The Classic Five-Part Structure 1. Introduce the topic to be argued. Establish its importance. 2. Provide background information so readers will be able to follow your discussion. 3. State your claim (your argumentative thesis) and develop your argument by making a logical appeal. Support your claims with facts, opinions, and examples. If appropriate, mix an emotional appeal or an appeal to authority with your logical appeals. 4. Acknowledge counterarguments and treat them with respect. Rebut these arguments. Reject their evidence or their logic or concede some validity and modify your claim accordingly. Be flexible; you might split the counterarguments and rebut them one at a time at different locations in the paper, or you might begin the paper with a counterargument, rebut it, and then move on to your own claim. 5. Conclude by summarizing the main points of your argument. Then remind readers of what you want them to believe or do. Give them something to remember. The Problem-Solution Structure I. There is a serious problem. A. The problem exists and is growing. (Provide support for argument.) B. The problem is serious. (Provide support.) C. Current methods cannot cope with the problem. (Provide support.) II. There is a solution to the problem. (Your claim goes here.) A. The solution is practical. (Provide support.) B. The solution is desirable. (Provide support.) C. We can implement the solution. (Provide support.) D. Alternate solutions are not as strong as the proposed solution. (Review – and reject – competing solutions.) In both cases, you know before you begin writing whether you will use an inductive (analytic) or deductive (synthetic) arrangement for your argument. The decision to move inductively or deductively is about strategy. Induction moves from support to a claim. Deduction moves from a claim to support – to particular facts, opinions, and examples. This is the preferred form for most writing in the humanities. You can position your claim at the beginning, middle, or end of your presentation. In the problem/solution structure, the claim is made only after the writer introduces a problem. With the five-part structure, you have more flexibility in positioning your claim. One factor that can help determine placement is the likelihood of your audience agreeing with you. When your audience is likely to be neutral or supportive, making your claim early on will not alienate readers (synthetic presentation). When your audience is likely to disagree, placing your thesis at the end of your presentation allows you time to build a consensus, step by step, until you reach your conclusion (analytical presentation).

The Classic Five-Part Structure 1. Introduce the topic to be argued. Establish its importance. 2. Provide background information so readers will be able to follow your discussion. 3. State your claim (your argumentative thesis) and develop your argument by making a logical appeal. Support your claims with facts, opinions, and examples. If appropriate, mix an emotional appeal or an appeal to authority with your logical appeals. 4. Acknowledge counterarguments and treat them with respect. Rebut these arguments. Reject their evidence or their logic or concede some validity and modify your claim accordingly. Be flexible; you might split the counterarguments and rebut them one at a time at different locations in the paper, or you might begin the paper with a counterargument, rebut it, and then move on to your own claim. 5. Conclude by summarizing the main points of your argument. Then remind readers of what you want them to believe or do. Give them something to remember. The Problem-Solution Structure I. There is a serious problem. A. The problem exists and is growing. (Provide support for argument.) B. The problem is serious. (Provide support.) C. Current methods cannot cope with the problem. (Provide support.) II. There is a solution to the problem. (Your claim goes here.) A. The solution is practical. (Provide support.) B. The solution is desirable. (Provide support.) C. We can implement the solution. (Provide support.) D. Alternate solutions are not as strong as the proposed solution. (Review – and reject – competing solutions.) In both cases, you know before you begin writing whether you will use an inductive (analytic) or deductive (synthetic) arrangement for your argument. The decision to move inductively or deductively is about strategy. Induction moves from support to a claim. Deduction moves from a claim to support – to particular facts, opinions, and examples. This is the preferred form for most writing in the humanities. You can position your claim at the beginning, middle, or end of your presentation. In the problem/solution structure, the claim is made only after the writer introduces a problem. With the five-part structure, you have more flexibility in positioning your claim. One factor that can help determine placement is the likelihood of your audience agreeing with you. When your audience is likely to be neutral or supportive, making your claim early on will not alienate readers (synthetic presentation). When your audience is likely to disagree, placing your thesis at the end of your presentation allows you time to build a consensus, step by step, until you reach your conclusion (analytical presentation).

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ME4575/5575 Renewable and Alternative Energy Fall 2015 Project 1 In this project, you will design a two piston Stirling engine (as in the example given in the class) of 1 kW power. The engine will be operated at TH=650 0C. The waste energy will be rejected at the temperature of TC=40 0C. The objective of the design is to maximize the efficiency and minimize the system weight. For the given temperature ratio, you have to select and optimize the piston diameter and piston stroke. The weight is proximately equal to the hot and cold piston volume multiplying by steel density. You can use Excel spreadsheet (or other engineering software) to create a Stirling modeling file to iterate on the piston diameter and stroke until the best combination of efficiency and weight (cost) is achieved. The project report has to contain a short introduction, technical description of the problem, details of analyses, and final conclusion of the design (size, weight, and efficiency).

ME4575/5575 Renewable and Alternative Energy Fall 2015 Project 1 In this project, you will design a two piston Stirling engine (as in the example given in the class) of 1 kW power. The engine will be operated at TH=650 0C. The waste energy will be rejected at the temperature of TC=40 0C. The objective of the design is to maximize the efficiency and minimize the system weight. For the given temperature ratio, you have to select and optimize the piston diameter and piston stroke. The weight is proximately equal to the hot and cold piston volume multiplying by steel density. You can use Excel spreadsheet (or other engineering software) to create a Stirling modeling file to iterate on the piston diameter and stroke until the best combination of efficiency and weight (cost) is achieved. The project report has to contain a short introduction, technical description of the problem, details of analyses, and final conclusion of the design (size, weight, and efficiency).

Researchers recently investigated whether or not coffee prevented the development of high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) in laboratory mice. The mice used in this experiment have a mutation that makes them become diabetic. Read about this research study in this article published on the Science Daily web-site New Evidence That Drinking Coffee May Reduce the Risk of Diabetes as well as the following summary: A group of 11 mice was given water, and another group of 10 mice was supplied with diluted black coffee (coffee:water 1:1) as drinking fluids for five weeks. The composition of the diets and living conditions were similar for both groups of mice. Blood glucose was monitored weekly for all mice. After five weeks, there was no change in average body weight between groups. Results indicated that blood glucose concentrations increased significantly in the mice that drank water compared with those that were supplied with coffee. Finally, blood glucose concentration in the coffee group exhibited a 30 percent decrease compared with that in the water group. In the original paper, the investigators acknowledged that the coffee for the experiment was supplied as a gift from a corporation. Then answer the following questions in your own words: 1. Identify and describe the steps of the scientific method. Which observations do you think the scientists made leading up to this research study? Given your understanding of the experimental design, formulate a specific hypothesis that is being tested in this experiment. Describe the experimental design including control and treatment group(s), and dependent and independent variables. Summarize the results and the conclusion (50 points) 2. Criticize the research described. Things to consider: Were the test subjects and treatments relevant and appropriate? Was the sample size large enough? Were the methods used appropriate? Can you think of a potential bias in a research study like this? What are the limitations of the conclusions made in this research study? Address at least two of these questions in your critique of the research study (20 points). 3. Discuss the relevance of this type of research, both for the world in general and for you personally (20 points). 4. Write answers in your own words with proper grammar and spelling (10 points)

Researchers recently investigated whether or not coffee prevented the development of high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) in laboratory mice. The mice used in this experiment have a mutation that makes them become diabetic. Read about this research study in this article published on the Science Daily web-site New Evidence That Drinking Coffee May Reduce the Risk of Diabetes as well as the following summary: A group of 11 mice was given water, and another group of 10 mice was supplied with diluted black coffee (coffee:water 1:1) as drinking fluids for five weeks. The composition of the diets and living conditions were similar for both groups of mice. Blood glucose was monitored weekly for all mice. After five weeks, there was no change in average body weight between groups. Results indicated that blood glucose concentrations increased significantly in the mice that drank water compared with those that were supplied with coffee. Finally, blood glucose concentration in the coffee group exhibited a 30 percent decrease compared with that in the water group. In the original paper, the investigators acknowledged that the coffee for the experiment was supplied as a gift from a corporation. Then answer the following questions in your own words: 1. Identify and describe the steps of the scientific method. Which observations do you think the scientists made leading up to this research study? Given your understanding of the experimental design, formulate a specific hypothesis that is being tested in this experiment. Describe the experimental design including control and treatment group(s), and dependent and independent variables. Summarize the results and the conclusion (50 points) 2. Criticize the research described. Things to consider: Were the test subjects and treatments relevant and appropriate? Was the sample size large enough? Were the methods used appropriate? Can you think of a potential bias in a research study like this? What are the limitations of the conclusions made in this research study? Address at least two of these questions in your critique of the research study (20 points). 3. Discuss the relevance of this type of research, both for the world in general and for you personally (20 points). 4. Write answers in your own words with proper grammar and spelling (10 points)

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Need help in Engineering Ethicks , due in 2 hours , and it is essay with one and half to two hand written paper. Essay one : Alan Dengson, John Dewey, Lewis Mumford, and Jessica Wooliams view technology as ” instrumental ‘ . what does it mean, generally speaking, to regard technology as instrumental rather than intrinsically valuable? with respect to two of the aforementioned authors, answer the following questions: 2- what are the moral dangers associated with losing sight of the instrumental value of technology? 1- why is it important, morally speaking, to affirm the instrumental value of technology? Outline: I. thesis statement: what is your overall argument? Three sentences or less II. instrumental VS. intrinsic Goods. – what an instrumental good is. – what an intrinsic good is. – An example of each -what it means to regard technology as either kind of good – An example of what happend when technology is regarded as intrinsically good III. Importance of affirming the instrumental value of technology. – How doe viewing technology in this light make us better off? _Examples – How does viewing technology as intrinsically good make us worse off? – Example IV. conclusion: summary of your previous point, 5 sentence or less Essay two: Aldo Leopold claims that we have a moral duty to protect the biotic community of which we are a part. What are the arguments in favor of this claim? in your view, is this te extension of moral respect to the natural environment a natural progression of mankind’s tendency to expand the scope of the ” moral community” Why or why not? Are there practical and/ or theoretical problems with this philosophical position regarding our duties to the environment? Outline : I. Thesis Statement : What is your overall argument? Three sentences or less. II. anthropological and Darwinian Bases of Leopold’s Argument. – What Leopold through early human societies were like morally – Leopold’s view of moral progress – Examples – How care for the environment forms of a part of moral progress for Leopold III. The limits of moral community, -How might adhering to Leopold’s argument negatively impact human beings? – how might it positively impact human beings as well as the environment ? – Examples IV: Conclusion: Summary of your previous point.

Need help in Engineering Ethicks , due in 2 hours , and it is essay with one and half to two hand written paper. Essay one : Alan Dengson, John Dewey, Lewis Mumford, and Jessica Wooliams view technology as ” instrumental ‘ . what does it mean, generally speaking, to regard technology as instrumental rather than intrinsically valuable? with respect to two of the aforementioned authors, answer the following questions: 2- what are the moral dangers associated with losing sight of the instrumental value of technology? 1- why is it important, morally speaking, to affirm the instrumental value of technology? Outline: I. thesis statement: what is your overall argument? Three sentences or less II. instrumental VS. intrinsic Goods. – what an instrumental good is. – what an intrinsic good is. – An example of each -what it means to regard technology as either kind of good – An example of what happend when technology is regarded as intrinsically good III. Importance of affirming the instrumental value of technology. – How doe viewing technology in this light make us better off? _Examples – How does viewing technology as intrinsically good make us worse off? – Example IV. conclusion: summary of your previous point, 5 sentence or less Essay two: Aldo Leopold claims that we have a moral duty to protect the biotic community of which we are a part. What are the arguments in favor of this claim? in your view, is this te extension of moral respect to the natural environment a natural progression of mankind’s tendency to expand the scope of the ” moral community” Why or why not? Are there practical and/ or theoretical problems with this philosophical position regarding our duties to the environment? Outline : I. Thesis Statement : What is your overall argument? Three sentences or less. II. anthropological and Darwinian Bases of Leopold’s Argument. – What Leopold through early human societies were like morally – Leopold’s view of moral progress – Examples – How care for the environment forms of a part of moral progress for Leopold III. The limits of moral community, -How might adhering to Leopold’s argument negatively impact human beings? – how might it positively impact human beings as well as the environment ? – Examples IV: Conclusion: Summary of your previous point.

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Read and analyze the strengths and weaknesses of each of these business cases with reference to the Business Case framework described by Gamble and the lecture sessions.Acting as a Board of review, document the relative merits and deficiencies of these proposals.Select the proposal that you best consider meets the needs of the region from the three business cases you reviewed. Make sure that you explain the reason(s) i.e. what decision framework or criteria you used to reach this conclusion.

Read and analyze the strengths and weaknesses of each of these business cases with reference to the Business Case framework described by Gamble and the lecture sessions.Acting as a Board of review, document the relative merits and deficiencies of these proposals.Select the proposal that you best consider meets the needs of the region from the three business cases you reviewed. Make sure that you explain the reason(s) i.e. what decision framework or criteria you used to reach this conclusion.

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Research Paper Write a 10 to 15 page research paper double spaced on some aspect of logistics systems development of the student’s choosing. Note: line spacing format for research papers is double space RESEARCH REPORT FORMAT (MUST BE IN APA FORMAT) STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM: What is the format that MGT 5061 students should use in their research papers? BACKGROUND: Here each student should comment on the background of their problem. The Background may be simply an academic issue or perhaps involve real problems at work. In any event, the importance of each student’s problem needs to be discussed so the reader understands why he or she should read more about it. DISCUSSION: Now comes the part where each student must write about the research done on his or her problem. What have other experts said about the problem? This information can come from other textbooks, magazine articles, newspapers, or personal interviews. If the student wants to use his or her own experience, that is fine, but the experience must be justified as to its validity. If a comparison between alternatives is being described, the choices should be discussed here in enough detail that a conclusion can be derived as to which one is better. Whenever an information source is cited, it must be referenced by footnotes so that the reader can find exactly where the information came from and what the author of the information exactly said. The style of footnoting used is not important; what is important is that each piece of information is referenced with a page number. Last, a bibliography must be included at the end of the paper. CONCLUSIONS: Once the background research is completed, the next step is to outline the conclusions that can be substantiated from the research DISCUSSION. The substantiation must be defended by saying why the research evidence supports the conclusions that are made. RECOMMENDATIONS: This section is to be used by those students who want to solve problems. By this time, the various choices have been examined in the DISCUSSION above and one was chosen in the CONCLUSION. So, the recommendation should be a simple statement that the preferred alternative be selected with the anticipated benefits that will be derived by the recommended selection.

Research Paper Write a 10 to 15 page research paper double spaced on some aspect of logistics systems development of the student’s choosing. Note: line spacing format for research papers is double space RESEARCH REPORT FORMAT (MUST BE IN APA FORMAT) STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM: What is the format that MGT 5061 students should use in their research papers? BACKGROUND: Here each student should comment on the background of their problem. The Background may be simply an academic issue or perhaps involve real problems at work. In any event, the importance of each student’s problem needs to be discussed so the reader understands why he or she should read more about it. DISCUSSION: Now comes the part where each student must write about the research done on his or her problem. What have other experts said about the problem? This information can come from other textbooks, magazine articles, newspapers, or personal interviews. If the student wants to use his or her own experience, that is fine, but the experience must be justified as to its validity. If a comparison between alternatives is being described, the choices should be discussed here in enough detail that a conclusion can be derived as to which one is better. Whenever an information source is cited, it must be referenced by footnotes so that the reader can find exactly where the information came from and what the author of the information exactly said. The style of footnoting used is not important; what is important is that each piece of information is referenced with a page number. Last, a bibliography must be included at the end of the paper. CONCLUSIONS: Once the background research is completed, the next step is to outline the conclusions that can be substantiated from the research DISCUSSION. The substantiation must be defended by saying why the research evidence supports the conclusions that are made. RECOMMENDATIONS: This section is to be used by those students who want to solve problems. By this time, the various choices have been examined in the DISCUSSION above and one was chosen in the CONCLUSION. So, the recommendation should be a simple statement that the preferred alternative be selected with the anticipated benefits that will be derived by the recommended selection.

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Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture Spring 2015 Look through popular magazines, and see if you can find advertisements that objectify women in order to sell a product. Alternately, you may use an advertisement on television (but make sure to provide a link to the ad so I can see it!). Study these images then write a paper about objectification that deals with all or some of the following: • What effect(s), if any, do you think the objectification of women’s bodies has on our culture? • Jean Kilbourne states “turning a human being into a thing is almost always the first step toward justifying violence against that person.” What do you think she means by this? Do you agree with her reasoning? Why or why not? • Some people would argue that depicting a woman’s body as an object is a form of art. What is your opinion of this point of view? Explain your reasoning. • Why do you think that women are objectified more often than men are? • How does sexualization and objectification play out differently across racial lines? • Kilbourne explains that the consequences of being objectified are different – and more serious – for women than for men. Do you agree? How is the world different for women than it is for men? How do objectified images of women interact with those in our culture differently from the way images of men do? Why is it important to look at images in the context of the culture? • What is the difference between sexual objectification and sexual subjectification? (Ros Gill ) • How do ads construct violent white masculinity and how does that vision of masculinity hurt both men and women? Throughout your written analysis, be sure to make clear and specific reference to the images you selected, and please submit these images with your paper. Make sure you engage with and reference to at least 4 of the following authors: Kilbourne, Bordo, Hunter & Soto, Rose, Durham, Gill, Katz, Schuchardt, Ono and Buescher. Guidelines:  Keep your content focused on structural, systemic, institutional factors rather than the individual: BE ANALYTICAL NOT ANECDOTAL.  Avoid using the first person or including personal stories/reactions. You must make sure to actively engage with your readings: these essays need to be informed and framed by the theoretical material you have been reading this semester.  Keep within the 4-6 page limit; use 12-point font, double spacing and 1-inch margins.  Use formal writing conventions (introduction/thesis statement, body, conclusion) and correct grammar. Resources may be cited within the text of your paper, i.e. (Walters, 2013).

Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture Spring 2015 Look through popular magazines, and see if you can find advertisements that objectify women in order to sell a product. Alternately, you may use an advertisement on television (but make sure to provide a link to the ad so I can see it!). Study these images then write a paper about objectification that deals with all or some of the following: • What effect(s), if any, do you think the objectification of women’s bodies has on our culture? • Jean Kilbourne states “turning a human being into a thing is almost always the first step toward justifying violence against that person.” What do you think she means by this? Do you agree with her reasoning? Why or why not? • Some people would argue that depicting a woman’s body as an object is a form of art. What is your opinion of this point of view? Explain your reasoning. • Why do you think that women are objectified more often than men are? • How does sexualization and objectification play out differently across racial lines? • Kilbourne explains that the consequences of being objectified are different – and more serious – for women than for men. Do you agree? How is the world different for women than it is for men? How do objectified images of women interact with those in our culture differently from the way images of men do? Why is it important to look at images in the context of the culture? • What is the difference between sexual objectification and sexual subjectification? (Ros Gill ) • How do ads construct violent white masculinity and how does that vision of masculinity hurt both men and women? Throughout your written analysis, be sure to make clear and specific reference to the images you selected, and please submit these images with your paper. Make sure you engage with and reference to at least 4 of the following authors: Kilbourne, Bordo, Hunter & Soto, Rose, Durham, Gill, Katz, Schuchardt, Ono and Buescher. Guidelines:  Keep your content focused on structural, systemic, institutional factors rather than the individual: BE ANALYTICAL NOT ANECDOTAL.  Avoid using the first person or including personal stories/reactions. You must make sure to actively engage with your readings: these essays need to be informed and framed by the theoretical material you have been reading this semester.  Keep within the 4-6 page limit; use 12-point font, double spacing and 1-inch margins.  Use formal writing conventions (introduction/thesis statement, body, conclusion) and correct grammar. Resources may be cited within the text of your paper, i.e. (Walters, 2013).

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Name: Lab Time: BIO 218 Experiment Paper Rubric (20 points) General Formatting: (2 pts.) • Margins should be 1 inch top, bottom, left, and right. • Font should be 12 point Times New Roman or similar font. • Double-spaced. • Pages numbered. Title page is unnumbered. Next page is numbered at the bottom right corner with a 2 followed by pages 3, 4, and 5. • All sections must be included: Abstract, Introduction, Methods, Results, Discussion, and Literature Cited. • At least 3 pages (double spaced) but no more than five pages long. • All scientific names should be formatted correctly by italicizing and capitalizing the genus name and having the species name in lowercase (Bufo americanus). • Title page should have a specific title, student name, course, lab section time, and date. Project elements (18 pts. Total) • Abstract (2 points) o Summarize most important points using past tense. Use present tense to suggest a general conclusion which supports or refutes the hypothesis. • Introduction (3 points) o General background on topic and species (state scientific name!) o Discuss the possible tests of the hypothesis. o Reads from general to specific. o States hypothesis/hypotheses to be addressed. May discuss null and all alternative hypotheses. • Methods (2 points) o Reports how experiment was conducted and all materials used. Use enough detail so others could repeat the study. o Discuss the type(s) of data collected. o Discuss how data was to be analyzed/compared/used to test hypothesis. • Results (3 points) o Reports what happened in the experiment. o If comparisons made, discuss how they were made. o Report statistical and other data. Use “significant” only for statistical significance. o NO interpretation of data (no data analysis). o At least one original figure present and formatted correctly. Figures such as pictures and graphs are numbered and have captions underneath. o At least one table present and formatted correctly. Tables such as charts are numbered and have captions above them. • Discussion: (3 points) o Discusses the results of the experiment and ties in how the results fit with the literature. o Use past tense to discuss your results and shift to present tense to discuss previously published information. o States how results supported or refuted the original hypothesis. Hypotheses are never proven! o Ties in results with big picture within topic of biology. • Literature Cited: (2 points: .5 per citation) o At least 2 peer-reviewed journal articles (provided) + 2 peer-reviewed journal articles (found on your own). o References used in text properly. o References all listed in this section are alphabetized by author’s last name and formatted correctly. o All references listed in the Literature Cited section are cited in text. Writing Elements (3 pts.) • Grammar or spelling is error-free and excellent print quality. (1 pt) • Writing is clear and flows logically throughout paper. (1 pt) • Appropriate content in each section? (1 pt) Additional Comments:

Name: Lab Time: BIO 218 Experiment Paper Rubric (20 points) General Formatting: (2 pts.) • Margins should be 1 inch top, bottom, left, and right. • Font should be 12 point Times New Roman or similar font. • Double-spaced. • Pages numbered. Title page is unnumbered. Next page is numbered at the bottom right corner with a 2 followed by pages 3, 4, and 5. • All sections must be included: Abstract, Introduction, Methods, Results, Discussion, and Literature Cited. • At least 3 pages (double spaced) but no more than five pages long. • All scientific names should be formatted correctly by italicizing and capitalizing the genus name and having the species name in lowercase (Bufo americanus). • Title page should have a specific title, student name, course, lab section time, and date. Project elements (18 pts. Total) • Abstract (2 points) o Summarize most important points using past tense. Use present tense to suggest a general conclusion which supports or refutes the hypothesis. • Introduction (3 points) o General background on topic and species (state scientific name!) o Discuss the possible tests of the hypothesis. o Reads from general to specific. o States hypothesis/hypotheses to be addressed. May discuss null and all alternative hypotheses. • Methods (2 points) o Reports how experiment was conducted and all materials used. Use enough detail so others could repeat the study. o Discuss the type(s) of data collected. o Discuss how data was to be analyzed/compared/used to test hypothesis. • Results (3 points) o Reports what happened in the experiment. o If comparisons made, discuss how they were made. o Report statistical and other data. Use “significant” only for statistical significance. o NO interpretation of data (no data analysis). o At least one original figure present and formatted correctly. Figures such as pictures and graphs are numbered and have captions underneath. o At least one table present and formatted correctly. Tables such as charts are numbered and have captions above them. • Discussion: (3 points) o Discusses the results of the experiment and ties in how the results fit with the literature. o Use past tense to discuss your results and shift to present tense to discuss previously published information. o States how results supported or refuted the original hypothesis. Hypotheses are never proven! o Ties in results with big picture within topic of biology. • Literature Cited: (2 points: .5 per citation) o At least 2 peer-reviewed journal articles (provided) + 2 peer-reviewed journal articles (found on your own). o References used in text properly. o References all listed in this section are alphabetized by author’s last name and formatted correctly. o All references listed in the Literature Cited section are cited in text. Writing Elements (3 pts.) • Grammar or spelling is error-free and excellent print quality. (1 pt) • Writing is clear and flows logically throughout paper. (1 pt) • Appropriate content in each section? (1 pt) Additional Comments:

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