Nutrient molecules are used as building blocks or for energy. This best represents which characteristic of life? Select one: Living things acquire materials and energy from the environment. Living things are homeostatic. Living things are adapted. Living things grow and develop. Living things respond to stimuli.

Nutrient molecules are used as building blocks or for energy. This best represents which characteristic of life? Select one: Living things acquire materials and energy from the environment. Living things are homeostatic. Living things are adapted. Living things grow and develop. Living things respond to stimuli.

Nutrient molecules are used as building blocks or for energy. … Read More...
Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture Spring 2015 Look through popular magazines, and see if you can find advertisements that objectify women in order to sell a product. Alternately, you may use an advertisement on television (but make sure to provide a link to the ad so I can see it!). Study these images then write a paper about objectification that deals with all or some of the following: • What effect(s), if any, do you think the objectification of women’s bodies has on our culture? • Jean Kilbourne states “turning a human being into a thing is almost always the first step toward justifying violence against that person.” What do you think she means by this? Do you agree with her reasoning? Why or why not? • Some people would argue that depicting a woman’s body as an object is a form of art. What is your opinion of this point of view? Explain your reasoning. • Why do you think that women are objectified more often than men are? • How does sexualization and objectification play out differently across racial lines? • Kilbourne explains that the consequences of being objectified are different – and more serious – for women than for men. Do you agree? How is the world different for women than it is for men? How do objectified images of women interact with those in our culture differently from the way images of men do? Why is it important to look at images in the context of the culture? • What is the difference between sexual objectification and sexual subjectification? (Ros Gill ) • How do ads construct violent white masculinity and how does that vision of masculinity hurt both men and women? Throughout your written analysis, be sure to make clear and specific reference to the images you selected, and please submit these images with your paper. Make sure you engage with and reference to at least 4 of the following authors: Kilbourne, Bordo, Hunter & Soto, Rose, Durham, Gill, Katz, Schuchardt, Ono and Buescher. Guidelines:  Keep your content focused on structural, systemic, institutional factors rather than the individual: BE ANALYTICAL NOT ANECDOTAL.  Avoid using the first person or including personal stories/reactions. You must make sure to actively engage with your readings: these essays need to be informed and framed by the theoretical material you have been reading this semester.  Keep within the 4-6 page limit; use 12-point font, double spacing and 1-inch margins.  Use formal writing conventions (introduction/thesis statement, body, conclusion) and correct grammar. Resources may be cited within the text of your paper, i.e. (Walters, 2013).

Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture Spring 2015 Look through popular magazines, and see if you can find advertisements that objectify women in order to sell a product. Alternately, you may use an advertisement on television (but make sure to provide a link to the ad so I can see it!). Study these images then write a paper about objectification that deals with all or some of the following: • What effect(s), if any, do you think the objectification of women’s bodies has on our culture? • Jean Kilbourne states “turning a human being into a thing is almost always the first step toward justifying violence against that person.” What do you think she means by this? Do you agree with her reasoning? Why or why not? • Some people would argue that depicting a woman’s body as an object is a form of art. What is your opinion of this point of view? Explain your reasoning. • Why do you think that women are objectified more often than men are? • How does sexualization and objectification play out differently across racial lines? • Kilbourne explains that the consequences of being objectified are different – and more serious – for women than for men. Do you agree? How is the world different for women than it is for men? How do objectified images of women interact with those in our culture differently from the way images of men do? Why is it important to look at images in the context of the culture? • What is the difference between sexual objectification and sexual subjectification? (Ros Gill ) • How do ads construct violent white masculinity and how does that vision of masculinity hurt both men and women? Throughout your written analysis, be sure to make clear and specific reference to the images you selected, and please submit these images with your paper. Make sure you engage with and reference to at least 4 of the following authors: Kilbourne, Bordo, Hunter & Soto, Rose, Durham, Gill, Katz, Schuchardt, Ono and Buescher. Guidelines:  Keep your content focused on structural, systemic, institutional factors rather than the individual: BE ANALYTICAL NOT ANECDOTAL.  Avoid using the first person or including personal stories/reactions. You must make sure to actively engage with your readings: these essays need to be informed and framed by the theoretical material you have been reading this semester.  Keep within the 4-6 page limit; use 12-point font, double spacing and 1-inch margins.  Use formal writing conventions (introduction/thesis statement, body, conclusion) and correct grammar. Resources may be cited within the text of your paper, i.e. (Walters, 2013).

The objectification of women has been a very controversial topic … Read More...
EXPERIMENT 6 FET CHARACTERISTIC CURVES ________________________________________ Bring a diskette to save your data. ________________________________________ OBJECT: The objective of this lab is to investigate the DC characteristics and operation of a field effect transistor (FET). The FET recommended to be used in this lab is 2N5486 n-channel FET. • Gathering data for the DC characteristics ________________________________________ APPARATUS: Dual DC Power Supply, Voltmeter, and 1k resistors, 2N5486 N-Channel FET. ________________________________________ THEORY: A JFET (Junction Field Effect Transistor) is a three terminal device (drain, source, and gate) similar to the BJT. The difference between them is that the JFET is a voltage controlled constant current device, whereas BJT is a current controlled current source device. Whereas for BJT the relationship between an output parameter, iC, and an input parameter, iB, is given by a constant , the relationship in JFET between an output parameter, iD, and an input parameter, vGS, is more complex. PROCEDURE: Measuring ID versus VDS (Output Characteristics) 1. Build the circuit shown below. 2. Obtain the output characteristics i.e. ID versus VDS. a. Set VGS = 0. Vary the voltage across drain (VDS) from 0 to 8 V with steps of 1 V and measure the corresponding drain current (ID). b. Repeat the procedure for different values of VGS. (0V, -0.5V, -1V, -1.5V, -2V, -2.5V, -3.0V, -3.5V, -4.0V). 3. Record the values in Table 1 and plot the graph ID vs. VGS. VGS 0 -0.5 -1.0 -1.5` -2.0 -2.5 -3.0 -3.5 -4.0 VDS ID ID ID ID ID ID ID ID ID 0 0 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0mA 1 0 0.7 mA 0.7 mA 0.66 mA 0.6 mA 0.6 mA 0.5 0.1mA 0mA 2 0 1.5 mA 1.3 mA 1.3mA 1.2 mA 1.1 mA 0.7 0.1mA 0mA 3 0 2.1 mA 2.6 mA 1.9 mA 1.8 mA 1.5 mA 0.8 mA 0.1mA 0mA 4 0 2.7 mA 2.6 mA 2.5 mA 2.4 mA 1.7 mA 0.8 mA 0.1mA 0mA 5 0 3.4 mA 3.3 mA 3.1 mA 2.8 mA 1.8 mA 0.9 mA 0.1mA 0mA 6 0 4.1 mA 3.4 mA 3.7 mA 3.2 mA 1.9 mA 0.9 mA 0.1mA 0mA 7 0 4.7 mA 4.5 mA 4.2 mA 3.4 mA 1.9 mA 0.9 mA 0.1mA 0mA 8 0 5.3 mA 5.1 mA 6.6 mA 3.5 mA 2.0 mA 0.9 mA 0.1mA 0mA Table 1. vds=0:8; id=[0 6.2e-3 9.7e-3 11.3e-3 11.9e-3 12.2e-3 12.3e-3 12.3e-3 12.32e-3]; plot(vds,id);grid on;hold on id2=[0 5.23e-3 8.05e-3 9.15e-3 9.57e-3 9.77e-3 9.88e-3 9.9e-3 9.92e-3]; plot(vds,id2);grid on;hold on id3=[0 4.29e-3 6.41e-3 7.17e-3 7.46e-3 7.60e-3 7.67e-3 7.73e-3 7.76e-3]; plot(vds,id3);grid on;hold on ________________________________________ Measuring ID versus VGS (Transconductance Characteristics) 1. For the same circuit, obtain the transconductance characteristics. i.e. ID versus VGS. a. Set a particular value of voltage for VDS, i.e. 5V. Start with a gate voltage VGS of 0 V, and measure the corresponding drain current (ID). b. Then decrease VGS in steps of 0.5 V until VGS is -4V. c. At each step record the drain current. VDS = 5 V VGS ID 0 3.42 mA -0.5 3.36 mA -1.00 3.27 mA -1.50 3.12 mA -2.00 2.79 mA -2.50 1.84 mA -3.00 0.71 mA -3.50 0.11 mA -4.00 0 mA Table 2. 2. Plot the graph with ID versus VGS using Excel, MATLAB, or some other program. Discussion Questions—Make sure you answer the following questions in your discussion. Use all of the data obtained to answer the following questions: 1. Discuss the output and transconductance curves obtained in lab? Are they what you expected? 2. Are the output characteristics spaced evenly? Should they be? 3. What are the applications of a JFET?

EXPERIMENT 6 FET CHARACTERISTIC CURVES ________________________________________ Bring a diskette to save your data. ________________________________________ OBJECT: The objective of this lab is to investigate the DC characteristics and operation of a field effect transistor (FET). The FET recommended to be used in this lab is 2N5486 n-channel FET. • Gathering data for the DC characteristics ________________________________________ APPARATUS: Dual DC Power Supply, Voltmeter, and 1k resistors, 2N5486 N-Channel FET. ________________________________________ THEORY: A JFET (Junction Field Effect Transistor) is a three terminal device (drain, source, and gate) similar to the BJT. The difference between them is that the JFET is a voltage controlled constant current device, whereas BJT is a current controlled current source device. Whereas for BJT the relationship between an output parameter, iC, and an input parameter, iB, is given by a constant , the relationship in JFET between an output parameter, iD, and an input parameter, vGS, is more complex. PROCEDURE: Measuring ID versus VDS (Output Characteristics) 1. Build the circuit shown below. 2. Obtain the output characteristics i.e. ID versus VDS. a. Set VGS = 0. Vary the voltage across drain (VDS) from 0 to 8 V with steps of 1 V and measure the corresponding drain current (ID). b. Repeat the procedure for different values of VGS. (0V, -0.5V, -1V, -1.5V, -2V, -2.5V, -3.0V, -3.5V, -4.0V). 3. Record the values in Table 1 and plot the graph ID vs. VGS. VGS 0 -0.5 -1.0 -1.5` -2.0 -2.5 -3.0 -3.5 -4.0 VDS ID ID ID ID ID ID ID ID ID 0 0 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0mA 1 0 0.7 mA 0.7 mA 0.66 mA 0.6 mA 0.6 mA 0.5 0.1mA 0mA 2 0 1.5 mA 1.3 mA 1.3mA 1.2 mA 1.1 mA 0.7 0.1mA 0mA 3 0 2.1 mA 2.6 mA 1.9 mA 1.8 mA 1.5 mA 0.8 mA 0.1mA 0mA 4 0 2.7 mA 2.6 mA 2.5 mA 2.4 mA 1.7 mA 0.8 mA 0.1mA 0mA 5 0 3.4 mA 3.3 mA 3.1 mA 2.8 mA 1.8 mA 0.9 mA 0.1mA 0mA 6 0 4.1 mA 3.4 mA 3.7 mA 3.2 mA 1.9 mA 0.9 mA 0.1mA 0mA 7 0 4.7 mA 4.5 mA 4.2 mA 3.4 mA 1.9 mA 0.9 mA 0.1mA 0mA 8 0 5.3 mA 5.1 mA 6.6 mA 3.5 mA 2.0 mA 0.9 mA 0.1mA 0mA Table 1. vds=0:8; id=[0 6.2e-3 9.7e-3 11.3e-3 11.9e-3 12.2e-3 12.3e-3 12.3e-3 12.32e-3]; plot(vds,id);grid on;hold on id2=[0 5.23e-3 8.05e-3 9.15e-3 9.57e-3 9.77e-3 9.88e-3 9.9e-3 9.92e-3]; plot(vds,id2);grid on;hold on id3=[0 4.29e-3 6.41e-3 7.17e-3 7.46e-3 7.60e-3 7.67e-3 7.73e-3 7.76e-3]; plot(vds,id3);grid on;hold on ________________________________________ Measuring ID versus VGS (Transconductance Characteristics) 1. For the same circuit, obtain the transconductance characteristics. i.e. ID versus VGS. a. Set a particular value of voltage for VDS, i.e. 5V. Start with a gate voltage VGS of 0 V, and measure the corresponding drain current (ID). b. Then decrease VGS in steps of 0.5 V until VGS is -4V. c. At each step record the drain current. VDS = 5 V VGS ID 0 3.42 mA -0.5 3.36 mA -1.00 3.27 mA -1.50 3.12 mA -2.00 2.79 mA -2.50 1.84 mA -3.00 0.71 mA -3.50 0.11 mA -4.00 0 mA Table 2. 2. Plot the graph with ID versus VGS using Excel, MATLAB, or some other program. Discussion Questions—Make sure you answer the following questions in your discussion. Use all of the data obtained to answer the following questions: 1. Discuss the output and transconductance curves obtained in lab? Are they what you expected? 2. Are the output characteristics spaced evenly? Should they be? 3. What are the applications of a JFET?

No expert has answered this question yet. You can browse … Read More...
Task 4 – Learning Outcome 2.1 Apply dimensional analysis to energy and mass transfer relationships a. The Reynolds number (Re) is a function of density, viscosity, and velocity of a fluid and a characteristic length (diameter of the pipe). Establish that Re = C (Vdr/m )-d by dimensional analysis and suggest appropriate methods to obtain constants C and d.

Task 4 – Learning Outcome 2.1 Apply dimensional analysis to energy and mass transfer relationships a. The Reynolds number (Re) is a function of density, viscosity, and velocity of a fluid and a characteristic length (diameter of the pipe). Establish that Re = C (Vdr/m )-d by dimensional analysis and suggest appropriate methods to obtain constants C and d.

The third task : Tutorial Topic 5 – IT and Information Systems Search business magazines and other sources of information for recent articles that discuss the use of information technology in delivering significant business benefits to an organisation. Use other sources to find additional information about the organisation. For the tutorial, prepare a brief report on your findings, and identify the application area(s) in the organisation that IT has supported. HOW TO DO THIS: 1. Identify an organisation big enough to have material published about it. 2. Write short introduction/description of the organisation 3. Identify business magazines that publish articles about IT 4. Other sources of information could be the organisations website 5. Or the company that is selling the information technology 6. Brief report – what is a report? what is the writing style of a report? Examples of information sourses: 1. http://www.infoworld.com/about 2. http://www.emeraldinsight.com/learning/management_thinking/articles/?subject=ebusiness 3. http://www.computerworlduk.com/it-business/ 4. http://www.businessweek.com/reports 5. http://www.informationweek.com/ 6. http://www.webroot.com/us/en/business/resources/articles/ or search for Business IT articles

The third task : Tutorial Topic 5 – IT and Information Systems Search business magazines and other sources of information for recent articles that discuss the use of information technology in delivering significant business benefits to an organisation. Use other sources to find additional information about the organisation. For the tutorial, prepare a brief report on your findings, and identify the application area(s) in the organisation that IT has supported. HOW TO DO THIS: 1. Identify an organisation big enough to have material published about it. 2. Write short introduction/description of the organisation 3. Identify business magazines that publish articles about IT 4. Other sources of information could be the organisations website 5. Or the company that is selling the information technology 6. Brief report – what is a report? what is the writing style of a report? Examples of information sourses: 1. http://www.infoworld.com/about 2. http://www.emeraldinsight.com/learning/management_thinking/articles/?subject=ebusiness 3. http://www.computerworlduk.com/it-business/ 4. http://www.businessweek.com/reports 5. http://www.informationweek.com/ 6. http://www.webroot.com/us/en/business/resources/articles/ or search for Business IT articles

Toyota Motor Corporation  Ever since 1957, after the Crown was … Read More...
9. Identify and discuss the trade-offs associated with operating a supply chain that handles both forward and reverse movements as compared with separate supply chains for these movements.

9. Identify and discuss the trade-offs associated with operating a supply chain that handles both forward and reverse movements as compared with separate supply chains for these movements.

By strategic plan, forward supply chains normally struggle to be … Read More...
Watch the video below, and then answer the questions below. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tZbDMUaqwE8 What does J.D. Bowen say is the problem with realism? A. Realism places too much emphasis on security, and thus its answers are all about conflict. B. Realism is too deterministic, ignoring the unpredictable human element in international relations. C. Realism discounts the possibility of progress and positive change. D. Realism can’t explain why a small country would fight a larger, more powerful one. E. Realism is like liberalism without a moral compass. Which of the following is NOT a characteristic of liberal thought? A. There are important issues in international relations beyond security and conflict. B. International actors have opportunities for cooperation. C. There is no real conflict of interests in international politics. D. Businesses and other non-state organizations have power. E. Interdependence is a facet of the international system. According to liberal theory, which of the following would be a potential actor in the international political system? A. states B. businesses C. aid groups D. churches E. all of these options Bowen claims that the United Nations is based on a “clearly liberal logic.” What is that logic? A. preventing conflict through the efforts of non-state actors B. preventing conflict through collective security C. preventing conflict through nuclear deterrence D. promoting freedom and democracy E. holding Germany accountable for its aggression in World War II Which of the following would most likely be a research topic for liberal theorists? A. how cultures develop identities B. how states can measure their military power by counting equipment and personnel C. how the United Nations can be more effective at preventing war D. why security is a masculine concept E. all of these options ———————————————————————————————————————

Watch the video below, and then answer the questions below. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tZbDMUaqwE8 What does J.D. Bowen say is the problem with realism? A. Realism places too much emphasis on security, and thus its answers are all about conflict. B. Realism is too deterministic, ignoring the unpredictable human element in international relations. C. Realism discounts the possibility of progress and positive change. D. Realism can’t explain why a small country would fight a larger, more powerful one. E. Realism is like liberalism without a moral compass. Which of the following is NOT a characteristic of liberal thought? A. There are important issues in international relations beyond security and conflict. B. International actors have opportunities for cooperation. C. There is no real conflict of interests in international politics. D. Businesses and other non-state organizations have power. E. Interdependence is a facet of the international system. According to liberal theory, which of the following would be a potential actor in the international political system? A. states B. businesses C. aid groups D. churches E. all of these options Bowen claims that the United Nations is based on a “clearly liberal logic.” What is that logic? A. preventing conflict through the efforts of non-state actors B. preventing conflict through collective security C. preventing conflict through nuclear deterrence D. promoting freedom and democracy E. holding Germany accountable for its aggression in World War II Which of the following would most likely be a research topic for liberal theorists? A. how cultures develop identities B. how states can measure their military power by counting equipment and personnel C. how the United Nations can be more effective at preventing war D. why security is a masculine concept E. all of these options ———————————————————————————————————————

Watch the video below, and then answer the questions below. … Read More...
Faculty of Science Technology and Engineering Department of Physics Senior Laboratory Faraday rotation AIM To show that optical activity is induced in a certain type of glass when it is in a magnetic field. To investigate the degree of rotation of linearly polarised light as a function of the applied magnetic field and hence determine a parameter which is characteristic of each material and known as Verdet’s constant. BACKGROUND INFORMATION A brief description of the properties and production of polarised light is given in the section labelled: Notes on polarisation. This should be read before proceeding with this experiment. Additional details may be found in the references listed at the end of this experiment. Whereas some materials, such as quartz, are naturally optically active, optical activity can be induced in others by the application of a magnetic field. For such materials, the angle through which the plane of polarisation of a linearly polarised beam is rotated () depends on the thickness of the sample (L), the strength of the magnetic field (B) and on the properties of the particular material. The latter is described by means of a parameter introduced by Verdet, which is wavelength dependent. Thus:  = V B L Lamp Polariser Solenoid Polariser Glass rod A Solenoid power supply Viewing mirror EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE The experimental arrangement is shown in the diagram. Unpolarised white light is produced by a hot filament and viewed using a mirror. • The light from the globe passes through two polarisers as well as the specially doped glass rod. Select one of the colour filters provided and place in the light path. Each of these filters transmits a relatively narrow band of wavelengths centred around a dominant wavelength as listed in the table. Filter No. Dominant Wavelength 98 4350 Å 50 4500 75 4900 58 5300 72 B 6060 92 6700 With the power supply for the coil switched off, (do not simply turn the potentiometer to zero: this still allows some current to flow) adjust one of the polarisers until minimum light is transmitted to the mirror. Minimum transmission can be determined visually. • Decide which polariser you will work with and do not alter the other one during the measurements. • The magnetic field is generated by a current in a solenoid (coil) placed around the glass rod. As the current in the coil is increased, the magnitude of the magnetic field will increase as shown on the calibration curve below. The degree of optical activity will also increase, resulting in some angle of rotation of the plane of polarisation. Hence you will need to rotate your chosen polariser to regain a minimum setting. 0 1 2 3 4 5 0.00 0.02 0.04 0.06 0.08 I (amps) B (tesla) Magnetic field (B) produced by current (I) in solenoid • Record the rotation angle () for coil currents of 0,1,2,3,4 and 5 amps. Avoid having the current in the coil switched on except when measurements are actually being taken as it can easily overheat. If the coil becomes too hot to touch, switch it off and wait for it to cool before proceeding. • Plot  as a function of B and, given that the length of the glass rod is 30 cm, determine Verdet’s constant for this material at the wavelength () in use. • Repeat the experiment for each of the wavelengths available using the filter set provided. • Calculate the logarithm for each V and  and tabulate the results. By plotting log V against log , determine the relationship between V and . [Hint: m log(x) = log (xm) and log(xy) = log(x) + log(y)]. • Calculate the errors involved in your determination of V. The uncertainty in a value of B may be taken as the uncertainty in reading the scale of the calibration curve) • The magnetic field direction can be reversed by reversing the direction of current flow in the coil. Describe the effect of this reversal and provide an explanation. Reference Optics Hecht.

Faculty of Science Technology and Engineering Department of Physics Senior Laboratory Faraday rotation AIM To show that optical activity is induced in a certain type of glass when it is in a magnetic field. To investigate the degree of rotation of linearly polarised light as a function of the applied magnetic field and hence determine a parameter which is characteristic of each material and known as Verdet’s constant. BACKGROUND INFORMATION A brief description of the properties and production of polarised light is given in the section labelled: Notes on polarisation. This should be read before proceeding with this experiment. Additional details may be found in the references listed at the end of this experiment. Whereas some materials, such as quartz, are naturally optically active, optical activity can be induced in others by the application of a magnetic field. For such materials, the angle through which the plane of polarisation of a linearly polarised beam is rotated () depends on the thickness of the sample (L), the strength of the magnetic field (B) and on the properties of the particular material. The latter is described by means of a parameter introduced by Verdet, which is wavelength dependent. Thus:  = V B L Lamp Polariser Solenoid Polariser Glass rod A Solenoid power supply Viewing mirror EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE The experimental arrangement is shown in the diagram. Unpolarised white light is produced by a hot filament and viewed using a mirror. • The light from the globe passes through two polarisers as well as the specially doped glass rod. Select one of the colour filters provided and place in the light path. Each of these filters transmits a relatively narrow band of wavelengths centred around a dominant wavelength as listed in the table. Filter No. Dominant Wavelength 98 4350 Å 50 4500 75 4900 58 5300 72 B 6060 92 6700 With the power supply for the coil switched off, (do not simply turn the potentiometer to zero: this still allows some current to flow) adjust one of the polarisers until minimum light is transmitted to the mirror. Minimum transmission can be determined visually. • Decide which polariser you will work with and do not alter the other one during the measurements. • The magnetic field is generated by a current in a solenoid (coil) placed around the glass rod. As the current in the coil is increased, the magnitude of the magnetic field will increase as shown on the calibration curve below. The degree of optical activity will also increase, resulting in some angle of rotation of the plane of polarisation. Hence you will need to rotate your chosen polariser to regain a minimum setting. 0 1 2 3 4 5 0.00 0.02 0.04 0.06 0.08 I (amps) B (tesla) Magnetic field (B) produced by current (I) in solenoid • Record the rotation angle () for coil currents of 0,1,2,3,4 and 5 amps. Avoid having the current in the coil switched on except when measurements are actually being taken as it can easily overheat. If the coil becomes too hot to touch, switch it off and wait for it to cool before proceeding. • Plot  as a function of B and, given that the length of the glass rod is 30 cm, determine Verdet’s constant for this material at the wavelength () in use. • Repeat the experiment for each of the wavelengths available using the filter set provided. • Calculate the logarithm for each V and  and tabulate the results. By plotting log V against log , determine the relationship between V and . [Hint: m log(x) = log (xm) and log(xy) = log(x) + log(y)]. • Calculate the errors involved in your determination of V. The uncertainty in a value of B may be taken as the uncertainty in reading the scale of the calibration curve) • The magnetic field direction can be reversed by reversing the direction of current flow in the coil. Describe the effect of this reversal and provide an explanation. Reference Optics Hecht.

Top of Form Abstract.     Faraday Effect or Faraday … Read More...