Define: 41 Things Philosophy is: 1. Ignorant 2. Selfish 3. Ironic 4. Plain 5. Misunderstood 6. A failure 7. Poor 8. Unscientific 9. Unteachable 10. Foolish 11. Abnormal 12. Divine trickery 13. Egalitarian 14. A divine calling 15. Laborious 16. Countercultural 17. Uncomfortable 18. Virtuous 19. Dangerous 20. Simplistic<br />21. Polemical 22. Therapeutic 23. “conformist” 24. Embarrassi ng 25. Invulnerable 26. Annoying 27. Pneumatic 28. Apolitic al 29. Docile/teachable 30. Messianic 31. Pious 32. Impract ical 33. Happy 34. Necessary 35. Death-defying 36. Fallible 37. Immortal 38. Confident 39. Painful 40. agnostic</br

Define: 41 Things Philosophy is: 1. Ignorant 2. Selfish 3. Ironic 4. Plain 5. Misunderstood 6. A failure 7. Poor 8. Unscientific 9. Unteachable 10. Foolish 11. Abnormal 12. Divine trickery 13. Egalitarian 14. A divine calling 15. Laborious 16. Countercultural 17. Uncomfortable 18. Virtuous 19. Dangerous 20. Simplistic
21. Polemical 22. Therapeutic 23. “conformist” 24. Embarrassi ng 25. Invulnerable 26. Annoying 27. Pneumatic 28. Apolitic al 29. Docile/teachable 30. Messianic 31. Pious 32. Impract ical 33. Happy 34. Necessary 35. Death-defying 36. Fallible 37. Immortal 38. Confident 39. Painful 40. agnostic

Ignorant- A person is said to be ignorant if he … Read More...
Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture Spring 2015 Look through popular magazines, and see if you can find advertisements that objectify women in order to sell a product. Alternately, you may use an advertisement on television (but make sure to provide a link to the ad so I can see it!). Study these images then write a paper about objectification that deals with all or some of the following: • What effect(s), if any, do you think the objectification of women’s bodies has on our culture? • Jean Kilbourne states “turning a human being into a thing is almost always the first step toward justifying violence against that person.” What do you think she means by this? Do you agree with her reasoning? Why or why not? • Some people would argue that depicting a woman’s body as an object is a form of art. What is your opinion of this point of view? Explain your reasoning. • Why do you think that women are objectified more often than men are? • How does sexualization and objectification play out differently across racial lines? • Kilbourne explains that the consequences of being objectified are different – and more serious – for women than for men. Do you agree? How is the world different for women than it is for men? How do objectified images of women interact with those in our culture differently from the way images of men do? Why is it important to look at images in the context of the culture? • What is the difference between sexual objectification and sexual subjectification? (Ros Gill ) • How do ads construct violent white masculinity and how does that vision of masculinity hurt both men and women? Throughout your written analysis, be sure to make clear and specific reference to the images you selected, and please submit these images with your paper. Make sure you engage with and reference to at least 4 of the following authors: Kilbourne, Bordo, Hunter & Soto, Rose, Durham, Gill, Katz, Schuchardt, Ono and Buescher. Guidelines:  Keep your content focused on structural, systemic, institutional factors rather than the individual: BE ANALYTICAL NOT ANECDOTAL.  Avoid using the first person or including personal stories/reactions. You must make sure to actively engage with your readings: these essays need to be informed and framed by the theoretical material you have been reading this semester.  Keep within the 4-6 page limit; use 12-point font, double spacing and 1-inch margins.  Use formal writing conventions (introduction/thesis statement, body, conclusion) and correct grammar. Resources may be cited within the text of your paper, i.e. (Walters, 2013).

Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture Spring 2015 Look through popular magazines, and see if you can find advertisements that objectify women in order to sell a product. Alternately, you may use an advertisement on television (but make sure to provide a link to the ad so I can see it!). Study these images then write a paper about objectification that deals with all or some of the following: • What effect(s), if any, do you think the objectification of women’s bodies has on our culture? • Jean Kilbourne states “turning a human being into a thing is almost always the first step toward justifying violence against that person.” What do you think she means by this? Do you agree with her reasoning? Why or why not? • Some people would argue that depicting a woman’s body as an object is a form of art. What is your opinion of this point of view? Explain your reasoning. • Why do you think that women are objectified more often than men are? • How does sexualization and objectification play out differently across racial lines? • Kilbourne explains that the consequences of being objectified are different – and more serious – for women than for men. Do you agree? How is the world different for women than it is for men? How do objectified images of women interact with those in our culture differently from the way images of men do? Why is it important to look at images in the context of the culture? • What is the difference between sexual objectification and sexual subjectification? (Ros Gill ) • How do ads construct violent white masculinity and how does that vision of masculinity hurt both men and women? Throughout your written analysis, be sure to make clear and specific reference to the images you selected, and please submit these images with your paper. Make sure you engage with and reference to at least 4 of the following authors: Kilbourne, Bordo, Hunter & Soto, Rose, Durham, Gill, Katz, Schuchardt, Ono and Buescher. Guidelines:  Keep your content focused on structural, systemic, institutional factors rather than the individual: BE ANALYTICAL NOT ANECDOTAL.  Avoid using the first person or including personal stories/reactions. You must make sure to actively engage with your readings: these essays need to be informed and framed by the theoretical material you have been reading this semester.  Keep within the 4-6 page limit; use 12-point font, double spacing and 1-inch margins.  Use formal writing conventions (introduction/thesis statement, body, conclusion) and correct grammar. Resources may be cited within the text of your paper, i.e. (Walters, 2013).

The objectification of women has been a very controversial topic … Read More...
2. Career development process is complex and rapidly evolving and new theories are continually developing presenting challenges to traditional understandings. Discuss why an understanding of career development processes is critical to management, employee and organizational success.

2. Career development process is complex and rapidly evolving and new theories are continually developing presenting challenges to traditional understandings. Discuss why an understanding of career development processes is critical to management, employee and organizational success.

Studies are at the present extrapolative huge employment income in … Read More...
. What behaviors indicate psychological distress? Name 5 and explain.

. What behaviors indicate psychological distress? Name 5 and explain.

The term ‘distress’ is commonly used in nursing literature to … Read More...
Fact Debate Brief Introduction Crime doesn’t pay; it should be punished. Even since childhood, a slap on the hand has prevented possible criminals from ever committing the same offense; whether it was successful or not depended on how much that child wanted that cookie. While a slap on the wrist might or might not be an effective deterrent, the same can be said about the death penalty. Every day, somewhere in the world, a criminal is stopped permanently from committing any future costs, but this is by the means of the death. While effective in stopping one person permanently, it does nothing about the crime world as a whole. While it is necessary to end the career of a criminal, no matter what his or her crime is, we must not end it by taking a life. Through this paper, the death penalty will be proven ineffective at deterring crime by use of other environmental factors. Definition: The death penalty is defined as the universal punishment of death as legally applied by a fair court system. It is important for it to be a fair legal system, as not to confuse it with genocide, mob mentality, or any other ruling without trial. Claim 1: Use of the death penalty is in decline Ground 1: According to the book The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective by Roger Hood and Carolyn Hoyle, published Dec. 8th, 2014, the Oxford professors in criminology say “As in most of the rest of the world, the death penalty in the US is in decline and distributed unevenly in frequency of use” even addressing that, as of April 2014, 18 states no longer have a death penalty, and even Oregon and Washington are considering removing their death penalty laws. Furthermore, in 2013, only 9 of these states still retaining the death penalty actually executed someone. Warrant 1: The death penalty can be reinstated at any time, but so far, it hasn’t been. At the same time, more states consider getting rid of it altogether. Therefore, it becomes clear that even states don’t want to be involved with this process showing that this is a disliked process. Claim 2: Even states with death penalty in effect still have high crime rates. Ground 2: With the reports gathered from fbi.gov, lawstreetmedia.com, a website based around political expertise and research determined the ranking of each state based on violent crime, published September 12th, 2014. Of the top ten most violent states, only three of which had the death penalty instituted (Maryland #9, New Mexico #4, Alaska #3). The other seven still had the system in place, and, despite it, still have a high amount of violent crime. On the opposite end of the spectrum, at the bottom ten most violent states, four of which, including the bottom-most states, do not have the death penalty in place. Warrant 2: With this ranking, it literally proves that the death penalty does not deter crime, or that there is a correlation between having the death penalty and having a decrease in the crime rate. Therefore, the idea of death penalty deterring crime is a null term in the sense that there is no, or a flawed connection. Claim 3: Violent crime is decreasing (but not because if the death penalty) Ground 3 A: According to an article published by The Economist, dated July 23rd, 2013, the rate of violent crime is in fact decreasing, but not because of the death penalty, but rather, because we have more police. From 1995 to 2010, policing has increased one-fifth, and with it, a decline in crime rate. In fact, in cities such as Detroit where policing has been cut, an opposite effect, an increase in crime, has been reported. Ground 3 B: An article from the Wall Street Journal, dated May 28th, 2011, also cites a decline in violent, only this time, citing the reason as a correlation with poverty levels. In 2009, at the start of the housing crisis, crime rates also dropped noticeably. Oddly enough, this article points out the belief that unemployment is often associated with crime; instead, the evidence presented is environmental in nature. Warrant 3: Crime rate isn’t deterred by death penalty, but rather, our surroundings. Seeing as how conditions have improved, so has the state of peace. Therefore, it becomes clear that the death penalty is ineffective at deterring crime because other key factors present more possibility for improvement of society. Claim 4: The death penalty is a historically flawed system. Ground 4A: According to the book The Death Penalty: Constitutional Issues, Commentaries, and Case Briefs by Scott Vollum, published in 2005, addresses how the case of the death penalty emerged to where it is today. While the book is now a decade old, it is used for historical context, particularly, in describing the first execution that took place in 1608. While it is true that most of these executions weren’t as well-grounded as the modern ones that take place now, they still had no effect in deterring crime. Why? Because even after America was established and more sane, the death penalty still had to be used because criminals still had violent behaviors. Ground 4B: According to data from Mother Jones, published May 17th, 2013, the reason why the crime rate was so high in the past could possibly be due to yet another environmental factor (affected by change over time), exposure to lead. Since the removal of lead from paint started over a hundred years ago, there has been a decline in homicide. Why is this important? Lead poisoning in child’s brain, if not lethal, can affect development and lead to mental disability, lower IQ, and lack of reasoning. Warrant 4: By examining history as a whole, there is a greater correlation between other factors that have resulted in a decline in violent crime. The decline in the crime rate has been an ongoing process, but has shown a faster decline due to other environmental factors, rather than the instatement of the death penalty. Claim 5: The world’s violent crime rate is changing, but not due to the death penalty. Ground 5A: According to article published by Amnesty USA in March of 2014, the number of executions under the death penalty reported in 2013 had increased by 15%. However, the rate of violent crime in the world has decreased significantly in the last decade. But, Latvia, for example, has permanently banned the death penalty since 2012. In 2014, the country was viewed overall as safe and low in violent crime rate. Ground 5B: However, while it is true that there is a decline in violent crime rate worldwide, The World Bank, April 17, 2013, reports that the rate of global poverty is decreasing. In a similar vein to the US, because wealth is being distributed better and conditions are improving overall, there is a steady decline in crime rate. Warrant 5: By examining the world as a whole, it becomes clear that it doesn’t matter if the death penalty is in place, violent crime will still exist. However, mirroring the US, as simple conditions improve, so does lifestyle. The death penalty does not deter crime in the world, rather a better quality of life is responsible for that. Works Cited “Death Sentences and Executions 2013.” Amnesty International USA. Amnesty USA, 26 Mar. 2014. Web. 15 Mar. 2015. <http://www.amnestyusa.org/research/reports/death-sentences-and-executions-2013>. D. K. “Why Is Crime Falling?” The Economist. The Economist Newspaper, 23 July 2013. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. <http://www.economist.com/blogs/economist-explains/2013/07/economist-explains-16>. Drum, Kevin. “The US Murder Rate Is on Track to Be Lowest in a Century.”Mother Jones. Mother Jones, 17 May 2013. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. <http://www.motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2013/05/us-murder-rate-track-be-lowest-century>. Hood, Roger, and Carolyn Hoyle. The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2002. 45. Print. Rizzo, Kevin. “Slideshow: America’s Safest and Most Dangerous States 2014.”Law Street Media. Law Street TM, 12 Sept. 2014. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. <http://lawstreetmedia.com/blogs/crime/safest-and-most-dangerous-states-2014/#slideshow>. Vollum, Scott. The Death Penalty: Constitutional Issues, Commentaries, and Case Briefs. Newark, NJ: LexisNexis, 2005. 2. Print. Theis, David. “Remarkable Declines in Global Poverty, But Major Challenges Remain.” The World Bank. The World Bank, 17 Apr. 2013. Web. 15 Mar. 2015. <http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/press-release/2013/04/17/remarkable-declines-in-global-poverty-but-major-challenges-remain>. Wilson, James Q. “Hard Times, Fewer Crimes.” WSJ. The Wall Street Journal, 28 May 2011. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. <http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052702304066504576345553135009870>.

Fact Debate Brief Introduction Crime doesn’t pay; it should be punished. Even since childhood, a slap on the hand has prevented possible criminals from ever committing the same offense; whether it was successful or not depended on how much that child wanted that cookie. While a slap on the wrist might or might not be an effective deterrent, the same can be said about the death penalty. Every day, somewhere in the world, a criminal is stopped permanently from committing any future costs, but this is by the means of the death. While effective in stopping one person permanently, it does nothing about the crime world as a whole. While it is necessary to end the career of a criminal, no matter what his or her crime is, we must not end it by taking a life. Through this paper, the death penalty will be proven ineffective at deterring crime by use of other environmental factors. Definition: The death penalty is defined as the universal punishment of death as legally applied by a fair court system. It is important for it to be a fair legal system, as not to confuse it with genocide, mob mentality, or any other ruling without trial. Claim 1: Use of the death penalty is in decline Ground 1: According to the book The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective by Roger Hood and Carolyn Hoyle, published Dec. 8th, 2014, the Oxford professors in criminology say “As in most of the rest of the world, the death penalty in the US is in decline and distributed unevenly in frequency of use” even addressing that, as of April 2014, 18 states no longer have a death penalty, and even Oregon and Washington are considering removing their death penalty laws. Furthermore, in 2013, only 9 of these states still retaining the death penalty actually executed someone. Warrant 1: The death penalty can be reinstated at any time, but so far, it hasn’t been. At the same time, more states consider getting rid of it altogether. Therefore, it becomes clear that even states don’t want to be involved with this process showing that this is a disliked process. Claim 2: Even states with death penalty in effect still have high crime rates. Ground 2: With the reports gathered from fbi.gov, lawstreetmedia.com, a website based around political expertise and research determined the ranking of each state based on violent crime, published September 12th, 2014. Of the top ten most violent states, only three of which had the death penalty instituted (Maryland #9, New Mexico #4, Alaska #3). The other seven still had the system in place, and, despite it, still have a high amount of violent crime. On the opposite end of the spectrum, at the bottom ten most violent states, four of which, including the bottom-most states, do not have the death penalty in place. Warrant 2: With this ranking, it literally proves that the death penalty does not deter crime, or that there is a correlation between having the death penalty and having a decrease in the crime rate. Therefore, the idea of death penalty deterring crime is a null term in the sense that there is no, or a flawed connection. Claim 3: Violent crime is decreasing (but not because if the death penalty) Ground 3 A: According to an article published by The Economist, dated July 23rd, 2013, the rate of violent crime is in fact decreasing, but not because of the death penalty, but rather, because we have more police. From 1995 to 2010, policing has increased one-fifth, and with it, a decline in crime rate. In fact, in cities such as Detroit where policing has been cut, an opposite effect, an increase in crime, has been reported. Ground 3 B: An article from the Wall Street Journal, dated May 28th, 2011, also cites a decline in violent, only this time, citing the reason as a correlation with poverty levels. In 2009, at the start of the housing crisis, crime rates also dropped noticeably. Oddly enough, this article points out the belief that unemployment is often associated with crime; instead, the evidence presented is environmental in nature. Warrant 3: Crime rate isn’t deterred by death penalty, but rather, our surroundings. Seeing as how conditions have improved, so has the state of peace. Therefore, it becomes clear that the death penalty is ineffective at deterring crime because other key factors present more possibility for improvement of society. Claim 4: The death penalty is a historically flawed system. Ground 4A: According to the book The Death Penalty: Constitutional Issues, Commentaries, and Case Briefs by Scott Vollum, published in 2005, addresses how the case of the death penalty emerged to where it is today. While the book is now a decade old, it is used for historical context, particularly, in describing the first execution that took place in 1608. While it is true that most of these executions weren’t as well-grounded as the modern ones that take place now, they still had no effect in deterring crime. Why? Because even after America was established and more sane, the death penalty still had to be used because criminals still had violent behaviors. Ground 4B: According to data from Mother Jones, published May 17th, 2013, the reason why the crime rate was so high in the past could possibly be due to yet another environmental factor (affected by change over time), exposure to lead. Since the removal of lead from paint started over a hundred years ago, there has been a decline in homicide. Why is this important? Lead poisoning in child’s brain, if not lethal, can affect development and lead to mental disability, lower IQ, and lack of reasoning. Warrant 4: By examining history as a whole, there is a greater correlation between other factors that have resulted in a decline in violent crime. The decline in the crime rate has been an ongoing process, but has shown a faster decline due to other environmental factors, rather than the instatement of the death penalty. Claim 5: The world’s violent crime rate is changing, but not due to the death penalty. Ground 5A: According to article published by Amnesty USA in March of 2014, the number of executions under the death penalty reported in 2013 had increased by 15%. However, the rate of violent crime in the world has decreased significantly in the last decade. But, Latvia, for example, has permanently banned the death penalty since 2012. In 2014, the country was viewed overall as safe and low in violent crime rate. Ground 5B: However, while it is true that there is a decline in violent crime rate worldwide, The World Bank, April 17, 2013, reports that the rate of global poverty is decreasing. In a similar vein to the US, because wealth is being distributed better and conditions are improving overall, there is a steady decline in crime rate. Warrant 5: By examining the world as a whole, it becomes clear that it doesn’t matter if the death penalty is in place, violent crime will still exist. However, mirroring the US, as simple conditions improve, so does lifestyle. The death penalty does not deter crime in the world, rather a better quality of life is responsible for that. Works Cited “Death Sentences and Executions 2013.” Amnesty International USA. Amnesty USA, 26 Mar. 2014. Web. 15 Mar. 2015. . D. K. “Why Is Crime Falling?” The Economist. The Economist Newspaper, 23 July 2013. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. . Drum, Kevin. “The US Murder Rate Is on Track to Be Lowest in a Century.”Mother Jones. Mother Jones, 17 May 2013. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. . Hood, Roger, and Carolyn Hoyle. The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2002. 45. Print. Rizzo, Kevin. “Slideshow: America’s Safest and Most Dangerous States 2014.”Law Street Media. Law Street TM, 12 Sept. 2014. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. . Vollum, Scott. The Death Penalty: Constitutional Issues, Commentaries, and Case Briefs. Newark, NJ: LexisNexis, 2005. 2. Print. Theis, David. “Remarkable Declines in Global Poverty, But Major Challenges Remain.” The World Bank. The World Bank, 17 Apr. 2013. Web. 15 Mar. 2015. . Wilson, James Q. “Hard Times, Fewer Crimes.” WSJ. The Wall Street Journal, 28 May 2011. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. .

Fact Debate Brief Introduction Crime doesn’t pay; it should be … Read More...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UnKEFSVAiNQ Watch the video, and then answer the questions below. According to realism, which of the following represents something that states would NOT seek? A. security B. prestige C. autonomy D. wealth E. permanent cooperation Schweller suggests that realists are wary of interdependence. If that is true, which of the following might be the most acceptable to a realist? A. creating a permanent pact of nonviolence with all English-speaking countries B. establishing an alliance to defend the U.S. against an invading country C. turning North America into something similar to the European Union, with a unified currency D. permitting the United Nations to run a global military so that the U.S. can reduce its military spending E. entering into a global production agreement in which the U.S. only manufactures computers Based on the video, which of the following statements about realists would seem to be false? A. Realists see the world as perpetually violent and full of war. B. Realists see humans as basically self-interested. C. Realists believe that the absence of a threat means a country should retrench. D. Realists believe that intervening in other countries to spread democracy is dangerous. E. Realists believe that autonomy is better than interdependence. What does Schweller mean by his statement that “there is no 911”? A. There is no global authority that is guaranteed to help any state in trouble. B. The world needs a central government to provide a universal social safety net. C. States need to cooperate more with each other in order to provide greater security for all. D. The United Nations is terrible at dealing with international emergencies. E. Islamic terrorists were not responsible for the attacks of September 11, 2001. Which of the following would be the best way to convince a realist to go to war? A. argue that we signed a treaty to protect that country B. argue that the country we are helping to defend was an ally in a prior war C. argue that it will provide the world with a chance at long-term peace and stability D. argue that the other country is a direct threat to our interests E. argue that if we do not intervene, the United Nations will

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UnKEFSVAiNQ Watch the video, and then answer the questions below. According to realism, which of the following represents something that states would NOT seek? A. security B. prestige C. autonomy D. wealth E. permanent cooperation Schweller suggests that realists are wary of interdependence. If that is true, which of the following might be the most acceptable to a realist? A. creating a permanent pact of nonviolence with all English-speaking countries B. establishing an alliance to defend the U.S. against an invading country C. turning North America into something similar to the European Union, with a unified currency D. permitting the United Nations to run a global military so that the U.S. can reduce its military spending E. entering into a global production agreement in which the U.S. only manufactures computers Based on the video, which of the following statements about realists would seem to be false? A. Realists see the world as perpetually violent and full of war. B. Realists see humans as basically self-interested. C. Realists believe that the absence of a threat means a country should retrench. D. Realists believe that intervening in other countries to spread democracy is dangerous. E. Realists believe that autonomy is better than interdependence. What does Schweller mean by his statement that “there is no 911”? A. There is no global authority that is guaranteed to help any state in trouble. B. The world needs a central government to provide a universal social safety net. C. States need to cooperate more with each other in order to provide greater security for all. D. The United Nations is terrible at dealing with international emergencies. E. Islamic terrorists were not responsible for the attacks of September 11, 2001. Which of the following would be the best way to convince a realist to go to war? A. argue that we signed a treaty to protect that country B. argue that the country we are helping to defend was an ally in a prior war C. argue that it will provide the world with a chance at long-term peace and stability D. argue that the other country is a direct threat to our interests E. argue that if we do not intervene, the United Nations will

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UnKEFSVAiNQ   Watch the video, and then answer the questions … Read More...
Use the links provided to answer the questions below. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9tt6BQDVKu0 http://assets.soomopublishing.com/courses/AG/Fragile_Superpower.pdf NIE Report Why does the report suggest that China and India may or may not become dominant powers in the near future? A. Both countries have high economic and social hurdles to overcome. B. Both countries are only somewhat democratic. C. Both countries lack the military strength and nuclear weaponry to challenge even smaller states. D. Neither country is a member of the UN Security Council. E. Neither country is concerned about global warming and is therefore unfit to become a great power player. According to the U.S. intelligence report discussed in the video, why will the use of nuclear weapons grow more likely? A. Irresponsible powerful countries will want to strike the United States to take over its dominant role in the world. B. There will be a tendency to forget just how dangerous they are as we over-emphasize the importance of international trade. C. Rogue states and terrorist groups may be able to gain greater access to these weapons. D. Since the United States and the Soviet Union are rapidly increasing their weapons building programs, the chances of a nuclear incident becomes higher. E. China is likely to produce nuclear weapons to use against the United States and the Soviet Union. According to the video, is the United States likely to lose its position in the world soon? A. Yes, given the rapid rise of China, we will be seeing a challenge from China in the next 5-10 years. B. Yes, China, in conjunction with India, will rise up against the United States. C. Yes, the Russians are working to undermine the U.S. position actively. D. No, although there appears to be decline, the replacement of the United States as the world leader is not likely to come in the next 10 years. E. No, the United States will actually lose its position after its departure from Iraq in 2012. The Rise of a Fierce Yet Fragile Superpower Why does Susan Shirk say that China is fragile? A. China is fragile because it isn’t a democratic country and will have a difficult time managing relations with other states because of this. B. China is fragile because it has a shrinking economy, so despite its size, China is actually very weak. C. China is fragile because its leaders tend to exacerbate the tensions between states like the Soviet Union and the United States. D. China is fragile because it cannot develop a strong sense of human rights and so its people may try to revolt against it. E. China is fragile because its rate of expansion has created gaps between the wealthy and poor and it has a problem of control with decentralized local governing structures. According to scholars, is a war between the rising power and the current power leader inevitable? A. No, while some scholars believe this is true, others suggest that a “peaceful rise” is possible. B. No, history indicates that all great power transitions have been peaceful. C. Yes, scholars indicate that all of our historical examples of great power transition have been through war. D. Yes, although there are examples of peaceful rise, there is too much cultural difference for that to occur with China. E. Yes, since tension between the United States and China is so strong, scholars agree that a war is coming.

Use the links provided to answer the questions below. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9tt6BQDVKu0 http://assets.soomopublishing.com/courses/AG/Fragile_Superpower.pdf NIE Report Why does the report suggest that China and India may or may not become dominant powers in the near future? A. Both countries have high economic and social hurdles to overcome. B. Both countries are only somewhat democratic. C. Both countries lack the military strength and nuclear weaponry to challenge even smaller states. D. Neither country is a member of the UN Security Council. E. Neither country is concerned about global warming and is therefore unfit to become a great power player. According to the U.S. intelligence report discussed in the video, why will the use of nuclear weapons grow more likely? A. Irresponsible powerful countries will want to strike the United States to take over its dominant role in the world. B. There will be a tendency to forget just how dangerous they are as we over-emphasize the importance of international trade. C. Rogue states and terrorist groups may be able to gain greater access to these weapons. D. Since the United States and the Soviet Union are rapidly increasing their weapons building programs, the chances of a nuclear incident becomes higher. E. China is likely to produce nuclear weapons to use against the United States and the Soviet Union. According to the video, is the United States likely to lose its position in the world soon? A. Yes, given the rapid rise of China, we will be seeing a challenge from China in the next 5-10 years. B. Yes, China, in conjunction with India, will rise up against the United States. C. Yes, the Russians are working to undermine the U.S. position actively. D. No, although there appears to be decline, the replacement of the United States as the world leader is not likely to come in the next 10 years. E. No, the United States will actually lose its position after its departure from Iraq in 2012. The Rise of a Fierce Yet Fragile Superpower Why does Susan Shirk say that China is fragile? A. China is fragile because it isn’t a democratic country and will have a difficult time managing relations with other states because of this. B. China is fragile because it has a shrinking economy, so despite its size, China is actually very weak. C. China is fragile because its leaders tend to exacerbate the tensions between states like the Soviet Union and the United States. D. China is fragile because it cannot develop a strong sense of human rights and so its people may try to revolt against it. E. China is fragile because its rate of expansion has created gaps between the wealthy and poor and it has a problem of control with decentralized local governing structures. According to scholars, is a war between the rising power and the current power leader inevitable? A. No, while some scholars believe this is true, others suggest that a “peaceful rise” is possible. B. No, history indicates that all great power transitions have been peaceful. C. Yes, scholars indicate that all of our historical examples of great power transition have been through war. D. Yes, although there are examples of peaceful rise, there is too much cultural difference for that to occur with China. E. Yes, since tension between the United States and China is so strong, scholars agree that a war is coming.

Use the links provided to answer the questions below. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9tt6BQDVKu0 … Read More...
GLG 110: Dangerous World Assignment #2: Landslides Part 1: Disasters in the News On March 22nd 2014, a large landslide occurred near Oso, Washington. As of July 23rd, 2014, all remains had been recovered and the death toll stood at 43 people. Lots of information about the landslide can be found on the American Geophysical Union’s Landslide blog. Read about the landslide here (don’t worry, each entry is quite short): http://blogs.agu.org/landslideblog/2014/03/23/oso-landslide-1/ http://blogs.agu.org/landslideblog/2014/03/24/oso-landslip-useful-resources/ http://blogs.agu.org/landslideblog/2014/03/25/the-steelhead-landslide-1/ http://blogs.agu.org/landslideblog/2014/03/28/oso-mechanisms-1/ http://blogs.agu.org/landslideblog/2014/04/02/steelhead-landslide-in-washington/ Answer the following questions: 1) Describe the factors that led to this landslide: What type of material was involved- how cohesive/prone to failure is it? Was the cause primarily due to a change in slope, a change in friction/cohesion, or addition of mass? What was this cause? 2) Was the cause of this slide natural, man-made, or a combination of both? 3) Discuss the hazard assessment/mitigation efforts in effect before the slide. What evidence in the surrounding geology/geography suggests an existing landslide hazard? Was anything being to done to reduce the risk of a damaging landslide? For questions 4 & 5, use the photo of the Oso Landslide below: 4) What type of slide do you think this is (rotational or translational)? What visual evidence in the photo above supports your choice? 5) On the image above and using diagrams from the lecture and your textbook, label the different parts of the slide. Terms you can include, but are not limited to, are: scarp, original surface, toe, head, foot. 6) When the failed material entered the river, it created another type of mass movement; what is this mass movement and why did it make the slide more damaging? Part 2: A little physics (it is a science class after all) We discussed in class how whether or not a slope will fail is based on the balance of gravitational vs. frictional forces using the following diagram and equations: For simplicity, we will ignore FR, the force of the base of the slope supporting the upper slope. In the case shown above, for the slope to be stable, the frictional resistance force, Ff, must be larger than the gravitational force acting down the slope, Fll: Fll < Ff 7) For a slope with angle θ = 30o and coefficient of friction μ = 0.6, is the slope stable? Please show your work, partial credit will be given. Please put a box around your answer. 8) For a slope with θ = 15o, for what values of μ will the slope be unstable? In other words, at what value of μ does, Fll = Ff, such that any decrease in μ will result in a slope failure? Please show your work, partial credit will be given. Please put a box around your answer. 9) For a slope where the cohesion of the vegetation and soil leads to a coefficient of friction of μ = 0.75, above what slope angle θ will the slope fail? Note: please answer in degrees, not radians. Please show your work, partial credit will be given. Please put a box around your answer. 10) Describe why the mass of a potential slide, in the slope force balance used above, does not affect whether or not the slope will fail.

GLG 110: Dangerous World Assignment #2: Landslides Part 1: Disasters in the News On March 22nd 2014, a large landslide occurred near Oso, Washington. As of July 23rd, 2014, all remains had been recovered and the death toll stood at 43 people. Lots of information about the landslide can be found on the American Geophysical Union’s Landslide blog. Read about the landslide here (don’t worry, each entry is quite short): http://blogs.agu.org/landslideblog/2014/03/23/oso-landslide-1/ http://blogs.agu.org/landslideblog/2014/03/24/oso-landslip-useful-resources/ http://blogs.agu.org/landslideblog/2014/03/25/the-steelhead-landslide-1/ http://blogs.agu.org/landslideblog/2014/03/28/oso-mechanisms-1/ http://blogs.agu.org/landslideblog/2014/04/02/steelhead-landslide-in-washington/ Answer the following questions: 1) Describe the factors that led to this landslide: What type of material was involved- how cohesive/prone to failure is it? Was the cause primarily due to a change in slope, a change in friction/cohesion, or addition of mass? What was this cause? 2) Was the cause of this slide natural, man-made, or a combination of both? 3) Discuss the hazard assessment/mitigation efforts in effect before the slide. What evidence in the surrounding geology/geography suggests an existing landslide hazard? Was anything being to done to reduce the risk of a damaging landslide? For questions 4 & 5, use the photo of the Oso Landslide below: 4) What type of slide do you think this is (rotational or translational)? What visual evidence in the photo above supports your choice? 5) On the image above and using diagrams from the lecture and your textbook, label the different parts of the slide. Terms you can include, but are not limited to, are: scarp, original surface, toe, head, foot. 6) When the failed material entered the river, it created another type of mass movement; what is this mass movement and why did it make the slide more damaging? Part 2: A little physics (it is a science class after all) We discussed in class how whether or not a slope will fail is based on the balance of gravitational vs. frictional forces using the following diagram and equations: For simplicity, we will ignore FR, the force of the base of the slope supporting the upper slope. In the case shown above, for the slope to be stable, the frictional resistance force, Ff, must be larger than the gravitational force acting down the slope, Fll: Fll < Ff 7) For a slope with angle θ = 30o and coefficient of friction μ = 0.6, is the slope stable? Please show your work, partial credit will be given. Please put a box around your answer. 8) For a slope with θ = 15o, for what values of μ will the slope be unstable? In other words, at what value of μ does, Fll = Ff, such that any decrease in μ will result in a slope failure? Please show your work, partial credit will be given. Please put a box around your answer. 9) For a slope where the cohesion of the vegetation and soil leads to a coefficient of friction of μ = 0.75, above what slope angle θ will the slope fail? Note: please answer in degrees, not radians. Please show your work, partial credit will be given. Please put a box around your answer. 10) Describe why the mass of a potential slide, in the slope force balance used above, does not affect whether or not the slope will fail.

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