Eq. 5) and is known as “Ohm’s Law.” The unit symbols stand for volts, V, and Amperes, A. The factor R stands for resistance and is measured in units of ohms, symbol  (capital omega). The definition of the ohm is: V (Eq. 6) By coincidence the letter symbols for potential (a quantity ) and volts (its unit) are identical. Thus “voltage” has become the laboratory slang name for potential. a. Rearrange the Ohm’s Law equation to match y = mx + b.. b. What is the experimental resistance? c. Comment on the experimental intercept: is its value reasonable? EXERCISE 3 This graph (Fig. 5) also follows Ohm’s Law, but solved for current I. For this graph the experimenter held potential difference V constant at 15.0V and measured the current for resistances of 100, 50, 40, and 30  Solve Ohm’s Law for I and you will see that 1/R is the logical variable to use on the x axis. For units, someone once jokingly referred to a “reciprocal ohm” as a “mho,” and the name stuck. a. Rearrange Equation 5 solved for I to match y = mx + b. b. What is the experimental potential difference? c. Calculate the percent difference from the 15.0 V that the experimenter set on the power supply (the instrument used for such experiments). d. Comment on the experimental intercept: is its value reasonable? Figure 4. Graph of potential difference versus current; data from a Physics II experiment. The theoretical equation, V = IR, is known as “Ohm’s Law.” Ohm’s Law y = 0.628x – 0.0275 R2 = 0.9933 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 Current, I (A) Potential difference, V (V) Figure 5. Another application of Ohm’s Law: a graph of current versus the inverse of resistance, from a different electric circuit experiment. Current versus (1/Resistance) y = 14.727x – 0.2214 R2 = 0.9938 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 R-1 (millimhos) I (milliamperes) Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com EXERCISE 4 The Atwood’s Machine experiment (see the solved example above) can be done in another way: keep mass difference m the same and vary the total mass M (Fig. 6). a. Rewrite Equation 1 and factor out (1/M). b. Equate the coefficient of (1/M) with the experimental slope and solve for acceleration of gravity g. c. Substitute the values for slope, mass difference, and frictional force and calculate the experimental of g. d. Derive the units of the slope and show that the units of g come out as they should. e. Is the value of the experimental intercept reasonable? EXERCISE 5 In the previous two exercises the reciprocal of a variable was used to make the graph come out linear. In this one the trick will be to use the square root of a variable (Fig. 7). In PHYS.203L and 205L Lab 19 The Pendulum the theoretical equation is where the period T is the time per cycle, L is the length of the string, and g is the acceleration of gravity. a. Rewrite Equation 7 with the square root of L factored out and placed at the end. b. Equate the coefficient of √L with the experimental slope and solve for acceleration of gravity g. c. Substitute the value for slope and calculate the experimental of g. d. Derive the units of the slope and show that the units of g come out as they should. e. Is the value of the experimental intercept reasonable? 2 (Eq . 7) g T   L Figure 6. Graph of acceleration versus the reciprocal of total mass; data from a another Physics I experiment. Atwood’s Machine m = 0.020 kg f = 7.2 mN y = 0.1964x – 0.0735 R2 = 0.995 0.400 0.600 0.800 1.000 2.000 2.500 3.000 3.500 4.000 4.500 5.000 1/M (1/kg) a (m/s2) Effect of Pendulum Length on Period y = 2.0523x – 0.0331 R2 = 0.999 0.400 0.800 1.200 1.600 2.000 2.400 0.00 0.10 0.20 0.30 0.40 0.50 0.60 0.70 0.80 0.90 1.00 1.10 L1/2 (m1/2) T (s) Figure 7. Graph of period T versus the square root of pendulum length; data from a Physics I experiment. Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com EXERCISE 6 In Exercise 5 another approach would have been to square both sides of Equation 7 and plot T2 versus L. Lab 20 directs us to use that alternative. It involves another case of periodic or harmonic motion with a similar, but more complicated, equation for the period: where T is the period of the bobbing (Fig. 8), M is the suspended mass, ms is the mass of the spring, k is a measure of stiffness called the spring constant, and C is a dimensionless factor showing how much of the spring mass is effectively bobbing. a. Square both sides of Equation 8 and rearrange it to match y = mx + b. b. Write y = mx + b under your rearranged equation and circle matching factors as in the Example. c. Write two new equations analogous to Equations 2 and 3 in the Example. Use the first of the two for calculating k and the second for finding C from the data of Fig. 9. d. A theoretical analysis has shown that for most springs C = 1/3. Find the percent error from that value. e. Derive the units of the slope and intercept; show that the units of k come out as N/m and that C is dimensionless. 2 (Eq . 8) k T M Cm s    Figure 8. In Lab 20 mass M is suspended from a spring which is set to bobbing up and down, a good approximation to simple harmonic motion (SHM), described by Equation 8. Lab 20: SHM of a Spring Mass of the spring, ms = 25.1 g y = 3.0185x + 0.0197 R2 = 0.9965 0.0000 0.2000 0.4000 0.6000 0.8000 1.0000 0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 0.3 M (kg) T 2 2 Figure 9. Graph of the square of the period T2 versus suspended mass M data from a Physics I experiment. Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com EXERCISE 7 This last exercise deals with an exponential equation, and the trick is to take the logarithm of both sides. In PHYS.204L/206L we do Lab 33 The RC Time Constant with theoretical equation: where V is the potential difference at time t across a circuit element called a capacitor (the  is dropped for simplicity), Vo is V at t = 0 (try it), and  (tau) is a characteristic of the circuit called the time constant. a. Take the natural log of both sides and apply the addition rule for logarithms of a product on the right-hand side. b. Noting that the graph (Fig. 10) plots lnV versus t, arrange your equation in y = mx + b order, write y = mx + b under it, and circle the parts as in the Example. c. Write two new equations analogous to Equations 2 and 3 in the Example. Use the first of the two for calculating  and the second for finding lnVo and then Vo. d. Note that the units of lnV are the natural log of volts, lnV. As usual derive the units of the slope and interecept and use them to obtain the units of your experimental V and t. V V e (Eq. 9) t o    Figure 10. Graph of a logarithm versus time; data from Lab 33, a Physics II experiment. Discharge of a Capacitor y = -9.17E-03x + 2.00E+00 R2 = 9.98E-01 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50

Morgan Extra Pages Graphing with Excel to be carried out in a computer lab, 3rd floor Calloway Hall or elsewhere The Excel spreadsheet consists of vertical columns and horizontal rows; a column and row intersect at a cell. A cell can contain data for use in calculations of all sorts. The Name Box shows the currently selected cell (Fig. 1). In the Excel 2007 and 2010 versions the drop-down menus familiar in most software screens have been replaced by tabs with horizontally-arranged command buttons of various categories (Fig. 2) ___________________________________________________________________ Open Excel, click on the Microsoft circle, upper left, and Save As your surname. xlsx on the desktop. Before leaving the lab e-mail the file to yourself and/or save to a flash drive. Also e-mail it to your instructor. Figure 1. Parts of an Excel spreadsheet. Name Box Figure 2. Tabs. Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com EXERCISE 1: BASIC OPERATIONS Click Save often as you work. 1. Type the heading “Edge Length” in Cell A1 and double click the crack between the A and B column heading for automatic widening of column A. Similarly, write headings for columns B and C and enter numbers in Cells A2 and A3 as in Fig. 3. Highlight Cells A2 and A3 by dragging the cursor (chunky plus-shape) over the two of them and letting go. 2. Note that there are three types of cursor crosses: chunky for selecting, barbed for moving entries or blocks of entries from cell to cell, and tiny (appearing only at the little square in the lower-right corner of a cell). Obtain a tiny arrow for Cell A3 and perform a plus-drag down Column A until the cells are filled up to 40 (in Cell A8). Note that the two highlighted cells set both the starting value of the fill and the intervals. 3. Click on Cell B2 and enter a formula for face area of a cube as follows: type =, click on Cell A2, type ^2, and press Enter (note the formula bar in Fig. 4). 4. Enter the formula for cube volume in Cell C2 (same procedure, but “=, click on A2, ^3, Enter”). 5. Highlight Cells B2 and C2; plus-drag down to Row 8 (Fig. 5). Do the numbers look correct? Click on some cells in the newly filled area and notice how Excel steps the row designations as it moves down the column (it can do it for horizontal plusdrags along rows also). This is the major programming development that has led to the popularity of spreadsheets. Figure 3. Entries. Figure 4. A formula. Figure 5. Plus-dragging formulas. Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com 6. Now let’s graph the Face Area versus Edge Length: select Cells A1 through B8, choose the Insert tab, and click the Scatter drop-down menu and select “Scatter with only Markers” (Fig. 6). 7. Move the graph (Excel calls it a “chart”) that appears up alongside your number table and dress it up as follows: a. Note that some Chart Layouts have appeared above. Click Layout 1 and alter each title to read Face Area for the vertical axis, Edge Length for the horizontal and Face Area vs. Edge Length for the Graph Title. b. Activate the Excel Least squares routine, called “fitting a trendline” in the program: right click any of the data markers and click Add Trendline. Choose Power and also check “Display equation on chart” and “Display R-squared value on chart.” Fig. 7 shows what the graph will look like at this point. c. The titles are explicit, so the legend is unnecessary. Click on it and press the delete button to remove it. Figure 6. Creating a scatter graph. Figure 7. A graph with a fitted curve. Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com 8. Now let’s overlay the Volume vs. Edge Length curve onto the same graph (optional for 203L/205L): Make a copy of your graph by clicking on the outer white area, clicking ctrl-c (or right click, copy), and pasting the copy somewhere else (ctrl-v). If you wish, delete the trendline as in Fig. 8. a. Right click on the outer white space, choose Select Data and click the Add button. b. You can type in the cell ranges by hand in the dialog box that comes up, but it is easier to click the red, white, and blue button on the right of each space and highlight what you want to go in. Click the red, white, and blue of the bar that has appeared, and you will bounce back to the Add dialog box. Use the Edge Length column for the x’s and Volume for the y’s. c. Right-click on any volume data point and choose Format Data Series. Clicking Secondary Axis will place its scale on the right of the graph as in Fig. 8. d. Dress up your graph with two axis titles (Layout-Labels-Axis Titles), etc. Figure 8. Adding a second curve and y-axis to the graph Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com EXERCISE 2: INTERPRETING A LINEAR GRAPH Introduction: Many experiments are repeated a number of times with one of the parameters involved varied from run to run. Often the goal is to measure the rate of change of a dependent variable, rather than a particular value. If the dependent variable can be expressed as a linear function of the independent parameter, then the slope and yintercept of an appropriate graph will give the rate of change and a particular value, respectively. An example of such an experiment in PHYS.203L/205L is the first part of Lab 20, in which weights are added to the bottom of a suspended spring (Figure 9). This experiment shows that a spring exerts a force Fs proportional to the distance stretched y = (y-yo), a relationship known as Hooke’s Law: Fs = – k(y – yo) (Eq. 1) where k is called the Hooke’s Law constant. The minus sign shows that the spring opposes any push or pull on it. In Lab 20 Fs is equal to (- Mg) and y is given by the reading on a meter stick. Masses were added to the bottom of the spring in 50-g increments giving weights in newtons of 0.49, 0.98, etc. The weight pan was used as the pointer for reading y and had a mass of 50 g, so yo could not be directly measured. For convenient graphing Equation 1 can be rewritten: -(Mg) = – ky + kyo Or (Mg) = ky – kyo (Eq. 1′) Procedure 1. On your spreadsheet note the tabs at the bottom left and double-click Sheet1. Type in “Basics,” and then click the Sheet2 tab to bring up a fresh worksheet. Change the sheet name to “Linear Fit” and fill in data as in this table. Hooke’s Law Experiment y (m) -Fs = Mg (N) 0.337 0.49 0.388 0.98 0.446 1.47 0.498 1.96 0.550 2.45 2. Highlight the cells with the numbers, and graph (Mg) versus y as in Steps 6 and 7 of the Basics section. Your Trendline this time will be Linear of course. If you are having trouble remembering what’s versus what, “y” looks like “v”, so what comes before the “v” of “versus” goes on the y (vertical) axis. Yes, this graph is confusing: the horizontal (“x”) axis is distance y, and the “y” axis is something else. 3. Click on the Equation/R2 box on the graph and highlight just the slope, that is, only the number that comes before the “x.” Copy it (control-c is a fast way to Figure 9. A spring with a weight stretching it Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com do it) and paste it (control-v) into an empty cell. Do likewise for the intercept (including the minus sign). SAVE YOUR FILE! 5. The next steps use the standard procedure for obtaining information from linear data. Write the general equation for a straight line immediately below a hand-written copy of Equation 1′ then circle matching items: (Mg) = k y + (- k yo) (Eq. 1′) y = m x + b Note the parentheses around the intercept term of Equation 1′ to emphasize that the minus sign is part of it. Equating above and below, you can create two useful new equations: slope m = k (Eq. 2) y-intercept b = -kyo (Eq. 3) 6. Solve Equation 2 for k, that is, rewrite left to right. Then substitute the value for slope m from your graph, and you have an experimental value for the Hooke’s Law constant k. Next solve Equation 3 for yo, substitute the value for intercept b from your graph and the value of k that you just found, and calculate yo. 7. Examine your linear graph for clues to finding the units of the slope and the yintercept. Use these units to find the units of k and yo. 8. Present your values of k and yo with their units neatly at the bottom of your spreadsheet. 9. R2 in Excel, like r in our lab manual and Corr. in the LoggerPro software, is a measure of how well the calculated line matches the data points. 1.00 would indicate a perfect match. State how good a match you think was made in this case? 10. Do the Homework, Further Exercises on Interpreting Linear Graphs, on the following pages. Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Eq.1 M m f M a g               , (Eq.2) M slope m g       (Eq.3) M b f        Morgan Extra Pages Homework: Graph Interpretation Exercises EXAMPLE WITH COMPLETE SOLUTION In PHYS.203L and 205L we do Lab 9 Newton’s Second Law on Atwood’s Machine using a photogate sensor (Fig. 1). The Atwood’s apparatus can slow the rate of fall enough to be measured even with primitive timing devices. In our experiment LoggerPro software automatically collects and analyzes the data giving reliable measurements of g, the acceleration of gravity. The equation governing motion for Atwood’s Machine can be written: where a is the acceleration of the masses and string, g is the acceleration of gravity, M is the total mass at both ends of the string, m is the difference between the masses, and f is the frictional force at the hub of the pulley wheel. In this exercise you are given a graph of a vs. m obtained in this experiment with the values of M and the slope and intercept (Fig. 2). The goal is to extract values for acceleration of gravity g and frictional force f from this information. To analyze the graph we write y = mx + b, the general equation for a straight line, directly under Equation 1 and match up the various parameters: Equating above and below, you can create two new equations: and y m x b M m f M a g                Figure 1. The Atwood’s Machine setup (from the LoggerPro handout). Figure 2. Graph of acceleration versus mass difference; data from a Physics I experiment. Atwood’s Machine M = 0.400 kg a = 24.4 m – 0.018 R2 = 0.998 0.00 0.20 0.40 0.60 0.80 1.00 1.20 1.40 0.000 0.010 0.020 0.030 0.040 0.050 0.060  m (kg) a (m/s2) Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com 2 2 9.76 / 0.400 24.4 /( ) m s kg m kg s g Mm      To handle Equation 2 it pays to consider what the units of the slope are. A slope is “the rise over the run,“ so its units must be the units of the vertical axis divided by those of the horizontal axis. In this case: Now let’s solve Equation 2 for g and substitute the values of total mass M and of the slope m from the graph: Using 9.80 m/s2 as the Baltimore accepted value for g, we can calculate the percent error: A similar process with Equation 3 leads to a value for f, the frictional force at the hub of the pulley wheel. Note that the units of intercept b are simply whatever the vertical axis units are, m/s2 in this case. Solving Equation 3 for f: EXERCISE 1 The Picket Fence experiment makes use of LoggerPro software to calculate velocities at regular time intervals as the striped plate passes through the photogate (Fig. 3). The theoretical equation is v = vi + at (Eq. 4) where vi = 0 (the fence is dropped from rest) and a = g. a. Write Equation 4 with y = mx + b under it and circle matching factors as in the Example. b. What is the experimental value of the acceleration of gravity? What is its percent error from the accepted value for Baltimore, 9.80 m/s2? c. Does the value of the y-intercept make sense? d. How well did the straight Trendline match the data? 2 / 2 kg s m kg m s   0.4% 100 9.80 9.76 9.80 100 . . . %        Acc Exp Acc Error kg m s mN kg m s f Mb 7.2 10 / 7.2 0.400 ( 0.018 / ) 3 2 2           Figure 3. Graph of speed versus time as calculated by LoggerPro as a picket fence falls freely through a photogate. Picket Fence Drop y = 9.8224x + 0.0007 R2 = 0.9997 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 t (s) v (m/s) Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com EXERCISE 2 This is an electrical example from PHYS.204L/206L, potential difference, V, versus current, I (Fig. 4). The theoretical equation is V = IR (Eq. 5) and is known as “Ohm’s Law.” The unit symbols stand for volts, V, and Amperes, A. The factor R stands for resistance and is measured in units of ohms, symbol  (capital omega). The definition of the ohm is: V (Eq. 6) By coincidence the letter symbols for potential (a quantity ) and volts (its unit) are identical. Thus “voltage” has become the laboratory slang name for potential. a. Rearrange the Ohm’s Law equation to match y = mx + b.. b. What is the experimental resistance? c. Comment on the experimental intercept: is its value reasonable? EXERCISE 3 This graph (Fig. 5) also follows Ohm’s Law, but solved for current I. For this graph the experimenter held potential difference V constant at 15.0V and measured the current for resistances of 100, 50, 40, and 30  Solve Ohm’s Law for I and you will see that 1/R is the logical variable to use on the x axis. For units, someone once jokingly referred to a “reciprocal ohm” as a “mho,” and the name stuck. a. Rearrange Equation 5 solved for I to match y = mx + b. b. What is the experimental potential difference? c. Calculate the percent difference from the 15.0 V that the experimenter set on the power supply (the instrument used for such experiments). d. Comment on the experimental intercept: is its value reasonable? Figure 4. Graph of potential difference versus current; data from a Physics II experiment. The theoretical equation, V = IR, is known as “Ohm’s Law.” Ohm’s Law y = 0.628x – 0.0275 R2 = 0.9933 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 Current, I (A) Potential difference, V (V) Figure 5. Another application of Ohm’s Law: a graph of current versus the inverse of resistance, from a different electric circuit experiment. Current versus (1/Resistance) y = 14.727x – 0.2214 R2 = 0.9938 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 R-1 (millimhos) I (milliamperes) Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com EXERCISE 4 The Atwood’s Machine experiment (see the solved example above) can be done in another way: keep mass difference m the same and vary the total mass M (Fig. 6). a. Rewrite Equation 1 and factor out (1/M). b. Equate the coefficient of (1/M) with the experimental slope and solve for acceleration of gravity g. c. Substitute the values for slope, mass difference, and frictional force and calculate the experimental of g. d. Derive the units of the slope and show that the units of g come out as they should. e. Is the value of the experimental intercept reasonable? EXERCISE 5 In the previous two exercises the reciprocal of a variable was used to make the graph come out linear. In this one the trick will be to use the square root of a variable (Fig. 7). In PHYS.203L and 205L Lab 19 The Pendulum the theoretical equation is where the period T is the time per cycle, L is the length of the string, and g is the acceleration of gravity. a. Rewrite Equation 7 with the square root of L factored out and placed at the end. b. Equate the coefficient of √L with the experimental slope and solve for acceleration of gravity g. c. Substitute the value for slope and calculate the experimental of g. d. Derive the units of the slope and show that the units of g come out as they should. e. Is the value of the experimental intercept reasonable? 2 (Eq . 7) g T   L Figure 6. Graph of acceleration versus the reciprocal of total mass; data from a another Physics I experiment. Atwood’s Machine m = 0.020 kg f = 7.2 mN y = 0.1964x – 0.0735 R2 = 0.995 0.400 0.600 0.800 1.000 2.000 2.500 3.000 3.500 4.000 4.500 5.000 1/M (1/kg) a (m/s2) Effect of Pendulum Length on Period y = 2.0523x – 0.0331 R2 = 0.999 0.400 0.800 1.200 1.600 2.000 2.400 0.00 0.10 0.20 0.30 0.40 0.50 0.60 0.70 0.80 0.90 1.00 1.10 L1/2 (m1/2) T (s) Figure 7. Graph of period T versus the square root of pendulum length; data from a Physics I experiment. Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com EXERCISE 6 In Exercise 5 another approach would have been to square both sides of Equation 7 and plot T2 versus L. Lab 20 directs us to use that alternative. It involves another case of periodic or harmonic motion with a similar, but more complicated, equation for the period: where T is the period of the bobbing (Fig. 8), M is the suspended mass, ms is the mass of the spring, k is a measure of stiffness called the spring constant, and C is a dimensionless factor showing how much of the spring mass is effectively bobbing. a. Square both sides of Equation 8 and rearrange it to match y = mx + b. b. Write y = mx + b under your rearranged equation and circle matching factors as in the Example. c. Write two new equations analogous to Equations 2 and 3 in the Example. Use the first of the two for calculating k and the second for finding C from the data of Fig. 9. d. A theoretical analysis has shown that for most springs C = 1/3. Find the percent error from that value. e. Derive the units of the slope and intercept; show that the units of k come out as N/m and that C is dimensionless. 2 (Eq . 8) k T M Cm s    Figure 8. In Lab 20 mass M is suspended from a spring which is set to bobbing up and down, a good approximation to simple harmonic motion (SHM), described by Equation 8. Lab 20: SHM of a Spring Mass of the spring, ms = 25.1 g y = 3.0185x + 0.0197 R2 = 0.9965 0.0000 0.2000 0.4000 0.6000 0.8000 1.0000 0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 0.3 M (kg) T 2 2 Figure 9. Graph of the square of the period T2 versus suspended mass M data from a Physics I experiment. Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com EXERCISE 7 This last exercise deals with an exponential equation, and the trick is to take the logarithm of both sides. In PHYS.204L/206L we do Lab 33 The RC Time Constant with theoretical equation: where V is the potential difference at time t across a circuit element called a capacitor (the  is dropped for simplicity), Vo is V at t = 0 (try it), and  (tau) is a characteristic of the circuit called the time constant. a. Take the natural log of both sides and apply the addition rule for logarithms of a product on the right-hand side. b. Noting that the graph (Fig. 10) plots lnV versus t, arrange your equation in y = mx + b order, write y = mx + b under it, and circle the parts as in the Example. c. Write two new equations analogous to Equations 2 and 3 in the Example. Use the first of the two for calculating  and the second for finding lnVo and then Vo. d. Note that the units of lnV are the natural log of volts, lnV. As usual derive the units of the slope and interecept and use them to obtain the units of your experimental V and t. V V e (Eq. 9) t o    Figure 10. Graph of a logarithm versus time; data from Lab 33, a Physics II experiment. Discharge of a Capacitor y = -9.17E-03x + 2.00E+00 R2 = 9.98E-01 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50

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A factory receives power at 480 Vrms @ 60 Hz. from the electric utility company. The factory’s electrical load can be simply represented by 2 loads. LOAD1 describes the manufacturing equipment on the assembly line. LOAD2 describes the power used in office rooms. From time to time, the assembly line shuts down thereby removing LOAD1 from the grid. SWITCH1 accounts for this effect in the equivalent circuit model shown above. Note that the 2 dependent sources represent a device called a “transformer” that steps the 480 Vrms down to 120 Vrms for use in the offices. (But don’t take my word for it; circuit analysis calculations will confirm this.) Given: Receiving End Voltage (with SWITCH1 closed): RV = 480 Vrms Wiring parameters: RW = 0.005 Ω, LW = 0.52052 mH Find: a) With SWITCH1 closed, find the value of C (in Farads) so that the total LOADt at the Receiving End has unity pf. Find the magnitude of the Sending End Voltage SV , and the magnitude of the “Office” load voltage, 2V. Note that RMS480VRV= for this case. b) With SWITCH1 open, using the value of C and SV found in part a), find the new values of the magnitudes of the Receiving End Voltage RV and Office Voltage 2V. Why will this be a problem for the office? How could you change the capacitor connection to avoid this problem? Hints: Note that no phase angles were given, and only magnitudes were asked for. You can choose one voltage or current to have 0 degree phase angle and then allow the calculations of any other voltages and currents be relative to that. In part b) RMS480VRV≠.

A factory receives power at 480 Vrms @ 60 Hz. from the electric utility company. The factory’s electrical load can be simply represented by 2 loads. LOAD1 describes the manufacturing equipment on the assembly line. LOAD2 describes the power used in office rooms. From time to time, the assembly line shuts down thereby removing LOAD1 from the grid. SWITCH1 accounts for this effect in the equivalent circuit model shown above. Note that the 2 dependent sources represent a device called a “transformer” that steps the 480 Vrms down to 120 Vrms for use in the offices. (But don’t take my word for it; circuit analysis calculations will confirm this.) Given: Receiving End Voltage (with SWITCH1 closed): RV = 480 Vrms Wiring parameters: RW = 0.005 Ω, LW = 0.52052 mH Find: a) With SWITCH1 closed, find the value of C (in Farads) so that the total LOADt at the Receiving End has unity pf. Find the magnitude of the Sending End Voltage SV , and the magnitude of the “Office” load voltage, 2V. Note that RMS480VRV= for this case. b) With SWITCH1 open, using the value of C and SV found in part a), find the new values of the magnitudes of the Receiving End Voltage RV and Office Voltage 2V. Why will this be a problem for the office? How could you change the capacitor connection to avoid this problem? Hints: Note that no phase angles were given, and only magnitudes were asked for. You can choose one voltage or current to have 0 degree phase angle and then allow the calculations of any other voltages and currents be relative to that. In part b) RMS480VRV≠.

A factory receives power at 480 Vrms @ 60 Hz. … Read More...
Que 1: in women who suffer from migraine …………………. are classified menstrual migraines, which tend to be more severe and longer lasting . a) 5% – 10% b) 45% – 55% c) 20% – 50% d) 65%-75% Que 2: why are the women on average, slightly shorter than men a) They have fat then man which contributes to stature b) Their long bones are sealed and stop growing earlier than men c) Their brains are somewhat smaller than man’s brain d) Their brains are somewhat larger than man, brain que 3: menopause frequently occurs between ………………..age of year a) 25-30 b) 45-55 c) 35-40 d) 65-75 que 4: this hormone causes enlargement of the larynx and an increase in the length and thickness of the vocal cords. A) estrogen 2) cholesterol 3) progesterone 4) testosterone Que 5: the reproductive cycle includes which of the following interconnected sets of events a) Ovarian cycle b) Urinary cycle c) Placental cycle d) Female prostate cycle Que 6: high level of circulating progesterone have been associated with : a) Excessive milk production b) Ovarian cancer c) Inability to breast feed a new born child d) Pregnancy Que 7: although variations exist, ovulation typically occurs on the …………day before mensuaration a) 1st b) 14th c) 7th d) 28th Que 8: LH stimulates interstitial cells a) To decrease GnRH b) To produce FSH c) To produce testosterones d) To produce sperm Que 9:what region of the uterus is shed during menstration? a) Stratum basalis of the myometrium b) Stratum basalis of the endometrium c) Stratum functionalis of the endometrium d) Perimetrium Que 10: the phenomenon is which women living in close proximity tend to menstruate at approximately the time is called. a) Precocious puberty b) Menstrual synchrony’ c) Delayed puberty d) Ovarian synchrony Que 11.studies have shown that healthy menstruating women a) Should not participate in sports b) Often feel ill or weak when exercising c) Are able to safety engage in athletic activities d) Can contaminate others and should not engage in contacts sports. Que 12: which term below describes a chemical that resembles steroid hormones and posses threat to maintain homeostasis. a) Androgens b) Prostaglandins c) Endocrine disruptors d) All of the above Que 13: one of the primary function of ……….is preparing and sustaining the uterus of pregnancy a) Testosterone b) Progesterone c) Estradiol d) inhibin Que 14: typically ovulation occurs a) at the end of the uterine phase b) at the start of follicular phase c) during an increase of LH in the ovarian cycle d) at the middle of the luteal phase

Que 1: in women who suffer from migraine …………………. are classified menstrual migraines, which tend to be more severe and longer lasting . a) 5% – 10% b) 45% – 55% c) 20% – 50% d) 65%-75% Que 2: why are the women on average, slightly shorter than men a) They have fat then man which contributes to stature b) Their long bones are sealed and stop growing earlier than men c) Their brains are somewhat smaller than man’s brain d) Their brains are somewhat larger than man, brain que 3: menopause frequently occurs between ………………..age of year a) 25-30 b) 45-55 c) 35-40 d) 65-75 que 4: this hormone causes enlargement of the larynx and an increase in the length and thickness of the vocal cords. A) estrogen 2) cholesterol 3) progesterone 4) testosterone Que 5: the reproductive cycle includes which of the following interconnected sets of events a) Ovarian cycle b) Urinary cycle c) Placental cycle d) Female prostate cycle Que 6: high level of circulating progesterone have been associated with : a) Excessive milk production b) Ovarian cancer c) Inability to breast feed a new born child d) Pregnancy Que 7: although variations exist, ovulation typically occurs on the …………day before mensuaration a) 1st b) 14th c) 7th d) 28th Que 8: LH stimulates interstitial cells a) To decrease GnRH b) To produce FSH c) To produce testosterones d) To produce sperm Que 9:what region of the uterus is shed during menstration? a) Stratum basalis of the myometrium b) Stratum basalis of the endometrium c) Stratum functionalis of the endometrium d) Perimetrium Que 10: the phenomenon is which women living in close proximity tend to menstruate at approximately the time is called. a) Precocious puberty b) Menstrual synchrony’ c) Delayed puberty d) Ovarian synchrony Que 11.studies have shown that healthy menstruating women a) Should not participate in sports b) Often feel ill or weak when exercising c) Are able to safety engage in athletic activities d) Can contaminate others and should not engage in contacts sports. Que 12: which term below describes a chemical that resembles steroid hormones and posses threat to maintain homeostasis. a) Androgens b) Prostaglandins c) Endocrine disruptors d) All of the above Que 13: one of the primary function of ……….is preparing and sustaining the uterus of pregnancy a) Testosterone b) Progesterone c) Estradiol d) inhibin Que 14: typically ovulation occurs a) at the end of the uterine phase b) at the start of follicular phase c) during an increase of LH in the ovarian cycle d) at the middle of the luteal phase