2. Career development process is complex and rapidly evolving and new theories are continually developing presenting challenges to traditional understandings. Discuss why an understanding of career development processes is critical to management, employee and organizational success.

2. Career development process is complex and rapidly evolving and new theories are continually developing presenting challenges to traditional understandings. Discuss why an understanding of career development processes is critical to management, employee and organizational success.

Studies are at the present extrapolative huge employment income in … Read More...
Another property we use is frequency. Frequency (f) is the number of cycles per second. We measure frequency in units of Hertz, (Hz). Frequency is the inverse of the time for one complete cycle. We call the time for one complete cycle the period (T) and measure in units of time. A complete cycle includes every possible value that repeats.What is the frequency of the signal?

Another property we use is frequency. Frequency (f) is the number of cycles per second. We measure frequency in units of Hertz, (Hz). Frequency is the inverse of the time for one complete cycle. We call the time for one complete cycle the period (T) and measure in units of time. A complete cycle includes every possible value that repeats.What is the frequency of the signal?

Frequency = 1/T =1/7 Hz   Another property we use … Read More...
Written Reflection #1 This week’s point to ponder and reflect on for your first written assignment … John Maxwell makes the point that leadership comes “from the inside out”; it is the qualities that make us up as people – as individuals – that make us effective leaders. For class we have asked you to complete “Appendix A: Evaluating Your Personal and Professional Values” from the Carson Dye text (both the self and have a peer evaluate your as well.) You have also completed the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and learned about your personality type through the online assessment, the “My Personality Strengths and Weaknesses” worksheet and classroom activity. Please look over the results of your two assessments and the MBTI Strengths and Weaknesses Worksheet and reflect on your own leadership qualities as described in these tools. It is a goal of this class that you come away with improved leadership abilities and that the information you gain is assimilated into your “real life.” For this week’s reflection paper: o Identify three leadership characteristics where you personally have recognized a need for growth or improvement. o Describe what they are and what you will do this semester – perhaps a daily goal as suggested by Maxwell or a goal of something you hope to achieve in this class – to improve in each of these three areas.  Don’t forget, you also need to incorporate quotes or references from both Dye and Maxwell to get full credit for the writing assignment. Write well!  This can be in first person – but NOT in second person! (“I” but not “you”!) As Maxwell states: “If you can become the leader you ought to be on the inside, you will be able to become the leader youwant to be on the outside.”

Written Reflection #1 This week’s point to ponder and reflect on for your first written assignment … John Maxwell makes the point that leadership comes “from the inside out”; it is the qualities that make us up as people – as individuals – that make us effective leaders. For class we have asked you to complete “Appendix A: Evaluating Your Personal and Professional Values” from the Carson Dye text (both the self and have a peer evaluate your as well.) You have also completed the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and learned about your personality type through the online assessment, the “My Personality Strengths and Weaknesses” worksheet and classroom activity. Please look over the results of your two assessments and the MBTI Strengths and Weaknesses Worksheet and reflect on your own leadership qualities as described in these tools. It is a goal of this class that you come away with improved leadership abilities and that the information you gain is assimilated into your “real life.” For this week’s reflection paper: o Identify three leadership characteristics where you personally have recognized a need for growth or improvement. o Describe what they are and what you will do this semester – perhaps a daily goal as suggested by Maxwell or a goal of something you hope to achieve in this class – to improve in each of these three areas.  Don’t forget, you also need to incorporate quotes or references from both Dye and Maxwell to get full credit for the writing assignment. Write well!  This can be in first person – but NOT in second person! (“I” but not “you”!) As Maxwell states: “If you can become the leader you ought to be on the inside, you will be able to become the leader youwant to be on the outside.”

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Read this article and answer this question in 2 pages : Answers should be from the below article only. What is the difference between “standards-based” and “standards-embedded” curriculum? what are the curricular implications of this difference? Article: In 2007, at the dawn of 21st century in education, it is impossible to talk about teaching, curriculum, schools, or education without discussing standards . standards-based v. standards-embedded curriculum We are in an age of accountability where our success as educators is determined by individual and group mastery of specific standards dem- onstrated by standardized test per- formance. Even before No Child Left Behind (NCLB), standards and measures were used to determine if schools and students were success- ful (McClure, 2005). But, NCLB has increased the pace, intensity, and high stakes of this trend. Gifted and talented students and their teach- ers are significantly impacted by these local or state proficiency stan- dards and grade-level assessments (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2006). This article explores how to use these standards in the develop- ment of high-quality curriculum for gifted students. NCLB, High-Stakes State Testing, and Standards- Based Instruction There are a few potentially positive outcomes of this evolution to public accountability. All stakeholders have had to ask themselves, “Are students learning? If so, what are they learning and how do we know?” In cases where we have been allowed to thoughtfully evaluate curriculum and instruction, we have also asked, “What’s worth learning?” “When’s the best time to learn it?” and “Who needs to learn it?” Even though state achievement tests are only a single measure, citizens are now offered a yardstick, albeit a nar- row one, for comparing communities, schools, and in some cases, teachers. Some testing reports allow teachers to identify for parents what their chil- dren can do and what they can not do. Testing also has focused attention on the not-so-new observations that pov- erty, discrimination and prejudices, and language proficiency impacts learning. With enough ceiling (e.g., above-grade-level assessments), even gifted students’ actual achievement and readiness levels can be identi- fied and provide a starting point for appropriately differentiated instruc- tion (Tomlinson, 2001). Unfortunately, as a veteran teacher for more than three decades and as a teacher-educator, my recent observa- tions of and conversations with class- room and gifted teachers have usually revealed negative outcomes. For gifted children, their actual achievement level is often unrecognized by teachers because both the tests and the reporting of the results rarely reach above the student’s grade-level placement. Assessments also focus on a huge number of state stan- dards for a given school year that cre- ate “overload” (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006) and have a devastating impact on the development and implementation of rich and relevant curriculum and instruction. In too many scenarios, I see teachers teach- ing directly to the test. And, in the worst cases, some teachers actually teach The Test. In those cases, The Test itself becomes the curriculum. Consistently I hear, “Oh, I used to teach a great unit on ________ but I can’t do it any- more because I have to teach the standards.” Or, “I have to teach my favorite units in April and May after testing.” If the outcomes can’t be boiled down to simple “I can . . .” state- ments that can be posted on a school’s walls, then teachers seem to omit poten- tially meaningful learning opportunities from the school year. In many cases, real education and learning are being trivial- ized. We seem to have lost sight of the more significant purpose of teaching and learning: individual growth and develop- ment. We also have surrendered much of the joy of learning, as the incidentals, the tangents, the “bird walks” are cut short or elimi- nated because teachers hear the con- stant ticking clock of the countdown to the state test and feel the pressure of the way-too-many standards that have to be covered in a mere 180 school days. The accountability movement has pushed us away from seeing the whole child: “Students are not machines, as the standards movement suggests; they are volatile, complicated, and paradoxical” (Cookson, 2001, p. 42). How does this impact gifted chil- dren? In many heterogeneous class- rooms, teachers have retreated to traditional subject delineations and traditional instruction in an effort to ensure direct standards-based instruc- tion even though “no solid basis exists in the research literature for the ways we currently develop, place, and align educational standards in school cur- ricula” (Zenger & Zenger, 2002, p. 212). Grade-level standards are often particularly inappropriate for the gifted and talented whose pace of learning, achievement levels, and depth of knowledge are significantly beyond their chronological peers. A broad-based, thematically rich, and challenging curriculum is the heart of education for the gifted. Virgil Ward, one of the earliest voices for a differen- tial education for the gifted, said, “It is insufficient to consider the curriculum for the gifted in terms of traditional subjects and instructional processes” (Ward, 1980, p. 5). VanTassel-Baska Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum gifted child today 45 Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum and Stambaugh (2006) described three dimensions of successful curriculum for gifted students: content mastery, pro- cess and product, and epistemological concept, “understanding and appre- ciating systems of knowledge rather than individual elements of those systems” (p. 9). Overemphasis on testing and grade-level standards limits all three and therefore limits learning for gifted students. Hirsch (2001) concluded that “broad gen- eral knowledge is the best entrée to deep knowledge” (p. 23) and that it is highly correlated with general ability to learn. He continued, “the best way to learn a subject is to learn its gen- eral principles and to study an ample number of diverse examples that illustrate those principles” (Hirsch, 2001, p. 23). Principle-based learn- ing applies to both gifted and general education children. In order to meet the needs of gifted and general education students, cur- riculum should be differentiated in ways that are relevant and engaging. Curriculum content, processes, and products should provide challenge, depth, and complexity, offering multiple opportunities for problem solving, creativity, and exploration. In specific content areas, the cur- riculum should reflect the elegance and sophistication unique to the discipline. Even with this expanded view of curriculum in mind, we still must find ways to address the current reality of state standards and assess- ments. Standards-Embedded Curriculum How can educators address this chal- lenge? As in most things, a change of perspective can be helpful. Standards- based curriculum as described above should be replaced with standards- embedded curriculum. Standards- embedded curriculum begins with broad questions and topics, either discipline specific or interdisciplinary. Once teachers have given thoughtful consideration to relevant, engaging, and important content and the con- nections that support meaning-making (Jensen, 1998), they next select stan- dards that are relevant to this content and to summative assessments. This process is supported by the backward planning advocated in Understanding by Design by Wiggins and McTighe (2005) and its predecessors, as well as current thinkers in other fields, such as Covey (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006). It is a critical component of differenti- ating instruction for advanced learners (Tomlinson, 2001) and a significant factor in the Core Parallel in the Parallel Curriculum Model (Tomlinson et al., 2002). Teachers choose from standards in multiple disciplines at both above and below grade level depending on the needs of the students and the classroom or program structure. Preassessment data and the results of prior instruc- tion also inform this process of embed- ding appropriate standards. For gifted students, this formative assessment will result in “more advanced curricula available at younger ages, ensuring that all levels of the standards are traversed in the process” (VanTassel-Baska & Little, 2003, p. 3). Once the essential questions, key content, and relevant standards are selected and sequenced, they are embedded into a coherent unit design and instructional decisions (grouping, pacing, instructional methodology) can be made. For gifted students, this includes the identification of appropri- ate resources, often including advanced texts, mentors, and independent research, as appropriate to the child’s developmental level and interest. Applying Standards- Embedded Curriculum What does this look like in practice? In reading the possible class- room applications below, consider these three Ohio Academic Content Standards for third grade: 1. Math: “Read thermometers in both Fahrenheit and Celsius scales” (“Academic Content Standards: K–12 Mathematics,” n.d., p. 71). 2. Social Studies: “Compare some of the cultural practices and products of various groups of people who have lived in the local community including artistic expression, religion, language, and food. Compare the cultural practices and products of the local community with those of other communities in Ohio, the United States, and countries of the world” (Academic Content Standards: K–12 Social Studies, n.d., p. 122). 3. Life Science: “Observe and explore how fossils provide evidence about animals that lived long ago and the nature of the environment at that time” (Academic Content Standards: K–12 Science, n.d., p. 57). When students are fortunate to have a teacher who is dedicated to helping all of them make good use of their time, the gifted may have a preassessment opportunity where they can demonstrate their familiarity with the content and potential mastery of a standard at their grade level. Students who pass may get to read by them- selves for the brief period while the rest of the class works on the single outcome. Sometimes more experienced teachers will create opportunities for gifted and advanced students Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum to work on a standard in the same domain or strand at the next higher grade level (i.e., accelerate through the standards). For example, a stu- dent might be able to work on a Life Science standard for fourth grade that progresses to other communities such as ecosystems. These above-grade-level standards can provide rich material for differentiation, advanced problem solving, and more in-depth curriculum integration. In another classroom scenario, a teacher may focus on the math stan- dard above, identifying the standard number on his lesson plan. He creates or collects paper thermometers, some showing measurement in Celsius and some in Fahrenheit. He also has some real thermometers. He demonstrates thermometer use with boiling water and with freezing water and reads the different temperatures. Students complete a worksheet that has them read thermometers in Celsius and Fahrenheit. The more advanced students may learn how to convert between the two scales. Students then practice with several questions on the topic that are similar in structure and content to those that have been on past proficiency tests. They are coached in how to answer them so that the stan- dard, instruction, formative assess- ment, and summative assessment are all aligned. Then, each student writes a statement that says, “I can read a thermometer using either Celsius or Fahrenheit scales.” Both of these examples describe a standards-based environment, where the starting point is the standard. Direct instruction to that standard is followed by an observable student behavior that demonstrates specific mastery of that single standard. The standard becomes both the start- ing point and the ending point of the curriculum. Education, rather than opening up a student’s mind, becomes a series of closed links in a chain. Whereas the above lessons may be differentiated to some extent, they have no context; they may relate only to the next standard on the list, such as, “Telling time to the nearest minute and finding elapsed time using a cal- endar or a clock.” How would a “standards-embed- ded” model of curriculum design be different? It would begin with the development of an essential ques- tion such as, “Who or what lived here before me? How were they different from me? How were they the same? How do we know?” These questions might be more relevant to our con- temporary highly mobile students. It would involve place and time. Using this intriguing line of inquiry, students might work on the social studies stan- dard as part of the study of their home- town, their school, or even their house or apartment. Because where people live and what they do is influenced by the weather, students could look into weather patterns of their area and learn how to measure temperature using a Fahrenheit scale so they could see if it is similar now to what it was a century ago. Skipping ahead to consideration of the social studies standard, students could then choose another country, preferably one that uses Celsius, and do the same investigation of fossils, communities, and the like. Students could complete a weather comparison, looking at the temperature in Celsius as people in other parts of the world, such as those in Canada, do. Thus, learning is contextualized and connected, dem- onstrating both depth and complexity. This approach takes a lot more work and time. It is a sophisticated integrated view of curriculum devel- opment and involves in-depth knowl- edge of the content areas, as well as an understanding of the scope and sequence of the standards in each dis- cipline. Teachers who develop vital single-discipline units, as well as inter- disciplinary teaching units, begin with a central topic surrounded by subtopics and connections to other areas. Then they connect important terms, facts, or concepts to the subtopics. Next, the skilled teacher/curriculum devel- oper embeds relevant, multileveled standards and objectives appropriate to a given student or group of stu- dents into the unit. Finally, teachers select the instructional strategies and develop student assessments. These assessments include, but are not lim- ited to, the types of questions asked on standardized and state assessments. Comparing Standards- Based and Standards- Embedded Curriculum Design Following is an articulation of the differences between standards-based and standards-embedded curriculum design. (See Figure 1.) 1. The starting point. Standards- based curriculum begins with the grade-level standard and the underlying assumption that every student needs to master that stan- dard at that moment in time. In standards-embedded curriculum, the multifaceted essential ques- tion and students’ needs are the starting points. 2. Preassessment. In standards- based curriculum and teaching, if a preassessment is provided, it cov- ers a single standard or two. In a standards-embedded curriculum, preassessment includes a broader range of grade-level and advanced standards, as well as students’ knowledge of surrounding content such as background experiences with the subject, relevant skills (such as reading and writing), and continued on page ?? even learning style or interests. gifted child today 47 Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum Standards Based Standards Embedded Starting Points The grade-level standard. Whole class’ general skill level Essential questions and content relevant to individual students and groups. Preassessment Targeted to a single grade-level standard. Short-cycle assessments. Background knowledge. Multiple grade-level standards from multiple areas connected by the theme of the unit. Includes annual learning style and interest inventories. Acceleration/ Enrichment To next grade-level standard in the same strand. To above-grade-level standards, as well as into broader thematically connected content. Language Arts Divided into individual skills. Reading and writing skills often separated from real-world relevant contexts. The language arts are embedded in all units and themes and connected to differentiated processes and products across all content areas. Instruction Lesson planning begins with the standard as the objective. Sequential direct instruction progresses through the standards in each content area separately. Strategies are selected to introduce, practice, and demonstrate mastery of all grade-level standards in all content areas in one school year. Lesson planning begins with essential questions, topics, and significant themes. Integrated instruction is designed around connections among content areas and embeds all relevant standards. Assessment Format modeled after the state test. Variety of assessments including questions similar to the state test format. Teacher Role Monitor of standards mastery. Time manager. Facilitator of instructional design and student engagement with learning, as well as assessor of achievement. Student Self- Esteem “I can . . .” statements. Star Charts. Passing “the test.” Completed projects/products. Making personal connections to learning and the theme/topic. Figure 1. Standards based v. standards-embedded instruction and gifted students. and the potential political outcry of “stepping on the toes” of the next grade’s teacher. Few classroom teachers have been provided with the in-depth professional develop- ment and understanding of curric- ulum compacting that would allow them to implement this effectively. In standards-embedded curricu- lum, enrichment and extensions of learning are more possible and more interesting because ideas, top- ics, and questions lend themselves more easily to depth and complex- ity than isolated skills. 4. Language arts. In standards- based classrooms, the language arts have been redivided into sepa- rate skills, with reading separated from writing, and writing sepa- rated from grammar. To many concrete thinkers, whole-language approaches seem antithetical to teaching “to the standards.” In a standards-embedded classroom, integrated language arts skills (reading, writing, listening, speak- ing, presenting, and even pho- nics) are embedded into the study of every unit. Especially for the gifted, the communication and language arts are essential, regard- less of domain-specific talents (Ward, 1980) and should be com- ponents of all curriculum because they are the underpinnings of scholarship in all areas. 5. Instruction. A standards-based classroom lends itself to direct instruction and sequential pro- gression from one standard to the next. A standards-embedded class- room requires a variety of more open-ended instructional strate- gies and materials that extend and diversify learning rather than focus it narrowly. Creativity and differ- entiation in instruction and stu- dent performance are supported more effectively in a standards- embedded approach. 6. Assessment. A standards-based classroom uses targeted assess- ments focused on the structure and content of questions on the externally imposed standardized test (i.e., proficiency tests). A stan- dards-embedded classroom lends itself to greater use of authentic assessment and differentiated 3. Acceleration/Enrichment. In a standards-based curriculum, the narrow definition of the learning outcome (a test item) often makes acceleration or curriculum compact- ing the only path for differentiating instruction for gifted, talented, and/ or advanced learners. This rarely happens, however, because of lack of materials, knowledge, o

Read this article and answer this question in 2 pages : Answers should be from the below article only. What is the difference between “standards-based” and “standards-embedded” curriculum? what are the curricular implications of this difference? Article: In 2007, at the dawn of 21st century in education, it is impossible to talk about teaching, curriculum, schools, or education without discussing standards . standards-based v. standards-embedded curriculum We are in an age of accountability where our success as educators is determined by individual and group mastery of specific standards dem- onstrated by standardized test per- formance. Even before No Child Left Behind (NCLB), standards and measures were used to determine if schools and students were success- ful (McClure, 2005). But, NCLB has increased the pace, intensity, and high stakes of this trend. Gifted and talented students and their teach- ers are significantly impacted by these local or state proficiency stan- dards and grade-level assessments (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2006). This article explores how to use these standards in the develop- ment of high-quality curriculum for gifted students. NCLB, High-Stakes State Testing, and Standards- Based Instruction There are a few potentially positive outcomes of this evolution to public accountability. All stakeholders have had to ask themselves, “Are students learning? If so, what are they learning and how do we know?” In cases where we have been allowed to thoughtfully evaluate curriculum and instruction, we have also asked, “What’s worth learning?” “When’s the best time to learn it?” and “Who needs to learn it?” Even though state achievement tests are only a single measure, citizens are now offered a yardstick, albeit a nar- row one, for comparing communities, schools, and in some cases, teachers. Some testing reports allow teachers to identify for parents what their chil- dren can do and what they can not do. Testing also has focused attention on the not-so-new observations that pov- erty, discrimination and prejudices, and language proficiency impacts learning. With enough ceiling (e.g., above-grade-level assessments), even gifted students’ actual achievement and readiness levels can be identi- fied and provide a starting point for appropriately differentiated instruc- tion (Tomlinson, 2001). Unfortunately, as a veteran teacher for more than three decades and as a teacher-educator, my recent observa- tions of and conversations with class- room and gifted teachers have usually revealed negative outcomes. For gifted children, their actual achievement level is often unrecognized by teachers because both the tests and the reporting of the results rarely reach above the student’s grade-level placement. Assessments also focus on a huge number of state stan- dards for a given school year that cre- ate “overload” (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006) and have a devastating impact on the development and implementation of rich and relevant curriculum and instruction. In too many scenarios, I see teachers teach- ing directly to the test. And, in the worst cases, some teachers actually teach The Test. In those cases, The Test itself becomes the curriculum. Consistently I hear, “Oh, I used to teach a great unit on ________ but I can’t do it any- more because I have to teach the standards.” Or, “I have to teach my favorite units in April and May after testing.” If the outcomes can’t be boiled down to simple “I can . . .” state- ments that can be posted on a school’s walls, then teachers seem to omit poten- tially meaningful learning opportunities from the school year. In many cases, real education and learning are being trivial- ized. We seem to have lost sight of the more significant purpose of teaching and learning: individual growth and develop- ment. We also have surrendered much of the joy of learning, as the incidentals, the tangents, the “bird walks” are cut short or elimi- nated because teachers hear the con- stant ticking clock of the countdown to the state test and feel the pressure of the way-too-many standards that have to be covered in a mere 180 school days. The accountability movement has pushed us away from seeing the whole child: “Students are not machines, as the standards movement suggests; they are volatile, complicated, and paradoxical” (Cookson, 2001, p. 42). How does this impact gifted chil- dren? In many heterogeneous class- rooms, teachers have retreated to traditional subject delineations and traditional instruction in an effort to ensure direct standards-based instruc- tion even though “no solid basis exists in the research literature for the ways we currently develop, place, and align educational standards in school cur- ricula” (Zenger & Zenger, 2002, p. 212). Grade-level standards are often particularly inappropriate for the gifted and talented whose pace of learning, achievement levels, and depth of knowledge are significantly beyond their chronological peers. A broad-based, thematically rich, and challenging curriculum is the heart of education for the gifted. Virgil Ward, one of the earliest voices for a differen- tial education for the gifted, said, “It is insufficient to consider the curriculum for the gifted in terms of traditional subjects and instructional processes” (Ward, 1980, p. 5). VanTassel-Baska Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum gifted child today 45 Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum and Stambaugh (2006) described three dimensions of successful curriculum for gifted students: content mastery, pro- cess and product, and epistemological concept, “understanding and appre- ciating systems of knowledge rather than individual elements of those systems” (p. 9). Overemphasis on testing and grade-level standards limits all three and therefore limits learning for gifted students. Hirsch (2001) concluded that “broad gen- eral knowledge is the best entrée to deep knowledge” (p. 23) and that it is highly correlated with general ability to learn. He continued, “the best way to learn a subject is to learn its gen- eral principles and to study an ample number of diverse examples that illustrate those principles” (Hirsch, 2001, p. 23). Principle-based learn- ing applies to both gifted and general education children. In order to meet the needs of gifted and general education students, cur- riculum should be differentiated in ways that are relevant and engaging. Curriculum content, processes, and products should provide challenge, depth, and complexity, offering multiple opportunities for problem solving, creativity, and exploration. In specific content areas, the cur- riculum should reflect the elegance and sophistication unique to the discipline. Even with this expanded view of curriculum in mind, we still must find ways to address the current reality of state standards and assess- ments. Standards-Embedded Curriculum How can educators address this chal- lenge? As in most things, a change of perspective can be helpful. Standards- based curriculum as described above should be replaced with standards- embedded curriculum. Standards- embedded curriculum begins with broad questions and topics, either discipline specific or interdisciplinary. Once teachers have given thoughtful consideration to relevant, engaging, and important content and the con- nections that support meaning-making (Jensen, 1998), they next select stan- dards that are relevant to this content and to summative assessments. This process is supported by the backward planning advocated in Understanding by Design by Wiggins and McTighe (2005) and its predecessors, as well as current thinkers in other fields, such as Covey (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006). It is a critical component of differenti- ating instruction for advanced learners (Tomlinson, 2001) and a significant factor in the Core Parallel in the Parallel Curriculum Model (Tomlinson et al., 2002). Teachers choose from standards in multiple disciplines at both above and below grade level depending on the needs of the students and the classroom or program structure. Preassessment data and the results of prior instruc- tion also inform this process of embed- ding appropriate standards. For gifted students, this formative assessment will result in “more advanced curricula available at younger ages, ensuring that all levels of the standards are traversed in the process” (VanTassel-Baska & Little, 2003, p. 3). Once the essential questions, key content, and relevant standards are selected and sequenced, they are embedded into a coherent unit design and instructional decisions (grouping, pacing, instructional methodology) can be made. For gifted students, this includes the identification of appropri- ate resources, often including advanced texts, mentors, and independent research, as appropriate to the child’s developmental level and interest. Applying Standards- Embedded Curriculum What does this look like in practice? In reading the possible class- room applications below, consider these three Ohio Academic Content Standards for third grade: 1. Math: “Read thermometers in both Fahrenheit and Celsius scales” (“Academic Content Standards: K–12 Mathematics,” n.d., p. 71). 2. Social Studies: “Compare some of the cultural practices and products of various groups of people who have lived in the local community including artistic expression, religion, language, and food. Compare the cultural practices and products of the local community with those of other communities in Ohio, the United States, and countries of the world” (Academic Content Standards: K–12 Social Studies, n.d., p. 122). 3. Life Science: “Observe and explore how fossils provide evidence about animals that lived long ago and the nature of the environment at that time” (Academic Content Standards: K–12 Science, n.d., p. 57). When students are fortunate to have a teacher who is dedicated to helping all of them make good use of their time, the gifted may have a preassessment opportunity where they can demonstrate their familiarity with the content and potential mastery of a standard at their grade level. Students who pass may get to read by them- selves for the brief period while the rest of the class works on the single outcome. Sometimes more experienced teachers will create opportunities for gifted and advanced students Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum to work on a standard in the same domain or strand at the next higher grade level (i.e., accelerate through the standards). For example, a stu- dent might be able to work on a Life Science standard for fourth grade that progresses to other communities such as ecosystems. These above-grade-level standards can provide rich material for differentiation, advanced problem solving, and more in-depth curriculum integration. In another classroom scenario, a teacher may focus on the math stan- dard above, identifying the standard number on his lesson plan. He creates or collects paper thermometers, some showing measurement in Celsius and some in Fahrenheit. He also has some real thermometers. He demonstrates thermometer use with boiling water and with freezing water and reads the different temperatures. Students complete a worksheet that has them read thermometers in Celsius and Fahrenheit. The more advanced students may learn how to convert between the two scales. Students then practice with several questions on the topic that are similar in structure and content to those that have been on past proficiency tests. They are coached in how to answer them so that the stan- dard, instruction, formative assess- ment, and summative assessment are all aligned. Then, each student writes a statement that says, “I can read a thermometer using either Celsius or Fahrenheit scales.” Both of these examples describe a standards-based environment, where the starting point is the standard. Direct instruction to that standard is followed by an observable student behavior that demonstrates specific mastery of that single standard. The standard becomes both the start- ing point and the ending point of the curriculum. Education, rather than opening up a student’s mind, becomes a series of closed links in a chain. Whereas the above lessons may be differentiated to some extent, they have no context; they may relate only to the next standard on the list, such as, “Telling time to the nearest minute and finding elapsed time using a cal- endar or a clock.” How would a “standards-embed- ded” model of curriculum design be different? It would begin with the development of an essential ques- tion such as, “Who or what lived here before me? How were they different from me? How were they the same? How do we know?” These questions might be more relevant to our con- temporary highly mobile students. It would involve place and time. Using this intriguing line of inquiry, students might work on the social studies stan- dard as part of the study of their home- town, their school, or even their house or apartment. Because where people live and what they do is influenced by the weather, students could look into weather patterns of their area and learn how to measure temperature using a Fahrenheit scale so they could see if it is similar now to what it was a century ago. Skipping ahead to consideration of the social studies standard, students could then choose another country, preferably one that uses Celsius, and do the same investigation of fossils, communities, and the like. Students could complete a weather comparison, looking at the temperature in Celsius as people in other parts of the world, such as those in Canada, do. Thus, learning is contextualized and connected, dem- onstrating both depth and complexity. This approach takes a lot more work and time. It is a sophisticated integrated view of curriculum devel- opment and involves in-depth knowl- edge of the content areas, as well as an understanding of the scope and sequence of the standards in each dis- cipline. Teachers who develop vital single-discipline units, as well as inter- disciplinary teaching units, begin with a central topic surrounded by subtopics and connections to other areas. Then they connect important terms, facts, or concepts to the subtopics. Next, the skilled teacher/curriculum devel- oper embeds relevant, multileveled standards and objectives appropriate to a given student or group of stu- dents into the unit. Finally, teachers select the instructional strategies and develop student assessments. These assessments include, but are not lim- ited to, the types of questions asked on standardized and state assessments. Comparing Standards- Based and Standards- Embedded Curriculum Design Following is an articulation of the differences between standards-based and standards-embedded curriculum design. (See Figure 1.) 1. The starting point. Standards- based curriculum begins with the grade-level standard and the underlying assumption that every student needs to master that stan- dard at that moment in time. In standards-embedded curriculum, the multifaceted essential ques- tion and students’ needs are the starting points. 2. Preassessment. In standards- based curriculum and teaching, if a preassessment is provided, it cov- ers a single standard or two. In a standards-embedded curriculum, preassessment includes a broader range of grade-level and advanced standards, as well as students’ knowledge of surrounding content such as background experiences with the subject, relevant skills (such as reading and writing), and continued on page ?? even learning style or interests. gifted child today 47 Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum Standards Based Standards Embedded Starting Points The grade-level standard. Whole class’ general skill level Essential questions and content relevant to individual students and groups. Preassessment Targeted to a single grade-level standard. Short-cycle assessments. Background knowledge. Multiple grade-level standards from multiple areas connected by the theme of the unit. Includes annual learning style and interest inventories. Acceleration/ Enrichment To next grade-level standard in the same strand. To above-grade-level standards, as well as into broader thematically connected content. Language Arts Divided into individual skills. Reading and writing skills often separated from real-world relevant contexts. The language arts are embedded in all units and themes and connected to differentiated processes and products across all content areas. Instruction Lesson planning begins with the standard as the objective. Sequential direct instruction progresses through the standards in each content area separately. Strategies are selected to introduce, practice, and demonstrate mastery of all grade-level standards in all content areas in one school year. Lesson planning begins with essential questions, topics, and significant themes. Integrated instruction is designed around connections among content areas and embeds all relevant standards. Assessment Format modeled after the state test. Variety of assessments including questions similar to the state test format. Teacher Role Monitor of standards mastery. Time manager. Facilitator of instructional design and student engagement with learning, as well as assessor of achievement. Student Self- Esteem “I can . . .” statements. Star Charts. Passing “the test.” Completed projects/products. Making personal connections to learning and the theme/topic. Figure 1. Standards based v. standards-embedded instruction and gifted students. and the potential political outcry of “stepping on the toes” of the next grade’s teacher. Few classroom teachers have been provided with the in-depth professional develop- ment and understanding of curric- ulum compacting that would allow them to implement this effectively. In standards-embedded curricu- lum, enrichment and extensions of learning are more possible and more interesting because ideas, top- ics, and questions lend themselves more easily to depth and complex- ity than isolated skills. 4. Language arts. In standards- based classrooms, the language arts have been redivided into sepa- rate skills, with reading separated from writing, and writing sepa- rated from grammar. To many concrete thinkers, whole-language approaches seem antithetical to teaching “to the standards.” In a standards-embedded classroom, integrated language arts skills (reading, writing, listening, speak- ing, presenting, and even pho- nics) are embedded into the study of every unit. Especially for the gifted, the communication and language arts are essential, regard- less of domain-specific talents (Ward, 1980) and should be com- ponents of all curriculum because they are the underpinnings of scholarship in all areas. 5. Instruction. A standards-based classroom lends itself to direct instruction and sequential pro- gression from one standard to the next. A standards-embedded class- room requires a variety of more open-ended instructional strate- gies and materials that extend and diversify learning rather than focus it narrowly. Creativity and differ- entiation in instruction and stu- dent performance are supported more effectively in a standards- embedded approach. 6. Assessment. A standards-based classroom uses targeted assess- ments focused on the structure and content of questions on the externally imposed standardized test (i.e., proficiency tests). A stan- dards-embedded classroom lends itself to greater use of authentic assessment and differentiated 3. Acceleration/Enrichment. In a standards-based curriculum, the narrow definition of the learning outcome (a test item) often makes acceleration or curriculum compact- ing the only path for differentiating instruction for gifted, talented, and/ or advanced learners. This rarely happens, however, because of lack of materials, knowledge, o

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Chapter 07 Homework Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 23, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy BioFlix Quiz: The Carbon Cycle Watch the animation at left before answering the questions below. Part A An organism gets carbon by using carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to make sugar molecules. This organism is a Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for The Carbon Cycle. ANSWER: Correct During photosynthesis, producers use carbon dioxide to make sugar molecules. Part B Which organisms play a role in returning carbon to the atmosphere? Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for The Carbon Cycle. ANSWER: higher-level consumer. producer. primary consumer. decomposer. None of the above Consumers and decomposers, but not producers. Producers only. Decomposers only. Consumers only. Producers, consumers, and decomposers. Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 1 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM Correct Producers, consumers, and decomposers all return carbon dioxide to the atmosphere during cellular respiration. Part C Every carbon atom in the organic molecules that make up your body MUST recently have been part of Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for The Carbon Cycle. ANSWER: Correct You are a consumer, and all your carbon comes ultimately from plants and other producers. Part D Imagine following a single carbon atom through the carbon cycle. Which of the following is a possible path for the carbon atom to take? Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for The Carbon Cycle. ANSWER: Correct Carbon moves from the atmosphere into a producer (such as a plant), up the food chain, and then back to the atmosphere during cellular respiration. Part E Which process or processes return carbon to the atmosphere? Hint 1. Review the animation. ANSWER: Correct Cellular respiration results in the release of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. a higher-level consumer. a primary consumer. a decomposer. a producer. a sugar molecule made in one of your chloroplasts. The atmosphere; a plant; a higher-level consumer; then back to the atmosphere. The atmosphere; a plant; an herbivore; another plant; then back to the atmosphere. The atmosphere, a plant, a herbivore, a decomposer, then back to the atmosphere The atmosphere; a decomposer; a higher-level consumer; then back to the atmosphere. The atmosphere; a decomposer; then back to the atmosphere. Cellular respiration only Photosynthesis only Cellular respiration and photosynthesis Breakdown of large organic molecules into smaller organic molecules Cellular respiration and the breakdown of large organic molecules into smaller organic molecules Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 2 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM Activity: The Nitrogen Cycle Click here to complete this activity. Then answer the questions. Part A Nitrifying bacteria convert _____ to _____. ANSWER: Correct Nitrifying bacteria convert ammonium to nitrites. Part B _____ removes nitrogen from the atmosphere. ANSWER: Correct Nitrogen fixation is the conversion of nitrogen gas to a form that can be used by plants (and other organisms). Part C Assimilation is indicated by the letter(s) _____. nitrogen gas … ammonium nitrogen gas … nitrates ammonium … nitrites nitrates … nitrogen gas ammonium … nitrogen gas Denitrification Nitrification Mineralization Nitrogen fixation Assimilation Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 3 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM ANSWER: Correct Assimilation is the uptake of nutrients into an organism. Part D Nitrogen-fixing bacteria is(are) indicated by the letter(s) _____. ANSWER: Correct Both of these pointers are indicating nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Nitrogen fixation is the conversion of nitrogen to a form that plants can use. Part E Nitrification is indicated by the letter(s) _____. ANSWER: C B A D and E C and D B and C A and B D and E C and D A Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 4 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM Correct Nitrification is the conversion of organic nitrogen-containing compounds to nitrites and nitrates. Part F Denitrifying bacteria convert _____ to _____. ANSWER: Correct Denitrifying bacteria convert nitrates to nitrogen gas. Part G Which one of these is a nitrate? ANSWER: Correct NO3 – is a nitrate. Part H Which one of these is a nitrite? ANSWER: Correct This is a nitrite. GeoScience: Earth’s Water and the Hydrologic Cycle A B B and C D and E B and E nitrogen gas … nitrites nitrogen gas … ammonium nitrates … nitrogen gas ammonium … nitrogen gas nitrogen gas … nitrates NO2 – NH4 – NH2 SH NO3 – PO4 – NH2 NH4 – NO2 – NO3 – Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 5 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM When you have finished, answer the questions. Part A The largest percentage of fresh water today is located in: ANSWER: Correct Ice sheets and glaciers are the greatest single repository of fresh water: they contain 77.3% of all Earth’s fresh water and 99.357% of all Earth’s surface fresh water. Part B Earth’s oceans hold: ANSWER: Correct The oceans contain 97.22% of all water, comprising about 1.321 billion cubic kilometers of salt water. This leaves only 2.78% of all of Earth’s water as fresh water (non-oceanic). Part C Which of the following is true of the hydrologic cycle? ANSWER: Correct About 20% of the moisture evaporated from the ocean combines with 2% of land-derived moisture to produce 22% of all precipitation that falls over land. Clearly, the bulk of continental precipitation comes from the oceanic portion of the cycle. Concept Review: Eutrophication Can you sequence the steps in the eutrophication process that occurs in a body of water? Part A Drag each statement to the appropriate location in the flowchart of the eutrophication process. ANSWER: soil. ice sheets and glaciers. the rivers and lakes of the world. groundwater resources. about the same amount of water as all groundwater sources combined. most of the fresh water on Earth. the bulk of all of the water found on Earth. about the same amount of water as all Earth’s rivers and lakes combined. Atmospheric water and surface water do not mix. Most evaporation on Earth occurs over the continents. The bulk of the precipitation occurs over land. Most of the water that falls on the continents is derived from the oceans. Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 6 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM Concept Review: Biogeochemical Cycles Can you sort the items by which biogeochemical cycle they apply to? Part A Drag each description to the appropriate bin. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 62.3%. You received 12.45 out of a possible total of 20 points. Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 7 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM

Chapter 07 Homework Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 23, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy BioFlix Quiz: The Carbon Cycle Watch the animation at left before answering the questions below. Part A An organism gets carbon by using carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to make sugar molecules. This organism is a Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for The Carbon Cycle. ANSWER: Correct During photosynthesis, producers use carbon dioxide to make sugar molecules. Part B Which organisms play a role in returning carbon to the atmosphere? Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for The Carbon Cycle. ANSWER: higher-level consumer. producer. primary consumer. decomposer. None of the above Consumers and decomposers, but not producers. Producers only. Decomposers only. Consumers only. Producers, consumers, and decomposers. Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 1 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM Correct Producers, consumers, and decomposers all return carbon dioxide to the atmosphere during cellular respiration. Part C Every carbon atom in the organic molecules that make up your body MUST recently have been part of Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for The Carbon Cycle. ANSWER: Correct You are a consumer, and all your carbon comes ultimately from plants and other producers. Part D Imagine following a single carbon atom through the carbon cycle. Which of the following is a possible path for the carbon atom to take? Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for The Carbon Cycle. ANSWER: Correct Carbon moves from the atmosphere into a producer (such as a plant), up the food chain, and then back to the atmosphere during cellular respiration. Part E Which process or processes return carbon to the atmosphere? Hint 1. Review the animation. ANSWER: Correct Cellular respiration results in the release of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. a higher-level consumer. a primary consumer. a decomposer. a producer. a sugar molecule made in one of your chloroplasts. The atmosphere; a plant; a higher-level consumer; then back to the atmosphere. The atmosphere; a plant; an herbivore; another plant; then back to the atmosphere. The atmosphere, a plant, a herbivore, a decomposer, then back to the atmosphere The atmosphere; a decomposer; a higher-level consumer; then back to the atmosphere. The atmosphere; a decomposer; then back to the atmosphere. Cellular respiration only Photosynthesis only Cellular respiration and photosynthesis Breakdown of large organic molecules into smaller organic molecules Cellular respiration and the breakdown of large organic molecules into smaller organic molecules Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 2 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM Activity: The Nitrogen Cycle Click here to complete this activity. Then answer the questions. Part A Nitrifying bacteria convert _____ to _____. ANSWER: Correct Nitrifying bacteria convert ammonium to nitrites. Part B _____ removes nitrogen from the atmosphere. ANSWER: Correct Nitrogen fixation is the conversion of nitrogen gas to a form that can be used by plants (and other organisms). Part C Assimilation is indicated by the letter(s) _____. nitrogen gas … ammonium nitrogen gas … nitrates ammonium … nitrites nitrates … nitrogen gas ammonium … nitrogen gas Denitrification Nitrification Mineralization Nitrogen fixation Assimilation Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 3 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM ANSWER: Correct Assimilation is the uptake of nutrients into an organism. Part D Nitrogen-fixing bacteria is(are) indicated by the letter(s) _____. ANSWER: Correct Both of these pointers are indicating nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Nitrogen fixation is the conversion of nitrogen to a form that plants can use. Part E Nitrification is indicated by the letter(s) _____. ANSWER: C B A D and E C and D B and C A and B D and E C and D A Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 4 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM Correct Nitrification is the conversion of organic nitrogen-containing compounds to nitrites and nitrates. Part F Denitrifying bacteria convert _____ to _____. ANSWER: Correct Denitrifying bacteria convert nitrates to nitrogen gas. Part G Which one of these is a nitrate? ANSWER: Correct NO3 – is a nitrate. Part H Which one of these is a nitrite? ANSWER: Correct This is a nitrite. GeoScience: Earth’s Water and the Hydrologic Cycle A B B and C D and E B and E nitrogen gas … nitrites nitrogen gas … ammonium nitrates … nitrogen gas ammonium … nitrogen gas nitrogen gas … nitrates NO2 – NH4 – NH2 SH NO3 – PO4 – NH2 NH4 – NO2 – NO3 – Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 5 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM When you have finished, answer the questions. Part A The largest percentage of fresh water today is located in: ANSWER: Correct Ice sheets and glaciers are the greatest single repository of fresh water: they contain 77.3% of all Earth’s fresh water and 99.357% of all Earth’s surface fresh water. Part B Earth’s oceans hold: ANSWER: Correct The oceans contain 97.22% of all water, comprising about 1.321 billion cubic kilometers of salt water. This leaves only 2.78% of all of Earth’s water as fresh water (non-oceanic). Part C Which of the following is true of the hydrologic cycle? ANSWER: Correct About 20% of the moisture evaporated from the ocean combines with 2% of land-derived moisture to produce 22% of all precipitation that falls over land. Clearly, the bulk of continental precipitation comes from the oceanic portion of the cycle. Concept Review: Eutrophication Can you sequence the steps in the eutrophication process that occurs in a body of water? Part A Drag each statement to the appropriate location in the flowchart of the eutrophication process. ANSWER: soil. ice sheets and glaciers. the rivers and lakes of the world. groundwater resources. about the same amount of water as all groundwater sources combined. most of the fresh water on Earth. the bulk of all of the water found on Earth. about the same amount of water as all Earth’s rivers and lakes combined. Atmospheric water and surface water do not mix. Most evaporation on Earth occurs over the continents. The bulk of the precipitation occurs over land. Most of the water that falls on the continents is derived from the oceans. Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 6 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM Concept Review: Biogeochemical Cycles Can you sort the items by which biogeochemical cycle they apply to? Part A Drag each description to the appropriate bin. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 62.3%. You received 12.45 out of a possible total of 20 points. Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 7 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM

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Source Selection Assignment Instructions You will need to select a topic on technology that you want to research and this topic will be the one that you use for your Technology Issue paper and presentation later in the semester. Take some extra care in choosing your topic so that it will hold your interest through the semester. Topic and Source Selection Assignment Activity: This assignment will require you to select a topic you wish to investigate. Once selected you will use the Internet to find four sources on the topic. Within your sources there must be varying viewpoints on the topic (i.e. viewpoint 1 – global warming is fact. viewpoint 2 – global warming is fiction. viewpoint 3 – humans have contributed to climate change). You will evaluate your four sources using the CRAAP tool. Purpose: This assignment will demonstrate how to apply a methodological approach to rating and determining the validity of an information source. Assignment: Select a topic from the list of potential topics or propose your own idea to your instructor. Use the Internet to locate 4 sources, more are recommended but you only need to submit 4 after applying the CRAAP tool. You must follow the restrictions listed in the activity area above. You are to complete the CRAAP matrix worksheet for your 4 sources and write a one paragraph evaluation/ opinion on the validity/ reliability of the information source. Deliverable: You will submit one CRAAP matrix worksheet for each of your four information sources. In total you will submit four worksheets for grading. Grading: This assignment is worth 100 points. Each source will be worth 25 points and will be evaluated according to the attached grading rubri

Source Selection Assignment Instructions You will need to select a topic on technology that you want to research and this topic will be the one that you use for your Technology Issue paper and presentation later in the semester. Take some extra care in choosing your topic so that it will hold your interest through the semester. Topic and Source Selection Assignment Activity: This assignment will require you to select a topic you wish to investigate. Once selected you will use the Internet to find four sources on the topic. Within your sources there must be varying viewpoints on the topic (i.e. viewpoint 1 – global warming is fact. viewpoint 2 – global warming is fiction. viewpoint 3 – humans have contributed to climate change). You will evaluate your four sources using the CRAAP tool. Purpose: This assignment will demonstrate how to apply a methodological approach to rating and determining the validity of an information source. Assignment: Select a topic from the list of potential topics or propose your own idea to your instructor. Use the Internet to locate 4 sources, more are recommended but you only need to submit 4 after applying the CRAAP tool. You must follow the restrictions listed in the activity area above. You are to complete the CRAAP matrix worksheet for your 4 sources and write a one paragraph evaluation/ opinion on the validity/ reliability of the information source. Deliverable: You will submit one CRAAP matrix worksheet for each of your four information sources. In total you will submit four worksheets for grading. Grading: This assignment is worth 100 points. Each source will be worth 25 points and will be evaluated according to the attached grading rubri

Assignment 2 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 2.6 Part A The figure shows the position-versus-time graph for a moving object. At which lettered point or points: Is the object moving the slowest? Is the object moving the fastest? Is the object at rest? Drag the appropriate items to their respective bins. ANSWER:

Assignment 2 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 2.6 Part A The figure shows the position-versus-time graph for a moving object. At which lettered point or points: Is the object moving the slowest? Is the object moving the fastest? Is the object at rest? Drag the appropriate items to their respective bins. ANSWER:

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Chapter 1 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, February 5, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Curved Motion Diagram The motion diagram shown in the figure represents a pendulum released from rest at an angle of 45 from the vertical. The dots in the motion diagram represent the positions of the pendulum bob at eleven moments separated by equal time intervals. The green arrows represent the average velocity between adjacent dots. Also given is a “compass rose” in which directions are labeled with the letters of the alphabet.  Part A What is the direction of the acceleration of the object at moment 5? Enter the letter of the arrow with this direction from the compass rose in the figure. Type Z if the acceleration vector has zero length. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Part B What is the direction of the acceleration of the object at moments 0 and 10? Enter the letters corresponding to the arrows with these directions from the compass rose in the figure, separated by commas. Type Z if the acceleration vector has zero length. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again PSS 1.1 Motion Diagrams Learning Goal: To practice Problem-Solving Strategy 1.1 for motion diagram problems. A car is traveling with constant velocity along a highway. The driver notices he is late for work, so he stomps down on the gas pedal and the car begins to speed up. The car has just achieved double its directions at time step 0, time step 10 = initial velocity when the driver spots a police officer behind him and applies the brakes. The car then slows down, coming to rest at a stoplight ahead. Draw a complete motion diagram for this situation. PROBLEM-SOLVING STRATEGY 1.1 Motion diagrams MODEL: Represent the moving object as a particle. Make simplifying assumptions when interpreting the problem statement. VISUALIZE: A complete motion diagram consists of: The position of the object in each frame of the film, shown as a dot. Use five or six dots to make the motion clear but without overcrowding the picture. More complex motions may need more dots. The average velocity vectors, found by connecting each dot in the motion diagram to the next with a vector arrow. There is one velocity vector linking each set of two position dots. Label the row of velocity vectors . The average acceleration vectors, found using Tactics Box 1.3. There is one acceleration vector linking each set of two velocity vectors. Each acceleration vector is drawn at the dot between the two velocity vectors it links. Use to indicate a point at which the acceleration is zero. Label the row of acceleration vectors . Model It is appropriate to use the particle model for the car. You should also make some simplifying assumptions. v 0 a Part A The car’s motion can be divided into three different stages: its motion before the driver realizes he’s late, its motion after the driver hits the gas (but before he sees the police car), and its motion after the driver sees the police car. Which of the following simplifying assumptions is it reasonable to make in this problem? During each of the three different stages of its motion, the car is moving with constant A. acceleration. B. During each of the three different stages of its motion, the car is moving with constant velocity. C. The highway is straight (i.e., there are no curves). D. The highway is level (i.e., there are no hills or valleys). Enter all the correct answers in alphabetical order without commas. For example, if statements C and D are correct, enter CD. ANSWER: Correct In addition to the assumptions listed above, in the rest of this problem assume that the car is moving in a straight line to the right. Visualize Part B In the three diagrams shown to the left, the position of the car at five subsequent instants of time is represented by black dots, and the car’s average velocity is represented by green arrows. Which of these diagrams best describes the position and the velocity of the car before the driver notices he is late? ANSWER: Correct Part C Which of the diagrams shown to the left best describes the position and the velocity of the car after the driver hits the gas, but before he notices the police officer? ANSWER: Correct A B C A B C Part D Which of the diagrams shown to the left best describes the position and the velocity of the car after the driver notices the police officer? ANSWER: Correct Part E Which of the diagrams shown below most accurately depicts the average acceleration vectors of the car during the events described in the problem introduction? ANSWER: A B C Correct You can now draw a complete motion diagram for the situation described in this problem. Your diagram should look like this: Measurements in SI Units Familiarity with SI units will aid your study of physics and all other sciences. Part A What is the approximate height of the average adult in centimeters? Hint 1. Converting between feet and centimeters The distance from your elbow to your fingertips is typically about 50 . A B C cm ANSWER: Correct If you’re not familiar with metric units of length, you can use your body to develop intuition for them. The average height of an adult is 5 6.4 . The distance from elbow to fingertips on the average adult is about 50 . Ten (1 ) is about the width of this adult’s little finger and 10 is about the width of the average hand. Part B Approximately what is the mass of the average adult in kilograms? Hint 1. Converting between pounds and kilograms Something that weighs 1 has a mass of about . ANSWER: Correct Something that weighs 1 has a mass of about . This is a useful conversion to keep in mind! ± A Trip to Europe 100 200 300 cm cm cm feet inches cm mm cm cm pound 1 kg 2 80 500 1200 kg kg kg pound (1/2) kg Learning Goal: To understand how to use dimensional analysis to solve problems. Dimensional analysis is a useful tool for solving problems that involve unit conversions. Since unit conversion is not limited to physics problems but is part of our everyday life, correct use of conversion factors is essential to working through problems of practical importance. For example, dimensional analysis could be used in problems involving currency exchange. Say you want to calculate how many euros you get if you exchange 3600 ( ), given the exchange rate , that is, 1 to 1.20 . Begin by writing down the starting value, 3600 . This can also be written as a fraction: . Next, convert dollars to euros. This conversion involves multiplying by a simple conversion factor derived from the exchange rate: . Note that the “dollar” unit, , should appear on the bottom of this conversion factor, since appears on the top of the starting value. Finally, since dollars are divided by dollars, the units can be canceled and the final result is . Currency exchange is only one example of many practical situations where dimensional analysis may help you to work through problems. Remember that dimensional analysis involves multiplying a given value by a conversion factor, resulting in a value in the new units. The conversion factor can be the ratio of any two quantities, as long as the ratio is equal to one. You and your friends are organizing a trip to Europe. Your plan is to rent a car and drive through the major European capitals. By consulting a map you estimate that you will cover a total distance of 5000 . Consider the euro-dollar exchange rate given in the introduction and use dimensional analysis to work through these simple problems. Part A You select a rental package that includes a car with an average consumption of 6.00 of fuel per 100 . Considering that in Europe the average fuel cost is 1.063 , how much (in US dollars) will you spend in fuel on your trip? Express your answer numerically in US dollars to three significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: US dollars USD 1 EUR = 1.20 USD euro US dollars USD 3600 USD 1 1.00 EUR 1.20 USD USD USD ( )( ) = 3000 EUR 3600 USD 1 1.00 EUR 1.20 USD km liters km euros/liter Part B How many gallons of fuel would the rental car consume per mile? Express your answer numerically in gallons per mile to three significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. Cost of fuel = USD gallons/mile

Chapter 1 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, February 5, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Curved Motion Diagram The motion diagram shown in the figure represents a pendulum released from rest at an angle of 45 from the vertical. The dots in the motion diagram represent the positions of the pendulum bob at eleven moments separated by equal time intervals. The green arrows represent the average velocity between adjacent dots. Also given is a “compass rose” in which directions are labeled with the letters of the alphabet.  Part A What is the direction of the acceleration of the object at moment 5? Enter the letter of the arrow with this direction from the compass rose in the figure. Type Z if the acceleration vector has zero length. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Part B What is the direction of the acceleration of the object at moments 0 and 10? Enter the letters corresponding to the arrows with these directions from the compass rose in the figure, separated by commas. Type Z if the acceleration vector has zero length. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again PSS 1.1 Motion Diagrams Learning Goal: To practice Problem-Solving Strategy 1.1 for motion diagram problems. A car is traveling with constant velocity along a highway. The driver notices he is late for work, so he stomps down on the gas pedal and the car begins to speed up. The car has just achieved double its directions at time step 0, time step 10 = initial velocity when the driver spots a police officer behind him and applies the brakes. The car then slows down, coming to rest at a stoplight ahead. Draw a complete motion diagram for this situation. PROBLEM-SOLVING STRATEGY 1.1 Motion diagrams MODEL: Represent the moving object as a particle. Make simplifying assumptions when interpreting the problem statement. VISUALIZE: A complete motion diagram consists of: The position of the object in each frame of the film, shown as a dot. Use five or six dots to make the motion clear but without overcrowding the picture. More complex motions may need more dots. The average velocity vectors, found by connecting each dot in the motion diagram to the next with a vector arrow. There is one velocity vector linking each set of two position dots. Label the row of velocity vectors . The average acceleration vectors, found using Tactics Box 1.3. There is one acceleration vector linking each set of two velocity vectors. Each acceleration vector is drawn at the dot between the two velocity vectors it links. Use to indicate a point at which the acceleration is zero. Label the row of acceleration vectors . Model It is appropriate to use the particle model for the car. You should also make some simplifying assumptions. v 0 a Part A The car’s motion can be divided into three different stages: its motion before the driver realizes he’s late, its motion after the driver hits the gas (but before he sees the police car), and its motion after the driver sees the police car. Which of the following simplifying assumptions is it reasonable to make in this problem? During each of the three different stages of its motion, the car is moving with constant A. acceleration. B. During each of the three different stages of its motion, the car is moving with constant velocity. C. The highway is straight (i.e., there are no curves). D. The highway is level (i.e., there are no hills or valleys). Enter all the correct answers in alphabetical order without commas. For example, if statements C and D are correct, enter CD. ANSWER: Correct In addition to the assumptions listed above, in the rest of this problem assume that the car is moving in a straight line to the right. Visualize Part B In the three diagrams shown to the left, the position of the car at five subsequent instants of time is represented by black dots, and the car’s average velocity is represented by green arrows. Which of these diagrams best describes the position and the velocity of the car before the driver notices he is late? ANSWER: Correct Part C Which of the diagrams shown to the left best describes the position and the velocity of the car after the driver hits the gas, but before he notices the police officer? ANSWER: Correct A B C A B C Part D Which of the diagrams shown to the left best describes the position and the velocity of the car after the driver notices the police officer? ANSWER: Correct Part E Which of the diagrams shown below most accurately depicts the average acceleration vectors of the car during the events described in the problem introduction? ANSWER: A B C Correct You can now draw a complete motion diagram for the situation described in this problem. Your diagram should look like this: Measurements in SI Units Familiarity with SI units will aid your study of physics and all other sciences. Part A What is the approximate height of the average adult in centimeters? Hint 1. Converting between feet and centimeters The distance from your elbow to your fingertips is typically about 50 . A B C cm ANSWER: Correct If you’re not familiar with metric units of length, you can use your body to develop intuition for them. The average height of an adult is 5 6.4 . The distance from elbow to fingertips on the average adult is about 50 . Ten (1 ) is about the width of this adult’s little finger and 10 is about the width of the average hand. Part B Approximately what is the mass of the average adult in kilograms? Hint 1. Converting between pounds and kilograms Something that weighs 1 has a mass of about . ANSWER: Correct Something that weighs 1 has a mass of about . This is a useful conversion to keep in mind! ± A Trip to Europe 100 200 300 cm cm cm feet inches cm mm cm cm pound 1 kg 2 80 500 1200 kg kg kg pound (1/2) kg Learning Goal: To understand how to use dimensional analysis to solve problems. Dimensional analysis is a useful tool for solving problems that involve unit conversions. Since unit conversion is not limited to physics problems but is part of our everyday life, correct use of conversion factors is essential to working through problems of practical importance. For example, dimensional analysis could be used in problems involving currency exchange. Say you want to calculate how many euros you get if you exchange 3600 ( ), given the exchange rate , that is, 1 to 1.20 . Begin by writing down the starting value, 3600 . This can also be written as a fraction: . Next, convert dollars to euros. This conversion involves multiplying by a simple conversion factor derived from the exchange rate: . Note that the “dollar” unit, , should appear on the bottom of this conversion factor, since appears on the top of the starting value. Finally, since dollars are divided by dollars, the units can be canceled and the final result is . Currency exchange is only one example of many practical situations where dimensional analysis may help you to work through problems. Remember that dimensional analysis involves multiplying a given value by a conversion factor, resulting in a value in the new units. The conversion factor can be the ratio of any two quantities, as long as the ratio is equal to one. You and your friends are organizing a trip to Europe. Your plan is to rent a car and drive through the major European capitals. By consulting a map you estimate that you will cover a total distance of 5000 . Consider the euro-dollar exchange rate given in the introduction and use dimensional analysis to work through these simple problems. Part A You select a rental package that includes a car with an average consumption of 6.00 of fuel per 100 . Considering that in Europe the average fuel cost is 1.063 , how much (in US dollars) will you spend in fuel on your trip? Express your answer numerically in US dollars to three significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: US dollars USD 1 EUR = 1.20 USD euro US dollars USD 3600 USD 1 1.00 EUR 1.20 USD USD USD ( )( ) = 3000 EUR 3600 USD 1 1.00 EUR 1.20 USD km liters km euros/liter Part B How many gallons of fuel would the rental car consume per mile? Express your answer numerically in gallons per mile to three significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. Cost of fuel = USD gallons/mile

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Chapter 5 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, March 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Tactics Box 5.1 Drawing Force Vectors Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 5.1 Drawing Force Vectors. To visualize how forces are exerted on objects, we can use simple diagrams such as vectors. This Tactics Box illustrates the process of drawing a force vector by using the particle model, in which objects are treated as points. TACTICS BOX 5.1 Drawing force vectors Represent the object 1. as a particle. 2. Place the tail of the force vector on the particle. 3. Draw the force vector as an arrow pointing in the proper direction and with a length proportional to the size of the force. 4. Give the vector an appropriate label. The resulting diagram for a force exerted on an object is shown in the drawing. Note that the object is represented as a black dot. Part A A book lies on a table. A pushing force parallel to the table top and directed to the right is exerted on the book. Follow the steps above to draw the force vector . Use the black dot as the particle representing the book. F  F push F push

Chapter 5 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, March 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Tactics Box 5.1 Drawing Force Vectors Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 5.1 Drawing Force Vectors. To visualize how forces are exerted on objects, we can use simple diagrams such as vectors. This Tactics Box illustrates the process of drawing a force vector by using the particle model, in which objects are treated as points. TACTICS BOX 5.1 Drawing force vectors Represent the object 1. as a particle. 2. Place the tail of the force vector on the particle. 3. Draw the force vector as an arrow pointing in the proper direction and with a length proportional to the size of the force. 4. Give the vector an appropriate label. The resulting diagram for a force exerted on an object is shown in the drawing. Note that the object is represented as a black dot. Part A A book lies on a table. A pushing force parallel to the table top and directed to the right is exerted on the book. Follow the steps above to draw the force vector . Use the black dot as the particle representing the book. F  F push F push

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Chapter 07 Homework Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 23, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy BioFlix Quiz: The Carbon Cycle Watch the animation at left before answering the questions below. Part A An organism gets carbon by using carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to make sugar molecules. This organism is a Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for The Carbon Cycle. ANSWER: Correct During photosynthesis, producers use carbon dioxide to make sugar molecules. Part B Which organisms play a role in returning carbon to the atmosphere? Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for The Carbon Cycle. ANSWER: higher-level consumer. producer. primary consumer. decomposer. None of the above Consumers and decomposers, but not producers. Producers only. Decomposers only. Consumers only. Producers, consumers, and decomposers. Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 1 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM Correct Producers, consumers, and decomposers all return carbon dioxide to the atmosphere during cellular respiration. Part C Every carbon atom in the organic molecules that make up your body MUST recently have been part of Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for The Carbon Cycle. ANSWER: Correct You are a consumer, and all your carbon comes ultimately from plants and other producers. Part D Imagine following a single carbon atom through the carbon cycle. Which of the following is a possible path for the carbon atom to take? Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for The Carbon Cycle. ANSWER: Correct Carbon moves from the atmosphere into a producer (such as a plant), up the food chain, and then back to the atmosphere during cellular respiration. Part E Which process or processes return carbon to the atmosphere? Hint 1. Review the animation. ANSWER: Correct Cellular respiration results in the release of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. a higher-level consumer. a primary consumer. a decomposer. a producer. a sugar molecule made in one of your chloroplasts. The atmosphere; a plant; a higher-level consumer; then back to the atmosphere. The atmosphere; a plant; an herbivore; another plant; then back to the atmosphere. The atmosphere, a plant, a herbivore, a decomposer, then back to the atmosphere The atmosphere; a decomposer; a higher-level consumer; then back to the atmosphere. The atmosphere; a decomposer; then back to the atmosphere. Cellular respiration only Photosynthesis only Cellular respiration and photosynthesis Breakdown of large organic molecules into smaller organic molecules Cellular respiration and the breakdown of large organic molecules into smaller organic molecules Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 2 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM Activity: The Nitrogen Cycle Click here to complete this activity. Then answer the questions. Part A Nitrifying bacteria convert _____ to _____. ANSWER: Correct Nitrifying bacteria convert ammonium to nitrites. Part B _____ removes nitrogen from the atmosphere. ANSWER: Correct Nitrogen fixation is the conversion of nitrogen gas to a form that can be used by plants (and other organisms). Part C Assimilation is indicated by the letter(s) _____. nitrogen gas … ammonium nitrogen gas … nitrates ammonium … nitrites nitrates … nitrogen gas ammonium … nitrogen gas Denitrification Nitrification Mineralization Nitrogen fixation Assimilation Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 3 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM ANSWER: Correct Assimilation is the uptake of nutrients into an organism. Part D Nitrogen-fixing bacteria is(are) indicated by the letter(s) _____. ANSWER: Correct Both of these pointers are indicating nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Nitrogen fixation is the conversion of nitrogen to a form that plants can use. Part E Nitrification is indicated by the letter(s) _____. ANSWER: C B A D and E C and D B and C A and B D and E C and D A Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 4 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM Correct Nitrification is the conversion of organic nitrogen-containing compounds to nitrites and nitrates. Part F Denitrifying bacteria convert _____ to _____. ANSWER: Correct Denitrifying bacteria convert nitrates to nitrogen gas. Part G Which one of these is a nitrate? ANSWER: Correct NO3 – is a nitrate. Part H Which one of these is a nitrite? ANSWER: Correct This is a nitrite. GeoScience: Earth’s Water and the Hydrologic Cycle A B B and C D and E B and E nitrogen gas … nitrites nitrogen gas … ammonium nitrates … nitrogen gas ammonium … nitrogen gas nitrogen gas … nitrates NO2 – NH4 – NH2 SH NO3 – PO4 – NH2 NH4 – NO2 – NO3 – Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 5 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM When you have finished, answer the questions. Part A The largest percentage of fresh water today is located in: ANSWER: Correct Ice sheets and glaciers are the greatest single repository of fresh water: they contain 77.3% of all Earth’s fresh water and 99.357% of all Earth’s surface fresh water. Part B Earth’s oceans hold: ANSWER: Correct The oceans contain 97.22% of all water, comprising about 1.321 billion cubic kilometers of salt water. This leaves only 2.78% of all of Earth’s water as fresh water (non-oceanic). Part C Which of the following is true of the hydrologic cycle? ANSWER: Correct About 20% of the moisture evaporated from the ocean combines with 2% of land-derived moisture to produce 22% of all precipitation that falls over land. Clearly, the bulk of continental precipitation comes from the oceanic portion of the cycle. Concept Review: Eutrophication Can you sequence the steps in the eutrophication process that occurs in a body of water? Part A Drag each statement to the appropriate location in the flowchart of the eutrophication process. ANSWER: soil. ice sheets and glaciers. the rivers and lakes of the world. groundwater resources. about the same amount of water as all groundwater sources combined. most of the fresh water on Earth. the bulk of all of the water found on Earth. about the same amount of water as all Earth’s rivers and lakes combined. Atmospheric water and surface water do not mix. Most evaporation on Earth occurs over the continents. The bulk of the precipitation occurs over land. Most of the water that falls on the continents is derived from the oceans. Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 6 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM Concept Review: Biogeochemical Cycles Can you sort the items by which biogeochemical cycle they apply to? Part A Drag each description to the appropriate bin. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 62.3%. You received 12.45 out of a possible total of 20 points. Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 7 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM

Chapter 07 Homework Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 23, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy BioFlix Quiz: The Carbon Cycle Watch the animation at left before answering the questions below. Part A An organism gets carbon by using carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to make sugar molecules. This organism is a Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for The Carbon Cycle. ANSWER: Correct During photosynthesis, producers use carbon dioxide to make sugar molecules. Part B Which organisms play a role in returning carbon to the atmosphere? Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for The Carbon Cycle. ANSWER: higher-level consumer. producer. primary consumer. decomposer. None of the above Consumers and decomposers, but not producers. Producers only. Decomposers only. Consumers only. Producers, consumers, and decomposers. Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 1 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM Correct Producers, consumers, and decomposers all return carbon dioxide to the atmosphere during cellular respiration. Part C Every carbon atom in the organic molecules that make up your body MUST recently have been part of Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for The Carbon Cycle. ANSWER: Correct You are a consumer, and all your carbon comes ultimately from plants and other producers. Part D Imagine following a single carbon atom through the carbon cycle. Which of the following is a possible path for the carbon atom to take? Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for The Carbon Cycle. ANSWER: Correct Carbon moves from the atmosphere into a producer (such as a plant), up the food chain, and then back to the atmosphere during cellular respiration. Part E Which process or processes return carbon to the atmosphere? Hint 1. Review the animation. ANSWER: Correct Cellular respiration results in the release of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. a higher-level consumer. a primary consumer. a decomposer. a producer. a sugar molecule made in one of your chloroplasts. The atmosphere; a plant; a higher-level consumer; then back to the atmosphere. The atmosphere; a plant; an herbivore; another plant; then back to the atmosphere. The atmosphere, a plant, a herbivore, a decomposer, then back to the atmosphere The atmosphere; a decomposer; a higher-level consumer; then back to the atmosphere. The atmosphere; a decomposer; then back to the atmosphere. Cellular respiration only Photosynthesis only Cellular respiration and photosynthesis Breakdown of large organic molecules into smaller organic molecules Cellular respiration and the breakdown of large organic molecules into smaller organic molecules Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 2 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM Activity: The Nitrogen Cycle Click here to complete this activity. Then answer the questions. Part A Nitrifying bacteria convert _____ to _____. ANSWER: Correct Nitrifying bacteria convert ammonium to nitrites. Part B _____ removes nitrogen from the atmosphere. ANSWER: Correct Nitrogen fixation is the conversion of nitrogen gas to a form that can be used by plants (and other organisms). Part C Assimilation is indicated by the letter(s) _____. nitrogen gas … ammonium nitrogen gas … nitrates ammonium … nitrites nitrates … nitrogen gas ammonium … nitrogen gas Denitrification Nitrification Mineralization Nitrogen fixation Assimilation Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 3 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM ANSWER: Correct Assimilation is the uptake of nutrients into an organism. Part D Nitrogen-fixing bacteria is(are) indicated by the letter(s) _____. ANSWER: Correct Both of these pointers are indicating nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Nitrogen fixation is the conversion of nitrogen to a form that plants can use. Part E Nitrification is indicated by the letter(s) _____. ANSWER: C B A D and E C and D B and C A and B D and E C and D A Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 4 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM Correct Nitrification is the conversion of organic nitrogen-containing compounds to nitrites and nitrates. Part F Denitrifying bacteria convert _____ to _____. ANSWER: Correct Denitrifying bacteria convert nitrates to nitrogen gas. Part G Which one of these is a nitrate? ANSWER: Correct NO3 – is a nitrate. Part H Which one of these is a nitrite? ANSWER: Correct This is a nitrite. GeoScience: Earth’s Water and the Hydrologic Cycle A B B and C D and E B and E nitrogen gas … nitrites nitrogen gas … ammonium nitrates … nitrogen gas ammonium … nitrogen gas nitrogen gas … nitrates NO2 – NH4 – NH2 SH NO3 – PO4 – NH2 NH4 – NO2 – NO3 – Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 5 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM When you have finished, answer the questions. Part A The largest percentage of fresh water today is located in: ANSWER: Correct Ice sheets and glaciers are the greatest single repository of fresh water: they contain 77.3% of all Earth’s fresh water and 99.357% of all Earth’s surface fresh water. Part B Earth’s oceans hold: ANSWER: Correct The oceans contain 97.22% of all water, comprising about 1.321 billion cubic kilometers of salt water. This leaves only 2.78% of all of Earth’s water as fresh water (non-oceanic). Part C Which of the following is true of the hydrologic cycle? ANSWER: Correct About 20% of the moisture evaporated from the ocean combines with 2% of land-derived moisture to produce 22% of all precipitation that falls over land. Clearly, the bulk of continental precipitation comes from the oceanic portion of the cycle. Concept Review: Eutrophication Can you sequence the steps in the eutrophication process that occurs in a body of water? Part A Drag each statement to the appropriate location in the flowchart of the eutrophication process. ANSWER: soil. ice sheets and glaciers. the rivers and lakes of the world. groundwater resources. about the same amount of water as all groundwater sources combined. most of the fresh water on Earth. the bulk of all of the water found on Earth. about the same amount of water as all Earth’s rivers and lakes combined. Atmospheric water and surface water do not mix. Most evaporation on Earth occurs over the continents. The bulk of the precipitation occurs over land. Most of the water that falls on the continents is derived from the oceans. Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 6 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM Concept Review: Biogeochemical Cycles Can you sort the items by which biogeochemical cycle they apply to? Part A Drag each description to the appropriate bin. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 62.3%. You received 12.45 out of a possible total of 20 points. Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 7 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM

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