http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UnKEFSVAiNQ Watch the video, and then answer the questions below. According to realism, which of the following represents something that states would NOT seek? A. security B. prestige C. autonomy D. wealth E. permanent cooperation Schweller suggests that realists are wary of interdependence. If that is true, which of the following might be the most acceptable to a realist? A. creating a permanent pact of nonviolence with all English-speaking countries B. establishing an alliance to defend the U.S. against an invading country C. turning North America into something similar to the European Union, with a unified currency D. permitting the United Nations to run a global military so that the U.S. can reduce its military spending E. entering into a global production agreement in which the U.S. only manufactures computers Based on the video, which of the following statements about realists would seem to be false? A. Realists see the world as perpetually violent and full of war. B. Realists see humans as basically self-interested. C. Realists believe that the absence of a threat means a country should retrench. D. Realists believe that intervening in other countries to spread democracy is dangerous. E. Realists believe that autonomy is better than interdependence. What does Schweller mean by his statement that “there is no 911”? A. There is no global authority that is guaranteed to help any state in trouble. B. The world needs a central government to provide a universal social safety net. C. States need to cooperate more with each other in order to provide greater security for all. D. The United Nations is terrible at dealing with international emergencies. E. Islamic terrorists were not responsible for the attacks of September 11, 2001. Which of the following would be the best way to convince a realist to go to war? A. argue that we signed a treaty to protect that country B. argue that the country we are helping to defend was an ally in a prior war C. argue that it will provide the world with a chance at long-term peace and stability D. argue that the other country is a direct threat to our interests E. argue that if we do not intervene, the United Nations will

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UnKEFSVAiNQ Watch the video, and then answer the questions below. According to realism, which of the following represents something that states would NOT seek? A. security B. prestige C. autonomy D. wealth E. permanent cooperation Schweller suggests that realists are wary of interdependence. If that is true, which of the following might be the most acceptable to a realist? A. creating a permanent pact of nonviolence with all English-speaking countries B. establishing an alliance to defend the U.S. against an invading country C. turning North America into something similar to the European Union, with a unified currency D. permitting the United Nations to run a global military so that the U.S. can reduce its military spending E. entering into a global production agreement in which the U.S. only manufactures computers Based on the video, which of the following statements about realists would seem to be false? A. Realists see the world as perpetually violent and full of war. B. Realists see humans as basically self-interested. C. Realists believe that the absence of a threat means a country should retrench. D. Realists believe that intervening in other countries to spread democracy is dangerous. E. Realists believe that autonomy is better than interdependence. What does Schweller mean by his statement that “there is no 911”? A. There is no global authority that is guaranteed to help any state in trouble. B. The world needs a central government to provide a universal social safety net. C. States need to cooperate more with each other in order to provide greater security for all. D. The United Nations is terrible at dealing with international emergencies. E. Islamic terrorists were not responsible for the attacks of September 11, 2001. Which of the following would be the best way to convince a realist to go to war? A. argue that we signed a treaty to protect that country B. argue that the country we are helping to defend was an ally in a prior war C. argue that it will provide the world with a chance at long-term peace and stability D. argue that the other country is a direct threat to our interests E. argue that if we do not intervene, the United Nations will

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UnKEFSVAiNQ   Watch the video, and then answer the questions … Read More...
Initial Data Collection After implementing your intervention/innovation, you may have noted that data collection isn’t exactly a linear process. Sometimes you need to go back and get more information, and sometimes you find yourself asking additional questions (that’s ok). In Chapter 6, Fichtman Dana and Yendol-Hoppey provide four steps to data analysis: 1. providing a description of the data; 2. making sense of what you have (and don’t have); 3. interpreting your data by creating statements about how the data informs an answer to the original question; 4. implications of the data. For this assignment, please develop responses to the first two steps using the following points as your guide: ● Please describe the data you’ve collected. ○ What did you see as you inquired? What was happening? ○ What are your initial insights into the data? ● Next, please explain how you have organized your data (“chronologically, by key events, or some combination of organizing units?”). ○ Have you provided the reader with evidence that you’ve looked at your inquiry from a number of angles and have collected trustworthy data? ○ Have you provided evidence of data triangulation? ○ What further questions do you have after your initial data collection? ○ How will you collect more information to satisfy your next questions? Assignment: Initial Data Collection (Due Week 2 Sunday, 11:59 p.m.) After implementing your intervention/innovation, you may have noted that data collection isn’t exactly a linear process. Sometimes you need to go back and get more information, and sometimes you find yourself asking additional questions (that’s ok). In Chapter 6, Fichtman Dana and Yendol-Hoppey provide four steps to data analysis: 1. providing a description of the data; 2. making sense of what you have (and don’t have); 3. interpreting your data by creating statements about how the data informs an answer to the original question; 4. implications of the data. For this assignment, please develop responses to the first two steps using the following points as your guide: ● Please describe the data you’ve collected. ○ What did you see as you inquired? What was happening? ○ What are your initial insights into the data? ● Next, please explain how you have organized your data (“chronologically, by key events, or some combination of organizing units?”). ○ Have you provided the reader with evidence that you’ve looked at your inquiry from a number of angles and have collected trustworthy data? ○ Have you provided evidence of data triangulation? ○ What further questions do you have after your initial data collection? ○ How will you collect more information to satisfy your next questions? Module 2 – Data Collection, Part 2 Module 2 continues to examine the data you are collecting with respect to issues of validity, reliability, trustworthiness, and sufficiency. Please continue to collect data relevant to your inquiry and begin to think about how you will code this data into meaningful organizing principles. Be sure to continuously write memos about your process as a sort of idea journal that you can continually draw from when writing your assignments. Required Readings: Dana, N. F. & Yendol-Hoppey, D. – Revisit Chapter 6 Assignments: For assignment details refer to the “Assignments for the Course” section in this syllabus or the submission link within Blackboard. Assignment: Initial Data Collection (Due Week 2 Sunday, 11:59 p.m.)

Initial Data Collection After implementing your intervention/innovation, you may have noted that data collection isn’t exactly a linear process. Sometimes you need to go back and get more information, and sometimes you find yourself asking additional questions (that’s ok). In Chapter 6, Fichtman Dana and Yendol-Hoppey provide four steps to data analysis: 1. providing a description of the data; 2. making sense of what you have (and don’t have); 3. interpreting your data by creating statements about how the data informs an answer to the original question; 4. implications of the data. For this assignment, please develop responses to the first two steps using the following points as your guide: ● Please describe the data you’ve collected. ○ What did you see as you inquired? What was happening? ○ What are your initial insights into the data? ● Next, please explain how you have organized your data (“chronologically, by key events, or some combination of organizing units?”). ○ Have you provided the reader with evidence that you’ve looked at your inquiry from a number of angles and have collected trustworthy data? ○ Have you provided evidence of data triangulation? ○ What further questions do you have after your initial data collection? ○ How will you collect more information to satisfy your next questions? Assignment: Initial Data Collection (Due Week 2 Sunday, 11:59 p.m.) After implementing your intervention/innovation, you may have noted that data collection isn’t exactly a linear process. Sometimes you need to go back and get more information, and sometimes you find yourself asking additional questions (that’s ok). In Chapter 6, Fichtman Dana and Yendol-Hoppey provide four steps to data analysis: 1. providing a description of the data; 2. making sense of what you have (and don’t have); 3. interpreting your data by creating statements about how the data informs an answer to the original question; 4. implications of the data. For this assignment, please develop responses to the first two steps using the following points as your guide: ● Please describe the data you’ve collected. ○ What did you see as you inquired? What was happening? ○ What are your initial insights into the data? ● Next, please explain how you have organized your data (“chronologically, by key events, or some combination of organizing units?”). ○ Have you provided the reader with evidence that you’ve looked at your inquiry from a number of angles and have collected trustworthy data? ○ Have you provided evidence of data triangulation? ○ What further questions do you have after your initial data collection? ○ How will you collect more information to satisfy your next questions? Module 2 – Data Collection, Part 2 Module 2 continues to examine the data you are collecting with respect to issues of validity, reliability, trustworthiness, and sufficiency. Please continue to collect data relevant to your inquiry and begin to think about how you will code this data into meaningful organizing principles. Be sure to continuously write memos about your process as a sort of idea journal that you can continually draw from when writing your assignments. Required Readings: Dana, N. F. & Yendol-Hoppey, D. – Revisit Chapter 6 Assignments: For assignment details refer to the “Assignments for the Course” section in this syllabus or the submission link within Blackboard. Assignment: Initial Data Collection (Due Week 2 Sunday, 11:59 p.m.)

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Question 1. 1. What is the rationale for the following statement: “An advertising campaign is about much more than creating a cool advertisement and hoping people notice it. It should be intimately related to the organization’s overall communication goals.”? Use an example in your answer. (Points : 5)

Question 1. 1. What is the rationale for the following statement: “An advertising campaign is about much more than creating a cool advertisement and hoping people notice it. It should be intimately related to the organization’s overall communication goals.”? Use an example in your answer. (Points : 5)

tactical communication plan is significant, reliable, controlled implementation is vital … Read More...
1 Before-class Preparation: Project Management Use the following questions to guide your reading and preparation for the iRAT/tRAT quiz. 1. Pre-lecture reading: Read the Textbook Chapter 7 from page 59 to page 63 “Step 3: Plan and manage the project”. 1) What is the three-part basic sequence of project management activities? 2) Fill in the blanks. During the “Plan” activity, a schedule shows will work on issues and materials will be applied to task? 3) Fill in the blank. During the “Assess” activity, periodic help keep team and customers informed of the state of the project. 2. Pre-lecture reading: Read the handout “Project Management – Creating a Project Schedule”. 1) What are the three aspects that need to be addressed when planning a project? 2) What are the two ways of presenting a WBS? Are task dependencies considered when creating a WBS? 3) In a network diagram, why do some tasks have to be completed in a specific order? What is the predecessor(s) of a task? 4) In a Gantt chart, what information can be derived from the “bar” for each task? What about the arrows? 5) What is a critical path? How to determine the total duration of a project? In order to reduce the project duration, should tasks on the critical path get additional resources or tasks not on the critical path? 3. Pre-lecture homework: answer all questions above. First copy each question then write down the answer. Submit the homework to Blackboard and also bring in the completed homework to the RAT quiz to use as a cheat sheet.

1 Before-class Preparation: Project Management Use the following questions to guide your reading and preparation for the iRAT/tRAT quiz. 1. Pre-lecture reading: Read the Textbook Chapter 7 from page 59 to page 63 “Step 3: Plan and manage the project”. 1) What is the three-part basic sequence of project management activities? 2) Fill in the blanks. During the “Plan” activity, a schedule shows will work on issues and materials will be applied to task? 3) Fill in the blank. During the “Assess” activity, periodic help keep team and customers informed of the state of the project. 2. Pre-lecture reading: Read the handout “Project Management – Creating a Project Schedule”. 1) What are the three aspects that need to be addressed when planning a project? 2) What are the two ways of presenting a WBS? Are task dependencies considered when creating a WBS? 3) In a network diagram, why do some tasks have to be completed in a specific order? What is the predecessor(s) of a task? 4) In a Gantt chart, what information can be derived from the “bar” for each task? What about the arrows? 5) What is a critical path? How to determine the total duration of a project? In order to reduce the project duration, should tasks on the critical path get additional resources or tasks not on the critical path? 3. Pre-lecture homework: answer all questions above. First copy each question then write down the answer. Submit the homework to Blackboard and also bring in the completed homework to the RAT quiz to use as a cheat sheet.

1000 words Total. Answer each question in paragraph form https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wzicXbnmllc In the video, presented by Brooke Deterline, talks about creating ethical cultures in a business. One of Brooke’s main point was courage. She defines courage as our ability to act from our hearts in the face of fear and is a skill that we can build with practice. Brooke gives an example of life without courage and shows us many scenarios where it is still happening today, 10 years after the ENRON scandal. Courage is something that lacks in social situations where wrong is being done. She states that we all are vulnerable to situation influence all the time and that it is natural human wiring. It seems that most of us, including myself, can become a bystander to follow a leader or a group that we know is doing wrong because we want to be accepted. (1) Why do you think that the most ethical and compassionate among us can easily betray our values, in the face of challenging situations? What challenges does one face when they are presented with a difficult situation? (2) Do you believe that with practice we can retrain our brains to override our natural fear response when we are put in these challenging situations? Managers sometimes face business problems that raise difficult questions. When being faced with these problems they must choose between two ways of resolving it. Each of these alternatives is the right thing to do, but they can not do both ways. Badaracco characterizes right-versus-right dilemmas as “dirty-hands problems,” where managers or any employee often have to “get their hands dirty” by making tough choices between competing virtues such as honesty, fairness, respect, objectivity, and responsibility. He shows us three managers that face different right- versus-right conflicts. We see that these managers have the responsibilities to live up to the commitments they have made and the standards by which they want live by. However, it is not that simple to choose from wanting to be a successful manager and a decent, responsible person. (3) After reading the three different extremes of right- versus- right, why do you think that Badaracco emphasizes on the statement made by Oliver Wendell Holmes, “I do not give a fig for the simplicity on the this side complexity, but i would give my life for the simplicity on the other side of complexity,” and what do you think it means? A manager often encounters right-versus-right dilemmas where professional responsibilities conflict with personal values. For example, a senior manager may have knowledge of plans to lay off an employee-friend who is planning the purchase of a new home. Warning the friend about the upcoming layoff would certainly help the friend avoid the difficulty of paying for a new home without a job, but it may also violate an agreement with senior management and shareholders to keep such plans confidential until these plans are properly implemented. (4) In a challenging situation like this, should mangers rely on fundamental ethical principles and the company’s mission statement to help them decide what to do or should they consult their own moral instincts and intuitions?

1000 words Total. Answer each question in paragraph form https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wzicXbnmllc In the video, presented by Brooke Deterline, talks about creating ethical cultures in a business. One of Brooke’s main point was courage. She defines courage as our ability to act from our hearts in the face of fear and is a skill that we can build with practice. Brooke gives an example of life without courage and shows us many scenarios where it is still happening today, 10 years after the ENRON scandal. Courage is something that lacks in social situations where wrong is being done. She states that we all are vulnerable to situation influence all the time and that it is natural human wiring. It seems that most of us, including myself, can become a bystander to follow a leader or a group that we know is doing wrong because we want to be accepted. (1) Why do you think that the most ethical and compassionate among us can easily betray our values, in the face of challenging situations? What challenges does one face when they are presented with a difficult situation? (2) Do you believe that with practice we can retrain our brains to override our natural fear response when we are put in these challenging situations? Managers sometimes face business problems that raise difficult questions. When being faced with these problems they must choose between two ways of resolving it. Each of these alternatives is the right thing to do, but they can not do both ways. Badaracco characterizes right-versus-right dilemmas as “dirty-hands problems,” where managers or any employee often have to “get their hands dirty” by making tough choices between competing virtues such as honesty, fairness, respect, objectivity, and responsibility. He shows us three managers that face different right- versus-right conflicts. We see that these managers have the responsibilities to live up to the commitments they have made and the standards by which they want live by. However, it is not that simple to choose from wanting to be a successful manager and a decent, responsible person. (3) After reading the three different extremes of right- versus- right, why do you think that Badaracco emphasizes on the statement made by Oliver Wendell Holmes, “I do not give a fig for the simplicity on the this side complexity, but i would give my life for the simplicity on the other side of complexity,” and what do you think it means? A manager often encounters right-versus-right dilemmas where professional responsibilities conflict with personal values. For example, a senior manager may have knowledge of plans to lay off an employee-friend who is planning the purchase of a new home. Warning the friend about the upcoming layoff would certainly help the friend avoid the difficulty of paying for a new home without a job, but it may also violate an agreement with senior management and shareholders to keep such plans confidential until these plans are properly implemented. (4) In a challenging situation like this, should mangers rely on fundamental ethical principles and the company’s mission statement to help them decide what to do or should they consult their own moral instincts and intuitions?

• Section 1: Design Description (<2/3 page) o Describe your design, including a SCHEMATIC, a PHOTOGRAPH, and a description of materials/items used o Describe why you chose your design • Section 2: Analysis (only as much length as is necessary to clearly communicate your analysis). Note that scanning handwritten resistance networks may be faster/easier than creating digital figures. o Estimate the rate in Watts at which sunlight is absorbed by your design (assume a solar flux of 1000 W/m2) o Show a thermal resistance network for each heat transfer path for the heat loss from your design. Calculate/estimate all thermal resistances. For all convection correlations, list the assumed geometry, the equation being used, and the calculated ‘h’ value. o Identify the dominant mode of heat loss, and discuss why this is the case. o STATE AND JUSTIFY all assumptions and estimates in the analysis. And by “justify” I mean “PROVE to me that your assumption is reasonable” • Section 3: Reflection (<1/2 page) o Suggest TWO design modifications that would significantly reduce the heat loss from your design. One modification must be a low-­‐cost modification that would fit within your project budget, and the other modification must be a modification using commercially available materials/technologies that would be realistically used in industry (i.e. without an absurd cost constraint). Note that you will have to perform some independent research on available materials and technologies to complete this. • Section 4: Bill of Materials o List ALL materials in the design (automatic 20% grade reduction for any material I find in your design that is unaccounted for in your bill of materials) o Can treat scavenged items as zero cost only if anyone could reasonably attain them freely (for donated items you must count the full purchase cost) o For structural materials, you must use the minimum UNIT COST, not a portion cost (i.e. if you buy an item in its smallest available quantity and only use 10% of the item, you still must include the TOTAL item cost) o For fastening/assembly/filler materials, you may use portion costs (e.g. glue, nails, screws, etc). If in doubt, ask me. o You must include the cost of any specialty tools required for your assembly that are not available in the machine shop (even if they are your own)

• Section 1: Design Description (<2/3 page) o Describe your design, including a SCHEMATIC, a PHOTOGRAPH, and a description of materials/items used o Describe why you chose your design • Section 2: Analysis (only as much length as is necessary to clearly communicate your analysis). Note that scanning handwritten resistance networks may be faster/easier than creating digital figures. o Estimate the rate in Watts at which sunlight is absorbed by your design (assume a solar flux of 1000 W/m2) o Show a thermal resistance network for each heat transfer path for the heat loss from your design. Calculate/estimate all thermal resistances. For all convection correlations, list the assumed geometry, the equation being used, and the calculated ‘h’ value. o Identify the dominant mode of heat loss, and discuss why this is the case. o STATE AND JUSTIFY all assumptions and estimates in the analysis. And by “justify” I mean “PROVE to me that your assumption is reasonable” • Section 3: Reflection (<1/2 page) o Suggest TWO design modifications that would significantly reduce the heat loss from your design. One modification must be a low-­‐cost modification that would fit within your project budget, and the other modification must be a modification using commercially available materials/technologies that would be realistically used in industry (i.e. without an absurd cost constraint). Note that you will have to perform some independent research on available materials and technologies to complete this. • Section 4: Bill of Materials o List ALL materials in the design (automatic 20% grade reduction for any material I find in your design that is unaccounted for in your bill of materials) o Can treat scavenged items as zero cost only if anyone could reasonably attain them freely (for donated items you must count the full purchase cost) o For structural materials, you must use the minimum UNIT COST, not a portion cost (i.e. if you buy an item in its smallest available quantity and only use 10% of the item, you still must include the TOTAL item cost) o For fastening/assembly/filler materials, you may use portion costs (e.g. glue, nails, screws, etc). If in doubt, ask me. o You must include the cost of any specialty tools required for your assembly that are not available in the machine shop (even if they are your own)

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Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture Spring 2015 Look through popular magazines, and see if you can find advertisements that objectify women in order to sell a product. Alternately, you may use an advertisement on television (but make sure to provide a link to the ad so I can see it!). Study these images then write a paper about objectification that deals with all or some of the following: • What effect(s), if any, do you think the objectification of women’s bodies has on our culture? • Jean Kilbourne states “turning a human being into a thing is almost always the first step toward justifying violence against that person.” What do you think she means by this? Do you agree with her reasoning? Why or why not? • Some people would argue that depicting a woman’s body as an object is a form of art. What is your opinion of this point of view? Explain your reasoning. • Why do you think that women are objectified more often than men are? • How does sexualization and objectification play out differently across racial lines? • Kilbourne explains that the consequences of being objectified are different – and more serious – for women than for men. Do you agree? How is the world different for women than it is for men? How do objectified images of women interact with those in our culture differently from the way images of men do? Why is it important to look at images in the context of the culture? • What is the difference between sexual objectification and sexual subjectification? (Ros Gill ) • How do ads construct violent white masculinity and how does that vision of masculinity hurt both men and women? Throughout your written analysis, be sure to make clear and specific reference to the images you selected, and please submit these images with your paper. Make sure you engage with and reference to at least 4 of the following authors: Kilbourne, Bordo, Hunter & Soto, Rose, Durham, Gill, Katz, Schuchardt, Ono and Buescher. Guidelines:  Keep your content focused on structural, systemic, institutional factors rather than the individual: BE ANALYTICAL NOT ANECDOTAL.  Avoid using the first person or including personal stories/reactions. You must make sure to actively engage with your readings: these essays need to be informed and framed by the theoretical material you have been reading this semester.  Keep within the 4-6 page limit; use 12-point font, double spacing and 1-inch margins.  Use formal writing conventions (introduction/thesis statement, body, conclusion) and correct grammar. Resources may be cited within the text of your paper, i.e. (Walters, 2013).

Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture Spring 2015 Look through popular magazines, and see if you can find advertisements that objectify women in order to sell a product. Alternately, you may use an advertisement on television (but make sure to provide a link to the ad so I can see it!). Study these images then write a paper about objectification that deals with all or some of the following: • What effect(s), if any, do you think the objectification of women’s bodies has on our culture? • Jean Kilbourne states “turning a human being into a thing is almost always the first step toward justifying violence against that person.” What do you think she means by this? Do you agree with her reasoning? Why or why not? • Some people would argue that depicting a woman’s body as an object is a form of art. What is your opinion of this point of view? Explain your reasoning. • Why do you think that women are objectified more often than men are? • How does sexualization and objectification play out differently across racial lines? • Kilbourne explains that the consequences of being objectified are different – and more serious – for women than for men. Do you agree? How is the world different for women than it is for men? How do objectified images of women interact with those in our culture differently from the way images of men do? Why is it important to look at images in the context of the culture? • What is the difference between sexual objectification and sexual subjectification? (Ros Gill ) • How do ads construct violent white masculinity and how does that vision of masculinity hurt both men and women? Throughout your written analysis, be sure to make clear and specific reference to the images you selected, and please submit these images with your paper. Make sure you engage with and reference to at least 4 of the following authors: Kilbourne, Bordo, Hunter & Soto, Rose, Durham, Gill, Katz, Schuchardt, Ono and Buescher. Guidelines:  Keep your content focused on structural, systemic, institutional factors rather than the individual: BE ANALYTICAL NOT ANECDOTAL.  Avoid using the first person or including personal stories/reactions. You must make sure to actively engage with your readings: these essays need to be informed and framed by the theoretical material you have been reading this semester.  Keep within the 4-6 page limit; use 12-point font, double spacing and 1-inch margins.  Use formal writing conventions (introduction/thesis statement, body, conclusion) and correct grammar. Resources may be cited within the text of your paper, i.e. (Walters, 2013).

The objectification of women has been a very controversial topic … Read More...
RMU Professional Workplace Communication/Talerico Questions for LA Reading 1: “Simplicity,” William Zinsser, 201-206 “The Maker’s Eye: Revising Your Own Manuscripts,” Donald M. Murray, 194-198 Please read the two articles—“Simplicity” and “The Maker’s Eye: Revising Your Own Manuscripts.” Then, answer the following questions in complete sentences, typed and double-spaced (every line); use 12-point type. The answers are due in class on Tuesday, September 8, when we will discuss them. “Simplicity,” William Zinsser, 201-206 1. What document or set of instructions have you read that you found wordy and difficult to read? How did you handle the situation? 2. What does Zinsser mean when he writes, “Our national tendency is to inflate and thereby sound important” (201)? Why is writing often like this? 3. What does the author say is the secret of good writing? Why is this secret important? 4. How can we, according to Zinsser, write clearly and simply? 5. Why is clear writing so important to today’s readers? 6. What two questions must the writer always ask? How might asking these questions during your writing—and when you are finished writing—improve your drafts? “The Maker’s Eye: Revising Your Own Manuscripts,” Donald M. Murray, 194-198.
 7. Murray lists many qualities of professional writers. What are three of them? 8. Why would science-fiction writer Ray Bradbury put away for one year a manuscript he has written, and then reread it “as a stranger” (195)? What would be the value of this? 9. For each of the following quotes by professional writers, write one sentence that summarizes the main point the writer is making: a) Nancy Hale: A writer “should be critical of everything that seems to him most delightful in his style. He should excise what he most admires because he wouldn’t thus admire it if he weren’t…in a sense protecting it from criticism” (195). b) John Ciardi: “The last act of the writing must be to become one’s own reader. It is, I suppose, a schizophrenic process, to begin passionately and to end critically, to begin hot and to end cold; and more important to be passion-hot and critic-cold at the same time” (195) c) Eleanor Estes: “The writer must survey his work critically, coolly, as though he were a stranger to it. He must be willing to prune, expertly and hard-heartedly. At the end of each revision, a manuscript may look…worked over, torn apart, pinned together, added to, deleted from, words changed and words changed back. Yet the book must maintain its orginal freshness and spontaneity” (195). d) Roald Dahl: “Good writing is essentially rewriting” (196). 10. Why do most readers, as Murray states, “underestimate the amount of rewriting it usually takes to produce spontaneous reading” (195)? Do you fit into this category? 11. List the 8 things the author says writers look for in creating their drafts. For each item on your list, write one sentence explaining what it means. 12. What are some of the things Murray says writers begin to learn by writing? Have you ever experienced any of these things when you were writing? Explain your answer. 13. What does Murray means when he states, “A piece of writing is never finished” (198)?

RMU Professional Workplace Communication/Talerico Questions for LA Reading 1: “Simplicity,” William Zinsser, 201-206 “The Maker’s Eye: Revising Your Own Manuscripts,” Donald M. Murray, 194-198 Please read the two articles—“Simplicity” and “The Maker’s Eye: Revising Your Own Manuscripts.” Then, answer the following questions in complete sentences, typed and double-spaced (every line); use 12-point type. The answers are due in class on Tuesday, September 8, when we will discuss them. “Simplicity,” William Zinsser, 201-206 1. What document or set of instructions have you read that you found wordy and difficult to read? How did you handle the situation? 2. What does Zinsser mean when he writes, “Our national tendency is to inflate and thereby sound important” (201)? Why is writing often like this? 3. What does the author say is the secret of good writing? Why is this secret important? 4. How can we, according to Zinsser, write clearly and simply? 5. Why is clear writing so important to today’s readers? 6. What two questions must the writer always ask? How might asking these questions during your writing—and when you are finished writing—improve your drafts? “The Maker’s Eye: Revising Your Own Manuscripts,” Donald M. Murray, 194-198.
 7. Murray lists many qualities of professional writers. What are three of them? 8. Why would science-fiction writer Ray Bradbury put away for one year a manuscript he has written, and then reread it “as a stranger” (195)? What would be the value of this? 9. For each of the following quotes by professional writers, write one sentence that summarizes the main point the writer is making: a) Nancy Hale: A writer “should be critical of everything that seems to him most delightful in his style. He should excise what he most admires because he wouldn’t thus admire it if he weren’t…in a sense protecting it from criticism” (195). b) John Ciardi: “The last act of the writing must be to become one’s own reader. It is, I suppose, a schizophrenic process, to begin passionately and to end critically, to begin hot and to end cold; and more important to be passion-hot and critic-cold at the same time” (195) c) Eleanor Estes: “The writer must survey his work critically, coolly, as though he were a stranger to it. He must be willing to prune, expertly and hard-heartedly. At the end of each revision, a manuscript may look…worked over, torn apart, pinned together, added to, deleted from, words changed and words changed back. Yet the book must maintain its orginal freshness and spontaneity” (195). d) Roald Dahl: “Good writing is essentially rewriting” (196). 10. Why do most readers, as Murray states, “underestimate the amount of rewriting it usually takes to produce spontaneous reading” (195)? Do you fit into this category? 11. List the 8 things the author says writers look for in creating their drafts. For each item on your list, write one sentence explaining what it means. 12. What are some of the things Murray says writers begin to learn by writing? Have you ever experienced any of these things when you were writing? Explain your answer. 13. What does Murray means when he states, “A piece of writing is never finished” (198)?

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