Chapter 15 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 16, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Fluid Pressure in a U-Tube A U-tube is filled with water, and the two arms are capped. The tube is cylindrical, and the right arm has twice the radius of the left arm. The caps have negligible mass, are watertight, and can freely slide up and down the tube. Part A A one-inch depth of sand is poured onto the cap on each arm. After the caps have moved (if necessary) to reestablish equilibrium, is the right cap higher, lower, or the same height as the left cap? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Pressure in the Ocean The pressure at 10 below the surface of the ocean is about 2.00×105 . Part A higher lower the same height m Pa Which of the following statements is true? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Now consider the pressure 20 below the surface of the ocean. Which of the following statements is true? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Relating Pressure and Height in a Container Learning Goal: To understand the derivation of the law relating height and pressure in a container. The weight of a column of seawater 1 in cross section and 10 high is about 2.00×105 . The weight of a column of seawater 1 in cross section and 10 high plus the weight of a column of air with the same cross section extending up to the top of the atmosphere is about 2.00×105 . The weight of 1 of seawater at 10 below the surface of the ocean is about 2.00×105 . The density of seawater is about 2.00×105 times the density of air at sea level. m2 m N m2 m N m3 m N m The pressure is twice that at a depth of 10 . The pressure is the same as that at a depth of 10 . The pressure is equal to that at a depth of 10 plus the weight per 1 cross sectional area of a column of seawater 10 high. The pressure is equal to the weight per 1 cross sectional area of a column of seawater 20 high. m m m m2 m m2 m In this problem, you will derive the law relating pressure to height in a container by analyzing a particular system. A container of uniform cross-sectional area is filled with liquid of uniform density . Consider a thin horizontal layer of liquid (thickness ) at a height as measured from the bottom of the container. Let the pressure exerted upward on the bottom of the layer be and the pressure exerted downward on the top be . Assume throughout the problem that the system is in equilibrium (the container has not been recently shaken or moved, etc.). Part A What is , the magnitude of the force exerted upward on the bottom of the liquid? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is , the magnitude of the force exerted downward on the top of the liquid? A  dy y p p + dp Fup Fup = Fdown You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C What is the weight of the thin layer of liquid? Express your answer in terms of quantities given in the problem introduction and , the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D Since the liquid is in equilibrium, the net force on the thin layer of liquid is zero. Complete the force equation for the sum of the vertical forces acting on the liquid layer described in the problem introduction. Express your answer in terms of quantities given in the problem introduction and taking upward forces to be positive. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Fdown = wlayer g wlayer = Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). A Submerged Ball A ball of mass and volume is lowered on a string into a fluid of density . Assume that the object would sink to the bottom if it were not supported by the string. Part A  = = i Fy,i mb V f What is the tension in the string when the ball is fully submerged but not touching the bottom, as shown in the figure? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the given quantities and , the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Archimedes’ Principle Learning Goal: To understand the applications of Archimedes’ principle. Archimedes’ principle is a powerful tool for solving many problems involving equilibrium in fluids. It states the following: When a body is partially or completely submerged in a fluid (either a liquid or a gas), the fluid exerts an upward force on the body equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the body. As a result of the upward Archimedes force (often called the buoyant force), some objects may float in a fluid, and all of them appear to weigh less. This is the familiar phenomenon of buoyancy. Quantitatively, the buoyant force can be found as , where is the force, is the density of the fluid, is the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity, and is the volume of the displaced fluid. In this problem, you will be asked several qualitative questions that should help you develop a feel for Archimedes’ principle. An object is placed in a fluid and then released. Assume that the object either floats to the surface (settling so that the object is partly above and partly below the fluid surface) or sinks to the bottom. (Note that for Parts A through D, you should assume that the object has settled in equilibrium.) Part A Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force is equal to the weight of fluid displaced by the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? T g T = Fbuoyant = fluidgV Fbuoyant fluid g V You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force is equal to the weight of the amount of fluid that has the same total volume as the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force equals the weight of the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? for every object submerged partially or completely in a fluid only for an object that floats only for an object that sinks for no object submerged in a fluid for an object that is partially submerged in a fluid only for an object that floats for an object completely submerged in a fluid for no object partially or completely submerged in a fluid You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force is less than the weight of the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? ANSWER: Now apply what you know to some more complicated situations. Part E An object is floating in equilibrium on the surface of a liquid. The object is then removed and placed in another container, filled with a denser liquid. What would you observe? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: for every object submerged partially or completely in a fluid for an object that floats only for an object that sinks for no object submerged in a fluid for every object submerged partially or completely in a fluid for an object that floats for an object that sinks for no object submerged in a fluid Part F An object is floating in equilibrium on the surface of a liquid. The object is then removed and placed in another container, filled with a less dense liquid. What would you observe? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part G Two objects, T and B, have identical size and shape and have uniform density. They are carefully placed in a container filled with a liquid. Both objects float in equilibrium. Less of object T is submerged than of object B, which floats, fully submerged, closer to the bottom of the container. Which of the following statements is true? ANSWER: The object would sink all the way to the bottom. The object would float submerged more deeply than in the first container. The object would float submerged less deeply than in the first container. More than one of these outcomes is possible. The object would sink all the way to the bottom. The object would float submerged more deeply than in the first container. The object would float submerged less deeply than in the first container. More than one of these outcomes is possible. Object T has a greater density than object B. Object B has a greater density than object T. Both objects have the same density. ± Buoyant Force Conceptual Question A rectangular wooden block of weight floats with exactly one-half of its volume below the waterline. Part A What is the buoyant force acting on the block? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B W The buoyant force cannot be determined. 2W W 1 W 2 The density of water is 1.00 . What is the density of the block? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). g/cm3 2.00 between 1.00 and 2.00 1.00 between 0.50 and 1.00 0.50 The density cannot be determined. g/cm3 g/cm3 g/cm3 g/cm3 g/cm3 Flow Velocity of Blood Conceptual Question Arteriosclerotic plaques forming on the inner walls of arteries can decrease the effective cross-sectional area of an artery. Even small changes in the effective area of an artery can lead to very large changes in the blood pressure in the artery and possibly to the collapse of the blood vessel. Imagine a healthy artery, with blood flow velocity of and mass per unit volume of . The kinetic energy per unit volume of blood is given by Imagine that plaque has narrowed an artery to one-fifth of its normal cross-sectional area (an 80% blockage). Part A Compared to normal blood flow velocity, , what is the velocity of blood as it passes through this blockage? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C v0 = 0.14 m/s  = 1050 kg/m3 K0 =  . 1 2 v20 v0 80v0 20v0 5v0 v0/5 This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). For parts D – F imagine that plaque has grown to a 90% blockage. Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). ± Playing with a Water Hose Two children, Ferdinand and Isabella, are playing with a water hose on a sunny summer day. Isabella is holding the hose in her hand 1.0 meters above the ground and is trying to spray Ferdinand, who is standing 10.0 meters away. Part A Will Isabella be able to spray Ferdinand if the water is flowing out of the hose at a constant speed of 3.5 meters per second? Assume that the hose is pointed parallel to the ground and take the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity to be 9.81 meters per second, per second. You did not open hints for this part. v0 g ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Tactics Box 15.2 Finding Whether an Object Floats or Sinks Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 15.2 Finding whether an object floats or sinks. If you hold an object underwater and then release it, it can float to the surface, sink, or remain “hanging” in the water, depending on whether the fluid density is larger than, smaller than, or equal to the object’s average density . These conditions are summarized in this Tactics Box. Yes No f avg TACTICS BOX 15.2 Finding whether an object floats or sinks Object sinks Object floats Object has neutral buoyancy An object sinks if it weighs more than the fluid it displaces, that is, if its average density is greater than the density of the fluid: . An object floats on the surface if it weighs less than the fluid it displaces, that is, if its average density is less than the density of the fluid: . An object hangs motionless in the fluid if it weighs exactly the same as the fluid it displaces. It has neutral buoyancy if its average density equals the density of the fluid: . Part A Ice at 0.0 has a density of 917 . A 3.00 ice cube is gently released inside a small container filled with oil and is observed to be neutrally buoyant. What is the density of the oil, ? Express your answer in kilograms per meter cubed to three significant figures. ANSWER: Part B Once the ice cube melts, what happens to the liquid water that it produces? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: avg > f avg < f avg = f 'C kg/m3 cm3 oil oil = kg/m3 Part C What happens if some ethyl alcohol of density 790 is poured into the container after the ice cube has melted? ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. The liquid water sinks to the bottom of the container. The liquid water rises to the surface and floats on top of the oil. The liquid water is in static equilibrium at the location where the ice cube was originally placed. kg/m3 A layer of ethyl alcohol forms between the oil and the water. The layer of ethyl alcohol forms at the bottom of the container. The layer of ethyl alcohol forms on the surface.

Chapter 15 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 16, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Fluid Pressure in a U-Tube A U-tube is filled with water, and the two arms are capped. The tube is cylindrical, and the right arm has twice the radius of the left arm. The caps have negligible mass, are watertight, and can freely slide up and down the tube. Part A A one-inch depth of sand is poured onto the cap on each arm. After the caps have moved (if necessary) to reestablish equilibrium, is the right cap higher, lower, or the same height as the left cap? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Pressure in the Ocean The pressure at 10 below the surface of the ocean is about 2.00×105 . Part A higher lower the same height m Pa Which of the following statements is true? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Now consider the pressure 20 below the surface of the ocean. Which of the following statements is true? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Relating Pressure and Height in a Container Learning Goal: To understand the derivation of the law relating height and pressure in a container. The weight of a column of seawater 1 in cross section and 10 high is about 2.00×105 . The weight of a column of seawater 1 in cross section and 10 high plus the weight of a column of air with the same cross section extending up to the top of the atmosphere is about 2.00×105 . The weight of 1 of seawater at 10 below the surface of the ocean is about 2.00×105 . The density of seawater is about 2.00×105 times the density of air at sea level. m2 m N m2 m N m3 m N m The pressure is twice that at a depth of 10 . The pressure is the same as that at a depth of 10 . The pressure is equal to that at a depth of 10 plus the weight per 1 cross sectional area of a column of seawater 10 high. The pressure is equal to the weight per 1 cross sectional area of a column of seawater 20 high. m m m m2 m m2 m In this problem, you will derive the law relating pressure to height in a container by analyzing a particular system. A container of uniform cross-sectional area is filled with liquid of uniform density . Consider a thin horizontal layer of liquid (thickness ) at a height as measured from the bottom of the container. Let the pressure exerted upward on the bottom of the layer be and the pressure exerted downward on the top be . Assume throughout the problem that the system is in equilibrium (the container has not been recently shaken or moved, etc.). Part A What is , the magnitude of the force exerted upward on the bottom of the liquid? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is , the magnitude of the force exerted downward on the top of the liquid? A  dy y p p + dp Fup Fup = Fdown You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C What is the weight of the thin layer of liquid? Express your answer in terms of quantities given in the problem introduction and , the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D Since the liquid is in equilibrium, the net force on the thin layer of liquid is zero. Complete the force equation for the sum of the vertical forces acting on the liquid layer described in the problem introduction. Express your answer in terms of quantities given in the problem introduction and taking upward forces to be positive. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Fdown = wlayer g wlayer = Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). A Submerged Ball A ball of mass and volume is lowered on a string into a fluid of density . Assume that the object would sink to the bottom if it were not supported by the string. Part A  = = i Fy,i mb V f What is the tension in the string when the ball is fully submerged but not touching the bottom, as shown in the figure? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the given quantities and , the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Archimedes’ Principle Learning Goal: To understand the applications of Archimedes’ principle. Archimedes’ principle is a powerful tool for solving many problems involving equilibrium in fluids. It states the following: When a body is partially or completely submerged in a fluid (either a liquid or a gas), the fluid exerts an upward force on the body equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the body. As a result of the upward Archimedes force (often called the buoyant force), some objects may float in a fluid, and all of them appear to weigh less. This is the familiar phenomenon of buoyancy. Quantitatively, the buoyant force can be found as , where is the force, is the density of the fluid, is the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity, and is the volume of the displaced fluid. In this problem, you will be asked several qualitative questions that should help you develop a feel for Archimedes’ principle. An object is placed in a fluid and then released. Assume that the object either floats to the surface (settling so that the object is partly above and partly below the fluid surface) or sinks to the bottom. (Note that for Parts A through D, you should assume that the object has settled in equilibrium.) Part A Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force is equal to the weight of fluid displaced by the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? T g T = Fbuoyant = fluidgV Fbuoyant fluid g V You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force is equal to the weight of the amount of fluid that has the same total volume as the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force equals the weight of the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? for every object submerged partially or completely in a fluid only for an object that floats only for an object that sinks for no object submerged in a fluid for an object that is partially submerged in a fluid only for an object that floats for an object completely submerged in a fluid for no object partially or completely submerged in a fluid You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force is less than the weight of the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? ANSWER: Now apply what you know to some more complicated situations. Part E An object is floating in equilibrium on the surface of a liquid. The object is then removed and placed in another container, filled with a denser liquid. What would you observe? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: for every object submerged partially or completely in a fluid for an object that floats only for an object that sinks for no object submerged in a fluid for every object submerged partially or completely in a fluid for an object that floats for an object that sinks for no object submerged in a fluid Part F An object is floating in equilibrium on the surface of a liquid. The object is then removed and placed in another container, filled with a less dense liquid. What would you observe? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part G Two objects, T and B, have identical size and shape and have uniform density. They are carefully placed in a container filled with a liquid. Both objects float in equilibrium. Less of object T is submerged than of object B, which floats, fully submerged, closer to the bottom of the container. Which of the following statements is true? ANSWER: The object would sink all the way to the bottom. The object would float submerged more deeply than in the first container. The object would float submerged less deeply than in the first container. More than one of these outcomes is possible. The object would sink all the way to the bottom. The object would float submerged more deeply than in the first container. The object would float submerged less deeply than in the first container. More than one of these outcomes is possible. Object T has a greater density than object B. Object B has a greater density than object T. Both objects have the same density. ± Buoyant Force Conceptual Question A rectangular wooden block of weight floats with exactly one-half of its volume below the waterline. Part A What is the buoyant force acting on the block? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B W The buoyant force cannot be determined. 2W W 1 W 2 The density of water is 1.00 . What is the density of the block? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). g/cm3 2.00 between 1.00 and 2.00 1.00 between 0.50 and 1.00 0.50 The density cannot be determined. g/cm3 g/cm3 g/cm3 g/cm3 g/cm3 Flow Velocity of Blood Conceptual Question Arteriosclerotic plaques forming on the inner walls of arteries can decrease the effective cross-sectional area of an artery. Even small changes in the effective area of an artery can lead to very large changes in the blood pressure in the artery and possibly to the collapse of the blood vessel. Imagine a healthy artery, with blood flow velocity of and mass per unit volume of . The kinetic energy per unit volume of blood is given by Imagine that plaque has narrowed an artery to one-fifth of its normal cross-sectional area (an 80% blockage). Part A Compared to normal blood flow velocity, , what is the velocity of blood as it passes through this blockage? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C v0 = 0.14 m/s  = 1050 kg/m3 K0 =  . 1 2 v20 v0 80v0 20v0 5v0 v0/5 This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). For parts D – F imagine that plaque has grown to a 90% blockage. Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). ± Playing with a Water Hose Two children, Ferdinand and Isabella, are playing with a water hose on a sunny summer day. Isabella is holding the hose in her hand 1.0 meters above the ground and is trying to spray Ferdinand, who is standing 10.0 meters away. Part A Will Isabella be able to spray Ferdinand if the water is flowing out of the hose at a constant speed of 3.5 meters per second? Assume that the hose is pointed parallel to the ground and take the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity to be 9.81 meters per second, per second. You did not open hints for this part. v0 g ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Tactics Box 15.2 Finding Whether an Object Floats or Sinks Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 15.2 Finding whether an object floats or sinks. If you hold an object underwater and then release it, it can float to the surface, sink, or remain “hanging” in the water, depending on whether the fluid density is larger than, smaller than, or equal to the object’s average density . These conditions are summarized in this Tactics Box. Yes No f avg TACTICS BOX 15.2 Finding whether an object floats or sinks Object sinks Object floats Object has neutral buoyancy An object sinks if it weighs more than the fluid it displaces, that is, if its average density is greater than the density of the fluid: . An object floats on the surface if it weighs less than the fluid it displaces, that is, if its average density is less than the density of the fluid: . An object hangs motionless in the fluid if it weighs exactly the same as the fluid it displaces. It has neutral buoyancy if its average density equals the density of the fluid: . Part A Ice at 0.0 has a density of 917 . A 3.00 ice cube is gently released inside a small container filled with oil and is observed to be neutrally buoyant. What is the density of the oil, ? Express your answer in kilograms per meter cubed to three significant figures. ANSWER: Part B Once the ice cube melts, what happens to the liquid water that it produces? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: avg > f avg < f avg = f 'C kg/m3 cm3 oil oil = kg/m3 Part C What happens if some ethyl alcohol of density 790 is poured into the container after the ice cube has melted? ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. The liquid water sinks to the bottom of the container. The liquid water rises to the surface and floats on top of the oil. The liquid water is in static equilibrium at the location where the ice cube was originally placed. kg/m3 A layer of ethyl alcohol forms between the oil and the water. The layer of ethyl alcohol forms at the bottom of the container. The layer of ethyl alcohol forms on the surface.

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Assignment 5 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, March 5, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 6.13 A hand presses down on the book in the figure. Part A Is the normal force of the table on the book larger than, smaller than, or equal to ? ANSWER: Correct mg Equal to Larger than Smaller than mg mg mg Problem 6.2 The three ropes in the figure are tied to a small, very light ring. Two of these ropes are anchored to walls at right angles with the tensions shown in the figure. Part A What is the magnitude of the tension in the third rope? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the direction of the tension in the third rope? Express your answer using two significant figures. T  3 T3 = 94 N T  3 Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct The Normal Force When an object rests on a surface, there is always a force perpendicular to the surface; we call this the normal force, denoted by . The two questions to the right will explore the normal force. Part A A man attempts to pick up his suitcase of weight by pulling straight up on the handle. However, he is unable to lift the suitcase from the floor. Which statement about the magnitude of the normal force acting on the suitcase is true during the time that the man pulls upward on the suitcase? Hint 1. How to approach this problem First, identify the forces that act on the suitcase and draw a free-body diagram. Then use the fact that the suitcase is in equilibrium, , to examine how the forces acting on the suitcase relate to each other. Hint 2. Identify the correct free-body diagram Which of the figures represents the free-body diagram of the suitcase while the man is pulling on the handle with a force of magnitude ? = 58   below horizontal n ws n F = 0 fpull Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B A B C D The magnitude of the normal force is equal to the magnitude of the weight of the suitcase. The magnitude of the normal force is equal to the magnitude of the weight of the suitcase minus the magnitude of the force of the pull. The magnitude of the normal force is equal to the sum of the magnitude of the force of the pull and the magnitude of the suitcase’s weight. The magnitude of the normal force is greater than the magnitude of the weight of the suitcase. Typesetting math: 100% Now assume that the man of weight is tired and decides to sit on his suitcase. Which statement about the magnitude of the normal force acting on the suitcase is true during the time that the man is sitting on the suitcase? Hint 1. Identify the correct free-body diagram. Which of the figures represents the free-body diagram while the man is sitting atop the suitcase? Here the vector labeled is a force that has the same magnitude as the man’s weight. ANSWER: wm n wm Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Recognize that the normal force acting on an object is not always equal to the weight of that object. This is an important point to understand. Problem 6.5 A construction worker with a weight of 880 stands on a roof that is sloped at 18 . Part A What is the magnitude of the normal force of the roof on the worker? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct A B C D The magnitude of the normal force is equal to the magnitude of the suitcase’s weight. The magnitude of the normal force is equal to the magnitude of the suitcase’s weight minus the magnitude of the man’s weight. The magnitude of the normal force is equal to the sum of the magnitude of the man’s weight and the magnitude of the suitcase’s weight. The magnitude of the normal force is less than the magnitude of the suitcase’s weight. N  n = 840 N Typesetting math: 100% Problem 6.6 In each of the two free-body diagrams, the forces are acting on a 3.0 object. Part A For diagram , find the value of , the -component of the acceleration. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B For diagram the part A, find the value of the -component of the acceleration. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: kg ax x ax = -0.67 m s2 ay, y Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part C For diagram , find the value of , the -component of the acceleration. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D For diagram the part C, find the value of , the -component of the acceleration. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: ay = 0 m s2 ax x ax = 0.67 m s2 ay y Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 6.7 In each of the two free-body diagrams, the forces are acting on a 3.0 object. Part A Find the value of , the component of the acceleration in diagram (a). Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct ay = 0 m s2 kg ax x ax = 0.99 m s2 Typesetting math: 100% Part B Find the value of , the component of the acceleration in diagram (a). Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C Find the value of , the component of the acceleration in diagram (b). Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D Find the value of , the component of the acceleration in diagram (b). Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct ay y ay = 0 m s2 ax x ax = -0.18 m s2 ay y ay = 0 m s2 Typesetting math: 100% Problem 6.10 A horizontal rope is tied to a 53.0 box on frictionless ice. What is the tension in the rope if: Part A The box is at rest? Express your answer as an integer and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B The box moves at a steady = 4.80 ? Express your answer as an integer and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C The box = 4.80 and = 4.60 ? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: kg T = 0 N vx m/s T = 0 N vx m/s ax m/s2 Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 6.14 It takes the elevator in a skyscraper 4.5 to reach its cruising speed of 11 . A 60 passenger gets aboard on the ground floor. Part A What is the passenger’s weight before the elevator starts moving? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the passenger’s weight while the elevator is speeding up? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the passenger’s weight after the elevator reaches its cruising speed? T = 244 N s m/s kg w = 590 N w = 730 N Typesetting math: 100% Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Block on an Incline A block lies on a plane raised an angle from the horizontal. Three forces act upon the block: , the force of gravity; , the normal force; and , the force of friction. The coefficient of friction is large enough to prevent the block from sliding . Part A Consider coordinate system a, with the x axis along the plane. Which forces lie along the axes? ANSWER: w = 590 N  F  w F n F  f Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part B Which forces lie along the axes of the coordinate system b, in which the y axis is vertical? ANSWER: Correct only only only and and and and and F  f F  n F  w F  f F  n F  f F  w F  n F w F  f F  n F w only only only and and and and and F  f F  n F  w F  f F  n F  f F  w F  n F w F  f F  n F w Typesetting math: 100% Usually the best advice is to choose coordinate system so that the acceleration of the system is directly along one of the coordinate axes. If the system isn’t accelerating, then you are better off choosing the coordinate system with the most vectors along the coordinate axes. But now you are going to ignore that advice. You will find the normal force, , using vertical coordinate system b. In these coordinates you will find the magnitude appearing in both the x and y equations, each multiplied by a trigonometric function. Part C Because the block is not moving, the sum of the y components of the forces acting on the block must be zero. Find an expression for the sum of the y components of the forces acting on the block, using coordinate system b. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , , and . Hint 1. Find the y component of Write an expression for , the y component of the force , using coordinate system b. Express your answer in terms of and . Hint 1. Some geometry help – a useful angle The smaller angle between and the y-axis is also , as shown in the figure. ANSWER: F  n Fn Fn Ff Fw  F n Fny F  n Fn  F  n  Typesetting math: 100% Hint 2. Find the y component of Write an expression for , the y component of the force , using coordinate system b. Express your answer in terms of and . Hint 1. Some geometry help – a useful angle The smaller angle between and the x-axis is also , as shown in the figure. ANSWER: ANSWER: Fny = Fncos() F f Ffy F f Ff  F  f  Ffy = Ffsin() Fy = 0 = Fncos() + Ffsin() − Fw Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part D Because the block is not moving, the sum of the x components of the forces acting on the block must be zero. Find an expression for the sum of the x components of the forces acting on the block, using coordinate system b. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , , and . Hint 1. Find the x component of Write an expression for , the x component of the force , using coordinate system b. Express your answer in terms of and . ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part E To find the magnitude of the normal force, you must express in terms of since is an unknown. Using the equations you found in the two previous parts, find an expression for involving and but not . Hint 1. How to approach the problem From your answers to the previous two parts you should have two force equations ( and ). Combine these equations to eliminate . The key is to multiply the Fn Ff Fw  F n Fnx F  n Fn  Fnx = −Fnsin() Fx = 0 = −Fnsin() + Ffcos() Fn Fw Ff Fn Fw  Ff Typesetting math: 100% Fy = 0 Fx = 0 Ff equation for the y components by and the equation for the x components by , then add or subtract the two equations to eliminate the term . An alternative motivation for the algebra is to eliminate the trig functions in front of by using the trig identity . At the very least this would result in an equation that is simple to solve for . ANSWER: Correct Congratulations on working this through. Now realize that in coordinate system a, which is aligned with the plane, the y-coordinate equation is , which leads immediately to the result obtained here for . CONCLUSION: A thoughtful examination of which coordinate system to choose can save a lot of algebra. Contact Forces Introduced Learning Goal: To introduce contact forces (normal and friction forces) and to understand that, except for friction forces under certain circumstances, these forces must be determined from: net Force = ma. Two solid objects cannot occupy the same space at the same time. Indeed, when the objects touch, they exert repulsive normal forces on each other, as well as frictional forces that resist their slipping relative to each other. These contact forces arise from a complex interplay between the electrostatic forces between the electrons and ions in the objects and the laws of quantum mechanics. As two surfaces are pushed together these forces increase exponentially over an atomic distance scale, easily becoming strong enough to distort the bulk material in the objects if they approach too close. In everyday experience, contact forces are limited by the deformation or acceleration of the objects, rather than by the fundamental interatomic forces. Hence, we can conclude the following: The magnitude of contact forces is determined by , that is, by the other forces on, and acceleration of, the contacting bodies. The only exception is that the frictional forces cannot exceed (although they can be smaller than this or even zero). Normal and friction forces Two types of contact forces operate in typical mechanics problems, the normal and frictional forces, usually designated by and (or , or something similar) respectively. These are the components of the overall contact force: perpendicular to and parallel to the plane of contact. Kinetic friction when surfaces slide cos  sin  Ff cos() sin() Fn sin2() + cos2 () = 1 Fn Fn = Fwcos() Fy = Fn − FW cos() = 0 Fn F = ma μn n f Ffric n f Typesetting math: 100% When one surface is sliding past the other, experiments show three things about the friction force (denoted ): The frictional force opposes the relative motion at the 1. point of contact, 2. is proportional to the normal force, and 3. the ratio of the magnitude of the frictional force to that of the normal force is fairly constant over a wide range of speeds. The constant of proportionality is called the coefficient of kinetic friction, often designated . As long as the sliding continues, the frictional force is then (valid when the surfaces slide by each other). Static friction when surfaces don’t slide When there is no relative motion of the surfaces, the frictional force can assume any value from zero up to a maximum , where is the coefficient of static friction. Invariably, is larger than , in agreement with the observation that when a force is large enough that something breaks loose and starts to slide, it often accelerates. The frictional force for surfaces with no relative motion is therefore (valid when the contacting surfaces have no relative motion). The actual magnitude and direction of the static friction force are such that it (together with other forces on the object) causes the object to remain motionless with respect to the contacting surface as long as the static friction force required does not exceed . The equation is valid only when the surfaces are on the verge of sliding. Part A When two objects slide by one another, which of the following statements about the force of friction between them, is true? ANSWER: Correct Part B fk fk μk fk = μkn μsn μs μs μk fs ! μsn μsn fs = μsn The frictional force is always equal to . The frictional force is always less than . The frictional force is determined by other forces on the objects so it can be either equal to or less than . μkn μkn μkn Typesetting math: 100% When two objects are in contact with no relative motion, which of the following statements about the frictional force between them, is true? ANSWER: Correct For static friction, the actual magnitude and direction of the friction force are such that it, together with any other forces present, will cause the object to have the observed acceleration. The magnitude of the force cannot exceed . If the magnitude of static friction needed to keep acceleration equal to zero exceeds , then the object will slide subject to the resistance of kinetic friction. Do not automatically assume that unless you are considering a situation in which the magnitude of the static friction force is as large as possible (i.e., when determining at what point an object will just begin to slip). Whether the actual magnitude of the friction force is 0, less than , or equal to depends on the magnitude of the other forces (if any) as well as the acceleration of the object through . Part C When a board with a box on it is slowly tilted to larger and larger angle, common experience shows that the box will at some point “break loose” and start to accelerate down the board. The box begins to slide once the component of gravity acting parallel to the board just begins to exceeds the maximum force of static friction. Which of the following is the most general explanation for why the box accelerates down the board? ANSWER: The frictional force is always equal to . The frictional force is always less than . The frictional force is determined by other forces on the objects so it can be either equal to or less than . μsn μsn μsn μsn μsn fs = μsn μsn μsn F = ma Fg The force of kinetic friction is smaller than that of maximum static friction, but remains the same. Once the box is moving, is smaller than the force of maximum static friction but larger than the force of kinetic friction. Once the box is moving, is larger than the force of maximum static friction. When the box is stationary, equals the force of static friction, but once the box starts moving, the sliding reduces the normal force, which in turn reduces the friction. Fg Fg Fg Fg Typesetting math: 100% Correct At the point when the box finally does “break loose,” you know that the component of the box’s weight that is parallel to the board just exceeds (i.e., this component of gravitational force on the box has just reached a magnitude such that the force of static friction, which has a maximum value of , can no longer oppose it.) For the box to then accelerate, there must be a net force on the box along the board. Thus, the component of the box’s weight parallel to the board must be greater than the force of kinetic friction. Therefore the force of kinetic friction must be less than the force of static friction which implies , as expected. Part D Consider a problem in which a car of mass is on a road tilted at an angle . The normal force Select the best answer. ANSWER: Correct The key point is that contact forces must be determined from Newton’s equation. In the problem described above, there is not enough information given to determine the normal force (e.g., the acceleration is unknown). Each of the answer options is valid under some conditions ( , the car is sliding down an icy incline, or the car is going around a banked turn), but in fact none is likely to be correct if there are other forces on the car or if the car is accelerating. Do not memorize values for the normal force valid in different problems–you must determine from . Problem 6.17 Bonnie and Clyde are sliding a 323 bank safe across the floor to their getaway car. The safe slides with a constant speed if Clyde pushes from behind with 375 of force while Bonnie pulls forward on a rope with 335 of force. μsn μsn μkn μsn μk < μs M  is found using n = Mg n = Mg cos() n = Mg cos() F  = Ma  = 0 n F = ma kg N N Typesetting math: 100% Part A What is the safe's coefficient of kinetic friction on the bank floor? ANSWER: Correct Problem 6.19 A crate is placed on a horizontal conveyor belt. The materials are such that and . Part A Draw a free-body diagram showing all the forces on the crate if the conveyer belt runs at constant speed. Draw the force vectors with their tails at the dot. The orientation of your vectors will be graded. The exact length of your vectors will not be graded but the relative length of one to the other will be graded. ANSWER: 0.224 10 kg μs = 0.5 μk = 0.3 Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part B Draw a free-body diagram showing all the forces on the crate if the conveyer belt is speeding up. Draw the force vectors with their tails at the dot. The orientation of your vectors will be graded. The exact length of your vectors will not be graded but the relative length of one to the other will be graded. ANSWER: Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part C What is the maximum acceleration the belt can have without the crate slipping? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct amax = 4.9 m s2 Typesetting math: 100% Problem 6.28 A 1100 steel beam is supported by two ropes. Part A What is the tension in rope 1? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the tension in rope 2? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: kg T1 = 7000 N Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 6.35 The position of a 1.4 mass is given by , where is in seconds. Part A What is the net horizontal force on the mass at ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the net horizontal force on the mass at ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 6.39 T2 = 4800 N kg x = (2t3 − 3t2 )m t t = 0 s F = -8.4 N t = 1 s F = 8.4 N Typesetting math: 100% A rifle with a barrel length of 61 fires a 8 bullet with a horizontal speed of 400 . The bullet strikes a block of wood and penetrates to a depth of 11 . Part A What resistive force (assumed to be constant) does the wood exert on the bullet? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How long does it take the bullet to come to rest after entering the wood? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 6.45 You and your friend Peter are putting new shingles on a roof pitched at 21 . You're sitting on the very top of the roof when Peter, who is at the edge of the roof directly below you, 5.0 away, asks you for the box of nails. Rather than carry the 2.0 box of nails down to Peter, you decide to give the box a push and have it slide down to him. Part A If the coefficient of kinetic friction between the box and the roof is 0.55, with what speed should you push the box to have it gently come to rest right at the edge of the roof? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. cm g m/s cm fk = 5800 N = 5.5×10−4 t s  m kg Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Problem 6.54 The 2.0 wood box in the figure slides down a vertical wood wall while you push on it at a 45 angle. Part A What magnitude of force should you apply to cause the box to slide down at a constant speed? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct v = 3.9 ms kg  F = 23 N Typesetting math: 100% Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 98.8%. You received 114.57 out of a possible total of 116 points. Typesetting math: 100%

Assignment 5 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, March 5, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 6.13 A hand presses down on the book in the figure. Part A Is the normal force of the table on the book larger than, smaller than, or equal to ? ANSWER: Correct mg Equal to Larger than Smaller than mg mg mg Problem 6.2 The three ropes in the figure are tied to a small, very light ring. Two of these ropes are anchored to walls at right angles with the tensions shown in the figure. Part A What is the magnitude of the tension in the third rope? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the direction of the tension in the third rope? Express your answer using two significant figures. T  3 T3 = 94 N T  3 Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct The Normal Force When an object rests on a surface, there is always a force perpendicular to the surface; we call this the normal force, denoted by . The two questions to the right will explore the normal force. Part A A man attempts to pick up his suitcase of weight by pulling straight up on the handle. However, he is unable to lift the suitcase from the floor. Which statement about the magnitude of the normal force acting on the suitcase is true during the time that the man pulls upward on the suitcase? Hint 1. How to approach this problem First, identify the forces that act on the suitcase and draw a free-body diagram. Then use the fact that the suitcase is in equilibrium, , to examine how the forces acting on the suitcase relate to each other. Hint 2. Identify the correct free-body diagram Which of the figures represents the free-body diagram of the suitcase while the man is pulling on the handle with a force of magnitude ? = 58   below horizontal n ws n F = 0 fpull Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B A B C D The magnitude of the normal force is equal to the magnitude of the weight of the suitcase. The magnitude of the normal force is equal to the magnitude of the weight of the suitcase minus the magnitude of the force of the pull. The magnitude of the normal force is equal to the sum of the magnitude of the force of the pull and the magnitude of the suitcase’s weight. The magnitude of the normal force is greater than the magnitude of the weight of the suitcase. Typesetting math: 100% Now assume that the man of weight is tired and decides to sit on his suitcase. Which statement about the magnitude of the normal force acting on the suitcase is true during the time that the man is sitting on the suitcase? Hint 1. Identify the correct free-body diagram. Which of the figures represents the free-body diagram while the man is sitting atop the suitcase? Here the vector labeled is a force that has the same magnitude as the man’s weight. ANSWER: wm n wm Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Recognize that the normal force acting on an object is not always equal to the weight of that object. This is an important point to understand. Problem 6.5 A construction worker with a weight of 880 stands on a roof that is sloped at 18 . Part A What is the magnitude of the normal force of the roof on the worker? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct A B C D The magnitude of the normal force is equal to the magnitude of the suitcase’s weight. The magnitude of the normal force is equal to the magnitude of the suitcase’s weight minus the magnitude of the man’s weight. The magnitude of the normal force is equal to the sum of the magnitude of the man’s weight and the magnitude of the suitcase’s weight. The magnitude of the normal force is less than the magnitude of the suitcase’s weight. N  n = 840 N Typesetting math: 100% Problem 6.6 In each of the two free-body diagrams, the forces are acting on a 3.0 object. Part A For diagram , find the value of , the -component of the acceleration. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B For diagram the part A, find the value of the -component of the acceleration. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: kg ax x ax = -0.67 m s2 ay, y Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part C For diagram , find the value of , the -component of the acceleration. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D For diagram the part C, find the value of , the -component of the acceleration. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: ay = 0 m s2 ax x ax = 0.67 m s2 ay y Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 6.7 In each of the two free-body diagrams, the forces are acting on a 3.0 object. Part A Find the value of , the component of the acceleration in diagram (a). Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct ay = 0 m s2 kg ax x ax = 0.99 m s2 Typesetting math: 100% Part B Find the value of , the component of the acceleration in diagram (a). Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C Find the value of , the component of the acceleration in diagram (b). Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D Find the value of , the component of the acceleration in diagram (b). Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct ay y ay = 0 m s2 ax x ax = -0.18 m s2 ay y ay = 0 m s2 Typesetting math: 100% Problem 6.10 A horizontal rope is tied to a 53.0 box on frictionless ice. What is the tension in the rope if: Part A The box is at rest? Express your answer as an integer and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B The box moves at a steady = 4.80 ? Express your answer as an integer and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C The box = 4.80 and = 4.60 ? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: kg T = 0 N vx m/s T = 0 N vx m/s ax m/s2 Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 6.14 It takes the elevator in a skyscraper 4.5 to reach its cruising speed of 11 . A 60 passenger gets aboard on the ground floor. Part A What is the passenger’s weight before the elevator starts moving? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the passenger’s weight while the elevator is speeding up? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the passenger’s weight after the elevator reaches its cruising speed? T = 244 N s m/s kg w = 590 N w = 730 N Typesetting math: 100% Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Block on an Incline A block lies on a plane raised an angle from the horizontal. Three forces act upon the block: , the force of gravity; , the normal force; and , the force of friction. The coefficient of friction is large enough to prevent the block from sliding . Part A Consider coordinate system a, with the x axis along the plane. Which forces lie along the axes? ANSWER: w = 590 N  F  w F n F  f Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part B Which forces lie along the axes of the coordinate system b, in which the y axis is vertical? ANSWER: Correct only only only and and and and and F  f F  n F  w F  f F  n F  f F  w F  n F w F  f F  n F w only only only and and and and and F  f F  n F  w F  f F  n F  f F  w F  n F w F  f F  n F w Typesetting math: 100% Usually the best advice is to choose coordinate system so that the acceleration of the system is directly along one of the coordinate axes. If the system isn’t accelerating, then you are better off choosing the coordinate system with the most vectors along the coordinate axes. But now you are going to ignore that advice. You will find the normal force, , using vertical coordinate system b. In these coordinates you will find the magnitude appearing in both the x and y equations, each multiplied by a trigonometric function. Part C Because the block is not moving, the sum of the y components of the forces acting on the block must be zero. Find an expression for the sum of the y components of the forces acting on the block, using coordinate system b. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , , and . Hint 1. Find the y component of Write an expression for , the y component of the force , using coordinate system b. Express your answer in terms of and . Hint 1. Some geometry help – a useful angle The smaller angle between and the y-axis is also , as shown in the figure. ANSWER: F  n Fn Fn Ff Fw  F n Fny F  n Fn  F  n  Typesetting math: 100% Hint 2. Find the y component of Write an expression for , the y component of the force , using coordinate system b. Express your answer in terms of and . Hint 1. Some geometry help – a useful angle The smaller angle between and the x-axis is also , as shown in the figure. ANSWER: ANSWER: Fny = Fncos() F f Ffy F f Ff  F  f  Ffy = Ffsin() Fy = 0 = Fncos() + Ffsin() − Fw Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part D Because the block is not moving, the sum of the x components of the forces acting on the block must be zero. Find an expression for the sum of the x components of the forces acting on the block, using coordinate system b. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , , and . Hint 1. Find the x component of Write an expression for , the x component of the force , using coordinate system b. Express your answer in terms of and . ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part E To find the magnitude of the normal force, you must express in terms of since is an unknown. Using the equations you found in the two previous parts, find an expression for involving and but not . Hint 1. How to approach the problem From your answers to the previous two parts you should have two force equations ( and ). Combine these equations to eliminate . The key is to multiply the Fn Ff Fw  F n Fnx F  n Fn  Fnx = −Fnsin() Fx = 0 = −Fnsin() + Ffcos() Fn Fw Ff Fn Fw  Ff Typesetting math: 100% Fy = 0 Fx = 0 Ff equation for the y components by and the equation for the x components by , then add or subtract the two equations to eliminate the term . An alternative motivation for the algebra is to eliminate the trig functions in front of by using the trig identity . At the very least this would result in an equation that is simple to solve for . ANSWER: Correct Congratulations on working this through. Now realize that in coordinate system a, which is aligned with the plane, the y-coordinate equation is , which leads immediately to the result obtained here for . CONCLUSION: A thoughtful examination of which coordinate system to choose can save a lot of algebra. Contact Forces Introduced Learning Goal: To introduce contact forces (normal and friction forces) and to understand that, except for friction forces under certain circumstances, these forces must be determined from: net Force = ma. Two solid objects cannot occupy the same space at the same time. Indeed, when the objects touch, they exert repulsive normal forces on each other, as well as frictional forces that resist their slipping relative to each other. These contact forces arise from a complex interplay between the electrostatic forces between the electrons and ions in the objects and the laws of quantum mechanics. As two surfaces are pushed together these forces increase exponentially over an atomic distance scale, easily becoming strong enough to distort the bulk material in the objects if they approach too close. In everyday experience, contact forces are limited by the deformation or acceleration of the objects, rather than by the fundamental interatomic forces. Hence, we can conclude the following: The magnitude of contact forces is determined by , that is, by the other forces on, and acceleration of, the contacting bodies. The only exception is that the frictional forces cannot exceed (although they can be smaller than this or even zero). Normal and friction forces Two types of contact forces operate in typical mechanics problems, the normal and frictional forces, usually designated by and (or , or something similar) respectively. These are the components of the overall contact force: perpendicular to and parallel to the plane of contact. Kinetic friction when surfaces slide cos  sin  Ff cos() sin() Fn sin2() + cos2 () = 1 Fn Fn = Fwcos() Fy = Fn − FW cos() = 0 Fn F = ma μn n f Ffric n f Typesetting math: 100% When one surface is sliding past the other, experiments show three things about the friction force (denoted ): The frictional force opposes the relative motion at the 1. point of contact, 2. is proportional to the normal force, and 3. the ratio of the magnitude of the frictional force to that of the normal force is fairly constant over a wide range of speeds. The constant of proportionality is called the coefficient of kinetic friction, often designated . As long as the sliding continues, the frictional force is then (valid when the surfaces slide by each other). Static friction when surfaces don’t slide When there is no relative motion of the surfaces, the frictional force can assume any value from zero up to a maximum , where is the coefficient of static friction. Invariably, is larger than , in agreement with the observation that when a force is large enough that something breaks loose and starts to slide, it often accelerates. The frictional force for surfaces with no relative motion is therefore (valid when the contacting surfaces have no relative motion). The actual magnitude and direction of the static friction force are such that it (together with other forces on the object) causes the object to remain motionless with respect to the contacting surface as long as the static friction force required does not exceed . The equation is valid only when the surfaces are on the verge of sliding. Part A When two objects slide by one another, which of the following statements about the force of friction between them, is true? ANSWER: Correct Part B fk fk μk fk = μkn μsn μs μs μk fs ! μsn μsn fs = μsn The frictional force is always equal to . The frictional force is always less than . The frictional force is determined by other forces on the objects so it can be either equal to or less than . μkn μkn μkn Typesetting math: 100% When two objects are in contact with no relative motion, which of the following statements about the frictional force between them, is true? ANSWER: Correct For static friction, the actual magnitude and direction of the friction force are such that it, together with any other forces present, will cause the object to have the observed acceleration. The magnitude of the force cannot exceed . If the magnitude of static friction needed to keep acceleration equal to zero exceeds , then the object will slide subject to the resistance of kinetic friction. Do not automatically assume that unless you are considering a situation in which the magnitude of the static friction force is as large as possible (i.e., when determining at what point an object will just begin to slip). Whether the actual magnitude of the friction force is 0, less than , or equal to depends on the magnitude of the other forces (if any) as well as the acceleration of the object through . Part C When a board with a box on it is slowly tilted to larger and larger angle, common experience shows that the box will at some point “break loose” and start to accelerate down the board. The box begins to slide once the component of gravity acting parallel to the board just begins to exceeds the maximum force of static friction. Which of the following is the most general explanation for why the box accelerates down the board? ANSWER: The frictional force is always equal to . The frictional force is always less than . The frictional force is determined by other forces on the objects so it can be either equal to or less than . μsn μsn μsn μsn μsn fs = μsn μsn μsn F = ma Fg The force of kinetic friction is smaller than that of maximum static friction, but remains the same. Once the box is moving, is smaller than the force of maximum static friction but larger than the force of kinetic friction. Once the box is moving, is larger than the force of maximum static friction. When the box is stationary, equals the force of static friction, but once the box starts moving, the sliding reduces the normal force, which in turn reduces the friction. Fg Fg Fg Fg Typesetting math: 100% Correct At the point when the box finally does “break loose,” you know that the component of the box’s weight that is parallel to the board just exceeds (i.e., this component of gravitational force on the box has just reached a magnitude such that the force of static friction, which has a maximum value of , can no longer oppose it.) For the box to then accelerate, there must be a net force on the box along the board. Thus, the component of the box’s weight parallel to the board must be greater than the force of kinetic friction. Therefore the force of kinetic friction must be less than the force of static friction which implies , as expected. Part D Consider a problem in which a car of mass is on a road tilted at an angle . The normal force Select the best answer. ANSWER: Correct The key point is that contact forces must be determined from Newton’s equation. In the problem described above, there is not enough information given to determine the normal force (e.g., the acceleration is unknown). Each of the answer options is valid under some conditions ( , the car is sliding down an icy incline, or the car is going around a banked turn), but in fact none is likely to be correct if there are other forces on the car or if the car is accelerating. Do not memorize values for the normal force valid in different problems–you must determine from . Problem 6.17 Bonnie and Clyde are sliding a 323 bank safe across the floor to their getaway car. The safe slides with a constant speed if Clyde pushes from behind with 375 of force while Bonnie pulls forward on a rope with 335 of force. μsn μsn μkn μsn μk < μs M  is found using n = Mg n = Mg cos() n = Mg cos() F  = Ma  = 0 n F = ma kg N N Typesetting math: 100% Part A What is the safe's coefficient of kinetic friction on the bank floor? ANSWER: Correct Problem 6.19 A crate is placed on a horizontal conveyor belt. The materials are such that and . Part A Draw a free-body diagram showing all the forces on the crate if the conveyer belt runs at constant speed. Draw the force vectors with their tails at the dot. The orientation of your vectors will be graded. The exact length of your vectors will not be graded but the relative length of one to the other will be graded. ANSWER: 0.224 10 kg μs = 0.5 μk = 0.3 Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part B Draw a free-body diagram showing all the forces on the crate if the conveyer belt is speeding up. Draw the force vectors with their tails at the dot. The orientation of your vectors will be graded. The exact length of your vectors will not be graded but the relative length of one to the other will be graded. ANSWER: Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part C What is the maximum acceleration the belt can have without the crate slipping? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct amax = 4.9 m s2 Typesetting math: 100% Problem 6.28 A 1100 steel beam is supported by two ropes. Part A What is the tension in rope 1? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the tension in rope 2? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: kg T1 = 7000 N Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 6.35 The position of a 1.4 mass is given by , where is in seconds. Part A What is the net horizontal force on the mass at ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the net horizontal force on the mass at ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 6.39 T2 = 4800 N kg x = (2t3 − 3t2 )m t t = 0 s F = -8.4 N t = 1 s F = 8.4 N Typesetting math: 100% A rifle with a barrel length of 61 fires a 8 bullet with a horizontal speed of 400 . The bullet strikes a block of wood and penetrates to a depth of 11 . Part A What resistive force (assumed to be constant) does the wood exert on the bullet? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How long does it take the bullet to come to rest after entering the wood? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 6.45 You and your friend Peter are putting new shingles on a roof pitched at 21 . You're sitting on the very top of the roof when Peter, who is at the edge of the roof directly below you, 5.0 away, asks you for the box of nails. Rather than carry the 2.0 box of nails down to Peter, you decide to give the box a push and have it slide down to him. Part A If the coefficient of kinetic friction between the box and the roof is 0.55, with what speed should you push the box to have it gently come to rest right at the edge of the roof? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. cm g m/s cm fk = 5800 N = 5.5×10−4 t s  m kg Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Problem 6.54 The 2.0 wood box in the figure slides down a vertical wood wall while you push on it at a 45 angle. Part A What magnitude of force should you apply to cause the box to slide down at a constant speed? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct v = 3.9 ms kg  F = 23 N Typesetting math: 100% Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 98.8%. You received 114.57 out of a possible total of 116 points. Typesetting math: 100%

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. What behaviors indicate psychological distress? Name 5 and explain.

. What behaviors indicate psychological distress? Name 5 and explain.

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Which of the following is true? Once inside the human body, bacteria cannot mutate. Bacteria can mutate within the human body. Bacteria cannot live in the human body. Bacteria do not mutate.

Which of the following is true? Once inside the human body, bacteria cannot mutate. Bacteria can mutate within the human body. Bacteria cannot live in the human body. Bacteria do not mutate.

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• What happens in the business environment when some people function according to those rules, and others do not?

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What are two important classes of regular-expression-based applications: lexical analyzers and text search.

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Tutorial 4 – Management 1. Andy works as a manager for Baskervilles Dog Food Company. Because they have several different suppliers of ingredients and the suppliers’ prices fluctuate from time to time, he has to produce several different formulas for each dog food product, depending on the availability and price of ingredients from the suppliers. He then orders the ingredients accordingly. Even though he cannot predict when ingredients will become available at a particular price, his ordering of ingredients can be considered routine. a. On what level of management is Andy working? (briefly explain your reasons)

Tutorial 4 – Management 1. Andy works as a manager for Baskervilles Dog Food Company. Because they have several different suppliers of ingredients and the suppliers’ prices fluctuate from time to time, he has to produce several different formulas for each dog food product, depending on the availability and price of ingredients from the suppliers. He then orders the ingredients accordingly. Even though he cannot predict when ingredients will become available at a particular price, his ordering of ingredients can be considered routine. a. On what level of management is Andy working? (briefly explain your reasons)

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Researchers recently investigated whether or not coffee prevented the development of high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) in laboratory mice. The mice used in this experiment have a mutation that makes them become diabetic. Read about this research study in this article published on the Science Daily web-site New Evidence That Drinking Coffee May Reduce the Risk of Diabetes as well as the following summary: A group of 11 mice was given water, and another group of 10 mice was supplied with diluted black coffee (coffee:water 1:1) as drinking fluids for five weeks. The composition of the diets and living conditions were similar for both groups of mice. Blood glucose was monitored weekly for all mice. After five weeks, there was no change in average body weight between groups. Results indicated that blood glucose concentrations increased significantly in the mice that drank water compared with those that were supplied with coffee. Finally, blood glucose concentration in the coffee group exhibited a 30 percent decrease compared with that in the water group. In the original paper, the investigators acknowledged that the coffee for the experiment was supplied as a gift from a corporation. Then answer the following questions in your own words: 1. Identify and describe the steps of the scientific method. Which observations do you think the scientists made leading up to this research study? Given your understanding of the experimental design, formulate a specific hypothesis that is being tested in this experiment. Describe the experimental design including control and treatment group(s), and dependent and independent variables. Summarize the results and the conclusion (50 points) 2. Criticize the research described. Things to consider: Were the test subjects and treatments relevant and appropriate? Was the sample size large enough? Were the methods used appropriate? Can you think of a potential bias in a research study like this? What are the limitations of the conclusions made in this research study? Address at least two of these questions in your critique of the research study (20 points). 3. Discuss the relevance of this type of research, both for the world in general and for you personally (20 points). 4. Write answers in your own words with proper grammar and spelling (10 points)

Researchers recently investigated whether or not coffee prevented the development of high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) in laboratory mice. The mice used in this experiment have a mutation that makes them become diabetic. Read about this research study in this article published on the Science Daily web-site New Evidence That Drinking Coffee May Reduce the Risk of Diabetes as well as the following summary: A group of 11 mice was given water, and another group of 10 mice was supplied with diluted black coffee (coffee:water 1:1) as drinking fluids for five weeks. The composition of the diets and living conditions were similar for both groups of mice. Blood glucose was monitored weekly for all mice. After five weeks, there was no change in average body weight between groups. Results indicated that blood glucose concentrations increased significantly in the mice that drank water compared with those that were supplied with coffee. Finally, blood glucose concentration in the coffee group exhibited a 30 percent decrease compared with that in the water group. In the original paper, the investigators acknowledged that the coffee for the experiment was supplied as a gift from a corporation. Then answer the following questions in your own words: 1. Identify and describe the steps of the scientific method. Which observations do you think the scientists made leading up to this research study? Given your understanding of the experimental design, formulate a specific hypothesis that is being tested in this experiment. Describe the experimental design including control and treatment group(s), and dependent and independent variables. Summarize the results and the conclusion (50 points) 2. Criticize the research described. Things to consider: Were the test subjects and treatments relevant and appropriate? Was the sample size large enough? Were the methods used appropriate? Can you think of a potential bias in a research study like this? What are the limitations of the conclusions made in this research study? Address at least two of these questions in your critique of the research study (20 points). 3. Discuss the relevance of this type of research, both for the world in general and for you personally (20 points). 4. Write answers in your own words with proper grammar and spelling (10 points)

The steps of the scientific method used in this research … Read More...
Q4b. What is a compensating control?

Q4b. What is a compensating control?

    Compensating controls are anticipated to be alternative arrangements. … Read More...