Journal Reflection6: • The psychoanalytic approach promotes self-awareness. Using MBTI as a tool, what have you learned about yourself and how it relates to leadership? • What characteristics for your type represent you and do not represent you? • What are your leadership strengths and challenges? • What have you learned about your leadership this semester?

Journal Reflection6: • The psychoanalytic approach promotes self-awareness. Using MBTI as a tool, what have you learned about yourself and how it relates to leadership? • What characteristics for your type represent you and do not represent you? • What are your leadership strengths and challenges? • What have you learned about your leadership this semester?

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This assignment challenges you to analyze how two writers present arguments about a significant issue or topic. For this assignment, you will choose two current newspaper or scholarly journal articles that focus on a current issue relevant to the people on the continent of Africa, and/or people of African descent. Your goal is to identify the purposes and claims of each author, locate their arguments in a rhetorical situation, and analyze the appeals each writer makes to support their argument. You will then evaluate the arguments: which author better satisfies their readers? Which author crafts the more fitting response? In sum, then, the main goals are: 1. Identify the purposes and claims that two authors make about a significant issue. 2. Locate the arguments in a rhetorical situation (what exigencies do the authors address? What constraints and resources exist for the authors? To whom are they writing? When and where was each article published? 3. Analyze the appeals (logical, ethical, emotional) put forth by the writers. 4. Evaluate the arguments. Which argument is more fitting? Which author better satisfies readers? (Your evaluation need not be either/or: maybe one author is more effective logically, for instance, while the second author is more effective ethically and emotionally.)

This assignment challenges you to analyze how two writers present arguments about a significant issue or topic. For this assignment, you will choose two current newspaper or scholarly journal articles that focus on a current issue relevant to the people on the continent of Africa, and/or people of African descent. Your goal is to identify the purposes and claims of each author, locate their arguments in a rhetorical situation, and analyze the appeals each writer makes to support their argument. You will then evaluate the arguments: which author better satisfies their readers? Which author crafts the more fitting response? In sum, then, the main goals are: 1. Identify the purposes and claims that two authors make about a significant issue. 2. Locate the arguments in a rhetorical situation (what exigencies do the authors address? What constraints and resources exist for the authors? To whom are they writing? When and where was each article published? 3. Analyze the appeals (logical, ethical, emotional) put forth by the writers. 4. Evaluate the arguments. Which argument is more fitting? Which author better satisfies readers? (Your evaluation need not be either/or: maybe one author is more effective logically, for instance, while the second author is more effective ethically and emotionally.)

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Fact Debate Brief Introduction Crime doesn’t pay; it should be punished. Even since childhood, a slap on the hand has prevented possible criminals from ever committing the same offense; whether it was successful or not depended on how much that child wanted that cookie. While a slap on the wrist might or might not be an effective deterrent, the same can be said about the death penalty. Every day, somewhere in the world, a criminal is stopped permanently from committing any future costs, but this is by the means of the death. While effective in stopping one person permanently, it does nothing about the crime world as a whole. While it is necessary to end the career of a criminal, no matter what his or her crime is, we must not end it by taking a life. Through this paper, the death penalty will be proven ineffective at deterring crime by use of other environmental factors. Definition: The death penalty is defined as the universal punishment of death as legally applied by a fair court system. It is important for it to be a fair legal system, as not to confuse it with genocide, mob mentality, or any other ruling without trial. Claim 1: Use of the death penalty is in decline Ground 1: According to the book The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective by Roger Hood and Carolyn Hoyle, published Dec. 8th, 2014, the Oxford professors in criminology say “As in most of the rest of the world, the death penalty in the US is in decline and distributed unevenly in frequency of use” even addressing that, as of April 2014, 18 states no longer have a death penalty, and even Oregon and Washington are considering removing their death penalty laws. Furthermore, in 2013, only 9 of these states still retaining the death penalty actually executed someone. Warrant 1: The death penalty can be reinstated at any time, but so far, it hasn’t been. At the same time, more states consider getting rid of it altogether. Therefore, it becomes clear that even states don’t want to be involved with this process showing that this is a disliked process. Claim 2: Even states with death penalty in effect still have high crime rates. Ground 2: With the reports gathered from fbi.gov, lawstreetmedia.com, a website based around political expertise and research determined the ranking of each state based on violent crime, published September 12th, 2014. Of the top ten most violent states, only three of which had the death penalty instituted (Maryland #9, New Mexico #4, Alaska #3). The other seven still had the system in place, and, despite it, still have a high amount of violent crime. On the opposite end of the spectrum, at the bottom ten most violent states, four of which, including the bottom-most states, do not have the death penalty in place. Warrant 2: With this ranking, it literally proves that the death penalty does not deter crime, or that there is a correlation between having the death penalty and having a decrease in the crime rate. Therefore, the idea of death penalty deterring crime is a null term in the sense that there is no, or a flawed connection. Claim 3: Violent crime is decreasing (but not because if the death penalty) Ground 3 A: According to an article published by The Economist, dated July 23rd, 2013, the rate of violent crime is in fact decreasing, but not because of the death penalty, but rather, because we have more police. From 1995 to 2010, policing has increased one-fifth, and with it, a decline in crime rate. In fact, in cities such as Detroit where policing has been cut, an opposite effect, an increase in crime, has been reported. Ground 3 B: An article from the Wall Street Journal, dated May 28th, 2011, also cites a decline in violent, only this time, citing the reason as a correlation with poverty levels. In 2009, at the start of the housing crisis, crime rates also dropped noticeably. Oddly enough, this article points out the belief that unemployment is often associated with crime; instead, the evidence presented is environmental in nature. Warrant 3: Crime rate isn’t deterred by death penalty, but rather, our surroundings. Seeing as how conditions have improved, so has the state of peace. Therefore, it becomes clear that the death penalty is ineffective at deterring crime because other key factors present more possibility for improvement of society. Claim 4: The death penalty is a historically flawed system. Ground 4A: According to the book The Death Penalty: Constitutional Issues, Commentaries, and Case Briefs by Scott Vollum, published in 2005, addresses how the case of the death penalty emerged to where it is today. While the book is now a decade old, it is used for historical context, particularly, in describing the first execution that took place in 1608. While it is true that most of these executions weren’t as well-grounded as the modern ones that take place now, they still had no effect in deterring crime. Why? Because even after America was established and more sane, the death penalty still had to be used because criminals still had violent behaviors. Ground 4B: According to data from Mother Jones, published May 17th, 2013, the reason why the crime rate was so high in the past could possibly be due to yet another environmental factor (affected by change over time), exposure to lead. Since the removal of lead from paint started over a hundred years ago, there has been a decline in homicide. Why is this important? Lead poisoning in child’s brain, if not lethal, can affect development and lead to mental disability, lower IQ, and lack of reasoning. Warrant 4: By examining history as a whole, there is a greater correlation between other factors that have resulted in a decline in violent crime. The decline in the crime rate has been an ongoing process, but has shown a faster decline due to other environmental factors, rather than the instatement of the death penalty. Claim 5: The world’s violent crime rate is changing, but not due to the death penalty. Ground 5A: According to article published by Amnesty USA in March of 2014, the number of executions under the death penalty reported in 2013 had increased by 15%. However, the rate of violent crime in the world has decreased significantly in the last decade. But, Latvia, for example, has permanently banned the death penalty since 2012. In 2014, the country was viewed overall as safe and low in violent crime rate. Ground 5B: However, while it is true that there is a decline in violent crime rate worldwide, The World Bank, April 17, 2013, reports that the rate of global poverty is decreasing. In a similar vein to the US, because wealth is being distributed better and conditions are improving overall, there is a steady decline in crime rate. Warrant 5: By examining the world as a whole, it becomes clear that it doesn’t matter if the death penalty is in place, violent crime will still exist. However, mirroring the US, as simple conditions improve, so does lifestyle. The death penalty does not deter crime in the world, rather a better quality of life is responsible for that. Works Cited “Death Sentences and Executions 2013.” Amnesty International USA. Amnesty USA, 26 Mar. 2014. Web. 15 Mar. 2015. <http://www.amnestyusa.org/research/reports/death-sentences-and-executions-2013>. D. K. “Why Is Crime Falling?” The Economist. The Economist Newspaper, 23 July 2013. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. <http://www.economist.com/blogs/economist-explains/2013/07/economist-explains-16>. Drum, Kevin. “The US Murder Rate Is on Track to Be Lowest in a Century.”Mother Jones. Mother Jones, 17 May 2013. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. <http://www.motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2013/05/us-murder-rate-track-be-lowest-century>. Hood, Roger, and Carolyn Hoyle. The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2002. 45. Print. Rizzo, Kevin. “Slideshow: America’s Safest and Most Dangerous States 2014.”Law Street Media. Law Street TM, 12 Sept. 2014. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. <http://lawstreetmedia.com/blogs/crime/safest-and-most-dangerous-states-2014/#slideshow>. Vollum, Scott. The Death Penalty: Constitutional Issues, Commentaries, and Case Briefs. Newark, NJ: LexisNexis, 2005. 2. Print. Theis, David. “Remarkable Declines in Global Poverty, But Major Challenges Remain.” The World Bank. The World Bank, 17 Apr. 2013. Web. 15 Mar. 2015. <http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/press-release/2013/04/17/remarkable-declines-in-global-poverty-but-major-challenges-remain>. Wilson, James Q. “Hard Times, Fewer Crimes.” WSJ. The Wall Street Journal, 28 May 2011. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. <http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052702304066504576345553135009870>.

Fact Debate Brief Introduction Crime doesn’t pay; it should be punished. Even since childhood, a slap on the hand has prevented possible criminals from ever committing the same offense; whether it was successful or not depended on how much that child wanted that cookie. While a slap on the wrist might or might not be an effective deterrent, the same can be said about the death penalty. Every day, somewhere in the world, a criminal is stopped permanently from committing any future costs, but this is by the means of the death. While effective in stopping one person permanently, it does nothing about the crime world as a whole. While it is necessary to end the career of a criminal, no matter what his or her crime is, we must not end it by taking a life. Through this paper, the death penalty will be proven ineffective at deterring crime by use of other environmental factors. Definition: The death penalty is defined as the universal punishment of death as legally applied by a fair court system. It is important for it to be a fair legal system, as not to confuse it with genocide, mob mentality, or any other ruling without trial. Claim 1: Use of the death penalty is in decline Ground 1: According to the book The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective by Roger Hood and Carolyn Hoyle, published Dec. 8th, 2014, the Oxford professors in criminology say “As in most of the rest of the world, the death penalty in the US is in decline and distributed unevenly in frequency of use” even addressing that, as of April 2014, 18 states no longer have a death penalty, and even Oregon and Washington are considering removing their death penalty laws. Furthermore, in 2013, only 9 of these states still retaining the death penalty actually executed someone. Warrant 1: The death penalty can be reinstated at any time, but so far, it hasn’t been. At the same time, more states consider getting rid of it altogether. Therefore, it becomes clear that even states don’t want to be involved with this process showing that this is a disliked process. Claim 2: Even states with death penalty in effect still have high crime rates. Ground 2: With the reports gathered from fbi.gov, lawstreetmedia.com, a website based around political expertise and research determined the ranking of each state based on violent crime, published September 12th, 2014. Of the top ten most violent states, only three of which had the death penalty instituted (Maryland #9, New Mexico #4, Alaska #3). The other seven still had the system in place, and, despite it, still have a high amount of violent crime. On the opposite end of the spectrum, at the bottom ten most violent states, four of which, including the bottom-most states, do not have the death penalty in place. Warrant 2: With this ranking, it literally proves that the death penalty does not deter crime, or that there is a correlation between having the death penalty and having a decrease in the crime rate. Therefore, the idea of death penalty deterring crime is a null term in the sense that there is no, or a flawed connection. Claim 3: Violent crime is decreasing (but not because if the death penalty) Ground 3 A: According to an article published by The Economist, dated July 23rd, 2013, the rate of violent crime is in fact decreasing, but not because of the death penalty, but rather, because we have more police. From 1995 to 2010, policing has increased one-fifth, and with it, a decline in crime rate. In fact, in cities such as Detroit where policing has been cut, an opposite effect, an increase in crime, has been reported. Ground 3 B: An article from the Wall Street Journal, dated May 28th, 2011, also cites a decline in violent, only this time, citing the reason as a correlation with poverty levels. In 2009, at the start of the housing crisis, crime rates also dropped noticeably. Oddly enough, this article points out the belief that unemployment is often associated with crime; instead, the evidence presented is environmental in nature. Warrant 3: Crime rate isn’t deterred by death penalty, but rather, our surroundings. Seeing as how conditions have improved, so has the state of peace. Therefore, it becomes clear that the death penalty is ineffective at deterring crime because other key factors present more possibility for improvement of society. Claim 4: The death penalty is a historically flawed system. Ground 4A: According to the book The Death Penalty: Constitutional Issues, Commentaries, and Case Briefs by Scott Vollum, published in 2005, addresses how the case of the death penalty emerged to where it is today. While the book is now a decade old, it is used for historical context, particularly, in describing the first execution that took place in 1608. While it is true that most of these executions weren’t as well-grounded as the modern ones that take place now, they still had no effect in deterring crime. Why? Because even after America was established and more sane, the death penalty still had to be used because criminals still had violent behaviors. Ground 4B: According to data from Mother Jones, published May 17th, 2013, the reason why the crime rate was so high in the past could possibly be due to yet another environmental factor (affected by change over time), exposure to lead. Since the removal of lead from paint started over a hundred years ago, there has been a decline in homicide. Why is this important? Lead poisoning in child’s brain, if not lethal, can affect development and lead to mental disability, lower IQ, and lack of reasoning. Warrant 4: By examining history as a whole, there is a greater correlation between other factors that have resulted in a decline in violent crime. The decline in the crime rate has been an ongoing process, but has shown a faster decline due to other environmental factors, rather than the instatement of the death penalty. Claim 5: The world’s violent crime rate is changing, but not due to the death penalty. Ground 5A: According to article published by Amnesty USA in March of 2014, the number of executions under the death penalty reported in 2013 had increased by 15%. However, the rate of violent crime in the world has decreased significantly in the last decade. But, Latvia, for example, has permanently banned the death penalty since 2012. In 2014, the country was viewed overall as safe and low in violent crime rate. Ground 5B: However, while it is true that there is a decline in violent crime rate worldwide, The World Bank, April 17, 2013, reports that the rate of global poverty is decreasing. In a similar vein to the US, because wealth is being distributed better and conditions are improving overall, there is a steady decline in crime rate. Warrant 5: By examining the world as a whole, it becomes clear that it doesn’t matter if the death penalty is in place, violent crime will still exist. However, mirroring the US, as simple conditions improve, so does lifestyle. The death penalty does not deter crime in the world, rather a better quality of life is responsible for that. Works Cited “Death Sentences and Executions 2013.” Amnesty International USA. Amnesty USA, 26 Mar. 2014. Web. 15 Mar. 2015. . D. K. “Why Is Crime Falling?” The Economist. The Economist Newspaper, 23 July 2013. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. . Drum, Kevin. “The US Murder Rate Is on Track to Be Lowest in a Century.”Mother Jones. Mother Jones, 17 May 2013. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. . Hood, Roger, and Carolyn Hoyle. The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2002. 45. Print. Rizzo, Kevin. “Slideshow: America’s Safest and Most Dangerous States 2014.”Law Street Media. Law Street TM, 12 Sept. 2014. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. . Vollum, Scott. The Death Penalty: Constitutional Issues, Commentaries, and Case Briefs. Newark, NJ: LexisNexis, 2005. 2. Print. Theis, David. “Remarkable Declines in Global Poverty, But Major Challenges Remain.” The World Bank. The World Bank, 17 Apr. 2013. Web. 15 Mar. 2015. . Wilson, James Q. “Hard Times, Fewer Crimes.” WSJ. The Wall Street Journal, 28 May 2011. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. .

Fact Debate Brief Introduction Crime doesn’t pay; it should be … Read More...
CURR 5702 Guidelines for Writing Analysis Project 1. Find a piece of writing written by a learner with special needs or an English learner. In your write-up, describe the learner’s background in as much detail as you can (country/language of origin, age/grade, gender, length of time in U.S., educational background, level of proficiency, etc.) and the type of writing it is (journal entry, 5-paragraph essay assignment, free write, etc.). 2. Determine what aspects of language are present in the writing. a. Where is the learner strong? b. Where does he/she need help? c. What features do you notice? (this is a list to get you thinking…you do not need to address every one) i. lexical variety ii. syntactic complexity iii. control of grammatical features (nouns, verbs, preps, etc.) iv. linking features (conjunctions) v. structures that mark order (first, second, later, finally) vi. structures that reference prior elements (using the right pronouns to refer back to some person or thing already mentioned) vii. Others? 3. Consider how you might assess this writing and provide feedback to the learner. a. Will you use a rubric? b. What will you focus on? Here are some possibilities: i. Organization and content ii. Language 1. Sentence fluency 2. Grammar/spelling/word choice iii. All of the above c. How will you convey your feedback? i. In writing 1. Highlight errors 2. Choose a few of the most common errors to highlight/ have the learner correct them? (e.g. Error log) 3. Provide general feedback without marking the paper? ii. Have a conference with the learner and discuss some of the areas in need of revision d. What are the next steps in the process? 4. What are your recommendations for literacy instruction? a. Based on your analysis and connections, how might you address the needs of this learner as a teacher? This is where you can connect your project with your readings from the course (or other readings as appropriate). i. Are there strategies, activities, tools, technology, resources, etc., that would be beneficial for your learner? Describe them and be sure to cite your sources. ii. Directly link the recommendations with the observations that you made in their writing sample and with your readings. 5. Write up the writing analysis you have done. Be sure to include the writing sample as an appendix. If you reference a rubric or Error log, etc., please include that as well. You should incorporate at least 4 references into this project (you can start with the 2 course texts if you like). Be sure to cite your sources within your paper and include a list of references at the end in APA format. The evaluation rubric for this project can be found below. Rubric for Writing Analysis Performance Excellent Good Needs Improvement Unacceptable 5 points 3-4 points 1-2 points 0 points Introduction and Context Writer introduces learner and gives clear context of learner. Writer identifies learner, but does not give full context OR writer describes context, but learner information sketchy. Writer has very little information about learner and/or context. No context provided. Writing Sample Writer describes clearly writing sample. Writer is too general about how writing sample. Writer has provided very little information about sample. No information provided regarding sample or no sample provided. 13-15 points 9-12 points 4-8 points 0-3 points Identification of Writing Challenges Language challenges are clearly identified and samples given to support challenges (including transcript numbers). Clear connections made to relevant topics covered in course. Writer indicates some idea of language challenges. Some support given. Some connections made to relevant topics covered in course. Writer discusses language challenges in general; does not support in terms of transcription. Minimal effort to make connections to relevant topics covered in course. Very little or no discussion language challenges identified and little or no transcription support provided. No connections to course topics. Plan for Assessment and Feedback Clear plan for assessing writing and providing feedback to learner. General plan for assessment; feedback addressed, but more details needed. Plan for assessment not clear; feedback to learner addressed superficially. No plan for assessment or feedback. Recommendations for Instruction Recommendations for instruction are clear and well-supported. Recommendations present, but need more description and support. Recommendations are implied or only partially supported. No recommendations given. 5 points 3-4 points 1-2 points 0 points References Writer includes at least 4 credible sources. Writer includes 3 sources. Writer includes 1-2 resources. Sources not included. Writing Conventions Writing is clear. No grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors. APA format is correct. A few grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors. APA format is mostly correct. Some grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors. Numerous issues with APA format. Many grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors. APA format disregarded. Total ____ / 75 Comments:

CURR 5702 Guidelines for Writing Analysis Project 1. Find a piece of writing written by a learner with special needs or an English learner. In your write-up, describe the learner’s background in as much detail as you can (country/language of origin, age/grade, gender, length of time in U.S., educational background, level of proficiency, etc.) and the type of writing it is (journal entry, 5-paragraph essay assignment, free write, etc.). 2. Determine what aspects of language are present in the writing. a. Where is the learner strong? b. Where does he/she need help? c. What features do you notice? (this is a list to get you thinking…you do not need to address every one) i. lexical variety ii. syntactic complexity iii. control of grammatical features (nouns, verbs, preps, etc.) iv. linking features (conjunctions) v. structures that mark order (first, second, later, finally) vi. structures that reference prior elements (using the right pronouns to refer back to some person or thing already mentioned) vii. Others? 3. Consider how you might assess this writing and provide feedback to the learner. a. Will you use a rubric? b. What will you focus on? Here are some possibilities: i. Organization and content ii. Language 1. Sentence fluency 2. Grammar/spelling/word choice iii. All of the above c. How will you convey your feedback? i. In writing 1. Highlight errors 2. Choose a few of the most common errors to highlight/ have the learner correct them? (e.g. Error log) 3. Provide general feedback without marking the paper? ii. Have a conference with the learner and discuss some of the areas in need of revision d. What are the next steps in the process? 4. What are your recommendations for literacy instruction? a. Based on your analysis and connections, how might you address the needs of this learner as a teacher? This is where you can connect your project with your readings from the course (or other readings as appropriate). i. Are there strategies, activities, tools, technology, resources, etc., that would be beneficial for your learner? Describe them and be sure to cite your sources. ii. Directly link the recommendations with the observations that you made in their writing sample and with your readings. 5. Write up the writing analysis you have done. Be sure to include the writing sample as an appendix. If you reference a rubric or Error log, etc., please include that as well. You should incorporate at least 4 references into this project (you can start with the 2 course texts if you like). Be sure to cite your sources within your paper and include a list of references at the end in APA format. The evaluation rubric for this project can be found below. Rubric for Writing Analysis Performance Excellent Good Needs Improvement Unacceptable 5 points 3-4 points 1-2 points 0 points Introduction and Context Writer introduces learner and gives clear context of learner. Writer identifies learner, but does not give full context OR writer describes context, but learner information sketchy. Writer has very little information about learner and/or context. No context provided. Writing Sample Writer describes clearly writing sample. Writer is too general about how writing sample. Writer has provided very little information about sample. No information provided regarding sample or no sample provided. 13-15 points 9-12 points 4-8 points 0-3 points Identification of Writing Challenges Language challenges are clearly identified and samples given to support challenges (including transcript numbers). Clear connections made to relevant topics covered in course. Writer indicates some idea of language challenges. Some support given. Some connections made to relevant topics covered in course. Writer discusses language challenges in general; does not support in terms of transcription. Minimal effort to make connections to relevant topics covered in course. Very little or no discussion language challenges identified and little or no transcription support provided. No connections to course topics. Plan for Assessment and Feedback Clear plan for assessing writing and providing feedback to learner. General plan for assessment; feedback addressed, but more details needed. Plan for assessment not clear; feedback to learner addressed superficially. No plan for assessment or feedback. Recommendations for Instruction Recommendations for instruction are clear and well-supported. Recommendations present, but need more description and support. Recommendations are implied or only partially supported. No recommendations given. 5 points 3-4 points 1-2 points 0 points References Writer includes at least 4 credible sources. Writer includes 3 sources. Writer includes 1-2 resources. Sources not included. Writing Conventions Writing is clear. No grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors. APA format is correct. A few grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors. APA format is mostly correct. Some grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors. Numerous issues with APA format. Many grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors. APA format disregarded. Total ____ / 75 Comments:

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1000 words Total. Answer each question in paragraph form https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wzicXbnmllc In the video, presented by Brooke Deterline, talks about creating ethical cultures in a business. One of Brooke’s main point was courage. She defines courage as our ability to act from our hearts in the face of fear and is a skill that we can build with practice. Brooke gives an example of life without courage and shows us many scenarios where it is still happening today, 10 years after the ENRON scandal. Courage is something that lacks in social situations where wrong is being done. She states that we all are vulnerable to situation influence all the time and that it is natural human wiring. It seems that most of us, including myself, can become a bystander to follow a leader or a group that we know is doing wrong because we want to be accepted. (1) Why do you think that the most ethical and compassionate among us can easily betray our values, in the face of challenging situations? What challenges does one face when they are presented with a difficult situation? (2) Do you believe that with practice we can retrain our brains to override our natural fear response when we are put in these challenging situations? Managers sometimes face business problems that raise difficult questions. When being faced with these problems they must choose between two ways of resolving it. Each of these alternatives is the right thing to do, but they can not do both ways. Badaracco characterizes right-versus-right dilemmas as “dirty-hands problems,” where managers or any employee often have to “get their hands dirty” by making tough choices between competing virtues such as honesty, fairness, respect, objectivity, and responsibility. He shows us three managers that face different right- versus-right conflicts. We see that these managers have the responsibilities to live up to the commitments they have made and the standards by which they want live by. However, it is not that simple to choose from wanting to be a successful manager and a decent, responsible person. (3) After reading the three different extremes of right- versus- right, why do you think that Badaracco emphasizes on the statement made by Oliver Wendell Holmes, “I do not give a fig for the simplicity on the this side complexity, but i would give my life for the simplicity on the other side of complexity,” and what do you think it means? A manager often encounters right-versus-right dilemmas where professional responsibilities conflict with personal values. For example, a senior manager may have knowledge of plans to lay off an employee-friend who is planning the purchase of a new home. Warning the friend about the upcoming layoff would certainly help the friend avoid the difficulty of paying for a new home without a job, but it may also violate an agreement with senior management and shareholders to keep such plans confidential until these plans are properly implemented. (4) In a challenging situation like this, should mangers rely on fundamental ethical principles and the company’s mission statement to help them decide what to do or should they consult their own moral instincts and intuitions?

1000 words Total. Answer each question in paragraph form https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wzicXbnmllc In the video, presented by Brooke Deterline, talks about creating ethical cultures in a business. One of Brooke’s main point was courage. She defines courage as our ability to act from our hearts in the face of fear and is a skill that we can build with practice. Brooke gives an example of life without courage and shows us many scenarios where it is still happening today, 10 years after the ENRON scandal. Courage is something that lacks in social situations where wrong is being done. She states that we all are vulnerable to situation influence all the time and that it is natural human wiring. It seems that most of us, including myself, can become a bystander to follow a leader or a group that we know is doing wrong because we want to be accepted. (1) Why do you think that the most ethical and compassionate among us can easily betray our values, in the face of challenging situations? What challenges does one face when they are presented with a difficult situation? (2) Do you believe that with practice we can retrain our brains to override our natural fear response when we are put in these challenging situations? Managers sometimes face business problems that raise difficult questions. When being faced with these problems they must choose between two ways of resolving it. Each of these alternatives is the right thing to do, but they can not do both ways. Badaracco characterizes right-versus-right dilemmas as “dirty-hands problems,” where managers or any employee often have to “get their hands dirty” by making tough choices between competing virtues such as honesty, fairness, respect, objectivity, and responsibility. He shows us three managers that face different right- versus-right conflicts. We see that these managers have the responsibilities to live up to the commitments they have made and the standards by which they want live by. However, it is not that simple to choose from wanting to be a successful manager and a decent, responsible person. (3) After reading the three different extremes of right- versus- right, why do you think that Badaracco emphasizes on the statement made by Oliver Wendell Holmes, “I do not give a fig for the simplicity on the this side complexity, but i would give my life for the simplicity on the other side of complexity,” and what do you think it means? A manager often encounters right-versus-right dilemmas where professional responsibilities conflict with personal values. For example, a senior manager may have knowledge of plans to lay off an employee-friend who is planning the purchase of a new home. Warning the friend about the upcoming layoff would certainly help the friend avoid the difficulty of paying for a new home without a job, but it may also violate an agreement with senior management and shareholders to keep such plans confidential until these plans are properly implemented. (4) In a challenging situation like this, should mangers rely on fundamental ethical principles and the company’s mission statement to help them decide what to do or should they consult their own moral instincts and intuitions?

Watch the videos, and then answer the questions below. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kt6SYhX_Ymo http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ka3yTfmyjAw Building Justice Which of the following is true of the International Criminal Court (ICC)? A. It was the first court to try individuals for crimes against humanity. B. It was founded to prosecute Nazi war criminals. C. It is a permanent court with universal jurisdiction. D. It was created by a treaty that has been signed by all of the world’s nations. E. none of these options What distinguishes a “crime against humanity” from other kinds of crimes? A. Crimes against humanity involve government officials as perpetrators. B. Crimes against humanity target particular ethnic groups. C. Crimes against humanity are punishable by the death penalty. D. Crimes against humanity involve attacks on civilians. E. all of these options An important goal of the ICC is to eliminate “impunity” for crimes, which means eliminating which of the following? A. the ability of perpetrators to obtain the weapons they need to commit the crimes B. the expectation of perpetrators that they can commit crimes without being punished C. the expectation of perpetrators that they can evade arrest by national authorities D. the ability of perpetrators to get a court-appointed lawyer if they are arrested and tried E. the ability of perpetrators to cross national boundaries and escape extradition Supporting a Strong International Justice System Which of the following is NOT a part of the emerging international justice system? A. local courts B. national courts C. regional courts D. international Courts E. United Nations tribunals Which of the following represents one of the major challenges faced by the ICC? A. increasing awareness of its cause B. obtaining more funding from the United Nations C. securing greater state cooperation with its activities D. apprehending and prosecuting Germain Katanga E. getting the United States to join

Watch the videos, and then answer the questions below. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kt6SYhX_Ymo http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ka3yTfmyjAw Building Justice Which of the following is true of the International Criminal Court (ICC)? A. It was the first court to try individuals for crimes against humanity. B. It was founded to prosecute Nazi war criminals. C. It is a permanent court with universal jurisdiction. D. It was created by a treaty that has been signed by all of the world’s nations. E. none of these options What distinguishes a “crime against humanity” from other kinds of crimes? A. Crimes against humanity involve government officials as perpetrators. B. Crimes against humanity target particular ethnic groups. C. Crimes against humanity are punishable by the death penalty. D. Crimes against humanity involve attacks on civilians. E. all of these options An important goal of the ICC is to eliminate “impunity” for crimes, which means eliminating which of the following? A. the ability of perpetrators to obtain the weapons they need to commit the crimes B. the expectation of perpetrators that they can commit crimes without being punished C. the expectation of perpetrators that they can evade arrest by national authorities D. the ability of perpetrators to get a court-appointed lawyer if they are arrested and tried E. the ability of perpetrators to cross national boundaries and escape extradition Supporting a Strong International Justice System Which of the following is NOT a part of the emerging international justice system? A. local courts B. national courts C. regional courts D. international Courts E. United Nations tribunals Which of the following represents one of the major challenges faced by the ICC? A. increasing awareness of its cause B. obtaining more funding from the United Nations C. securing greater state cooperation with its activities D. apprehending and prosecuting Germain Katanga E. getting the United States to join

Watch the videos, and then answer the questions below. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kt6SYhX_Ymo … Read More...