A 15 cm long solenoid has 2000 turns of wire and is designed to cancel the earth’s magnetic field of near its center. How large must be the current through the wire? A. 0.01 mA B. 7.0 mA C. 14 mA + D. 21 mA E. 28 mA

A 15 cm long solenoid has 2000 turns of wire and is designed to cancel the earth’s magnetic field of near its center. How large must be the current through the wire? A. 0.01 mA B. 7.0 mA C. 14 mA + D. 21 mA E. 28 mA

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Question 1, chap 33, sect 3. part 1 of 2 10 points The compound eyes of bees and other insects are highly sensitive to light in the ultraviolet portion of the spectrum, particularly light with frequencies between 7.5 × 1014 Hz and 1.0 × 1015 Hz. The speed of light is 3 × 108 m/s. What is the largest wavelength to which these frequencies correspond? Question 3, chap 33, sect 3. part 1 of 3 10 points A plane electromagnetic sinusoidal wave of frequency 10.7 MHz travels in free space. The speed of light is 2.99792 × 108 m/s. Determine the wavelength of the wave. Question 4, chap 33, sect 3. part 2 of 3 10 points Find the period of the wave. Question 2, chap 33, sect 3. part 2 of 2 10 points What is the smallest wavelength? Question 5, chap 33, sect 3. part 3 of 3 10 points At some point and some instant, the electric field has has a value of 998 N/C. Calculate the magnitude of the magnetic field at this point and this instant. Question 6, chap 33, sect 3. part 1 of 2 10 points A plane electromagnetic sinusoidal wave of frequency 10.7 MHz travels in free space. The speed of light is 2.99792 × 108 m/s. Determine the wavelength of the wave. Question 8, chap 33, sect 3. part 1 of 1 10 points The magnetic field amplitude of an electromagnetic wave is 9.9 × 10−6 T. The speed of light is 2.99792 × 108 m/s . Calculate the amplitude of the electric field if the wave is traveling in free space. Question 7, chap 33, sect 3. part 2 of 2 10 points At some point and some instant, the electric field has has a value of 998 V/m. Calculate the magnitude of the magnetic field at this point and this instant. Question 9, chap 33, sect 5. part 1 of 1 10 points The cable is carrying the current I(t). at the surface of a long transmission cable of resistivity ρ, length ℓ and radius a, using the expression ~S = 1 μ0 ~E × ~B . Question 10, chap 33, sect 5. part 1 of 1 10 points In 1965 Penzias and Wilson discovered the cosmic microwave radiation left over from the Big Bang expansion of the universe. The energy density of this radiation is 7.64 × 10−14 J/m3. The speed of light 2.99792 × 108 m/s and the permeability of free space is 4π × 10−7 N/A2. Determine the corresponding electric field amplQuestion 11, chap 33, sect 5. part 1 of 5 10 points Consider a monochromatic electromagnetic plane wave propagating in the x direction. At a particular point in space, the magnitude of the electric field has an instantaneous value of 998 V/m in the positive y-direction. The wave is traveling in the positive x-direction. x y z E wave propagation The speed of light is 2.99792×108 m/s, the permeability of free space is 4π×10−7 T ・ N/A and the permittivity of free space 8.85419 × 10−12 C2/N ・ m2. Compute the instantaneous magnitude of the magnetic field at the same point and time.itude. Question 12, chap 33, sect 5. part 2 of 5 10 points What is the instantaneous magnitude of the Poynting vector at the same point and time? Question 13, chap 33, sect 5. part 3 of 5 10 points What are the directions of the instantaneous magnetic field and theQuestion 14, chap 33, sect 5. part 4 of 5 10 points What is the instantaneous value of the energy density of the electric field? Question 16, chap 33, sect 6. part 1 of 4 10 points Consider an electromagnetic plane wave with time average intensity 104 W/m2 . The speed of light is 2.99792 × 108 m/s and the permeability of free space is 4 π × 10−7 T・m/A. What is its maximum electric field? What is the instantaneous value of the energy density of the magnetic field? Question 17, chap 33, sect 6. part 2 of 4 10 points What is the the maximum magnetic field? Question 19, chap 33, sect 6. part 4 of 4 10 points Consider an electromagnetic wave pattern as shown in the figure below. Question 18, chap 33, sect 6. part 3 of 4 10 points What is the pressure on a surface which is perpendicular to the beam and is totally reflective? Question 20, chap 33, sect 8. part 1 of 1 10 points A coin is at the bottom of a beaker. The beaker is filled with 1.6 cm of water (n1 = 1.33) covered by 2.1 cm of liquid (n2 = 1.4) floating on the water. How deep does the coin appear to be from the upper surface of the liquid (near the top of the beaker)? An cylindrical opaque drinking glass has a diameter 3 cm and height h, as shown in the figure. An observer’s eye is placed as shown (the observer is just barely looking over the rim of the glass). When empty, the observer can just barely see the edge of the bottom of the glass. When filled to the brim with a transparent liquid, the observer can just barely see the center of the bottom of the glass. The liquid in the drinking glass has an index of refraction of 1.4 . θi h d θr eye Calculate the angle θr . Question 22, chap 33, sect 8. part 2 of 2 10 points Calculate the height h of the glass.

Question 1, chap 33, sect 3. part 1 of 2 10 points The compound eyes of bees and other insects are highly sensitive to light in the ultraviolet portion of the spectrum, particularly light with frequencies between 7.5 × 1014 Hz and 1.0 × 1015 Hz. The speed of light is 3 × 108 m/s. What is the largest wavelength to which these frequencies correspond? Question 3, chap 33, sect 3. part 1 of 3 10 points A plane electromagnetic sinusoidal wave of frequency 10.7 MHz travels in free space. The speed of light is 2.99792 × 108 m/s. Determine the wavelength of the wave. Question 4, chap 33, sect 3. part 2 of 3 10 points Find the period of the wave. Question 2, chap 33, sect 3. part 2 of 2 10 points What is the smallest wavelength? Question 5, chap 33, sect 3. part 3 of 3 10 points At some point and some instant, the electric field has has a value of 998 N/C. Calculate the magnitude of the magnetic field at this point and this instant. Question 6, chap 33, sect 3. part 1 of 2 10 points A plane electromagnetic sinusoidal wave of frequency 10.7 MHz travels in free space. The speed of light is 2.99792 × 108 m/s. Determine the wavelength of the wave. Question 8, chap 33, sect 3. part 1 of 1 10 points The magnetic field amplitude of an electromagnetic wave is 9.9 × 10−6 T. The speed of light is 2.99792 × 108 m/s . Calculate the amplitude of the electric field if the wave is traveling in free space. Question 7, chap 33, sect 3. part 2 of 2 10 points At some point and some instant, the electric field has has a value of 998 V/m. Calculate the magnitude of the magnetic field at this point and this instant. Question 9, chap 33, sect 5. part 1 of 1 10 points The cable is carrying the current I(t). at the surface of a long transmission cable of resistivity ρ, length ℓ and radius a, using the expression ~S = 1 μ0 ~E × ~B . Question 10, chap 33, sect 5. part 1 of 1 10 points In 1965 Penzias and Wilson discovered the cosmic microwave radiation left over from the Big Bang expansion of the universe. The energy density of this radiation is 7.64 × 10−14 J/m3. The speed of light 2.99792 × 108 m/s and the permeability of free space is 4π × 10−7 N/A2. Determine the corresponding electric field amplQuestion 11, chap 33, sect 5. part 1 of 5 10 points Consider a monochromatic electromagnetic plane wave propagating in the x direction. At a particular point in space, the magnitude of the electric field has an instantaneous value of 998 V/m in the positive y-direction. The wave is traveling in the positive x-direction. x y z E wave propagation The speed of light is 2.99792×108 m/s, the permeability of free space is 4π×10−7 T ・ N/A and the permittivity of free space 8.85419 × 10−12 C2/N ・ m2. Compute the instantaneous magnitude of the magnetic field at the same point and time.itude. Question 12, chap 33, sect 5. part 2 of 5 10 points What is the instantaneous magnitude of the Poynting vector at the same point and time? Question 13, chap 33, sect 5. part 3 of 5 10 points What are the directions of the instantaneous magnetic field and theQuestion 14, chap 33, sect 5. part 4 of 5 10 points What is the instantaneous value of the energy density of the electric field? Question 16, chap 33, sect 6. part 1 of 4 10 points Consider an electromagnetic plane wave with time average intensity 104 W/m2 . The speed of light is 2.99792 × 108 m/s and the permeability of free space is 4 π × 10−7 T・m/A. What is its maximum electric field? What is the instantaneous value of the energy density of the magnetic field? Question 17, chap 33, sect 6. part 2 of 4 10 points What is the the maximum magnetic field? Question 19, chap 33, sect 6. part 4 of 4 10 points Consider an electromagnetic wave pattern as shown in the figure below. Question 18, chap 33, sect 6. part 3 of 4 10 points What is the pressure on a surface which is perpendicular to the beam and is totally reflective? Question 20, chap 33, sect 8. part 1 of 1 10 points A coin is at the bottom of a beaker. The beaker is filled with 1.6 cm of water (n1 = 1.33) covered by 2.1 cm of liquid (n2 = 1.4) floating on the water. How deep does the coin appear to be from the upper surface of the liquid (near the top of the beaker)? An cylindrical opaque drinking glass has a diameter 3 cm and height h, as shown in the figure. An observer’s eye is placed as shown (the observer is just barely looking over the rim of the glass). When empty, the observer can just barely see the edge of the bottom of the glass. When filled to the brim with a transparent liquid, the observer can just barely see the center of the bottom of the glass. The liquid in the drinking glass has an index of refraction of 1.4 . θi h d θr eye Calculate the angle θr . Question 22, chap 33, sect 8. part 2 of 2 10 points Calculate the height h of the glass.

Aristotle’s breadth of knowledge and exploration is amazing. Some of his most interesting ideas center around the ideas of happiness and virtue. What do you think about Aristotle’s suggestions for the happy life and the cultivation of virtue. Choose a virtue (e.g., courage, moderation, patience, responsibility, etc.) and also determine the excess and deficiency. Explore the meaning of this virtue and practice it through the week. As you hit the “mean” do you find yourself more happy?

Aristotle’s breadth of knowledge and exploration is amazing. Some of his most interesting ideas center around the ideas of happiness and virtue. What do you think about Aristotle’s suggestions for the happy life and the cultivation of virtue. Choose a virtue (e.g., courage, moderation, patience, responsibility, etc.) and also determine the excess and deficiency. Explore the meaning of this virtue and practice it through the week. As you hit the “mean” do you find yourself more happy?

“Happiness depends on ourselves.” additional than anyone else, Aristotle preserve … Read More...
Drop Tower NASA operates a 2.2-second drop tower at the Glen Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. At this facility, experimental packages are dropped from the top of the tower, on the eighth floor of the building. During their 2.2 seconds of free fall, experiments experience a microgravity environment similar to a spacecraft in orbit. a) What is the drop distance of a 2.2-s tower?

Drop Tower NASA operates a 2.2-second drop tower at the Glen Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. At this facility, experimental packages are dropped from the top of the tower, on the eighth floor of the building. During their 2.2 seconds of free fall, experiments experience a microgravity environment similar to a spacecraft in orbit. a) What is the drop distance of a 2.2-s tower?

To find the distance in 2.2 s use the following … Read More...
Question 1 1. When the rules of perspective are applied in order to represent unusual points of view, we call this ________. a. foreshortening b. chiaroscuro c. convergence d. highlight e. overlapping 10 points Question 2 1. A flat work of art has two dimensions: ________ and width. a. breadth b. depth c. size d. mass e. height 10 points Question 3 1. Méret Oppenheim was part of an art movement that rejected rational, conscious thought. Her fur-lined teacup and saucer, Object, conjures an unexpected and illogical sensation for the viewer by using ________ texture. a. smooth b. familiar c. expected d. subversive e. silky 10 points Question 4 1. In James Allen’s etching The Connectors, an image of workers erecting the Empire State Building, the artist created a feeling of great height by using ________ line to lead the viewer’s eye diagonally downward. a. horizontal b. communicative c. regular d. directional e. implied 10 points Question 5 1. Because it is three-dimensional, a form has these three spatial measurements: height, width, and ________. a. mass b. length c. size d. depth e. strength 10 points Question 6 1. The ancient Egyptian depiction of the journey of the Sun god Re (0.1) was painted on ________. a. stone b. a coffin c. the wall of a tomb d. copper e. a vase 10 points Question 7 1. The area covered by a pattern is called the ________. a. field b. motif c. background d. size e. foreground 10 points Question 8 1. ________ balance is achieved when two halves of a composition are not mirror images of each other. a. unified b. radial c. varied d. asymmetrical e. symmetrical 10 points Question 9 1. In Audrey Flack’s Marilyn Monroe, the burning candle, the flower, and the hourglass are typical of a kind of symbolism in art that reminds us of death. This kind of symbolism is known as ________. a. vanitas b. feminism c. abstract d. eternal e. none of the other answers 10 points Question 10 1. Tibetan Buddhist monks create colored sand images with a radial design. This representation of the universe is called a ________. a. prayer wheel b. rotunda c. mandala d. prayer flag e. lotus 10 points Question 11 1. In The School of Athens, Raphael focused our attention on two Greek philosophers positioned in the center of the work. They are ________ and ________. a. Plato . . . Aristotle b. Aristotle . . . Socrates c. Diogenes . . . Socrates d. Diogenes . . . Aristotle e. Socrates . . . Plato 10 points Question 12 1. In his Obey campaign poster Shepard Fairey used a striking contrast between positive and ________ shapes to attract the attention of the public. a. figure–ground reversal b. implied c. geometric d. organic e. negative 10 points Question 13 1. The Italian architect Andrea Palladio created a radial design in his plan for the Villa Capra. This building is also called the ________. a. Colosseum b. Pantheon c. Villa Rotonda d. Villa Caprese e. Parthenon 10 points Question 14 1. The French artist Georges Seurat employed a new technique to create a jewel-like diffusion of light and vibration of color in his work The Circus. This type of painting, made up of small dots of color, is known as ________. a. Fauvism b. Luminism c. pointillism d. Pop art e. Impressionism 10 points Question 15 1. The rarity of an artwork, and its value, are often closely related. True False 10 points Question 16 1. By orienting lines so that they attract attention to a specific area of a work of art the artist is using ________. a. actual line b. implied line c. directional line d. measured line e. chaotic line 10 points Question 17 1. Kindred Spirits by Asher Brown Durand uses the effects of ________ to give a sense of the vastness of the American landscape. a. pencil drawing b. geometry c. atmospheric perspective d. foreshortening e. color 10 points Question 18 1. The opposite of emphasis is ________. a. subordination b. tone c. focal point d. color e. proportion 10 points Question 19 1. Gustav Klimt’s portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer was typical of his portraits of the wives and sisters of ________. a. foreign tourists b. Nazi rulers c. German scientists d. Austrian businessmen e. important politicians 10 points Question 20 1. The combination of jarring vertical and diagonal lines in Vincent van Gogh’s The Bedroom creates an atmosphere of ________. a. happiness b. rest c. anxiety d. expectation e. calm 10 points Question 21 1. If the clothing of the saint was the only light area in The Funeral of St. Bonaventure, the viewer’s eye would not be easily drawn to any other areas of the composition. True False 10 points Question 22 1. Miriam Schapiro’s collage Baby Blocks combines two different kinds of shape. ________ is the term used to describe a shape that suggests the natural world, while the term geometric suggests mathematical regularity. a. conceptual b. implied c. organic d. regular e. artificial 10 points Question 23 1. Any of the ________ of art can help focus our interest on specific areas of a work of art. a. styles b. elements c. periods d. tones e. themes 10 points Question 24 1. An artwork can be described as non-objective if its subject matter is ________. a. three-dimensional b. difficult c. unrecognizable d. recognizable e. animals 10 points Question 25 1. Match the methodological approach with its definition: biographical analysis feminist analysis formal analysis contextual analysis 2. iconographical analysis a. analyzes the use of formal elements in a work. b. considers the role of women in an artwork c. interprets objects and figures in the artwork as symbols d. considers the artist’s personal experiences e. considers the religious, political, and social environment in which the artwork was made and viewed 10 points Question 26 1. Alexander Calder invented the ________, a type of suspended, balanced sculpture that uses air currents to power its movement. a. mime b. relief c. mobile d. stabile e. zoetrope 10 points Question 27 1. Louise Nevelson’s work White Vertical Water is a realistic depiction of fish in a river. True False 10 points Question 28 1. William G. Wall’s Fort Edward was published as a ________. a. print b. watercolor c. photograph d. oil painting e. newspaper article 10 points Question 29 1. Artemisia Gentileschi worked during this stylistic and historical period. a. Surrealism b. Impressionism c. Baroque d. Renaissance e. Pop art 10 points Question 30 1. The process of using a series of parallel lines set close to one another to differentiate planes of value in a work of art is called ________. a. highlight b. core shadow c. perspective d. hatching e. palette 10 points Question 31 1. The artist Canaletto, in his drawing of the Ducal Palace in Venice, created an impression of three dimensions by using line to show the division between ________. a. planes b. two figures c. colors d. time periods e. mountains 10 points Question 32 1. Marisol’s work Father Damien was created to memorialize the heroism of a priest who lost his life helping the victims of leprosy. This sculpture stands in front of the State Capitol Building in the U.S. State of ________. a. Arizona b. Pennsylvania c. Utah d. Tennessee e. Hawaii 10 points Question 33 1. The medium of Marc Quinn’s Self is: a. clay b. the artist’s toenail clippings c. wood d. real human hair e. the artist’s own blood 10 points Question 34 1. The work now known as the Watts Towers was in fact given a different title by its creator. That title was ________. a. Nuestro Pueblo b. LA Towers c. Found Objects d. it had no title originally e. Skyscrapers 1 and 2 10 points Question 35 1. Why do we presume that the head of a woman from Benin (0.18) was made for someone wealthy? a. because it was made to be shown in a museum b. because it strongly resembles the Queen c. because it has a price carved on the back d. because it was made from rare ivory e. it was definitely not made for anyone wealthy 10 points Question 36 1. Shahzia Sikander’s art is best described as Abstract Expressionism Naturalist sculpture Pop Art Miniature Painting 10 points Question 37 1. A sunset is a work of art. True False 10 points Question 38 1. A mens’ urinal became a well known artwork in the 20th century. True False 10 points Question 39 1. Which artist has torn out people’s lawns to design and build edible gardens across the country? Andrea Zittel Fritz Haeg Ruben Ortiz Torres Mark Newport

Question 1 1. When the rules of perspective are applied in order to represent unusual points of view, we call this ________. a. foreshortening b. chiaroscuro c. convergence d. highlight e. overlapping 10 points Question 2 1. A flat work of art has two dimensions: ________ and width. a. breadth b. depth c. size d. mass e. height 10 points Question 3 1. Méret Oppenheim was part of an art movement that rejected rational, conscious thought. Her fur-lined teacup and saucer, Object, conjures an unexpected and illogical sensation for the viewer by using ________ texture. a. smooth b. familiar c. expected d. subversive e. silky 10 points Question 4 1. In James Allen’s etching The Connectors, an image of workers erecting the Empire State Building, the artist created a feeling of great height by using ________ line to lead the viewer’s eye diagonally downward. a. horizontal b. communicative c. regular d. directional e. implied 10 points Question 5 1. Because it is three-dimensional, a form has these three spatial measurements: height, width, and ________. a. mass b. length c. size d. depth e. strength 10 points Question 6 1. The ancient Egyptian depiction of the journey of the Sun god Re (0.1) was painted on ________. a. stone b. a coffin c. the wall of a tomb d. copper e. a vase 10 points Question 7 1. The area covered by a pattern is called the ________. a. field b. motif c. background d. size e. foreground 10 points Question 8 1. ________ balance is achieved when two halves of a composition are not mirror images of each other. a. unified b. radial c. varied d. asymmetrical e. symmetrical 10 points Question 9 1. In Audrey Flack’s Marilyn Monroe, the burning candle, the flower, and the hourglass are typical of a kind of symbolism in art that reminds us of death. This kind of symbolism is known as ________. a. vanitas b. feminism c. abstract d. eternal e. none of the other answers 10 points Question 10 1. Tibetan Buddhist monks create colored sand images with a radial design. This representation of the universe is called a ________. a. prayer wheel b. rotunda c. mandala d. prayer flag e. lotus 10 points Question 11 1. In The School of Athens, Raphael focused our attention on two Greek philosophers positioned in the center of the work. They are ________ and ________. a. Plato . . . Aristotle b. Aristotle . . . Socrates c. Diogenes . . . Socrates d. Diogenes . . . Aristotle e. Socrates . . . Plato 10 points Question 12 1. In his Obey campaign poster Shepard Fairey used a striking contrast between positive and ________ shapes to attract the attention of the public. a. figure–ground reversal b. implied c. geometric d. organic e. negative 10 points Question 13 1. The Italian architect Andrea Palladio created a radial design in his plan for the Villa Capra. This building is also called the ________. a. Colosseum b. Pantheon c. Villa Rotonda d. Villa Caprese e. Parthenon 10 points Question 14 1. The French artist Georges Seurat employed a new technique to create a jewel-like diffusion of light and vibration of color in his work The Circus. This type of painting, made up of small dots of color, is known as ________. a. Fauvism b. Luminism c. pointillism d. Pop art e. Impressionism 10 points Question 15 1. The rarity of an artwork, and its value, are often closely related. True False 10 points Question 16 1. By orienting lines so that they attract attention to a specific area of a work of art the artist is using ________. a. actual line b. implied line c. directional line d. measured line e. chaotic line 10 points Question 17 1. Kindred Spirits by Asher Brown Durand uses the effects of ________ to give a sense of the vastness of the American landscape. a. pencil drawing b. geometry c. atmospheric perspective d. foreshortening e. color 10 points Question 18 1. The opposite of emphasis is ________. a. subordination b. tone c. focal point d. color e. proportion 10 points Question 19 1. Gustav Klimt’s portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer was typical of his portraits of the wives and sisters of ________. a. foreign tourists b. Nazi rulers c. German scientists d. Austrian businessmen e. important politicians 10 points Question 20 1. The combination of jarring vertical and diagonal lines in Vincent van Gogh’s The Bedroom creates an atmosphere of ________. a. happiness b. rest c. anxiety d. expectation e. calm 10 points Question 21 1. If the clothing of the saint was the only light area in The Funeral of St. Bonaventure, the viewer’s eye would not be easily drawn to any other areas of the composition. True False 10 points Question 22 1. Miriam Schapiro’s collage Baby Blocks combines two different kinds of shape. ________ is the term used to describe a shape that suggests the natural world, while the term geometric suggests mathematical regularity. a. conceptual b. implied c. organic d. regular e. artificial 10 points Question 23 1. Any of the ________ of art can help focus our interest on specific areas of a work of art. a. styles b. elements c. periods d. tones e. themes 10 points Question 24 1. An artwork can be described as non-objective if its subject matter is ________. a. three-dimensional b. difficult c. unrecognizable d. recognizable e. animals 10 points Question 25 1. Match the methodological approach with its definition: biographical analysis feminist analysis formal analysis contextual analysis 2. iconographical analysis a. analyzes the use of formal elements in a work. b. considers the role of women in an artwork c. interprets objects and figures in the artwork as symbols d. considers the artist’s personal experiences e. considers the religious, political, and social environment in which the artwork was made and viewed 10 points Question 26 1. Alexander Calder invented the ________, a type of suspended, balanced sculpture that uses air currents to power its movement. a. mime b. relief c. mobile d. stabile e. zoetrope 10 points Question 27 1. Louise Nevelson’s work White Vertical Water is a realistic depiction of fish in a river. True False 10 points Question 28 1. William G. Wall’s Fort Edward was published as a ________. a. print b. watercolor c. photograph d. oil painting e. newspaper article 10 points Question 29 1. Artemisia Gentileschi worked during this stylistic and historical period. a. Surrealism b. Impressionism c. Baroque d. Renaissance e. Pop art 10 points Question 30 1. The process of using a series of parallel lines set close to one another to differentiate planes of value in a work of art is called ________. a. highlight b. core shadow c. perspective d. hatching e. palette 10 points Question 31 1. The artist Canaletto, in his drawing of the Ducal Palace in Venice, created an impression of three dimensions by using line to show the division between ________. a. planes b. two figures c. colors d. time periods e. mountains 10 points Question 32 1. Marisol’s work Father Damien was created to memorialize the heroism of a priest who lost his life helping the victims of leprosy. This sculpture stands in front of the State Capitol Building in the U.S. State of ________. a. Arizona b. Pennsylvania c. Utah d. Tennessee e. Hawaii 10 points Question 33 1. The medium of Marc Quinn’s Self is: a. clay b. the artist’s toenail clippings c. wood d. real human hair e. the artist’s own blood 10 points Question 34 1. The work now known as the Watts Towers was in fact given a different title by its creator. That title was ________. a. Nuestro Pueblo b. LA Towers c. Found Objects d. it had no title originally e. Skyscrapers 1 and 2 10 points Question 35 1. Why do we presume that the head of a woman from Benin (0.18) was made for someone wealthy? a. because it was made to be shown in a museum b. because it strongly resembles the Queen c. because it has a price carved on the back d. because it was made from rare ivory e. it was definitely not made for anyone wealthy 10 points Question 36 1. Shahzia Sikander’s art is best described as Abstract Expressionism Naturalist sculpture Pop Art Miniature Painting 10 points Question 37 1. A sunset is a work of art. True False 10 points Question 38 1. A mens’ urinal became a well known artwork in the 20th century. True False 10 points Question 39 1. Which artist has torn out people’s lawns to design and build edible gardens across the country? Andrea Zittel Fritz Haeg Ruben Ortiz Torres Mark Newport

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6. Elon Corporation manufactures parts for an aircraft company. It uses a computerized numerical controlled (CNC) machining center to produce a specific part that has a design (nominal) target of 1.275 inches with tolerances of ±.024 inch. The CNC process that manufacturers these parts has a mean of 1.281 inches and a standard deviation of 0.008 inch. Determine the proportion of parts outside the specifications. Assume Normal Distribution.

6. Elon Corporation manufactures parts for an aircraft company. It uses a computerized numerical controlled (CNC) machining center to produce a specific part that has a design (nominal) target of 1.275 inches with tolerances of ±.024 inch. The CNC process that manufacturers these parts has a mean of 1.281 inches and a standard deviation of 0.008 inch. Determine the proportion of parts outside the specifications. Assume Normal Distribution.

P(defect) = P(X<1.251) + P(X>1.299) = P(X<1.251) +1- P(X<1.299) = … Read More...
Chapter 13 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 16, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy A Matter of Some Gravity Learning Goal: To understand Newton’s law of gravitation and the distinction between inertial and gravitational masses. In this problem, you will practice using Newton’s law of gravitation. According to that law, the magnitude of the gravitational force between two small particles of masses and , separated by a distance , is given by , where is the universal gravitational constant, whose numerical value (in SI units) is . This formula applies not only to small particles, but also to spherical objects. In fact, the gravitational force between two uniform spheres is the same as if we concentrated all the mass of each sphere at its center. Thus, by modeling the Earth and the Moon as uniform spheres, you can use the particle approximation when calculating the force of gravity between them. Be careful in using Newton’s law to choose the correct value for . To calculate the force of gravitational attraction between two uniform spheres, the distance in the equation for Newton’s law of gravitation is the distance between the centers of the spheres. For instance, if a small object such as an elephant is located on the surface of the Earth, the radius of the Earth would be used in the equation. Note that the force of gravity acting on an object located near the surface of a planet is often called weight. Also note that in situations involving satellites, you are often given the altitude of the satellite, that is, the distance from the satellite to the surface of the planet; this is not the distance to be used in the formula for the law of gravitation. There is a potentially confusing issue involving mass. Mass is defined as a measure of an object’s inertia, that is, its ability to resist acceleration. Newton’s second law demonstrates the relationship between mass, acceleration, and the net force acting on an object: . We can now refer to this measure of inertia more precisely as the inertial mass. On the other hand, the masses of the particles that appear in the expression for the law of gravity seem to have nothing to do with inertia: Rather, they serve as a measure of the strength of gravitational interactions. It would be reasonable to call such a property gravitational mass. Does this mean that every object has two different masses? Generally speaking, yes. However, the good news is that according to the latest, highly precise, measurements, the inertial and the gravitational mass of an object are, in fact, equal to each other; it is an established consensus among physicists that there is only one mass after all, which is a measure of both the object’s inertia and its ability to engage in gravitational interactions. Note that this consensus, like everything else in science, is open to possible amendments in the future. In this problem, you will answer several questions that require the use of Newton’s law of gravitation. Part A Two particles are separated by a certain distance. The force of gravitational interaction between them is . Now the separation between the particles is tripled. Find the new force of gravitational Fg m1 m2 r Fg = G m1m2 r2 G 6.67 × 10−11 N m2 kg2 r r rEarth F  = m net a F0

Chapter 13 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 16, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy A Matter of Some Gravity Learning Goal: To understand Newton’s law of gravitation and the distinction between inertial and gravitational masses. In this problem, you will practice using Newton’s law of gravitation. According to that law, the magnitude of the gravitational force between two small particles of masses and , separated by a distance , is given by , where is the universal gravitational constant, whose numerical value (in SI units) is . This formula applies not only to small particles, but also to spherical objects. In fact, the gravitational force between two uniform spheres is the same as if we concentrated all the mass of each sphere at its center. Thus, by modeling the Earth and the Moon as uniform spheres, you can use the particle approximation when calculating the force of gravity between them. Be careful in using Newton’s law to choose the correct value for . To calculate the force of gravitational attraction between two uniform spheres, the distance in the equation for Newton’s law of gravitation is the distance between the centers of the spheres. For instance, if a small object such as an elephant is located on the surface of the Earth, the radius of the Earth would be used in the equation. Note that the force of gravity acting on an object located near the surface of a planet is often called weight. Also note that in situations involving satellites, you are often given the altitude of the satellite, that is, the distance from the satellite to the surface of the planet; this is not the distance to be used in the formula for the law of gravitation. There is a potentially confusing issue involving mass. Mass is defined as a measure of an object’s inertia, that is, its ability to resist acceleration. Newton’s second law demonstrates the relationship between mass, acceleration, and the net force acting on an object: . We can now refer to this measure of inertia more precisely as the inertial mass. On the other hand, the masses of the particles that appear in the expression for the law of gravity seem to have nothing to do with inertia: Rather, they serve as a measure of the strength of gravitational interactions. It would be reasonable to call such a property gravitational mass. Does this mean that every object has two different masses? Generally speaking, yes. However, the good news is that according to the latest, highly precise, measurements, the inertial and the gravitational mass of an object are, in fact, equal to each other; it is an established consensus among physicists that there is only one mass after all, which is a measure of both the object’s inertia and its ability to engage in gravitational interactions. Note that this consensus, like everything else in science, is open to possible amendments in the future. In this problem, you will answer several questions that require the use of Newton’s law of gravitation. Part A Two particles are separated by a certain distance. The force of gravitational interaction between them is . Now the separation between the particles is tripled. Find the new force of gravitational Fg m1 m2 r Fg = G m1m2 r2 G 6.67 × 10−11 N m2 kg2 r r rEarth F  = m net a F0

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Homework Assignment 7. Due March 19 1. Consider the differential equation: ?? ?? = − 1 2 ? sin? ? with initial condition given by ?(0) = 1 Solve this equation from t = 0 to t = 8π using the following methods: (a) Solve analytically by separating variables and integrating. (b) Solve using the 4th-order Runge-Kutta method (write your own code for this, do not use the MATLAB provided ODE solvers) for the following two step sizes: I. Maximum step size for stability (don’t try and do this analytically – try out your code for different step sizes to find the stability limit). II. Maximum step size for a time-accurate solution. “Good” accuracy can be defined in several ways, but use the definition that the numerical solution remains within 2% of the true solution a t = nπ. (c) Solve using the MATLAB function ode45. 2. A car and its suspension system traveling over a bumpy road can be modeled as a mass/spring/damper system. In this model, ?? is the vertical motion of the wheel center of mass, ?? is the vertical motion of the car chassis, and ?? represents the displacement of the bottom of the tire due to the variation in the road surface. Applying Newton’s law to the two masses yields a system of second-order equations: ???̈? + ??(?̇? − ?̇?) + ??(?? − ??) + ???? = ???? ???̈? − ??(?̇? − ?̇?) − ??(?? − ??) + ???? = 0 (a) Convert the two second-order ODE’s into a system of 4 first-order ODE’s. Write them in standard “state-space” form. (b) Assume the car hits a large pothole at t = 0 so that ??(?) = ?−0.2 m 0 ≤ ? < 0.2 s 0 ? > 0.2 s Create a MATLAB function that returns the right hand sides of the state-space equations for an input t and an input state vector. (c) Solve the system on the time interval [0 60] seconds using the MATLAB function ode45. Find the displacement and velocity of the chassis and the wheel as a function of time. Use the following data: ?? = 100 kg, ?? = 1900 kg, ?? = 145 N/m, ?? = 25 N/m, ?? = 150 N-s/m 3. Write a MATLAB program to simulate the dynamics of a helicopter lifting a survivor. When lifting the survivor into the helicopter with a constant speed winch, the resulting dynamics are non-linear, and stability is dependent upon the winch speed. Using polar coordinates, we can find the equations of motion to be: −?? sin ? = ????̈ + 2?̇?̇? ?̇ = constant (negative) Notice that the mass of the survivor factors out and thus the solution is independent of the mass of the person being lifted. In these equations, r is the instantaneous length of the winch cable, g, is the gravitational constant, and θ is the angle of the swing. You may choose to use either your Runge-Kutta solver from problem 1 or ode45 to integrate the equations of motion. This problem is of particular interest to the survivor since an unstable condition can cause the angle of the swing to exceed 90⁰, essentially placing him/her in danger of being beheaded by the rotor blades of the rescue helicopter. Also, it is desirable to retrieve the survivor as fast as possible to get away from the danger. Use your program to determine the maximum winch speed for which the survivor will not swing above the helicopter attach point for a lift from the initial conditions: ?? = 0.1 ??? ?? ̇ = 0 ?? = 34 ? And ending when ? = 0.5 ?. The maximum lifting speed of the winch is 5 m/s. Present your results for the above problems in an appropriate fashion. For problem 1, be sure to include a comparison of the numerical methods with each other and with the true solution. Be sure to discuss your findings with respect to the notions of stability and accuracy of the numerical methods. For problem 2, ensure that your results are easily interpreted by a reader. Students receiving a score of 70% or above on these two problems will receive credit for outcome #5. For problem 3, if you receive at least 70% of the points, you will receive credit for outcome #4.

Homework Assignment 7. Due March 19 1. Consider the differential equation: ?? ?? = − 1 2 ? sin? ? with initial condition given by ?(0) = 1 Solve this equation from t = 0 to t = 8π using the following methods: (a) Solve analytically by separating variables and integrating. (b) Solve using the 4th-order Runge-Kutta method (write your own code for this, do not use the MATLAB provided ODE solvers) for the following two step sizes: I. Maximum step size for stability (don’t try and do this analytically – try out your code for different step sizes to find the stability limit). II. Maximum step size for a time-accurate solution. “Good” accuracy can be defined in several ways, but use the definition that the numerical solution remains within 2% of the true solution a t = nπ. (c) Solve using the MATLAB function ode45. 2. A car and its suspension system traveling over a bumpy road can be modeled as a mass/spring/damper system. In this model, ?? is the vertical motion of the wheel center of mass, ?? is the vertical motion of the car chassis, and ?? represents the displacement of the bottom of the tire due to the variation in the road surface. Applying Newton’s law to the two masses yields a system of second-order equations: ???̈? + ??(?̇? − ?̇?) + ??(?? − ??) + ???? = ???? ???̈? − ??(?̇? − ?̇?) − ??(?? − ??) + ???? = 0 (a) Convert the two second-order ODE’s into a system of 4 first-order ODE’s. Write them in standard “state-space” form. (b) Assume the car hits a large pothole at t = 0 so that ??(?) = ?−0.2 m 0 ≤ ? < 0.2 s 0 ? > 0.2 s Create a MATLAB function that returns the right hand sides of the state-space equations for an input t and an input state vector. (c) Solve the system on the time interval [0 60] seconds using the MATLAB function ode45. Find the displacement and velocity of the chassis and the wheel as a function of time. Use the following data: ?? = 100 kg, ?? = 1900 kg, ?? = 145 N/m, ?? = 25 N/m, ?? = 150 N-s/m 3. Write a MATLAB program to simulate the dynamics of a helicopter lifting a survivor. When lifting the survivor into the helicopter with a constant speed winch, the resulting dynamics are non-linear, and stability is dependent upon the winch speed. Using polar coordinates, we can find the equations of motion to be: −?? sin ? = ????̈ + 2?̇?̇? ?̇ = constant (negative) Notice that the mass of the survivor factors out and thus the solution is independent of the mass of the person being lifted. In these equations, r is the instantaneous length of the winch cable, g, is the gravitational constant, and θ is the angle of the swing. You may choose to use either your Runge-Kutta solver from problem 1 or ode45 to integrate the equations of motion. This problem is of particular interest to the survivor since an unstable condition can cause the angle of the swing to exceed 90⁰, essentially placing him/her in danger of being beheaded by the rotor blades of the rescue helicopter. Also, it is desirable to retrieve the survivor as fast as possible to get away from the danger. Use your program to determine the maximum winch speed for which the survivor will not swing above the helicopter attach point for a lift from the initial conditions: ?? = 0.1 ??? ?? ̇ = 0 ?? = 34 ? And ending when ? = 0.5 ?. The maximum lifting speed of the winch is 5 m/s. Present your results for the above problems in an appropriate fashion. For problem 1, be sure to include a comparison of the numerical methods with each other and with the true solution. Be sure to discuss your findings with respect to the notions of stability and accuracy of the numerical methods. For problem 2, ensure that your results are easily interpreted by a reader. Students receiving a score of 70% or above on these two problems will receive credit for outcome #5. For problem 3, if you receive at least 70% of the points, you will receive credit for outcome #4.

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PHSX 220 Homework 12 D2L – Due Thursday April 13 – 5:00 pm Exam 3 MC Review Problem 1: A 1.0-kg with a velocity of 2.0m/s perpendicular towards a wall rebounds from the wall at 1.5m/s perpendicularlly away from the wall. The change in the momentum of the ball is: A. zero B. 0.5 N s away from wall C. 0.5 N s toward wall D. 3.5 N s away from wall E. 3.5 N s toward wall Problem 2: A 64 kg man stands on a frictionless surface with a 0.10 kg stone at his feet. Both the man and the person are initially at rest. He kicks the stone with his foot so that his end velocity is 0.0017m/s in the forward direction. The velocity of the stone is now: A. 1.1m/s forward B. 1.1m/s backward C. 0.0017m/s forward D. 0.0017m/s backward E. none of these Problem 3: A 2-kg cart, traveling on a rctionless surface with a speed of 3m/s, collides with a stationary 4-kg cart. The carts then stick together. Calculate the magnitude of the impulse exerted by one cart on the other: A. 0 B. 4N s C. 6N s D. 9N s E. 12N s Problem 4: A disc has an initial angular velocity of 18 radians per second. It has a constant angular acceleration of 2.0 radians per second every second and is slowing at rst. How much time elapses before its angular velocity is 18 rad/s in the direction opposite to its initial angular velocity? A. 3.0 s B. 6.0 s C. 9.0 s D. 18 s E. 36 s Problem 5: Three point masses of M, 2M, and 3M, are fastened to a massless rod of length L as shown. The rotational inertia about the rotational axis shown is: A. (ML2=2) B. (ML2) C. (3ML2)=2 D. (6ML2) E. (3ML2)=4 Problem 6: A board is allowed to pivot about its center. A 5-N force is applied 2m from the pivot and another 5-N force is applied 4m from the pivot. These forces are applied at the angles shown in the gure. The magnitude of the net torque about the pivot is: A. 0 Nm B. 5 Nm C. 8.7 Nm D. 15 Nm E. 26 Nm Problem 7: A solid disk (r=0.03 m) and a rotational inertia of 4:5×10􀀀3kgm2 hangs from the ceiling. A string passes over it with a 2.0-kg block and a 4.0-kg block hanging on either end of the string and does not slip as the system starts to move. When the speed of the 4 kg block is 2.0m/s the kinetic energy of the pulley is: A. 0.15 J B. 0.30 J C. 1.0J D. 10 J E. 20 J Problem 8: A merry go round (r= 3.0m, I =600 kgm2) is initially spinning with an angular velocity of 0.80 radians per second when a 20 kg point mass moves from the center to the rim. Calculate the nal angular velocity of the system: A. 0.62 rad/s B. 0.73 rad/s C. 0.80 rad/s D. 0.89 rad/s E. 1.1 rad/s

PHSX 220 Homework 12 D2L – Due Thursday April 13 – 5:00 pm Exam 3 MC Review Problem 1: A 1.0-kg with a velocity of 2.0m/s perpendicular towards a wall rebounds from the wall at 1.5m/s perpendicularlly away from the wall. The change in the momentum of the ball is: A. zero B. 0.5 N s away from wall C. 0.5 N s toward wall D. 3.5 N s away from wall E. 3.5 N s toward wall Problem 2: A 64 kg man stands on a frictionless surface with a 0.10 kg stone at his feet. Both the man and the person are initially at rest. He kicks the stone with his foot so that his end velocity is 0.0017m/s in the forward direction. The velocity of the stone is now: A. 1.1m/s forward B. 1.1m/s backward C. 0.0017m/s forward D. 0.0017m/s backward E. none of these Problem 3: A 2-kg cart, traveling on a rctionless surface with a speed of 3m/s, collides with a stationary 4-kg cart. The carts then stick together. Calculate the magnitude of the impulse exerted by one cart on the other: A. 0 B. 4N s C. 6N s D. 9N s E. 12N s Problem 4: A disc has an initial angular velocity of 18 radians per second. It has a constant angular acceleration of 2.0 radians per second every second and is slowing at rst. How much time elapses before its angular velocity is 18 rad/s in the direction opposite to its initial angular velocity? A. 3.0 s B. 6.0 s C. 9.0 s D. 18 s E. 36 s Problem 5: Three point masses of M, 2M, and 3M, are fastened to a massless rod of length L as shown. The rotational inertia about the rotational axis shown is: A. (ML2=2) B. (ML2) C. (3ML2)=2 D. (6ML2) E. (3ML2)=4 Problem 6: A board is allowed to pivot about its center. A 5-N force is applied 2m from the pivot and another 5-N force is applied 4m from the pivot. These forces are applied at the angles shown in the gure. The magnitude of the net torque about the pivot is: A. 0 Nm B. 5 Nm C. 8.7 Nm D. 15 Nm E. 26 Nm Problem 7: A solid disk (r=0.03 m) and a rotational inertia of 4:5×10􀀀3kgm2 hangs from the ceiling. A string passes over it with a 2.0-kg block and a 4.0-kg block hanging on either end of the string and does not slip as the system starts to move. When the speed of the 4 kg block is 2.0m/s the kinetic energy of the pulley is: A. 0.15 J B. 0.30 J C. 1.0J D. 10 J E. 20 J Problem 8: A merry go round (r= 3.0m, I =600 kgm2) is initially spinning with an angular velocity of 0.80 radians per second when a 20 kg point mass moves from the center to the rim. Calculate the nal angular velocity of the system: A. 0.62 rad/s B. 0.73 rad/s C. 0.80 rad/s D. 0.89 rad/s E. 1.1 rad/s

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