MSE201 Midterm Exam 10/17/2014 Each element 2 points. Put ALL calculations and answers in your Blue Book! 1. Materials are characterized by: a. Macroscopic properties b. Microstructure c. Atomic level composition d. All of the above 2. Atoms are: a. Discrete units of matter b. An abstract concept c. Found in fractional units d. Crystallographic lattice points 3. The Burger’s vector describes: a. Surface cracks b. Crystal twinning c. Dislocation geometry d. The most direct route to McDonald’s 4. Cubic Close Packed (CCP) is another name for which of the following: a. HCP b. BCC c. FCC d. All of the above 5. Glass and ceramic materials tend to: a. Fail catastrophically at low strain b. Show ductility c. Deform plastically before failure d. Have elastic moduli ~106 Pa 6. Solid state diffusion & vacancy generation: a. Are completely unrelated b. Are directly related c. Increase linearly with Temperature d. Describe lattice point motion 7. Diffusion & heat transfer: a. Are completely unrelated b. Are directly related c. Increase linearly with Temperature d. Have identical differential equations 8. A vacancy and a dislocation both: a. Disrupt the crystal lattice b. Represent partial occupancy c. Contain ruptured bonds d. Are low energy regions 9. Dislocations: a. Are interstitial dopants b. Are crystal defects c. Require atomic impurities d. Enhance plastic deformation 10. Ionic, covalent and metallic bonding are primary bonding types. a. Primary bonds require exchange or sharing of what between atoms? b. How does electronegativity drive the reaction of sodium metal and chlorine gas to form sodium chloride? c. Carbon-carbon bonds are what type? d. The directional nature of covalent bonds is related to what structural feature of atoms? 11. The (111) plane of the FCC structure is close-packed. a. Sketch this plane within a unit cell. b. How many atoms are on the plane you drew inside the unit cell? c. Estimate the area of the plane d. Calculate the area atomic density e. If there is one vacancy per 1012 lattice points at 273K, what is the partial atomic occupancy of each lattice point? f. If you are asked calculate the number of vacancies present at 600K, what additional information do you need? 12. Dislocation motion occurs largely along close-packed directions and planes. First, compare the FCC & BCC structures: a. Describe any close packed planes b. Describe any close packed directions c. If the ductile-to-brittle transition at low temperatures is related to the number of close-packed directions and planes, do you expect BCC or FCC metals to have greater ductility? d. Magnesium and other HCP metals are brittle. Does your analysis from 12.c. support this observation? 13. A tensile test is performed on a ductile sample. The first 1% of strain is elastic with a modulus of 100E9 Pa, at which point plastic deformation begins. The tensile strength of 1.1E9 Pa is determined at 9% strain, while failure occurs at a stress of 9E8 Pa and strain of 18%. a. Sketch the complete stress-strain cycle b. Estimate the toughness in units of J/m3.

MSE201 Midterm Exam 10/17/2014 Each element 2 points. Put ALL calculations and answers in your Blue Book! 1. Materials are characterized by: a. Macroscopic properties b. Microstructure c. Atomic level composition d. All of the above 2. Atoms are: a. Discrete units of matter b. An abstract concept c. Found in fractional units d. Crystallographic lattice points 3. The Burger’s vector describes: a. Surface cracks b. Crystal twinning c. Dislocation geometry d. The most direct route to McDonald’s 4. Cubic Close Packed (CCP) is another name for which of the following: a. HCP b. BCC c. FCC d. All of the above 5. Glass and ceramic materials tend to: a. Fail catastrophically at low strain b. Show ductility c. Deform plastically before failure d. Have elastic moduli ~106 Pa 6. Solid state diffusion & vacancy generation: a. Are completely unrelated b. Are directly related c. Increase linearly with Temperature d. Describe lattice point motion 7. Diffusion & heat transfer: a. Are completely unrelated b. Are directly related c. Increase linearly with Temperature d. Have identical differential equations 8. A vacancy and a dislocation both: a. Disrupt the crystal lattice b. Represent partial occupancy c. Contain ruptured bonds d. Are low energy regions 9. Dislocations: a. Are interstitial dopants b. Are crystal defects c. Require atomic impurities d. Enhance plastic deformation 10. Ionic, covalent and metallic bonding are primary bonding types. a. Primary bonds require exchange or sharing of what between atoms? b. How does electronegativity drive the reaction of sodium metal and chlorine gas to form sodium chloride? c. Carbon-carbon bonds are what type? d. The directional nature of covalent bonds is related to what structural feature of atoms? 11. The (111) plane of the FCC structure is close-packed. a. Sketch this plane within a unit cell. b. How many atoms are on the plane you drew inside the unit cell? c. Estimate the area of the plane d. Calculate the area atomic density e. If there is one vacancy per 1012 lattice points at 273K, what is the partial atomic occupancy of each lattice point? f. If you are asked calculate the number of vacancies present at 600K, what additional information do you need? 12. Dislocation motion occurs largely along close-packed directions and planes. First, compare the FCC & BCC structures: a. Describe any close packed planes b. Describe any close packed directions c. If the ductile-to-brittle transition at low temperatures is related to the number of close-packed directions and planes, do you expect BCC or FCC metals to have greater ductility? d. Magnesium and other HCP metals are brittle. Does your analysis from 12.c. support this observation? 13. A tensile test is performed on a ductile sample. The first 1% of strain is elastic with a modulus of 100E9 Pa, at which point plastic deformation begins. The tensile strength of 1.1E9 Pa is determined at 9% strain, while failure occurs at a stress of 9E8 Pa and strain of 18%. a. Sketch the complete stress-strain cycle b. Estimate the toughness in units of J/m3.

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Building Vocabulary: The Genetic Basis of Cancer Can you match each term related to the genetic basis of cancer with its description? Part A Drag the terms on the left to the appropriate blanks on the right to complete the sentences

Building Vocabulary: The Genetic Basis of Cancer Can you match each term related to the genetic basis of cancer with its description? Part A Drag the terms on the left to the appropriate blanks on the right to complete the sentences

PHY-102: Energy and Circular Motion Exercises Complete the following exercises. 1. A rifle with a longer barrel can fire bullets with a larger velocity than a rifle with a shorter barrel. a. Explain this using the impulse-momentum theorem. b. Explain this using the work-energy theorem 2. Use physics terms to explain the benefits of crumple zones in modern cars. 3. When a gun is fired at the shooting range, the gun recoils (moves backward). Explain this using the law of conservation of momentum. 4. Rank the following in terms of increasing inertia: A. A 10,000 kg train car at rest B. A 100 kg person running at 5 m/s C. A 1200 kg car going 15 m/s D. A 15 kg meteor going at a speed of 1000 m/s 5. Rank the following in terms of increasing momentum: A. A 10,000 kg train car at rest B. A 100 kg person running at 5 m/s C. A 1200 kg car going 15 m/s D. A 15 kg meteor going at a speed of 1000 m/s 6. Rank the following in terms of increasing kinetic energy: A. A 1200 kg car going 15 m/s B. A 10,000 kg train car at rest C. A 15 kg meteor going at a speed of 1000 m/s D. A 100 kg person running at 5 m/s 7. Ben (55 kg) is standing on very slippery ice when Junior (25 kg) bumps into him. Junior was moving at a speed of 8 m/s before the collision and Ben and Junior embrace after the collision. Find the speed of Ben and Junior as they move across the ice after the collision. Give the answer in m/s. Describe the work you did to get the answer. 8. Identical marbles are released from the same height on each of the following four frictionless ramps. Compare the speed of the marbles at the end of each ramp. Explain your reasoning. 9. A force of only 150 N can lift a 600 N sack of flour to a height of 0.50 m when using a lever as shown in the diagram below. a. Find the work done on the sack of flour (in J). b. Find the distance you must push with the 150 N force on the left side (in m). c. Briefly explain the benefit of using a lever to lift a heavy object. 10. Rank the following in terms of increasing power. A. Doing 100 J of work in 10 seconds. B. Doing 100 J of work in 5 seconds. C. Doing 200 J of work in 5 seconds. D. Doing 400 J of work in 30 seconds. 11. A student lifts a 25 kg mass a vertical distance of 1.6 m in a time of 2.0 seconds. a. Find the force needed to lift the mass (in N). b. Find the work done by the student (in J). c. Find the power exerted by the student (in W). 12. A satellite is put into an orbit at a distance from the center of the Earth equal to twice the distance from the center of the Earth to the surface. If the satellite had a weight at the surface of 4000 N, what is the force of gravity (weight) of the satellite when it is in its orbit? Give your answer in newtons, N. 13. Consider a satellite in a circular orbit around the Earth. a. Why is it important to give a satellite a horizontal speed when placing it in orbit? b. What will happen if the horizontal speed is too small? c. What will happen if the horizontal speed is too large? 14. If you drop an object from a distance of 1 meter above the ground, where would it fall to the ground in the shortest time: Atop Mt. Everest or in New York? 15. Why do the astronauts aboard the space station appear to be weightless? 16. Why do the passengers on a high-flying airplane not appear weightless, similar to the astronauts on the space station? 17. A ranger needs to capture a monkey hanging on a tree branch. The ranger aims his dart gun directly at the monkey and fires the tranquilizer dart. However, the monkey lets go of the branch at exactly the same time as the ranger fires the dart. Will the monkey get hit or will it avoid the dart? The remaining questions are multiple-choice questions: 18. Compared to its weight on Earth, a 5 kg object on the moon will weigh A. the same amount. B. less. C. more. 19. Compared to its mass on Earth, a 5 kg object on the moon will have A. the same mass. B. less mass. C. more mass. 20. The reason padded dashboards are used in cars is that they A. look nice and feel good. B. decrease the impulse in a collision. C. increase the force of impact in a collision. D. decrease the momentum of a collision. E. increase the time of impact in a collision. 21. Suppose you are standing on a frozen lake where there is no friction between your feet and the ice. What can you do to get off the lake? A. Bend over touching the ice in front of you and then bring you feet to your hands. B. Walk very slowly on tiptoe. C. Get on your hands and knees and crawl off the ice. D. Throw something in the direction opposite to the way you want to go. 22. A car travels in a circle with constant speed. Which of the following is true? A. The net force on the car is zero because the car is not accelerating. B. The net force on the car is directed forward, in the direction of travel. C. The net force on the car is directed inward, toward the center of the curve. D. The net force on the car is directed outward, away from the center of the curve. 23. A job is done slowly, and an identical job is done quickly. Which of the following is true? a. They require the same amount of force, but different amounts of work. b. They require the same amount of work, but different amounts of power. c. They require the same amounts of power, but different amounts of work. d. They require the same amounts of work, but different amounts of energy. 24. How many joules of work are done on a box when a force of 60 N pushes it 5 m in 3 seconds? a. 300 J b. 12 J c. 100 J d. 36 J e. 4 J 25. A 1 kg cart moving with a speed of 3 m/s collides with a 2 kg cart at rest. If the carts stick together after the collision, with what speed will they move after the collision? a. 3 m/s b. 1.5 m/s c. 1 m/s d. 2 m/s

PHY-102: Energy and Circular Motion Exercises Complete the following exercises. 1. A rifle with a longer barrel can fire bullets with a larger velocity than a rifle with a shorter barrel. a. Explain this using the impulse-momentum theorem. b. Explain this using the work-energy theorem 2. Use physics terms to explain the benefits of crumple zones in modern cars. 3. When a gun is fired at the shooting range, the gun recoils (moves backward). Explain this using the law of conservation of momentum. 4. Rank the following in terms of increasing inertia: A. A 10,000 kg train car at rest B. A 100 kg person running at 5 m/s C. A 1200 kg car going 15 m/s D. A 15 kg meteor going at a speed of 1000 m/s 5. Rank the following in terms of increasing momentum: A. A 10,000 kg train car at rest B. A 100 kg person running at 5 m/s C. A 1200 kg car going 15 m/s D. A 15 kg meteor going at a speed of 1000 m/s 6. Rank the following in terms of increasing kinetic energy: A. A 1200 kg car going 15 m/s B. A 10,000 kg train car at rest C. A 15 kg meteor going at a speed of 1000 m/s D. A 100 kg person running at 5 m/s 7. Ben (55 kg) is standing on very slippery ice when Junior (25 kg) bumps into him. Junior was moving at a speed of 8 m/s before the collision and Ben and Junior embrace after the collision. Find the speed of Ben and Junior as they move across the ice after the collision. Give the answer in m/s. Describe the work you did to get the answer. 8. Identical marbles are released from the same height on each of the following four frictionless ramps. Compare the speed of the marbles at the end of each ramp. Explain your reasoning. 9. A force of only 150 N can lift a 600 N sack of flour to a height of 0.50 m when using a lever as shown in the diagram below. a. Find the work done on the sack of flour (in J). b. Find the distance you must push with the 150 N force on the left side (in m). c. Briefly explain the benefit of using a lever to lift a heavy object. 10. Rank the following in terms of increasing power. A. Doing 100 J of work in 10 seconds. B. Doing 100 J of work in 5 seconds. C. Doing 200 J of work in 5 seconds. D. Doing 400 J of work in 30 seconds. 11. A student lifts a 25 kg mass a vertical distance of 1.6 m in a time of 2.0 seconds. a. Find the force needed to lift the mass (in N). b. Find the work done by the student (in J). c. Find the power exerted by the student (in W). 12. A satellite is put into an orbit at a distance from the center of the Earth equal to twice the distance from the center of the Earth to the surface. If the satellite had a weight at the surface of 4000 N, what is the force of gravity (weight) of the satellite when it is in its orbit? Give your answer in newtons, N. 13. Consider a satellite in a circular orbit around the Earth. a. Why is it important to give a satellite a horizontal speed when placing it in orbit? b. What will happen if the horizontal speed is too small? c. What will happen if the horizontal speed is too large? 14. If you drop an object from a distance of 1 meter above the ground, where would it fall to the ground in the shortest time: Atop Mt. Everest or in New York? 15. Why do the astronauts aboard the space station appear to be weightless? 16. Why do the passengers on a high-flying airplane not appear weightless, similar to the astronauts on the space station? 17. A ranger needs to capture a monkey hanging on a tree branch. The ranger aims his dart gun directly at the monkey and fires the tranquilizer dart. However, the monkey lets go of the branch at exactly the same time as the ranger fires the dart. Will the monkey get hit or will it avoid the dart? The remaining questions are multiple-choice questions: 18. Compared to its weight on Earth, a 5 kg object on the moon will weigh A. the same amount. B. less. C. more. 19. Compared to its mass on Earth, a 5 kg object on the moon will have A. the same mass. B. less mass. C. more mass. 20. The reason padded dashboards are used in cars is that they A. look nice and feel good. B. decrease the impulse in a collision. C. increase the force of impact in a collision. D. decrease the momentum of a collision. E. increase the time of impact in a collision. 21. Suppose you are standing on a frozen lake where there is no friction between your feet and the ice. What can you do to get off the lake? A. Bend over touching the ice in front of you and then bring you feet to your hands. B. Walk very slowly on tiptoe. C. Get on your hands and knees and crawl off the ice. D. Throw something in the direction opposite to the way you want to go. 22. A car travels in a circle with constant speed. Which of the following is true? A. The net force on the car is zero because the car is not accelerating. B. The net force on the car is directed forward, in the direction of travel. C. The net force on the car is directed inward, toward the center of the curve. D. The net force on the car is directed outward, away from the center of the curve. 23. A job is done slowly, and an identical job is done quickly. Which of the following is true? a. They require the same amount of force, but different amounts of work. b. They require the same amount of work, but different amounts of power. c. They require the same amounts of power, but different amounts of work. d. They require the same amounts of work, but different amounts of energy. 24. How many joules of work are done on a box when a force of 60 N pushes it 5 m in 3 seconds? a. 300 J b. 12 J c. 100 J d. 36 J e. 4 J 25. A 1 kg cart moving with a speed of 3 m/s collides with a 2 kg cart at rest. If the carts stick together after the collision, with what speed will they move after the collision? a. 3 m/s b. 1.5 m/s c. 1 m/s d. 2 m/s

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Evaluation Methodology , Fall 2015 EVALUATION PROPOSAL GUIDELINES The evaluation proposal is a major application of knowledge assignment for this course. The proposal should represent your cumulative knowledge of evaluation research methodology. You may be required to submit part of this assignment in sequential stages. If so, you will be provided, in writing, the due dates for the various aspects of the proposal. The date for the submission of the entire proposal is indicated in your course outline. The below components must be included in the proposal. I. Introduction (maximum 10 pages) A. Description of the Program and Organization (the Evaluand) (In this section, be sure to describe who, what, when, and how long the program has been in place; describe the program, types of people involved in the program, and the types of services offered; briefly discussed need for program as determined by program managers) I. Organizational Overview 1. Program Mission, Goals, SMART Objectives, Activities, Resources 2. Organizational Context of the Program II. Program Logic Model of Evaluand (insert program logic model from your previous assignment, attending to feedback from instructor and classmates) III. Significance of the Program and the Evaluation Discuss the Rationale of the Evaluation B. Evaluation Goals, Objectives, and Stakeholders Objectives of the Evaluation Study Description of Key Direct and Indirect Evaluation Stakeholders (e.g., clients, agents, beneficiaries, etc.) Potential Constraints and Barriers of the Evaluation Evaluation Proposal Guidelines (continued) C. Evaluation Approach, Questions and/or Hypotheses Evaluation Approach/Guiding Framework Evaluation Questions (at least three process and three outcome questions) Describe How Evaluation Questions Will Be Generated II. Methodology (maximum 10 pages) A. Participants Target Population/Sample Plan (describe the target population/sample from whom you intend to obtain collect data; justify sampling procedures by relating them to stakeholder characteristics, evaluation questions and criteria, and constraints of the evaluation) Handling Respondents’ Confidentiality and Ethical Concerns (include Informed Consent Form) B. Instrumentation Data Collection Instruments/Measures Describe Measures, Justify Choices, Address Issues of Validity, Reliability, and Cultural/Contextual Relevance; Rationale for Selection of Instruments C. Evaluation Design Data Collection Procedures (Research Design – Qualitative, Quantitative, Mixed Methods) Explain Choice for Data Collection Methods Selected D. Data Map (set up a data map or summary table to show how each step of the evaluation is related to each other); see example below) Evaluation Methodology Evaluation Proposal Guidelines (continued) Table 1. Data Map of Evaluation of the Kids House Afterschool Program (An Illustrative Example) Evaluation Questions Methodology Data Collection Strategy Timeline Does the program provide individual tutoring to the children in the community three days per week, as intended? (process question) Document analysis Evaluator will review copies of program’s weekly service delivery records Ongoing Has the program reached it intended target population? (process question) Document analysis Evaluator will review documents describing the children being served Six weeks after program start How satisfied are the children and their parents (guardian) with the Kids house Program? Qualitative Focus group interviews with the children in the program and separately with their parents (guardian) Ongoing after two weeks program start Did the children in the Kids House Program demonstrate significant improvements in reading? Quantitative Pretest/Posttest Questionnaire Pretest at first session Posttest at last session E. Projected Statistical Analysis of Data F. Data Collection Schedule (Timetable) (must be described in chart form) G. Standards for Evaluation (describe how your proposed evaluation will meet the Program Evaluation Standards – utility, feasibility, propriety, accuracy, accountability and the AEA Guiding Principles for Evaluation) III. Evaluation Products and Communication Plan (maximum two pages) A. Listing of Deliverable or Products Evaluation Methodology Evaluation Proposal Guidelines (continued) B. Communicating Results: The Evaluation Report (describe plan for communicating evaluation findings during the evaluation and at the end of the evaluation – orally? written report? combination? who will you involve in a discussion of the findings and why) . C. Potential Use of Findings for Aiding Direct and Indirect Stakeholders IV. Staffing, Management Plan, and Budget (maximum two pages) A. Describe tasks, deadlines, and who completes them? B. Describe the time, money, and other resources required for addressing your evaluation questions C. Include a narrative a budget and time schedule in table format V. References (minimum of three sources) VI. Appendices (include copies of instruments, consent forms, etc.) VII. Reflective Journaling (Separate Document) Using a diary format, describe// explain what you have learned about yourself and the evaluation profession by taking this course and writing this proposal Other Important Proposal Guidelines A. Typed, double space, 12 point font; one-inch margins on all sides B. Include title page, table of contents, and (if applicable) listing of figures and/or tables C. Maximum of 25 pages (excluding cover page, references, appendices) D. Proper and complete citation for all materials and sources using the American Psychological Association Style Manual (latest edition). Evaluation Methodology Evaluation Proposal Guidelines (cont’d.) E. As a general rule, sources (unless a classic) must be within the past decade and statistical/demographic data no earlier than 2009

Evaluation Methodology , Fall 2015 EVALUATION PROPOSAL GUIDELINES The evaluation proposal is a major application of knowledge assignment for this course. The proposal should represent your cumulative knowledge of evaluation research methodology. You may be required to submit part of this assignment in sequential stages. If so, you will be provided, in writing, the due dates for the various aspects of the proposal. The date for the submission of the entire proposal is indicated in your course outline. The below components must be included in the proposal. I. Introduction (maximum 10 pages) A. Description of the Program and Organization (the Evaluand) (In this section, be sure to describe who, what, when, and how long the program has been in place; describe the program, types of people involved in the program, and the types of services offered; briefly discussed need for program as determined by program managers) I. Organizational Overview 1. Program Mission, Goals, SMART Objectives, Activities, Resources 2. Organizational Context of the Program II. Program Logic Model of Evaluand (insert program logic model from your previous assignment, attending to feedback from instructor and classmates) III. Significance of the Program and the Evaluation Discuss the Rationale of the Evaluation B. Evaluation Goals, Objectives, and Stakeholders Objectives of the Evaluation Study Description of Key Direct and Indirect Evaluation Stakeholders (e.g., clients, agents, beneficiaries, etc.) Potential Constraints and Barriers of the Evaluation Evaluation Proposal Guidelines (continued) C. Evaluation Approach, Questions and/or Hypotheses Evaluation Approach/Guiding Framework Evaluation Questions (at least three process and three outcome questions) Describe How Evaluation Questions Will Be Generated II. Methodology (maximum 10 pages) A. Participants Target Population/Sample Plan (describe the target population/sample from whom you intend to obtain collect data; justify sampling procedures by relating them to stakeholder characteristics, evaluation questions and criteria, and constraints of the evaluation) Handling Respondents’ Confidentiality and Ethical Concerns (include Informed Consent Form) B. Instrumentation Data Collection Instruments/Measures Describe Measures, Justify Choices, Address Issues of Validity, Reliability, and Cultural/Contextual Relevance; Rationale for Selection of Instruments C. Evaluation Design Data Collection Procedures (Research Design – Qualitative, Quantitative, Mixed Methods) Explain Choice for Data Collection Methods Selected D. Data Map (set up a data map or summary table to show how each step of the evaluation is related to each other); see example below) Evaluation Methodology Evaluation Proposal Guidelines (continued) Table 1. Data Map of Evaluation of the Kids House Afterschool Program (An Illustrative Example) Evaluation Questions Methodology Data Collection Strategy Timeline Does the program provide individual tutoring to the children in the community three days per week, as intended? (process question) Document analysis Evaluator will review copies of program’s weekly service delivery records Ongoing Has the program reached it intended target population? (process question) Document analysis Evaluator will review documents describing the children being served Six weeks after program start How satisfied are the children and their parents (guardian) with the Kids house Program? Qualitative Focus group interviews with the children in the program and separately with their parents (guardian) Ongoing after two weeks program start Did the children in the Kids House Program demonstrate significant improvements in reading? Quantitative Pretest/Posttest Questionnaire Pretest at first session Posttest at last session E. Projected Statistical Analysis of Data F. Data Collection Schedule (Timetable) (must be described in chart form) G. Standards for Evaluation (describe how your proposed evaluation will meet the Program Evaluation Standards – utility, feasibility, propriety, accuracy, accountability and the AEA Guiding Principles for Evaluation) III. Evaluation Products and Communication Plan (maximum two pages) A. Listing of Deliverable or Products Evaluation Methodology Evaluation Proposal Guidelines (continued) B. Communicating Results: The Evaluation Report (describe plan for communicating evaluation findings during the evaluation and at the end of the evaluation – orally? written report? combination? who will you involve in a discussion of the findings and why) . C. Potential Use of Findings for Aiding Direct and Indirect Stakeholders IV. Staffing, Management Plan, and Budget (maximum two pages) A. Describe tasks, deadlines, and who completes them? B. Describe the time, money, and other resources required for addressing your evaluation questions C. Include a narrative a budget and time schedule in table format V. References (minimum of three sources) VI. Appendices (include copies of instruments, consent forms, etc.) VII. Reflective Journaling (Separate Document) Using a diary format, describe// explain what you have learned about yourself and the evaluation profession by taking this course and writing this proposal Other Important Proposal Guidelines A. Typed, double space, 12 point font; one-inch margins on all sides B. Include title page, table of contents, and (if applicable) listing of figures and/or tables C. Maximum of 25 pages (excluding cover page, references, appendices) D. Proper and complete citation for all materials and sources using the American Psychological Association Style Manual (latest edition). Evaluation Methodology Evaluation Proposal Guidelines (cont’d.) E. As a general rule, sources (unless a classic) must be within the past decade and statistical/demographic data no earlier than 2009

STUDENT GRADER Total Score I am submitting my own work, and I understand penalties will be assessed if I submit work for credit that is not my own. Print Name ID Number Sign Name Date # Points Score 1 4 2 8 3 6 4 12 5 4 6 10 7 8 8 6 9 6 Weeks late Adjusted Score Estimated Work Hours 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Overall Weight Adjusted Score: Deduct 20% from score for each week late Problem 1. Sketch circuits for the following logic equations. Y <= (A and B and C) or not ((A and not B and C and not D) or not (B or D)); X <= (A xor (B and C) xor not D) or (not (B xor C) and not (C or D)) Problem 2. Sketch circuits and write VHDL assignment statements for the following equations. F = m(1, 2, 6) F = M(0, 7) Problem 3. Write logic assignment statements for the following circuit. Problem 4: Sketch circuits and write VHDL assignment statements for the truth tables below. Problem 5: Sketch POS circuits for the 2XOR and 2XNOR functions. Problem 6: Sketch the circuit described by the netlist shown, and complete the timing diagram for the stimulus shown to document the circuit’s response to the example stimulus. Use a 100ns vertical grid in your timing diagram, and show all inputs and outputs. Problem 7: Create a truth table that corresponds to the simulation shown below. Show all input and output values in the truth table, and sketch a logic circuit that could have been used to create the waveform. Problem 8. The Seattle Mariners haven’t had a stolen base in 6 months, and the manager decided it was because the other teams were reading his signals to the base runners. He came up with a new set of signals (pulling on his EAR, lifting one LEG, patting the top of his HEAD, and BOWing) to indicate when runners should attempt to steal a base. A runner should STEAL a base if and only if the manager pulls his EAR and BOWs while patting his HEAD, or if he lifts his LEG and pats his HEAD without BOWing, or anytime he pulls his EAR without lifting his LEG. Sketch a minimal circuit that could be used to indicate when a runner should steal a base. Problem 9. A room has four doors and four light switches (one by each door). Sketch a circuit that allows the four switches to control the light – each switch should be able to turn the light on if it is currently off, and off if it is currently on. Note that it will not be possible to associate a given switch position with “light on” or “light off” – simply moving any switch should modify the light’s status.

STUDENT GRADER Total Score I am submitting my own work, and I understand penalties will be assessed if I submit work for credit that is not my own. Print Name ID Number Sign Name Date # Points Score 1 4 2 8 3 6 4 12 5 4 6 10 7 8 8 6 9 6 Weeks late Adjusted Score Estimated Work Hours 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Overall Weight Adjusted Score: Deduct 20% from score for each week late Problem 1. Sketch circuits for the following logic equations. Y <= (A and B and C) or not ((A and not B and C and not D) or not (B or D)); X <= (A xor (B and C) xor not D) or (not (B xor C) and not (C or D)) Problem 2. Sketch circuits and write VHDL assignment statements for the following equations. F = m(1, 2, 6) F = M(0, 7) Problem 3. Write logic assignment statements for the following circuit. Problem 4: Sketch circuits and write VHDL assignment statements for the truth tables below. Problem 5: Sketch POS circuits for the 2XOR and 2XNOR functions. Problem 6: Sketch the circuit described by the netlist shown, and complete the timing diagram for the stimulus shown to document the circuit’s response to the example stimulus. Use a 100ns vertical grid in your timing diagram, and show all inputs and outputs. Problem 7: Create a truth table that corresponds to the simulation shown below. Show all input and output values in the truth table, and sketch a logic circuit that could have been used to create the waveform. Problem 8. The Seattle Mariners haven’t had a stolen base in 6 months, and the manager decided it was because the other teams were reading his signals to the base runners. He came up with a new set of signals (pulling on his EAR, lifting one LEG, patting the top of his HEAD, and BOWing) to indicate when runners should attempt to steal a base. A runner should STEAL a base if and only if the manager pulls his EAR and BOWs while patting his HEAD, or if he lifts his LEG and pats his HEAD without BOWing, or anytime he pulls his EAR without lifting his LEG. Sketch a minimal circuit that could be used to indicate when a runner should steal a base. Problem 9. A room has four doors and four light switches (one by each door). Sketch a circuit that allows the four switches to control the light – each switch should be able to turn the light on if it is currently off, and off if it is currently on. Note that it will not be possible to associate a given switch position with “light on” or “light off” – simply moving any switch should modify the light’s status.

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Earlier in the history of Western medicine, surgeons did not know the immune function of the thymus gland and it was sometimes removed in children. What symptoms would you now predict these patients might display afterward? Select one: increased inflammatory and allergic responses to foreign material including viruses reduced ability to recognize foreign material and distinguish it from body proteins serious problems following receiving blood transfusions of any type of blood complete rejection of all normal body tissues failure to produce any white blood cells

Earlier in the history of Western medicine, surgeons did not know the immune function of the thymus gland and it was sometimes removed in children. What symptoms would you now predict these patients might display afterward? Select one: increased inflammatory and allergic responses to foreign material including viruses reduced ability to recognize foreign material and distinguish it from body proteins serious problems following receiving blood transfusions of any type of blood complete rejection of all normal body tissues failure to produce any white blood cells

Earlier in the history of Western medicine, surgeons did not … Read More...
Assignment 3 Due: 11:59pm on Friday, February 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Problem 2.68 As a science project, you drop a watermelon off the top of the Empire State Building, 320 m above the sidewalk. It so happens that Superman flies by at the instant you release the watermelon. Superman is headed straight down with a speed of 36.0 . Part A How fast is the watermelon going when it passes Superman? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 2.63 A motorist is driving at when she sees that a traffic light ahead has just turned red. She knows that this light stays red for , and she wants to reach the light just as it turns green again. It takes her to step on the brakes and begin slowing. Part A What is her speed as she reaches the light at the instant it turns green? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: m/s 72.0 ms 20 m/s 200 m 15 s 1.0 s 5.71 ms Correct Conceptual Question 4.1 Part A At this instant, is the particle in the figurespeeding up, slowing down, or traveling at constant speed? ANSWER: Correct Part B Is this particle curving to the right, curving to the left, or traveling straight? Speeding up Slowing down Traveling at constant speed ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 4.2 Part A At this instant, is the particle in the following figure speeding up, slowing down, or traveling at constant speed? ANSWER: Curving to the right Curving to the left Traveling straight Correct Part B Is this particle curving upward, curving downward, or traveling straight? ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.8 A particle’s trajectory is described by and , where is in s. Part A What is the particle’s speed at ? ANSWER: The particle is speeding up. The particle is slowing down. The particle is traveling at constant speed. The particle is curving upward. The particle is curving downward. The particle is traveling straight. x = ( 1 −2 ) m 2 t3 t2 y = ( 1 −2t) m 2 t2 t t = 0 s v = 2 m/s Correct Part B What is the particle’s speed at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the particle’s direction of motion, measured as an angle from the x-axis, at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the particle’s direction of motion, measured as an angle from the x-axis, at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: t = 5.0s v = 18 m/s t = 0 s  = -90  counterclockwise from the +x axis. t = 5.0s  = 9.7  counterclockwise from the +x axis. Correct Problem 4.9 A rocket-powered hockey puck moves on a horizontal frictionless table. The figure shows the graph of and the figure shows the graph of , the x- and y-components of the puck’s velocity, respectively. The puck starts at the origin. Part A In which direction is the puck moving at = 3 ? Give your answer as an angle from the x-axis. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part B vx vy t s = 51   above the x-axis How far from the origin is the puck at 5 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 4.13 A rifle is aimed horizontally at a target 51.0 away. The bullet hits the target 1.50 below the aim point. You may want to review ( pages 91 – 95) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Quadratic Equations Part A What was the bullet’s flight time? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Start by drawing a picture of the bullet’s trajectory, including where it leaves the gun and where it hits the target. You can assume that the gun was held parallel to the ground. Label the distances given in the problem. Choose an x-y coordinate system, making sure to label the origin. It is conventional to have x in the horizontal direction and y in the vertical direction. What is the y coordinate when the bullet leaves the gun? What is the y coordinate when it hits the target? What is the initial velocity in the y direction? What is the acceleration in the y direction? What is the equation that describes the motion in the vertical y direction as a function of time? Can you use the equation for to determine the time of flight? Why was it not necessary to include the motion in the x direction? s s = 180 cm m cm y(t) y(t) ANSWER: Correct Part B What was the bullet’s speed as it left the barrel? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem In the coordinate system introduced in Part A, what are the x coordinates when the bullet leaves the gun and when it hits the target? Is there any acceleration in the x direction? What is the equation that describes the motion in the horizontal x direction as a function of time? Can you use the equation for to determine the initial velocity? ANSWER: Correct Introduction to Projectile Motion Learning Goal: To understand the basic concepts of projectile motion. Projectile motion may seem rather complex at first. However, by breaking it down into components, you will find that it is really no different than the one-dimensional motions that you have already studied. One of the most often used techniques in physics is to divide two- and three-dimensional quantities into components. For instance, in projectile motion, a particle has some initial velocity . In general, this velocity can point in any direction on the xy plane and can have any magnitude. To make a problem more managable, it is common to break up such a quantity into its x component and its y component . 5.53×10−2 s x(t) x(t) 922 ms v vx vy Consider a particle with initial velocity that has magnitude 12.0 and is directed 60.0 above the negative x axis. Part A What is the x component of ? Express your answer in meters per second. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the y component of ? Express your answer in meters per second. ANSWER: Correct Breaking up the velocities into components is particularly useful when the components do not affect each other. Eventually, you will learn about situations in which the components of velocity do affect one another, but for now you will only be looking at problems where they do not. So, if there is acceleration in the x direction but not in the y direction, then the x component of the velocity will change, but the y component of the velocity will not. Part C Look at this applet. The motion diagram for a projectile is displayed, as are the motion diagrams for each component. The x-component motion diagram is what you would get if you shined a spotlight down on the particle as it moved and recorded the motion of its shadow. Similarly, if you shined a spotlight to the left and recorded the particle’s shadow, you would get the motion diagram for its y component. How would you describe the two motion diagrams for the components? ANSWER: v m/s degrees vx v vx = -6.00 m/s vy v vy = 10.4 m/s Correct As you can see, the two components of the motion obey their own independent kinematic laws. For the vertical component, there is an acceleration downward with magnitude . Thus, you can calculate the vertical position of the particle at any time using the standard kinematic equation . Similarly, there is no acceleration in the horizontal direction, so the horizontal position of the particle is given by the standard kinematic equation . Now, consider this applet. Two balls are simultaneously dropped from a height of 5.0 . Part D How long does it take for the balls to reach the ground? Use 10 for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. Express your answer in seconds to two significant figures. Hint 1. How to approach the problem The balls are released from rest at a height of 5.0 at time . Using these numbers and basic kinematics, you can determine the amount of time it takes for the balls to reach the ground. ANSWER: Correct This situation, which you have dealt with before (motion under the constant acceleration of gravity), is actually a special case of projectile motion. Think of this as projectile motion where the horizontal component of the initial velocity is zero. Both the vertical and horizontal components exhibit motion with constant nonzero acceleration. The vertical component exhibits motion with constant nonzero acceleration, whereas the horizontal component exhibits constant-velocity motion. The vertical component exhibits constant-velocity motion, whereas the horizontal component exhibits motion with constant nonzero acceleration. Both the vertical and horizontal components exhibit motion with constant velocity. g = 10 m/s2 y = y0 + v0 t + (1/2)at2 x = x0 + v0 t m tg m/s2 m t = 0 s tg = 1.0 s Part E Imagine the ball on the left is given a nonzero initial speed in the horizontal direction, while the ball on the right continues to fall with zero initial velocity. What horizontal speed must the ball on the left start with so that it hits the ground at the same position as the ball on the right? Remember that the two balls are released, starting a horizontal distance of 3.0 apart. Express your answer in meters per second to two significant figures. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Recall from Part B that the horizontal component of velocity does not change during projectile motion. Therefore, you need to find the horizontal component of velocity such that, in a time , the ball will move horizontally 3.0 . You can assume that its initial x coordinate is . ANSWER: Correct You can adjust the horizontal speeds in this applet. Notice that regardless of what horizontal speeds you give to the balls, they continue to move vertically in the same way (i.e., they are at the same y coordinate at the same time). Problem 4.12 A ball thrown horizontally at 27 travels a horizontal distance of 49 before hitting the ground. Part A From what height was the ball thrown? Express your answer using two significant figures with the appropriate units. ANSWER: vx m vx tg = 1.0 s m x0 = 0.0 m vx = 3.0 m/s m/s m h = 16 m Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 4.20 The figure shows the angular-velocity-versus-time graph for a particle moving in a circle. You may want to review ( page ) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: The Definite Integral Part A How many revolutions does the object make during the first 3.5 ? Express your answer using two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: s n = Incorrect; Try Again Problem 4.26 To withstand “g-forces” of up to 10 g’s, caused by suddenly pulling out of a steep dive, fighter jet pilots train on a “human centrifuge.” 10 g’s is an acceleration of . Part A If the length of the centrifuge arm is 10.0 , at what speed is the rider moving when she experiences 10 g’s? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.28 Your roommate is working on his bicycle and has the bike upside down. He spins the 60.0 -diameter wheel, and you notice that a pebble stuck in the tread goes by three times every second. Part A What is the pebble’s speed? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct 98 m/s2 m 31.3 ms cm 5.65 ms Part B What is the pebble’s acceleration? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 4.43 On the Apollo 14 mission to the moon, astronaut Alan Shepard hit a golf ball with a 6 iron. The acceleration due to gravity on the moon is 1/6 of its value on earth. Suppose he hits the ball with a speed of 13 at an angle 50 above the horizontal. You may want to review ( pages 90 – 95) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Quadratic Equations Part A How much farther did the ball travel on the moon than it would have on earth? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Start by drawing a picture of the path of the golf ball, showing its starting and ending points. Choose a coordinate system, and label the origin. It is conventional to let x be the horizontal direction and y the vertical direction. What is the initial velocity in the x and y directions? What is the acceleration in the x and y directions on the moon and on the earth? What are the equations for and as a function of time, and , respectively? What is the y coordinate when the golf ball hits the ground? Can you use this information to determine the time of flight on the moon and on the earth? 107 m s2 m/s  x y x(t) y(t) Once you have the time of flight, how can you use the equation to determine the total distance traveled? Compare the distance traveled on the moon to the distance traveled on the earth . ANSWER: Correct Part B For how much more time was the ball in flight? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is the equation describing as a function of time? What is the initial x component of the ball’s velocity? How are the initial x component of the ball’s velocity and the distance traveled related to the time of flight? What is the difference between the time of flight on the moon and on earth? ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.42 In the Olympic shotput event, an athlete throws the shot with an initial speed of 12 at a 40.0 angle from the horizontal. The shot leaves her hand at a height of 1.8 above the ground. x(t) L = 85 m x(t) x t = 10 s m/s  m Part A How far does the shot travel? Express your answer to four significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B Repeat the calculation of part (a) for angles of 42.5 , 45.0 , and 47.5 . Express your answer to four significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C Express your answer to four significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D x = 16.36 m    x(42.5 ) = 16.39 m x(45.0 ) = 16.31 m Express your answer to four significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part E At what angle of release does she throw the farthest? ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.44 A ball is thrown toward a cliff of height with a speed of 32 and an angle of 60 above horizontal. It lands on the edge of the cliff 3.2 later. Part A How high is the cliff? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: x(47.5 ) = 16.13 m 40.0 42.5 45.0 47.5 h m/s  s h = 39 m Answer Requested Part B What was the maximum height of the ball? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the ball’s impact speed? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.58 A typical laboratory centrifuge rotates at 3600 . Test tubes have to be placed into a centrifuge very carefully because of the very large accelerations. Part A What is the acceleration at the end of a test tube that is 10 from the axis of rotation? Express your answer with the appropriate units. hmax = 39 m v = 16 ms rpm cm ANSWER: Correct Part B For comparison, what is the magnitude of the acceleration a test tube would experience if dropped from a height of 1.0 and stopped in a 1.7-ms-long encounter with a hard floor? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.62 Communications satellites are placed in a circular orbit where they stay directly over a fixed point on the equator as the earth rotates. These are called geosynchronous orbits. The radius of the earth is , and the altitude of a geosynchronous orbit is ( 22000 miles). Part A What is the speed of a satellite in a geosynchronous orbit? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct a = 1.42×104 m s2 m a = 2610 m s2 6.37 × 106m 3.58 × 107m  v = 3070 ms Part B What is the magnitude of the acceleration of a satellite in a geosynchronous orbit? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 89.5%. You received 103.82 out of a possible total of 116 points. a = 0.223 m s2

Assignment 3 Due: 11:59pm on Friday, February 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Problem 2.68 As a science project, you drop a watermelon off the top of the Empire State Building, 320 m above the sidewalk. It so happens that Superman flies by at the instant you release the watermelon. Superman is headed straight down with a speed of 36.0 . Part A How fast is the watermelon going when it passes Superman? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 2.63 A motorist is driving at when she sees that a traffic light ahead has just turned red. She knows that this light stays red for , and she wants to reach the light just as it turns green again. It takes her to step on the brakes and begin slowing. Part A What is her speed as she reaches the light at the instant it turns green? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: m/s 72.0 ms 20 m/s 200 m 15 s 1.0 s 5.71 ms Correct Conceptual Question 4.1 Part A At this instant, is the particle in the figurespeeding up, slowing down, or traveling at constant speed? ANSWER: Correct Part B Is this particle curving to the right, curving to the left, or traveling straight? Speeding up Slowing down Traveling at constant speed ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 4.2 Part A At this instant, is the particle in the following figure speeding up, slowing down, or traveling at constant speed? ANSWER: Curving to the right Curving to the left Traveling straight Correct Part B Is this particle curving upward, curving downward, or traveling straight? ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.8 A particle’s trajectory is described by and , where is in s. Part A What is the particle’s speed at ? ANSWER: The particle is speeding up. The particle is slowing down. The particle is traveling at constant speed. The particle is curving upward. The particle is curving downward. The particle is traveling straight. x = ( 1 −2 ) m 2 t3 t2 y = ( 1 −2t) m 2 t2 t t = 0 s v = 2 m/s Correct Part B What is the particle’s speed at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the particle’s direction of motion, measured as an angle from the x-axis, at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the particle’s direction of motion, measured as an angle from the x-axis, at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: t = 5.0s v = 18 m/s t = 0 s  = -90  counterclockwise from the +x axis. t = 5.0s  = 9.7  counterclockwise from the +x axis. Correct Problem 4.9 A rocket-powered hockey puck moves on a horizontal frictionless table. The figure shows the graph of and the figure shows the graph of , the x- and y-components of the puck’s velocity, respectively. The puck starts at the origin. Part A In which direction is the puck moving at = 3 ? Give your answer as an angle from the x-axis. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part B vx vy t s = 51   above the x-axis How far from the origin is the puck at 5 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 4.13 A rifle is aimed horizontally at a target 51.0 away. The bullet hits the target 1.50 below the aim point. You may want to review ( pages 91 – 95) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Quadratic Equations Part A What was the bullet’s flight time? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Start by drawing a picture of the bullet’s trajectory, including where it leaves the gun and where it hits the target. You can assume that the gun was held parallel to the ground. Label the distances given in the problem. Choose an x-y coordinate system, making sure to label the origin. It is conventional to have x in the horizontal direction and y in the vertical direction. What is the y coordinate when the bullet leaves the gun? What is the y coordinate when it hits the target? What is the initial velocity in the y direction? What is the acceleration in the y direction? What is the equation that describes the motion in the vertical y direction as a function of time? Can you use the equation for to determine the time of flight? Why was it not necessary to include the motion in the x direction? s s = 180 cm m cm y(t) y(t) ANSWER: Correct Part B What was the bullet’s speed as it left the barrel? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem In the coordinate system introduced in Part A, what are the x coordinates when the bullet leaves the gun and when it hits the target? Is there any acceleration in the x direction? What is the equation that describes the motion in the horizontal x direction as a function of time? Can you use the equation for to determine the initial velocity? ANSWER: Correct Introduction to Projectile Motion Learning Goal: To understand the basic concepts of projectile motion. Projectile motion may seem rather complex at first. However, by breaking it down into components, you will find that it is really no different than the one-dimensional motions that you have already studied. One of the most often used techniques in physics is to divide two- and three-dimensional quantities into components. For instance, in projectile motion, a particle has some initial velocity . In general, this velocity can point in any direction on the xy plane and can have any magnitude. To make a problem more managable, it is common to break up such a quantity into its x component and its y component . 5.53×10−2 s x(t) x(t) 922 ms v vx vy Consider a particle with initial velocity that has magnitude 12.0 and is directed 60.0 above the negative x axis. Part A What is the x component of ? Express your answer in meters per second. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the y component of ? Express your answer in meters per second. ANSWER: Correct Breaking up the velocities into components is particularly useful when the components do not affect each other. Eventually, you will learn about situations in which the components of velocity do affect one another, but for now you will only be looking at problems where they do not. So, if there is acceleration in the x direction but not in the y direction, then the x component of the velocity will change, but the y component of the velocity will not. Part C Look at this applet. The motion diagram for a projectile is displayed, as are the motion diagrams for each component. The x-component motion diagram is what you would get if you shined a spotlight down on the particle as it moved and recorded the motion of its shadow. Similarly, if you shined a spotlight to the left and recorded the particle’s shadow, you would get the motion diagram for its y component. How would you describe the two motion diagrams for the components? ANSWER: v m/s degrees vx v vx = -6.00 m/s vy v vy = 10.4 m/s Correct As you can see, the two components of the motion obey their own independent kinematic laws. For the vertical component, there is an acceleration downward with magnitude . Thus, you can calculate the vertical position of the particle at any time using the standard kinematic equation . Similarly, there is no acceleration in the horizontal direction, so the horizontal position of the particle is given by the standard kinematic equation . Now, consider this applet. Two balls are simultaneously dropped from a height of 5.0 . Part D How long does it take for the balls to reach the ground? Use 10 for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. Express your answer in seconds to two significant figures. Hint 1. How to approach the problem The balls are released from rest at a height of 5.0 at time . Using these numbers and basic kinematics, you can determine the amount of time it takes for the balls to reach the ground. ANSWER: Correct This situation, which you have dealt with before (motion under the constant acceleration of gravity), is actually a special case of projectile motion. Think of this as projectile motion where the horizontal component of the initial velocity is zero. Both the vertical and horizontal components exhibit motion with constant nonzero acceleration. The vertical component exhibits motion with constant nonzero acceleration, whereas the horizontal component exhibits constant-velocity motion. The vertical component exhibits constant-velocity motion, whereas the horizontal component exhibits motion with constant nonzero acceleration. Both the vertical and horizontal components exhibit motion with constant velocity. g = 10 m/s2 y = y0 + v0 t + (1/2)at2 x = x0 + v0 t m tg m/s2 m t = 0 s tg = 1.0 s Part E Imagine the ball on the left is given a nonzero initial speed in the horizontal direction, while the ball on the right continues to fall with zero initial velocity. What horizontal speed must the ball on the left start with so that it hits the ground at the same position as the ball on the right? Remember that the two balls are released, starting a horizontal distance of 3.0 apart. Express your answer in meters per second to two significant figures. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Recall from Part B that the horizontal component of velocity does not change during projectile motion. Therefore, you need to find the horizontal component of velocity such that, in a time , the ball will move horizontally 3.0 . You can assume that its initial x coordinate is . ANSWER: Correct You can adjust the horizontal speeds in this applet. Notice that regardless of what horizontal speeds you give to the balls, they continue to move vertically in the same way (i.e., they are at the same y coordinate at the same time). Problem 4.12 A ball thrown horizontally at 27 travels a horizontal distance of 49 before hitting the ground. Part A From what height was the ball thrown? Express your answer using two significant figures with the appropriate units. ANSWER: vx m vx tg = 1.0 s m x0 = 0.0 m vx = 3.0 m/s m/s m h = 16 m Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 4.20 The figure shows the angular-velocity-versus-time graph for a particle moving in a circle. You may want to review ( page ) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: The Definite Integral Part A How many revolutions does the object make during the first 3.5 ? Express your answer using two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: s n = Incorrect; Try Again Problem 4.26 To withstand “g-forces” of up to 10 g’s, caused by suddenly pulling out of a steep dive, fighter jet pilots train on a “human centrifuge.” 10 g’s is an acceleration of . Part A If the length of the centrifuge arm is 10.0 , at what speed is the rider moving when she experiences 10 g’s? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.28 Your roommate is working on his bicycle and has the bike upside down. He spins the 60.0 -diameter wheel, and you notice that a pebble stuck in the tread goes by three times every second. Part A What is the pebble’s speed? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct 98 m/s2 m 31.3 ms cm 5.65 ms Part B What is the pebble’s acceleration? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 4.43 On the Apollo 14 mission to the moon, astronaut Alan Shepard hit a golf ball with a 6 iron. The acceleration due to gravity on the moon is 1/6 of its value on earth. Suppose he hits the ball with a speed of 13 at an angle 50 above the horizontal. You may want to review ( pages 90 – 95) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Quadratic Equations Part A How much farther did the ball travel on the moon than it would have on earth? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Start by drawing a picture of the path of the golf ball, showing its starting and ending points. Choose a coordinate system, and label the origin. It is conventional to let x be the horizontal direction and y the vertical direction. What is the initial velocity in the x and y directions? What is the acceleration in the x and y directions on the moon and on the earth? What are the equations for and as a function of time, and , respectively? What is the y coordinate when the golf ball hits the ground? Can you use this information to determine the time of flight on the moon and on the earth? 107 m s2 m/s  x y x(t) y(t) Once you have the time of flight, how can you use the equation to determine the total distance traveled? Compare the distance traveled on the moon to the distance traveled on the earth . ANSWER: Correct Part B For how much more time was the ball in flight? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is the equation describing as a function of time? What is the initial x component of the ball’s velocity? How are the initial x component of the ball’s velocity and the distance traveled related to the time of flight? What is the difference between the time of flight on the moon and on earth? ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.42 In the Olympic shotput event, an athlete throws the shot with an initial speed of 12 at a 40.0 angle from the horizontal. The shot leaves her hand at a height of 1.8 above the ground. x(t) L = 85 m x(t) x t = 10 s m/s  m Part A How far does the shot travel? Express your answer to four significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B Repeat the calculation of part (a) for angles of 42.5 , 45.0 , and 47.5 . Express your answer to four significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C Express your answer to four significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D x = 16.36 m    x(42.5 ) = 16.39 m x(45.0 ) = 16.31 m Express your answer to four significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part E At what angle of release does she throw the farthest? ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.44 A ball is thrown toward a cliff of height with a speed of 32 and an angle of 60 above horizontal. It lands on the edge of the cliff 3.2 later. Part A How high is the cliff? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: x(47.5 ) = 16.13 m 40.0 42.5 45.0 47.5 h m/s  s h = 39 m Answer Requested Part B What was the maximum height of the ball? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the ball’s impact speed? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.58 A typical laboratory centrifuge rotates at 3600 . Test tubes have to be placed into a centrifuge very carefully because of the very large accelerations. Part A What is the acceleration at the end of a test tube that is 10 from the axis of rotation? Express your answer with the appropriate units. hmax = 39 m v = 16 ms rpm cm ANSWER: Correct Part B For comparison, what is the magnitude of the acceleration a test tube would experience if dropped from a height of 1.0 and stopped in a 1.7-ms-long encounter with a hard floor? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.62 Communications satellites are placed in a circular orbit where they stay directly over a fixed point on the equator as the earth rotates. These are called geosynchronous orbits. The radius of the earth is , and the altitude of a geosynchronous orbit is ( 22000 miles). Part A What is the speed of a satellite in a geosynchronous orbit? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct a = 1.42×104 m s2 m a = 2610 m s2 6.37 × 106m 3.58 × 107m  v = 3070 ms Part B What is the magnitude of the acceleration of a satellite in a geosynchronous orbit? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 89.5%. You received 103.82 out of a possible total of 116 points. a = 0.223 m s2

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Chapter 11 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, April 18, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Understanding Work and Kinetic Energy Learning Goal: To learn about the Work-Energy Theorem and its basic applications. In this problem, you will learn about the relationship between the work done on an object and the kinetic energy of that object. The kinetic energy of an object of mass moving at a speed is defined as . It seems reasonable to say that the speed of an object–and, therefore, its kinetic energy–can be changed by performing work on the object. In this problem, we will explore the mathematical relationship between the work done on an object and the change in the kinetic energy of that object. First, let us consider a sled of mass being pulled by a constant, horizontal force of magnitude along a rough, horizontal surface. The sled is speeding up. Part A How many forces are acting on the sled? ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C K m v K = (1/2)mv2 m F one two three four This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part I Typesetting math: 91% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part J This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part K This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Work-Energy Theorem Reviewed Learning Goal: Review the work-energy theorem and apply it to a simple problem. If you push a particle of mass in the direction in which it is already moving, you expect the particle’s speed to increase. If you push with a constant force , then the particle will accelerate with acceleration (from Newton’s 2nd law). Part A Enter a one- or two-word answer that correctly completes the following statement. If the constant force is applied for a fixed interval of time , then the _____ of the particle will increase by an amount . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: M F a = F/M t at Typesetting math: 91% Part B Enter a one- or two-word answer that correctly completes the following statement. If the constant force is applied over a given distance , along the path of the particle, then the _____ of the particle will increase by . ANSWER: Part C If the initial kinetic energy of the particle is , and its final kinetic energy is , express in terms of and the work done on the particle. ANSWER: Part D In general, the work done by a force is written as . Now, consider whether the following statements are true or false: The dot product assures that the integrand is always nonnegative. The dot product indicates that only the component of the force perpendicular to the path contributes to the integral. The dot product indicates that only the component of the force parallel to the path contributes to the integral. Enter t for true or f for false for each statement. Separate your responses with commas (e.g., t,f,t). ANSWER: D FD Ki Kf Kf Ki W Kf = F W =  ( ) d f i F r r Typesetting math: 91% Part E Assume that the particle has initial speed . Find its final kinetic energy in terms of , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part F What is the final speed of the particle? Express your answer in terms of and . ANSWER: ± The Work Done in Pulling a Supertanker Two tugboats pull a disabled supertanker. Each tug exerts a constant force of 2.20×106 , one at an angle 10.0 west of north, and the other at an angle 10.0 east of north, as they pull the tanker a distance 0.660 toward the north. Part A What is the total work done by the two tugboats on the supertanker? Express your answer in joules, to three significant figures. vi Kf vi M F D Kf = Kf M vf = N km Typesetting math: 91% You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Energy Required to Lift a Heavy Box As you are trying to move a heavy box of mass , you realize that it is too heavy for you to lift by yourself. There is no one around to help, so you attach an ideal pulley to the box and a massless rope to the ceiling, which you wrap around the pulley. You pull up on the rope to lift the box. Use for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity and neglect friction forces. Part A Once you have pulled hard enough to start the box moving upward, what is the magnitude of the upward force you must apply to the rope to start raising the box with constant velocity? Express the magnitude of the force in terms of , the mass of the box. J m g F m Typesetting math: 91% You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Pulling a Block on an Incline with Friction A block of weight sits on an inclined plane as shown. A force of magnitude is applied to pull the block up the incline at constant speed. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the plane and the block is . Part A F = mg F μ Typesetting math: 91% What is the total work done on the block by the force of friction as the block moves a distance up the incline? Express the work done by friction in terms of any or all of the variables , , , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is the total work done on the block by the applied force as the block moves a distance up the incline? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the variables , , , , , and . ANSWER: Now the applied force is changed so that instead of pulling the block up the incline, the force pulls the block down the incline at a constant speed. Wfric L μ m g  L F Wfric = WF F L μ m g  L F WF = Typesetting math: 91% Part C What is the total work done on the block by the force of friction as the block moves a distance down the incline? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the variables , , , , , and . ANSWER: Part D What is the total work done on the box by the appled force in this case? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the variables , , , , , and . ANSWER: When Push Comes to Shove Two forces, of magnitudes = 75.0 and = 25.0 , act in opposite directions on a block, which sits atop a frictionless surface, as shown in the figure. Initially, the center of the block is at position = -1.00 . At some later time, the block has moved to the right, and its center is at a new position, = 1.00 . Wfric L μ m g  L F Wfric = WF μ m g  L F WF = F1 N F2 N xi cm xf cm Typesetting math: 91% Part A Find the work done on the block by the force of magnitude = 75.0 as the block moves from = -1.00 to = 1.00 . Express your answer numerically, in joules. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Find the work done by the force of magnitude = 25.0 as the block moves from = -1.00 to = 1.00 . Express your answer numerically, in joules. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: W1 F1 N xi cm xf cm W1 = J W2 F2 N xi cm xf cm Typesetting math: 91% Part C What is the net work done on the block by the two forces? Express your answer numerically, in joules. ANSWER: Part D Determine the change in the kinetic energy of the block as it moves from = -1.00 to = 1.00 . Express your answer numerically, in joules. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Work from a Constant Force Learning Goal: W2 = J Wnet Wnet = J Kf − Ki xi cm xf cm Kf − Ki = J Typesetting math: 91% To understand how to compute the work done by a constant force acting on a particle that moves in a straight line. In this problem, you will calculate the work done by a constant force. A force is considered constant if is independent of . This is the most frequently encountered situation in elementary Newtonian mechanics. Part A Consider a particle moving in a straight line from initial point B to final point A, acted upon by a constant force . The force (think of it as a field, having a magnitude and direction at every position ) is indicated by a series of identical vectors pointing to the left, parallel to the horizontal axis. The vectors are all identical only because the force is constant along the path. The magnitude of the force is , and the displacement vector from point B to point A is (of magnitude , making and angle (radians) with the positive x axis). Find , the work that the force performs on the particle as it moves from point B to point A. Express the work in terms of , , and . Remember to use radians, not degrees, for any angles that appear in your answer. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Now consider the same force acting on a particle that travels from point A to point B. The displacement vector now points in the opposite direction as it did in Part A. Find the work done by in this case. Express your answer in terms of , , and . F( r) r F r F L L  WBA F L F  WBA = F L WAB F Typesetting math: 91% L F  You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: ± Vector Dot Product Let vectors , , and . Calculate the following: Part A You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: WAB = A = (2, 1,−4) B = (−3, 0, 1) C = (−1,−1, 2) Typesetting math: 91% Part B What is the angle between and ? Express your answer using one significant figure. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C ANSWER: Part D ANSWER: A B = AB A B AB = radians 2B 3C = Typesetting math: 91% Part E Which of the following can be computed? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: and are different vectors with lengths and respectively. Find the following: Part F Express your answer in terms of You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: 2(B 3C) = A B C A (B C) A (B + C) 3 A V 1 V 2 V1 V2 V1 Typesetting math: 91% Part G If and are perpendicular, You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part H If and are parallel, Express your answer in terms of and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: ± Tactics Box 11.1 Calculating the Work Done by a Constant Force V = 1 V 1 V 1 V 2 V = 1 V 2 V 1 V 2 V1 V2 V = 1 V 2 Typesetting math: 91% Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 11.1 Calculating the Work Done by a Constant Force. Recall that the work done by a constant force at an angle to the displacement is . The vector magnitudes and are always positive, so the sign of is determined entirely by the angle between the force and the displacement. W F  d W = Fd cos  F d W  Typesetting math: 91% TACTICS BOX 11.1 Calculating the work done by a constant force Force and displacement Work Sign of Energy transfer Energy is transferred into the system. The particle speeds up. increases. No energy is transferred. Speed and are constant. Energy is transferred out of the system. The particle slows down. decreases. A box has weight of magnitude = 2.00 accelerates down a rough plane that is inclined at an angle = 30.0 above the horizontal, as shown at left. The normal force acting on the box has a magnitude = 1.732 , the coefficient of kinetic friction between the box and the plane is = 0.300, and the displacement of the box is 1.80 down the inclined plane.  W W 0 F(“r) + K < 90 F("r) cos  + 90 0 0 K > 90 F(“r) cos  − K 180 −F(“r) − FG N  n N μk d m Typesetting math: 91% Part A What is the work done on the box by gravity? Express your answers in joules to two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Wgrav Wgrav = J Typesetting math: 91% Work and Potential Energy on a Sliding Block with Friction A block of weight sits on a plane inclined at an angle as shown. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the plane and the block is . A force is applied to push the block up the incline at constant speed. Part A What is the work done on the block by the force of friction as the block moves a distance up the incline? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the following: , , , . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: w  μ F Wf L μ w  L Wf = Typesetting math: 91% Part B What is the work done by the applied force of magnitude ? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the following: , , , . ANSWER: Part C What is the change in the potential energy of the block, , after it has been pushed a distance up the incline? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the following: , , , . ANSWER: Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). W F μ w  L W = “U L μ w  L “U = Typesetting math: 91% Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Where’s the Energy? Learning Goal: To understand how to apply the law of conservation of energy to situations with and without nonconservative forces acting. The law of conservation of energy states the following: In an isolated system the total energy remains constant. If the objects within the system interact through gravitational and elastic forces only, then the total mechanical energy is conserved. The mechanical energy of a system is defined as the sum of kinetic energy and potential energy . For such systems where no forces other than the gravitational and elastic forces do work, the law of conservation of energy can be written as , where the quantities with subscript “i” refer to the “initial” moment and those with subscript “f” refer to the final moment. A wise choice of initial and final moments, which is not always obvious, may significantly simplify the solution. The kinetic energy of an object that has mass \texttip{m}{m} and velocity \texttip{v}{v} is given by \large{K=\frac{1}{2}mv^2}. Potential energy, instead, has many forms. The two forms that you will be dealing with most often in this chapter are the gravitational and elastic potential energy. Gravitational potential energy is the energy possessed by elevated objects. For small heights, it can be found as U_{\rm g}=mgh, where \texttip{m}{m} is the mass of the object, \texttip{g}{g} is the acceleration due to gravity, and \texttip{h}{h} is the elevation of the object above the zero level. The zero level is the elevation at which the gravitational potential energy is assumed to be (you guessed it) zero. The choice of the zero level is dictated by convenience; typically (but not necessarily), it is selected to coincide with the lowest position of the object during the motion explored in the problem. Elastic potential energy is associated with stretched or compressed elastic objects such as springs. For a spring with a force constant \texttip{k}{k}, stretched or compressed a distance \texttip{x}{x}, the associated elastic potential energy is \large{U_{\rm e}=\frac{1}{2}kx^2}. When all three types of energy change, the law of conservation of energy for an object of mass \texttip{m}{m} can be written as K U Ki + Ui = Kf + Uf Typesetting math: 91% \large{\frac{1}{2}mv_{\rm i}^2+mgh_{\rm i}+\frac{1}{2}kx_{\rm i}^2=\frac{1}{2}mv_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}^2+mgh_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}+\frac{1}{2}kx_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}^2}. The gravitational force and the elastic force are two examples of conservative forces. What if nonconservative forces, such as friction, also act within the system? In that case, the total mechanical energy would change. The law of conservation of energy is then written as \large{\frac{1}{2}mv_{\rm i}^2+mgh_{\rm i}+\frac{1}{2}kx_{\rm i}^2+W_{\rm nc}=\frac{1}{2}mv_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}^2+mgh_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}+\frac{1}{2}kx_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}^2}, where \texttip{W_{\rm nc}}{W_nc} represents the work done by the nonconservative forces acting on the object between the initial and the final moments. The work \texttip{W_{\rm nc}}{W_nc} is usually negative; that is, the nonconservative forces tend to decrease, or dissipate, the mechanical energy of the system. In this problem, we will consider the following situation as depicted in the diagram : A block of mass \texttip{m}{m} slides at a speed \texttip{v}{v} along a horizontal, smooth table. It next slides down a smooth ramp, descending a height \texttip{h}{h}, and then slides along a horizontal rough floor, stopping eventually. Assume that the block slides slowly enough so that it does not lose contact with the supporting surfaces (table, ramp, or floor). You will analyze the motion of the block at different moments using the law of conservation of energy. Part A Which word in the statement of this problem allows you to assume that the table is frictionless? ANSWER: Part B straight smooth horizontal Typesetting math: 91% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H Typesetting math: 91% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part I This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part J This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part K This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Sliding In Socks Suppose that the coefficient of kinetic friction between Zak’s feet and the floor, while wearing socks, is 0.250. Knowing this, Zak decides to get a running start and then slide across the floor. Part A If Zak’s speed is 3.00 \rm m/s when he starts to slide, what distance \texttip{d}{d} will he slide before stopping? Express your answer in meters. ANSWER: Typesetting math: 91% Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. \rm m Typesetting math: 91%

Chapter 11 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, April 18, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Understanding Work and Kinetic Energy Learning Goal: To learn about the Work-Energy Theorem and its basic applications. In this problem, you will learn about the relationship between the work done on an object and the kinetic energy of that object. The kinetic energy of an object of mass moving at a speed is defined as . It seems reasonable to say that the speed of an object–and, therefore, its kinetic energy–can be changed by performing work on the object. In this problem, we will explore the mathematical relationship between the work done on an object and the change in the kinetic energy of that object. First, let us consider a sled of mass being pulled by a constant, horizontal force of magnitude along a rough, horizontal surface. The sled is speeding up. Part A How many forces are acting on the sled? ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C K m v K = (1/2)mv2 m F one two three four This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part I Typesetting math: 91% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part J This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part K This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Work-Energy Theorem Reviewed Learning Goal: Review the work-energy theorem and apply it to a simple problem. If you push a particle of mass in the direction in which it is already moving, you expect the particle’s speed to increase. If you push with a constant force , then the particle will accelerate with acceleration (from Newton’s 2nd law). Part A Enter a one- or two-word answer that correctly completes the following statement. If the constant force is applied for a fixed interval of time , then the _____ of the particle will increase by an amount . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: M F a = F/M t at Typesetting math: 91% Part B Enter a one- or two-word answer that correctly completes the following statement. If the constant force is applied over a given distance , along the path of the particle, then the _____ of the particle will increase by . ANSWER: Part C If the initial kinetic energy of the particle is , and its final kinetic energy is , express in terms of and the work done on the particle. ANSWER: Part D In general, the work done by a force is written as . Now, consider whether the following statements are true or false: The dot product assures that the integrand is always nonnegative. The dot product indicates that only the component of the force perpendicular to the path contributes to the integral. The dot product indicates that only the component of the force parallel to the path contributes to the integral. Enter t for true or f for false for each statement. Separate your responses with commas (e.g., t,f,t). ANSWER: D FD Ki Kf Kf Ki W Kf = F W =  ( ) d f i F r r Typesetting math: 91% Part E Assume that the particle has initial speed . Find its final kinetic energy in terms of , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part F What is the final speed of the particle? Express your answer in terms of and . ANSWER: ± The Work Done in Pulling a Supertanker Two tugboats pull a disabled supertanker. Each tug exerts a constant force of 2.20×106 , one at an angle 10.0 west of north, and the other at an angle 10.0 east of north, as they pull the tanker a distance 0.660 toward the north. Part A What is the total work done by the two tugboats on the supertanker? Express your answer in joules, to three significant figures. vi Kf vi M F D Kf = Kf M vf = N km Typesetting math: 91% You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Energy Required to Lift a Heavy Box As you are trying to move a heavy box of mass , you realize that it is too heavy for you to lift by yourself. There is no one around to help, so you attach an ideal pulley to the box and a massless rope to the ceiling, which you wrap around the pulley. You pull up on the rope to lift the box. Use for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity and neglect friction forces. Part A Once you have pulled hard enough to start the box moving upward, what is the magnitude of the upward force you must apply to the rope to start raising the box with constant velocity? Express the magnitude of the force in terms of , the mass of the box. J m g F m Typesetting math: 91% You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Pulling a Block on an Incline with Friction A block of weight sits on an inclined plane as shown. A force of magnitude is applied to pull the block up the incline at constant speed. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the plane and the block is . Part A F = mg F μ Typesetting math: 91% What is the total work done on the block by the force of friction as the block moves a distance up the incline? Express the work done by friction in terms of any or all of the variables , , , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is the total work done on the block by the applied force as the block moves a distance up the incline? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the variables , , , , , and . ANSWER: Now the applied force is changed so that instead of pulling the block up the incline, the force pulls the block down the incline at a constant speed. Wfric L μ m g  L F Wfric = WF F L μ m g  L F WF = Typesetting math: 91% Part C What is the total work done on the block by the force of friction as the block moves a distance down the incline? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the variables , , , , , and . ANSWER: Part D What is the total work done on the box by the appled force in this case? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the variables , , , , , and . ANSWER: When Push Comes to Shove Two forces, of magnitudes = 75.0 and = 25.0 , act in opposite directions on a block, which sits atop a frictionless surface, as shown in the figure. Initially, the center of the block is at position = -1.00 . At some later time, the block has moved to the right, and its center is at a new position, = 1.00 . Wfric L μ m g  L F Wfric = WF μ m g  L F WF = F1 N F2 N xi cm xf cm Typesetting math: 91% Part A Find the work done on the block by the force of magnitude = 75.0 as the block moves from = -1.00 to = 1.00 . Express your answer numerically, in joules. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Find the work done by the force of magnitude = 25.0 as the block moves from = -1.00 to = 1.00 . Express your answer numerically, in joules. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: W1 F1 N xi cm xf cm W1 = J W2 F2 N xi cm xf cm Typesetting math: 91% Part C What is the net work done on the block by the two forces? Express your answer numerically, in joules. ANSWER: Part D Determine the change in the kinetic energy of the block as it moves from = -1.00 to = 1.00 . Express your answer numerically, in joules. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Work from a Constant Force Learning Goal: W2 = J Wnet Wnet = J Kf − Ki xi cm xf cm Kf − Ki = J Typesetting math: 91% To understand how to compute the work done by a constant force acting on a particle that moves in a straight line. In this problem, you will calculate the work done by a constant force. A force is considered constant if is independent of . This is the most frequently encountered situation in elementary Newtonian mechanics. Part A Consider a particle moving in a straight line from initial point B to final point A, acted upon by a constant force . The force (think of it as a field, having a magnitude and direction at every position ) is indicated by a series of identical vectors pointing to the left, parallel to the horizontal axis. The vectors are all identical only because the force is constant along the path. The magnitude of the force is , and the displacement vector from point B to point A is (of magnitude , making and angle (radians) with the positive x axis). Find , the work that the force performs on the particle as it moves from point B to point A. Express the work in terms of , , and . Remember to use radians, not degrees, for any angles that appear in your answer. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Now consider the same force acting on a particle that travels from point A to point B. The displacement vector now points in the opposite direction as it did in Part A. Find the work done by in this case. Express your answer in terms of , , and . F( r) r F r F L L  WBA F L F  WBA = F L WAB F Typesetting math: 91% L F  You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: ± Vector Dot Product Let vectors , , and . Calculate the following: Part A You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: WAB = A = (2, 1,−4) B = (−3, 0, 1) C = (−1,−1, 2) Typesetting math: 91% Part B What is the angle between and ? Express your answer using one significant figure. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C ANSWER: Part D ANSWER: A B = AB A B AB = radians 2B 3C = Typesetting math: 91% Part E Which of the following can be computed? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: and are different vectors with lengths and respectively. Find the following: Part F Express your answer in terms of You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: 2(B 3C) = A B C A (B C) A (B + C) 3 A V 1 V 2 V1 V2 V1 Typesetting math: 91% Part G If and are perpendicular, You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part H If and are parallel, Express your answer in terms of and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: ± Tactics Box 11.1 Calculating the Work Done by a Constant Force V = 1 V 1 V 1 V 2 V = 1 V 2 V 1 V 2 V1 V2 V = 1 V 2 Typesetting math: 91% Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 11.1 Calculating the Work Done by a Constant Force. Recall that the work done by a constant force at an angle to the displacement is . The vector magnitudes and are always positive, so the sign of is determined entirely by the angle between the force and the displacement. W F  d W = Fd cos  F d W  Typesetting math: 91% TACTICS BOX 11.1 Calculating the work done by a constant force Force and displacement Work Sign of Energy transfer Energy is transferred into the system. The particle speeds up. increases. No energy is transferred. Speed and are constant. Energy is transferred out of the system. The particle slows down. decreases. A box has weight of magnitude = 2.00 accelerates down a rough plane that is inclined at an angle = 30.0 above the horizontal, as shown at left. The normal force acting on the box has a magnitude = 1.732 , the coefficient of kinetic friction between the box and the plane is = 0.300, and the displacement of the box is 1.80 down the inclined plane.  W W 0 F(“r) + K < 90 F("r) cos  + 90 0 0 K > 90 F(“r) cos  − K 180 −F(“r) − FG N  n N μk d m Typesetting math: 91% Part A What is the work done on the box by gravity? Express your answers in joules to two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Wgrav Wgrav = J Typesetting math: 91% Work and Potential Energy on a Sliding Block with Friction A block of weight sits on a plane inclined at an angle as shown. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the plane and the block is . A force is applied to push the block up the incline at constant speed. Part A What is the work done on the block by the force of friction as the block moves a distance up the incline? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the following: , , , . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: w  μ F Wf L μ w  L Wf = Typesetting math: 91% Part B What is the work done by the applied force of magnitude ? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the following: , , , . ANSWER: Part C What is the change in the potential energy of the block, , after it has been pushed a distance up the incline? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the following: , , , . ANSWER: Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). W F μ w  L W = “U L μ w  L “U = Typesetting math: 91% Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Where’s the Energy? Learning Goal: To understand how to apply the law of conservation of energy to situations with and without nonconservative forces acting. The law of conservation of energy states the following: In an isolated system the total energy remains constant. If the objects within the system interact through gravitational and elastic forces only, then the total mechanical energy is conserved. The mechanical energy of a system is defined as the sum of kinetic energy and potential energy . For such systems where no forces other than the gravitational and elastic forces do work, the law of conservation of energy can be written as , where the quantities with subscript “i” refer to the “initial” moment and those with subscript “f” refer to the final moment. A wise choice of initial and final moments, which is not always obvious, may significantly simplify the solution. The kinetic energy of an object that has mass \texttip{m}{m} and velocity \texttip{v}{v} is given by \large{K=\frac{1}{2}mv^2}. Potential energy, instead, has many forms. The two forms that you will be dealing with most often in this chapter are the gravitational and elastic potential energy. Gravitational potential energy is the energy possessed by elevated objects. For small heights, it can be found as U_{\rm g}=mgh, where \texttip{m}{m} is the mass of the object, \texttip{g}{g} is the acceleration due to gravity, and \texttip{h}{h} is the elevation of the object above the zero level. The zero level is the elevation at which the gravitational potential energy is assumed to be (you guessed it) zero. The choice of the zero level is dictated by convenience; typically (but not necessarily), it is selected to coincide with the lowest position of the object during the motion explored in the problem. Elastic potential energy is associated with stretched or compressed elastic objects such as springs. For a spring with a force constant \texttip{k}{k}, stretched or compressed a distance \texttip{x}{x}, the associated elastic potential energy is \large{U_{\rm e}=\frac{1}{2}kx^2}. When all three types of energy change, the law of conservation of energy for an object of mass \texttip{m}{m} can be written as K U Ki + Ui = Kf + Uf Typesetting math: 91% \large{\frac{1}{2}mv_{\rm i}^2+mgh_{\rm i}+\frac{1}{2}kx_{\rm i}^2=\frac{1}{2}mv_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}^2+mgh_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}+\frac{1}{2}kx_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}^2}. The gravitational force and the elastic force are two examples of conservative forces. What if nonconservative forces, such as friction, also act within the system? In that case, the total mechanical energy would change. The law of conservation of energy is then written as \large{\frac{1}{2}mv_{\rm i}^2+mgh_{\rm i}+\frac{1}{2}kx_{\rm i}^2+W_{\rm nc}=\frac{1}{2}mv_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}^2+mgh_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}+\frac{1}{2}kx_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}^2}, where \texttip{W_{\rm nc}}{W_nc} represents the work done by the nonconservative forces acting on the object between the initial and the final moments. The work \texttip{W_{\rm nc}}{W_nc} is usually negative; that is, the nonconservative forces tend to decrease, or dissipate, the mechanical energy of the system. In this problem, we will consider the following situation as depicted in the diagram : A block of mass \texttip{m}{m} slides at a speed \texttip{v}{v} along a horizontal, smooth table. It next slides down a smooth ramp, descending a height \texttip{h}{h}, and then slides along a horizontal rough floor, stopping eventually. Assume that the block slides slowly enough so that it does not lose contact with the supporting surfaces (table, ramp, or floor). You will analyze the motion of the block at different moments using the law of conservation of energy. Part A Which word in the statement of this problem allows you to assume that the table is frictionless? ANSWER: Part B straight smooth horizontal Typesetting math: 91% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H Typesetting math: 91% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part I This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part J This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part K This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Sliding In Socks Suppose that the coefficient of kinetic friction between Zak’s feet and the floor, while wearing socks, is 0.250. Knowing this, Zak decides to get a running start and then slide across the floor. Part A If Zak’s speed is 3.00 \rm m/s when he starts to slide, what distance \texttip{d}{d} will he slide before stopping? Express your answer in meters. ANSWER: Typesetting math: 91% Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. \rm m Typesetting math: 91%

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Chapter 14 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 16, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Harmonic Oscillator Equations Learning Goal: To derive the formulas for the major characteristics of motion as functions of time for a horizontal spring oscillator and to practice using the obtained formulas by answering some basic questions. A block of mass is attached to a spring whose spring constant is . The other end of the spring is fixed so that when the spring is unstretched, the mass is located at . . Assume that the +x direction is to the right. The mass is now pulled to the right a distance beyond the equilibrium position and released, at time , with zero initial velocity. Assume that the vertical forces acting on the block balance each other and that the tension of the spring is, in effect, the only force affecting the motion of the block. Therefore, the system will undergo simple harmonic motion. For such a system, the equation of motion is , and its solution, which provides the equation for , is . Part A At what time does the block come back to its original equilibrium position ( ) for the first time? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables: , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: m k x = 0 A t = 0 a(t) = − x(t) km x(t) x(t) = Acos( t) km −−  t1 x = 0 A k m

Chapter 14 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 16, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Harmonic Oscillator Equations Learning Goal: To derive the formulas for the major characteristics of motion as functions of time for a horizontal spring oscillator and to practice using the obtained formulas by answering some basic questions. A block of mass is attached to a spring whose spring constant is . The other end of the spring is fixed so that when the spring is unstretched, the mass is located at . . Assume that the +x direction is to the right. The mass is now pulled to the right a distance beyond the equilibrium position and released, at time , with zero initial velocity. Assume that the vertical forces acting on the block balance each other and that the tension of the spring is, in effect, the only force affecting the motion of the block. Therefore, the system will undergo simple harmonic motion. For such a system, the equation of motion is , and its solution, which provides the equation for , is . Part A At what time does the block come back to its original equilibrium position ( ) for the first time? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables: , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: m k x = 0 A t = 0 a(t) = − x(t) km x(t) x(t) = Acos( t) km −−  t1 x = 0 A k m

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COMM 1311: Written Communication Assignment 5 Argumentation Essay (Chapter 10, pp. 218-232, Arlov) Purpose of Assignment • The purpose of this assignment is to enable the student to write an essay with a compelling argumentation that shows critical thinking. A persuasive essay is a writer’s attempt to convince readers of the validity of a particular opinion on a controversial issue. Objectives • The student will be able to correctly structure an essay and bring forward a compelling thesis and argument. • The student will understand the creativity of the writing process and use his own ideas. • The student will be able to craft a compelling essay and show critical thinking. • The student will show that he is able to argue both sides of a topic and is willing to acknowledge a different opinion. Instructions 1. Establish a subject Choose a topic that interests you. An argument does not have to be a burning issue, but it must be a debatable topic. It can be anything you feel strongly about but it has to be approved by the instructor. 2. Present a clear thesis and identify the controversy Your thesis should inform readers of your purpose and how you will proceed in your argumentation. 3. Follow an organizational pattern and provide support The body paragraphs of the essay should provide specific support. These supports may include personal experience, statistics, facts, or experts’ opinions. They may be garnered from scientific journals, magazines, books, newspapers, textbooks, studies, or interviews. Select only the facts that are relevant. 4. Consider differing opinions A persuasive essay may be strengthened by acknowledging conflict viewpoints and discussing them. 4. Draw a conclusion Restate your position in different words from the introduction. Do not introduce new material in the conclusion. You may want to conclude by encouraging some specific call to action. Requirements The essay topic must meet the approval of the instructor: • Have a complete cover page • have at least 500 words • use full sentences (and no bullet points) • must have page numbers • must have a reference page Example writing (not a complete essay): Boxing: Countdown to Injury A left hook smashes into the fighter’s jaw. A following right slams his head the opposite direction. An uppercut to the jaw snaps his head back, momentarily stopping the blood flow to his brain. The boxer drops, hitting the mat with a thud. His brain bounces off his skull for the second time in a matter of seconds. Is this what we should call a sport? Because of injuries, neurological damage, and ring deaths, the rules of professional boxing should be changed. Boxing has always been a brutal sport. The ancient Greeks used gloves studded with metal spikes, which slashed the face and body and split skulls. Although gloves are no longer spiked, boxers today sustain injuries ranging from cuts and bruises to broken bones. It is not uncommon to see a boxer leave the ring with a cut on his face, an eye swollen shut, and a nose enlarged and bloody. Often, healing in is incomplete because these areas receive the same blows again and again in other matches. In fact, repeated blows almost cost Sugar Ray Leonard his sight when his retina detached in his left eye. Besides superficial injuries, boxers suffer short-term neurological damage as a result of staggering blows to the head. A knockout punch, for example, is often delivered with such force that the brain smashes against the skull, tearing nerve fibers and blood vessels, resulting in a concussion. Even a blow to the neck can close the carotid artery, the main artery to the brain, whereby oxygen and blood to the brain are disrupted, resulting in dizziness and confusion. Later, the boxers often have no memory of the moments before or after a knockout blow. Submission Criteria Due Date: Sunday, December 6, 2015. Late assignments will receive an automatic ZERO grade. Where to deliver hard copies: In class Assessment Criteria CRITERIA Assessment Rubric Argumentation Essay SCORES Introduction Introduces the issue and its importance, says what your essay will cover 2 Organization The sound structure of the essay 1 Expression Sentences, phrases, metaphors, verbs etc. The strength of the language used 4 Conclusion Restate the issue, summarizes the strength of the arguments in the essays, gives your opinion about which essay is the strongest with supporting reasons 1 Mechanics Followed guidelines, professional format, punctuation, spelling, and capitalization are correct, use of headings, no bullet points 2 TOTAL 10% Plagiarism, copying from the internet or any other sources without citation will result in an automatic ZERO grade and a procedure of Academic Misconduct will filed against you. The complete essay has to be created and written by you alone. Prior assignments CAN NOT be used.

COMM 1311: Written Communication Assignment 5 Argumentation Essay (Chapter 10, pp. 218-232, Arlov) Purpose of Assignment • The purpose of this assignment is to enable the student to write an essay with a compelling argumentation that shows critical thinking. A persuasive essay is a writer’s attempt to convince readers of the validity of a particular opinion on a controversial issue. Objectives • The student will be able to correctly structure an essay and bring forward a compelling thesis and argument. • The student will understand the creativity of the writing process and use his own ideas. • The student will be able to craft a compelling essay and show critical thinking. • The student will show that he is able to argue both sides of a topic and is willing to acknowledge a different opinion. Instructions 1. Establish a subject Choose a topic that interests you. An argument does not have to be a burning issue, but it must be a debatable topic. It can be anything you feel strongly about but it has to be approved by the instructor. 2. Present a clear thesis and identify the controversy Your thesis should inform readers of your purpose and how you will proceed in your argumentation. 3. Follow an organizational pattern and provide support The body paragraphs of the essay should provide specific support. These supports may include personal experience, statistics, facts, or experts’ opinions. They may be garnered from scientific journals, magazines, books, newspapers, textbooks, studies, or interviews. Select only the facts that are relevant. 4. Consider differing opinions A persuasive essay may be strengthened by acknowledging conflict viewpoints and discussing them. 4. Draw a conclusion Restate your position in different words from the introduction. Do not introduce new material in the conclusion. You may want to conclude by encouraging some specific call to action. Requirements The essay topic must meet the approval of the instructor: • Have a complete cover page • have at least 500 words • use full sentences (and no bullet points) • must have page numbers • must have a reference page Example writing (not a complete essay): Boxing: Countdown to Injury A left hook smashes into the fighter’s jaw. A following right slams his head the opposite direction. An uppercut to the jaw snaps his head back, momentarily stopping the blood flow to his brain. The boxer drops, hitting the mat with a thud. His brain bounces off his skull for the second time in a matter of seconds. Is this what we should call a sport? Because of injuries, neurological damage, and ring deaths, the rules of professional boxing should be changed. Boxing has always been a brutal sport. The ancient Greeks used gloves studded with metal spikes, which slashed the face and body and split skulls. Although gloves are no longer spiked, boxers today sustain injuries ranging from cuts and bruises to broken bones. It is not uncommon to see a boxer leave the ring with a cut on his face, an eye swollen shut, and a nose enlarged and bloody. Often, healing in is incomplete because these areas receive the same blows again and again in other matches. In fact, repeated blows almost cost Sugar Ray Leonard his sight when his retina detached in his left eye. Besides superficial injuries, boxers suffer short-term neurological damage as a result of staggering blows to the head. A knockout punch, for example, is often delivered with such force that the brain smashes against the skull, tearing nerve fibers and blood vessels, resulting in a concussion. Even a blow to the neck can close the carotid artery, the main artery to the brain, whereby oxygen and blood to the brain are disrupted, resulting in dizziness and confusion. Later, the boxers often have no memory of the moments before or after a knockout blow. Submission Criteria Due Date: Sunday, December 6, 2015. Late assignments will receive an automatic ZERO grade. Where to deliver hard copies: In class Assessment Criteria CRITERIA Assessment Rubric Argumentation Essay SCORES Introduction Introduces the issue and its importance, says what your essay will cover 2 Organization The sound structure of the essay 1 Expression Sentences, phrases, metaphors, verbs etc. The strength of the language used 4 Conclusion Restate the issue, summarizes the strength of the arguments in the essays, gives your opinion about which essay is the strongest with supporting reasons 1 Mechanics Followed guidelines, professional format, punctuation, spelling, and capitalization are correct, use of headings, no bullet points 2 TOTAL 10% Plagiarism, copying from the internet or any other sources without citation will result in an automatic ZERO grade and a procedure of Academic Misconduct will filed against you. The complete essay has to be created and written by you alone. Prior assignments CAN NOT be used.

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