1-Two notions serve as the basis for all torts: wrongs and compensation. True False 2-The goal of tort law is to put a defendant in the position that he or she would have been in had the tort occurred to the defendant. True False 3-Hayley is injured in an accident precipitated by Isolde. Hayley files a tort action against Isolde, seeking to recover for the damage suffered. Damages that are intended to compensate or reimburse a plaintiff for actual losses are: compensatory damages. reimbursement damages. actual damages. punitive damages. 4-Ladd throws a rock intending to hit Minh but misses and hits Nasir instead. On the basis of the tort of battery, Nasir can sue: Ladd. Minh. the rightful owner of the rock. no one. 4-Luella trespasses on Merchandise Mart’s property. Through the use of reasonable force, Merchandise Mart’s security guard detains Luella until the police arrive. Merchandise Mart is liable for: assault. battery. false imprisonment. none of the choice 6-The extreme risk of an activity is a defense against imposing strict liability. True False 7-Misrepresentation in an ad is enough to show an intent to induce the reliance of anyone who may use the product. True False 8-Luke is playing a video game on a defective disk that melts in his game player, starting a fire that injures his hands. Luke files a suit against Mystic Maze, Inc., the game’s maker under the doctrine of strict liability. A significant application of this doctrine is in the area of: cyber torts. intentional torts. product liability. unintentional torts 9-More than two hundred years ago, the Declaration of Independence recognized the importance of protecting creative works. True False 10-n 2014, Cloud Computing Corporation registers its trademark as provided by federal law. After the first renewal, this registration: is renewable every ten years. is renewable every twenty years. runs for life of the corporation plus seventy years. runs forever. 11-Wendy works as a weather announcer for a TV station under the character name Weather Wendy. Wendy can register her character’s name as: a certification mark. a trade name. a service mark. none of the choices 12-Much of the material on the Internet, including software and database information, is not copyrighted. True False 13-In a criminal case, the state must prove its case by a preponderance of the evidence. True False 14-Under the Fourth Amendmentt, general searches through a person’s belongings are permissible. True False 15-Maura enters a gas station and points a gun at the clerk Nate. She then forces Nate to open the cash register and give her all the money. Maura can be charged with: burglary. robbery. larceny. receiving stolen property. 16-Reno, driving while intoxicated, causes a car accident that results in the death of Santo. Reno is arrested and charged with a felony. A felony is a crime punishable by death or imprisonment for: any period of time. more than one year. more than six months. more than ten days. 17-Corporate officers and directors may be held criminally liable for the actions of employees under their supervision. True False 18-Sal assures Tom that she will deliver a truckload of hay to his cattle ranch. A person’s declaration to do a certain act is part of the definition of: an expectation. a moral obligation. a prediction. a promise. 19-Lark promises to buy Mac’s used textbook for $60. Lark is: an offeror. an offeree a promisee. a promisor. 20-Casey offers to sell a certain used forklift to DIY Lumber Outlet, but Casey dies before DIY accepts. Most likely, Casey’s death: did not affect the offer. shortened the time of the offer but did not terminated it. extended the time of the offer. terminated the offer.

1-Two notions serve as the basis for all torts: wrongs and compensation. True False 2-The goal of tort law is to put a defendant in the position that he or she would have been in had the tort occurred to the defendant. True False 3-Hayley is injured in an accident precipitated by Isolde. Hayley files a tort action against Isolde, seeking to recover for the damage suffered. Damages that are intended to compensate or reimburse a plaintiff for actual losses are: compensatory damages. reimbursement damages. actual damages. punitive damages. 4-Ladd throws a rock intending to hit Minh but misses and hits Nasir instead. On the basis of the tort of battery, Nasir can sue: Ladd. Minh. the rightful owner of the rock. no one. 4-Luella trespasses on Merchandise Mart’s property. Through the use of reasonable force, Merchandise Mart’s security guard detains Luella until the police arrive. Merchandise Mart is liable for: assault. battery. false imprisonment. none of the choice 6-The extreme risk of an activity is a defense against imposing strict liability. True False 7-Misrepresentation in an ad is enough to show an intent to induce the reliance of anyone who may use the product. True False 8-Luke is playing a video game on a defective disk that melts in his game player, starting a fire that injures his hands. Luke files a suit against Mystic Maze, Inc., the game’s maker under the doctrine of strict liability. A significant application of this doctrine is in the area of: cyber torts. intentional torts. product liability. unintentional torts 9-More than two hundred years ago, the Declaration of Independence recognized the importance of protecting creative works. True False 10-n 2014, Cloud Computing Corporation registers its trademark as provided by federal law. After the first renewal, this registration: is renewable every ten years. is renewable every twenty years. runs for life of the corporation plus seventy years. runs forever. 11-Wendy works as a weather announcer for a TV station under the character name Weather Wendy. Wendy can register her character’s name as: a certification mark. a trade name. a service mark. none of the choices 12-Much of the material on the Internet, including software and database information, is not copyrighted. True False 13-In a criminal case, the state must prove its case by a preponderance of the evidence. True False 14-Under the Fourth Amendmentt, general searches through a person’s belongings are permissible. True False 15-Maura enters a gas station and points a gun at the clerk Nate. She then forces Nate to open the cash register and give her all the money. Maura can be charged with: burglary. robbery. larceny. receiving stolen property. 16-Reno, driving while intoxicated, causes a car accident that results in the death of Santo. Reno is arrested and charged with a felony. A felony is a crime punishable by death or imprisonment for: any period of time. more than one year. more than six months. more than ten days. 17-Corporate officers and directors may be held criminally liable for the actions of employees under their supervision. True False 18-Sal assures Tom that she will deliver a truckload of hay to his cattle ranch. A person’s declaration to do a certain act is part of the definition of: an expectation. a moral obligation. a prediction. a promise. 19-Lark promises to buy Mac’s used textbook for $60. Lark is: an offeror. an offeree a promisee. a promisor. 20-Casey offers to sell a certain used forklift to DIY Lumber Outlet, but Casey dies before DIY accepts. Most likely, Casey’s death: did not affect the offer. shortened the time of the offer but did not terminated it. extended the time of the offer. terminated the offer.

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Learning Objectives This part begins with what are probably the basic questions for a designer of a computing sytem’s human interface: • How should the functionality of the system be described and presented to the user? • How can the design of the interface help the user to understand and successfully use the system? Learning Goals At the conclusion of this module you will be able to: • define the user’s movement among the displays that make up the system; • the addition of visual and spatial cues to the information organization; and • methods of structuring and presenting the interface. Introduction This module deals with the development and utilization of a system. We all have systems for doing things. For instance, we may have a system for handling routine situations around the house that makes sense only to us. Or, we may be oriented toward systems that have a more widespread understanding such as personal finance or how to fill out our IRS forms. When humans use a system, whether natural or man-made, they do so based on their understanding of that system. A totally accurate understanding of a system is not a necessary condition for effective use of that system. Key Terms Systems, User Model, Model, Metaphor, Concept Modeling The Development of Human Systems I. The organization of knowledge about a phenomenon or system constitutes the human’s conceptual model of that system. Information gained from experience with a system contributes to the model, and the model in turn provides a reference or guide for future experience with the system. A. (Reinstein and Hersh, 1984) – a set of concepts a person gradually acquires to explain the behavior of a system. …. That enables that person to understand and interact with the system. 1. For the user, the important thing about a model is its ability to predict: when confronted with unfamiliar or incompletely understood situations, the user relies on their model, their conceptual understanding of the system, to make educated guesses about how to proceed. If the user’s model accurately reflects the effects of the system, then he will be more successful in learning and using the system, and likely will perceive the system as easy to use. 2. Because the model can server this important role in design of helping to create an understandable and predictable system, the creation of the user’s conceptual model should be the first task of system development. One of the more important examples of the use of conceptual model, the XEROX Star office automation system (whose design greatly influenced Apple’s Lisa and Macintosh systems), started with thirty man-years of design work on the user interface before either the hardware or the system software was designed (Smith, Irby, Kimball, Verplank and Harselm, 1982). 3. The conceptual model does not have to be an accurate representation of how the system actually functions. Indeed, it can be quite different from reality, and in most if not all circumstances for systems as complex as computers, should be. 4. The model may be a myth or metaphor, that explains the system: it “suggests that the computer is like something with which the user is already familiar” (Rubinstein and Hersh, 1984, p. 43), or provides a simple explanation of the system which can be used to predict the system’s behavior. 5. ….the conceptual models people form are based on their interactions with an environment … “people who have different roles within an environment … will form different conceptual systems of those environments. 6. People whose essential interaction with an environment is to create it will almost inevitably have an understanding and conceptualization of it which is different from those whose major interaction with it is to use it” Action Assignment Based on the readings for this module, please identify a personal “system” with which you act and perform within. This should be from personal experience and one that assists in providing a model for organization, understanding and problem solving.

Learning Objectives This part begins with what are probably the basic questions for a designer of a computing sytem’s human interface: • How should the functionality of the system be described and presented to the user? • How can the design of the interface help the user to understand and successfully use the system? Learning Goals At the conclusion of this module you will be able to: • define the user’s movement among the displays that make up the system; • the addition of visual and spatial cues to the information organization; and • methods of structuring and presenting the interface. Introduction This module deals with the development and utilization of a system. We all have systems for doing things. For instance, we may have a system for handling routine situations around the house that makes sense only to us. Or, we may be oriented toward systems that have a more widespread understanding such as personal finance or how to fill out our IRS forms. When humans use a system, whether natural or man-made, they do so based on their understanding of that system. A totally accurate understanding of a system is not a necessary condition for effective use of that system. Key Terms Systems, User Model, Model, Metaphor, Concept Modeling The Development of Human Systems I. The organization of knowledge about a phenomenon or system constitutes the human’s conceptual model of that system. Information gained from experience with a system contributes to the model, and the model in turn provides a reference or guide for future experience with the system. A. (Reinstein and Hersh, 1984) – a set of concepts a person gradually acquires to explain the behavior of a system. …. That enables that person to understand and interact with the system. 1. For the user, the important thing about a model is its ability to predict: when confronted with unfamiliar or incompletely understood situations, the user relies on their model, their conceptual understanding of the system, to make educated guesses about how to proceed. If the user’s model accurately reflects the effects of the system, then he will be more successful in learning and using the system, and likely will perceive the system as easy to use. 2. Because the model can server this important role in design of helping to create an understandable and predictable system, the creation of the user’s conceptual model should be the first task of system development. One of the more important examples of the use of conceptual model, the XEROX Star office automation system (whose design greatly influenced Apple’s Lisa and Macintosh systems), started with thirty man-years of design work on the user interface before either the hardware or the system software was designed (Smith, Irby, Kimball, Verplank and Harselm, 1982). 3. The conceptual model does not have to be an accurate representation of how the system actually functions. Indeed, it can be quite different from reality, and in most if not all circumstances for systems as complex as computers, should be. 4. The model may be a myth or metaphor, that explains the system: it “suggests that the computer is like something with which the user is already familiar” (Rubinstein and Hersh, 1984, p. 43), or provides a simple explanation of the system which can be used to predict the system’s behavior. 5. ….the conceptual models people form are based on their interactions with an environment … “people who have different roles within an environment … will form different conceptual systems of those environments. 6. People whose essential interaction with an environment is to create it will almost inevitably have an understanding and conceptualization of it which is different from those whose major interaction with it is to use it” Action Assignment Based on the readings for this module, please identify a personal “system” with which you act and perform within. This should be from personal experience and one that assists in providing a model for organization, understanding and problem solving.

The first task : Seminar Topic 6 – Operation Information Systems Investigate teleworking and how teleworkers operate. From your findings identify the types of operations information systems that would be required to support and administer this type of operation within an organization

The first task : Seminar Topic 6 – Operation Information Systems Investigate teleworking and how teleworkers operate. From your findings identify the types of operations information systems that would be required to support and administer this type of operation within an organization

Now a day’s individuals and organizations uses information technology (IT) … Read More...
Assignment 2 CPIS- 428: Professional computing issues Max. Points – 5 Q1: As discussed in the course that there is no money to be made from open source code, why would a developer release software under an open source license? (Pts. 2) Q2. Why do employers monitor workers? Do you think they should be able to do so? Why or why not? (Pts. 2) Q3: Discuss that why information privacy is important on public networks?

Assignment 2 CPIS- 428: Professional computing issues Max. Points – 5 Q1: As discussed in the course that there is no money to be made from open source code, why would a developer release software under an open source license? (Pts. 2) Q2. Why do employers monitor workers? Do you think they should be able to do so? Why or why not? (Pts. 2) Q3: Discuss that why information privacy is important on public networks?

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2. Look up three standards from your discipline and from your country (Saudi Arabia), and write 2-5 objectives for each.

2. Look up three standards from your discipline and from your country (Saudi Arabia), and write 2-5 objectives for each.

Learning 1 Go ahead in graduate studies or be victorious … Read More...
3. How might a lesson plan differ between elementary earth science and high school computer science?

3. How might a lesson plan differ between elementary earth science and high school computer science?

Elementary earth science The basic concept are more important here, … Read More...
1. How might a lesson plan differ between elementary earth science and high school computer science?

1. How might a lesson plan differ between elementary earth science and high school computer science?

Elementary earth science The basic concept are more important here, … Read More...
Bitcoins What is Bitcoin Mining?

Bitcoins What is Bitcoin Mining?

What is Bitcoin Mining?     Mining is the procedure … Read More...
CIS 343 Homework #1 1. In the game of “craps” two dice are thrown and the outcome of a bet is based on the sum of the two dice. If you bet $1 that the sum is “seven” then you win $4 or lose your dollar. The probability that you win is 6/36=1/6, and P(loss) = 5/6. Find a rough range for a) 200 plays, (b) 20, 000 plays. You must show your work when you compute the SD of the box! [Hint: There are four steps in solving this problem. 1. You must first find the box model, the simplest model has six tickets in the box with some of the tickets +4 and others –1. You must determine how many of each of those two numbers are in the box. 2. Next find the Average of the box and the SD of the box, use “n” not “(n-1)” to compute the SD. 3. Third compute Expected(Winnings)=m•AveOfBox and SD(Winnings)=√m•SDofBox, where m is the number of plays. 4. Finally the Rough Range is Expected(Win)±SD(Win).] 2. Work out the average and SD for the following list: a) 1, 3, 4, 5, 7 Then work out the average and SD for the next list: b) 6, 8, 9, 10, 12 Use n-1 in computing the SD. Are you surprised by the answers? 3. Use “n” in computing SD’s for this problem. a) A list has 10 numbers, each number is a 1, or 2, or 3. If the average is 2 and the SD is 0, find the list. b) A second list has 10 numbers, each number is a 1, or 2, or 3. If the SD is 1, find the list. c) Can the SD be bigger than 1? [This problem is solved by trial and error. Think what center and spread mean! You do not need to use every number for every list. If you do not like the number 3, you may not have to use it] 4. Find the population standard deviation for the following four populations: a) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 b) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 [Divide by 5 for the population in a), divide by 10 for the population in b).] c) 2, -1, -1, -1 d) 2, -1, -1, -1, 2, -1, -1, -1 [Divide by 4 for the population in c), divide by 8 for the population in d).]

CIS 343 Homework #1 1. In the game of “craps” two dice are thrown and the outcome of a bet is based on the sum of the two dice. If you bet $1 that the sum is “seven” then you win $4 or lose your dollar. The probability that you win is 6/36=1/6, and P(loss) = 5/6. Find a rough range for a) 200 plays, (b) 20, 000 plays. You must show your work when you compute the SD of the box! [Hint: There are four steps in solving this problem. 1. You must first find the box model, the simplest model has six tickets in the box with some of the tickets +4 and others –1. You must determine how many of each of those two numbers are in the box. 2. Next find the Average of the box and the SD of the box, use “n” not “(n-1)” to compute the SD. 3. Third compute Expected(Winnings)=m•AveOfBox and SD(Winnings)=√m•SDofBox, where m is the number of plays. 4. Finally the Rough Range is Expected(Win)±SD(Win).] 2. Work out the average and SD for the following list: a) 1, 3, 4, 5, 7 Then work out the average and SD for the next list: b) 6, 8, 9, 10, 12 Use n-1 in computing the SD. Are you surprised by the answers? 3. Use “n” in computing SD’s for this problem. a) A list has 10 numbers, each number is a 1, or 2, or 3. If the average is 2 and the SD is 0, find the list. b) A second list has 10 numbers, each number is a 1, or 2, or 3. If the SD is 1, find the list. c) Can the SD be bigger than 1? [This problem is solved by trial and error. Think what center and spread mean! You do not need to use every number for every list. If you do not like the number 3, you may not have to use it] 4. Find the population standard deviation for the following four populations: a) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 b) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 [Divide by 5 for the population in a), divide by 10 for the population in b).] c) 2, -1, -1, -1 d) 2, -1, -1, -1, 2, -1, -1, -1 [Divide by 4 for the population in c), divide by 8 for the population in d).]

info@checkyourstudy.com Operations Team Whatsapp( +91 9911743277) CIS 343 Homework #1  1.  … Read More...