Fact Debate Brief Introduction Crime doesn’t pay; it should be punished. Even since childhood, a slap on the hand has prevented possible criminals from ever committing the same offense; whether it was successful or not depended on how much that child wanted that cookie. While a slap on the wrist might or might not be an effective deterrent, the same can be said about the death penalty. Every day, somewhere in the world, a criminal is stopped permanently from committing any future costs, but this is by the means of the death. While effective in stopping one person permanently, it does nothing about the crime world as a whole. While it is necessary to end the career of a criminal, no matter what his or her crime is, we must not end it by taking a life. Through this paper, the death penalty will be proven ineffective at deterring crime by use of other environmental factors. Definition: The death penalty is defined as the universal punishment of death as legally applied by a fair court system. It is important for it to be a fair legal system, as not to confuse it with genocide, mob mentality, or any other ruling without trial. Claim 1: Use of the death penalty is in decline Ground 1: According to the book The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective by Roger Hood and Carolyn Hoyle, published Dec. 8th, 2014, the Oxford professors in criminology say “As in most of the rest of the world, the death penalty in the US is in decline and distributed unevenly in frequency of use” even addressing that, as of April 2014, 18 states no longer have a death penalty, and even Oregon and Washington are considering removing their death penalty laws. Furthermore, in 2013, only 9 of these states still retaining the death penalty actually executed someone. Warrant 1: The death penalty can be reinstated at any time, but so far, it hasn’t been. At the same time, more states consider getting rid of it altogether. Therefore, it becomes clear that even states don’t want to be involved with this process showing that this is a disliked process. Claim 2: Even states with death penalty in effect still have high crime rates. Ground 2: With the reports gathered from fbi.gov, lawstreetmedia.com, a website based around political expertise and research determined the ranking of each state based on violent crime, published September 12th, 2014. Of the top ten most violent states, only three of which had the death penalty instituted (Maryland #9, New Mexico #4, Alaska #3). The other seven still had the system in place, and, despite it, still have a high amount of violent crime. On the opposite end of the spectrum, at the bottom ten most violent states, four of which, including the bottom-most states, do not have the death penalty in place. Warrant 2: With this ranking, it literally proves that the death penalty does not deter crime, or that there is a correlation between having the death penalty and having a decrease in the crime rate. Therefore, the idea of death penalty deterring crime is a null term in the sense that there is no, or a flawed connection. Claim 3: Violent crime is decreasing (but not because if the death penalty) Ground 3 A: According to an article published by The Economist, dated July 23rd, 2013, the rate of violent crime is in fact decreasing, but not because of the death penalty, but rather, because we have more police. From 1995 to 2010, policing has increased one-fifth, and with it, a decline in crime rate. In fact, in cities such as Detroit where policing has been cut, an opposite effect, an increase in crime, has been reported. Ground 3 B: An article from the Wall Street Journal, dated May 28th, 2011, also cites a decline in violent, only this time, citing the reason as a correlation with poverty levels. In 2009, at the start of the housing crisis, crime rates also dropped noticeably. Oddly enough, this article points out the belief that unemployment is often associated with crime; instead, the evidence presented is environmental in nature. Warrant 3: Crime rate isn’t deterred by death penalty, but rather, our surroundings. Seeing as how conditions have improved, so has the state of peace. Therefore, it becomes clear that the death penalty is ineffective at deterring crime because other key factors present more possibility for improvement of society. Claim 4: The death penalty is a historically flawed system. Ground 4A: According to the book The Death Penalty: Constitutional Issues, Commentaries, and Case Briefs by Scott Vollum, published in 2005, addresses how the case of the death penalty emerged to where it is today. While the book is now a decade old, it is used for historical context, particularly, in describing the first execution that took place in 1608. While it is true that most of these executions weren’t as well-grounded as the modern ones that take place now, they still had no effect in deterring crime. Why? Because even after America was established and more sane, the death penalty still had to be used because criminals still had violent behaviors. Ground 4B: According to data from Mother Jones, published May 17th, 2013, the reason why the crime rate was so high in the past could possibly be due to yet another environmental factor (affected by change over time), exposure to lead. Since the removal of lead from paint started over a hundred years ago, there has been a decline in homicide. Why is this important? Lead poisoning in child’s brain, if not lethal, can affect development and lead to mental disability, lower IQ, and lack of reasoning. Warrant 4: By examining history as a whole, there is a greater correlation between other factors that have resulted in a decline in violent crime. The decline in the crime rate has been an ongoing process, but has shown a faster decline due to other environmental factors, rather than the instatement of the death penalty. Claim 5: The world’s violent crime rate is changing, but not due to the death penalty. Ground 5A: According to article published by Amnesty USA in March of 2014, the number of executions under the death penalty reported in 2013 had increased by 15%. However, the rate of violent crime in the world has decreased significantly in the last decade. But, Latvia, for example, has permanently banned the death penalty since 2012. In 2014, the country was viewed overall as safe and low in violent crime rate. Ground 5B: However, while it is true that there is a decline in violent crime rate worldwide, The World Bank, April 17, 2013, reports that the rate of global poverty is decreasing. In a similar vein to the US, because wealth is being distributed better and conditions are improving overall, there is a steady decline in crime rate. Warrant 5: By examining the world as a whole, it becomes clear that it doesn’t matter if the death penalty is in place, violent crime will still exist. However, mirroring the US, as simple conditions improve, so does lifestyle. The death penalty does not deter crime in the world, rather a better quality of life is responsible for that. Works Cited “Death Sentences and Executions 2013.” Amnesty International USA. Amnesty USA, 26 Mar. 2014. Web. 15 Mar. 2015. <http://www.amnestyusa.org/research/reports/death-sentences-and-executions-2013>. D. K. “Why Is Crime Falling?” The Economist. The Economist Newspaper, 23 July 2013. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. <http://www.economist.com/blogs/economist-explains/2013/07/economist-explains-16>. Drum, Kevin. “The US Murder Rate Is on Track to Be Lowest in a Century.”Mother Jones. Mother Jones, 17 May 2013. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. <http://www.motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2013/05/us-murder-rate-track-be-lowest-century>. Hood, Roger, and Carolyn Hoyle. The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2002. 45. Print. Rizzo, Kevin. “Slideshow: America’s Safest and Most Dangerous States 2014.”Law Street Media. Law Street TM, 12 Sept. 2014. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. <http://lawstreetmedia.com/blogs/crime/safest-and-most-dangerous-states-2014/#slideshow>. Vollum, Scott. The Death Penalty: Constitutional Issues, Commentaries, and Case Briefs. Newark, NJ: LexisNexis, 2005. 2. Print. Theis, David. “Remarkable Declines in Global Poverty, But Major Challenges Remain.” The World Bank. The World Bank, 17 Apr. 2013. Web. 15 Mar. 2015. <http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/press-release/2013/04/17/remarkable-declines-in-global-poverty-but-major-challenges-remain>. Wilson, James Q. “Hard Times, Fewer Crimes.” WSJ. The Wall Street Journal, 28 May 2011. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. <http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052702304066504576345553135009870>.

Fact Debate Brief Introduction Crime doesn’t pay; it should be punished. Even since childhood, a slap on the hand has prevented possible criminals from ever committing the same offense; whether it was successful or not depended on how much that child wanted that cookie. While a slap on the wrist might or might not be an effective deterrent, the same can be said about the death penalty. Every day, somewhere in the world, a criminal is stopped permanently from committing any future costs, but this is by the means of the death. While effective in stopping one person permanently, it does nothing about the crime world as a whole. While it is necessary to end the career of a criminal, no matter what his or her crime is, we must not end it by taking a life. Through this paper, the death penalty will be proven ineffective at deterring crime by use of other environmental factors. Definition: The death penalty is defined as the universal punishment of death as legally applied by a fair court system. It is important for it to be a fair legal system, as not to confuse it with genocide, mob mentality, or any other ruling without trial. Claim 1: Use of the death penalty is in decline Ground 1: According to the book The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective by Roger Hood and Carolyn Hoyle, published Dec. 8th, 2014, the Oxford professors in criminology say “As in most of the rest of the world, the death penalty in the US is in decline and distributed unevenly in frequency of use” even addressing that, as of April 2014, 18 states no longer have a death penalty, and even Oregon and Washington are considering removing their death penalty laws. Furthermore, in 2013, only 9 of these states still retaining the death penalty actually executed someone. Warrant 1: The death penalty can be reinstated at any time, but so far, it hasn’t been. At the same time, more states consider getting rid of it altogether. Therefore, it becomes clear that even states don’t want to be involved with this process showing that this is a disliked process. Claim 2: Even states with death penalty in effect still have high crime rates. Ground 2: With the reports gathered from fbi.gov, lawstreetmedia.com, a website based around political expertise and research determined the ranking of each state based on violent crime, published September 12th, 2014. Of the top ten most violent states, only three of which had the death penalty instituted (Maryland #9, New Mexico #4, Alaska #3). The other seven still had the system in place, and, despite it, still have a high amount of violent crime. On the opposite end of the spectrum, at the bottom ten most violent states, four of which, including the bottom-most states, do not have the death penalty in place. Warrant 2: With this ranking, it literally proves that the death penalty does not deter crime, or that there is a correlation between having the death penalty and having a decrease in the crime rate. Therefore, the idea of death penalty deterring crime is a null term in the sense that there is no, or a flawed connection. Claim 3: Violent crime is decreasing (but not because if the death penalty) Ground 3 A: According to an article published by The Economist, dated July 23rd, 2013, the rate of violent crime is in fact decreasing, but not because of the death penalty, but rather, because we have more police. From 1995 to 2010, policing has increased one-fifth, and with it, a decline in crime rate. In fact, in cities such as Detroit where policing has been cut, an opposite effect, an increase in crime, has been reported. Ground 3 B: An article from the Wall Street Journal, dated May 28th, 2011, also cites a decline in violent, only this time, citing the reason as a correlation with poverty levels. In 2009, at the start of the housing crisis, crime rates also dropped noticeably. Oddly enough, this article points out the belief that unemployment is often associated with crime; instead, the evidence presented is environmental in nature. Warrant 3: Crime rate isn’t deterred by death penalty, but rather, our surroundings. Seeing as how conditions have improved, so has the state of peace. Therefore, it becomes clear that the death penalty is ineffective at deterring crime because other key factors present more possibility for improvement of society. Claim 4: The death penalty is a historically flawed system. Ground 4A: According to the book The Death Penalty: Constitutional Issues, Commentaries, and Case Briefs by Scott Vollum, published in 2005, addresses how the case of the death penalty emerged to where it is today. While the book is now a decade old, it is used for historical context, particularly, in describing the first execution that took place in 1608. While it is true that most of these executions weren’t as well-grounded as the modern ones that take place now, they still had no effect in deterring crime. Why? Because even after America was established and more sane, the death penalty still had to be used because criminals still had violent behaviors. Ground 4B: According to data from Mother Jones, published May 17th, 2013, the reason why the crime rate was so high in the past could possibly be due to yet another environmental factor (affected by change over time), exposure to lead. Since the removal of lead from paint started over a hundred years ago, there has been a decline in homicide. Why is this important? Lead poisoning in child’s brain, if not lethal, can affect development and lead to mental disability, lower IQ, and lack of reasoning. Warrant 4: By examining history as a whole, there is a greater correlation between other factors that have resulted in a decline in violent crime. The decline in the crime rate has been an ongoing process, but has shown a faster decline due to other environmental factors, rather than the instatement of the death penalty. Claim 5: The world’s violent crime rate is changing, but not due to the death penalty. Ground 5A: According to article published by Amnesty USA in March of 2014, the number of executions under the death penalty reported in 2013 had increased by 15%. However, the rate of violent crime in the world has decreased significantly in the last decade. But, Latvia, for example, has permanently banned the death penalty since 2012. In 2014, the country was viewed overall as safe and low in violent crime rate. Ground 5B: However, while it is true that there is a decline in violent crime rate worldwide, The World Bank, April 17, 2013, reports that the rate of global poverty is decreasing. In a similar vein to the US, because wealth is being distributed better and conditions are improving overall, there is a steady decline in crime rate. Warrant 5: By examining the world as a whole, it becomes clear that it doesn’t matter if the death penalty is in place, violent crime will still exist. However, mirroring the US, as simple conditions improve, so does lifestyle. The death penalty does not deter crime in the world, rather a better quality of life is responsible for that. Works Cited “Death Sentences and Executions 2013.” Amnesty International USA. Amnesty USA, 26 Mar. 2014. Web. 15 Mar. 2015. . D. K. “Why Is Crime Falling?” The Economist. The Economist Newspaper, 23 July 2013. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. . Drum, Kevin. “The US Murder Rate Is on Track to Be Lowest in a Century.”Mother Jones. Mother Jones, 17 May 2013. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. . Hood, Roger, and Carolyn Hoyle. The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2002. 45. Print. Rizzo, Kevin. “Slideshow: America’s Safest and Most Dangerous States 2014.”Law Street Media. Law Street TM, 12 Sept. 2014. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. . Vollum, Scott. The Death Penalty: Constitutional Issues, Commentaries, and Case Briefs. Newark, NJ: LexisNexis, 2005. 2. Print. Theis, David. “Remarkable Declines in Global Poverty, But Major Challenges Remain.” The World Bank. The World Bank, 17 Apr. 2013. Web. 15 Mar. 2015. . Wilson, James Q. “Hard Times, Fewer Crimes.” WSJ. The Wall Street Journal, 28 May 2011. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. .

Fact Debate Brief Introduction Crime doesn’t pay; it should be … Read More...
After reading about the life, trial, and death of Socrates, what do you think about Socrates’ address to the Athenians at his trial, when he said, “The unexamined life is not worth living?” How does it relate to examples in your own life?

After reading about the life, trial, and death of Socrates, what do you think about Socrates’ address to the Athenians at his trial, when he said, “The unexamined life is not worth living?” How does it relate to examples in your own life?

Socrates assumed that the reason of human life was individual … Read More...
Gene therapy may be used in the future to fight cancer by inserting genes that Select one: fight off mutations of the patient’s DNA. produce radioactive isotopes. cause cell death. produce anticancer drugs. all of the above.

Gene therapy may be used in the future to fight cancer by inserting genes that Select one: fight off mutations of the patient’s DNA. produce radioactive isotopes. cause cell death. produce anticancer drugs. all of the above.

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Question 10 (1 point) In contrast to Freud’s theory, object relations theorists Question 10 options: focus on internal drives and conflicts. are interested in the intellectual and emotional development of the infant. are interested in an infant’s relationship with his or her parents. do not believe that children develop unconscious representations of significant objects in their environment. ________________________________________ Question 11 (1 point) The psychologists who developed the frustration aggression hypothesis used or adapted each of the following concepts from Freudian theory except one. Which one? Question 11 options: displacement sublimation catharsis reinforcement Question 12 (1 point) Although he changed his mind during his career, which of the following did Freud eventually decide was the cause of human aggression? Question 12 options: a death instinct frustration projection unresolved Oedipal conflicts Question 13 (1 point) Freud wrote about all of the following types of anxiety except one. Which one? Question 13 options: reality anxiety neurotic anxiety moral anxiety performance anxiety Question 14 (1 point) Which of the following is true about neurotic anxiety, as conceived by Freud? Question 14 options: It is experienced when id impulses are close to breaking into consciousness. It prevents the ego from utilizing defense mechanisms. It is created when id impulses violate society’s moral code. People experiencing neurotic anxiety usually are aware of what is making them anxious. Question 15 (1 point) One explanation for why aggression leads to more aggression is that it is reinforced by the cathartic release of tension. Question 15 options: True False ________________________________________ ________________________________________ Question 1 (1 point) A man is said to have one personality trait that dominates his personality. Allport would identify this personality trait as a Question 1 options: 1) common trait. 2) central trait. 3) cardinal trait. 4) secondary trait. Question 2 (1 point) Which of the following is true about the trait approach to personality? Question 2 options: 1) Trait researchers generally are not interested in understanding and predicting the behavior of a single individual. 2) It is not easy to make comparisons across people with the trait approach. 3) The trait approach has been responsible for generating a number of useful approaches to psychotherapy. 4) Trait theorists place a greater emphasis on discovering the mechanisms underlying behavior than do theorists from other approaches to personality. Question 3 (1 point) Many researchers fail to produce strong links between personality traits and behavior. Epstein has argued that the reason for this failure is because Question 3 options: 1) researchers don’t perform the correct statistical analysis. 2) researchers don’t measure personality traits correctly. 3) researchers don’t measure behavior correctly. 4) none of the above Question 4 (1 point) Which theorist had a strong influence on Henry Murray’s theorizing about personality? Question 4 options: 1) Gordon Allport 2) Alfred Adler 3) Sigmund Freud 4) Carl Jung Question 5 (1 point) Sometimes test makers include the same test questions more than once on the test. This is done to detect which potential problem? Question 5 options: 1) faking good 2) faking bad 3) carelessness and sabotage 4) social desirability

Question 10 (1 point) In contrast to Freud’s theory, object relations theorists Question 10 options: focus on internal drives and conflicts. are interested in the intellectual and emotional development of the infant. are interested in an infant’s relationship with his or her parents. do not believe that children develop unconscious representations of significant objects in their environment. ________________________________________ Question 11 (1 point) The psychologists who developed the frustration aggression hypothesis used or adapted each of the following concepts from Freudian theory except one. Which one? Question 11 options: displacement sublimation catharsis reinforcement Question 12 (1 point) Although he changed his mind during his career, which of the following did Freud eventually decide was the cause of human aggression? Question 12 options: a death instinct frustration projection unresolved Oedipal conflicts Question 13 (1 point) Freud wrote about all of the following types of anxiety except one. Which one? Question 13 options: reality anxiety neurotic anxiety moral anxiety performance anxiety Question 14 (1 point) Which of the following is true about neurotic anxiety, as conceived by Freud? Question 14 options: It is experienced when id impulses are close to breaking into consciousness. It prevents the ego from utilizing defense mechanisms. It is created when id impulses violate society’s moral code. People experiencing neurotic anxiety usually are aware of what is making them anxious. Question 15 (1 point) One explanation for why aggression leads to more aggression is that it is reinforced by the cathartic release of tension. Question 15 options: True False ________________________________________ ________________________________________ Question 1 (1 point) A man is said to have one personality trait that dominates his personality. Allport would identify this personality trait as a Question 1 options: 1) common trait. 2) central trait. 3) cardinal trait. 4) secondary trait. Question 2 (1 point) Which of the following is true about the trait approach to personality? Question 2 options: 1) Trait researchers generally are not interested in understanding and predicting the behavior of a single individual. 2) It is not easy to make comparisons across people with the trait approach. 3) The trait approach has been responsible for generating a number of useful approaches to psychotherapy. 4) Trait theorists place a greater emphasis on discovering the mechanisms underlying behavior than do theorists from other approaches to personality. Question 3 (1 point) Many researchers fail to produce strong links between personality traits and behavior. Epstein has argued that the reason for this failure is because Question 3 options: 1) researchers don’t perform the correct statistical analysis. 2) researchers don’t measure personality traits correctly. 3) researchers don’t measure behavior correctly. 4) none of the above Question 4 (1 point) Which theorist had a strong influence on Henry Murray’s theorizing about personality? Question 4 options: 1) Gordon Allport 2) Alfred Adler 3) Sigmund Freud 4) Carl Jung Question 5 (1 point) Sometimes test makers include the same test questions more than once on the test. This is done to detect which potential problem? Question 5 options: 1) faking good 2) faking bad 3) carelessness and sabotage 4) social desirability

No expert has answered this question yet. You can browse … Read More...
Studies have shown that people eating a balanced vegetarian diet Question 5 options: have higher rates of type 2 diabetes have lower rates of type 2 diabetes have less energy than non-vegetarians have higher rates of death from heart disease

Studies have shown that people eating a balanced vegetarian diet Question 5 options: have higher rates of type 2 diabetes have lower rates of type 2 diabetes have less energy than non-vegetarians have higher rates of death from heart disease

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GLG 110: Dangerous World Assignment #2: Landslides Part 1: Disasters in the News On March 22nd 2014, a large landslide occurred near Oso, Washington. As of July 23rd, 2014, all remains had been recovered and the death toll stood at 43 people. Lots of information about the landslide can be found on the American Geophysical Union’s Landslide blog. Read about the landslide here (don’t worry, each entry is quite short): http://blogs.agu.org/landslideblog/2014/03/23/oso-landslide-1/ http://blogs.agu.org/landslideblog/2014/03/24/oso-landslip-useful-resources/ http://blogs.agu.org/landslideblog/2014/03/25/the-steelhead-landslide-1/ http://blogs.agu.org/landslideblog/2014/03/28/oso-mechanisms-1/ http://blogs.agu.org/landslideblog/2014/04/02/steelhead-landslide-in-washington/ Answer the following questions: 1) Describe the factors that led to this landslide: What type of material was involved- how cohesive/prone to failure is it? Was the cause primarily due to a change in slope, a change in friction/cohesion, or addition of mass? What was this cause? 2) Was the cause of this slide natural, man-made, or a combination of both? 3) Discuss the hazard assessment/mitigation efforts in effect before the slide. What evidence in the surrounding geology/geography suggests an existing landslide hazard? Was anything being to done to reduce the risk of a damaging landslide? For questions 4 & 5, use the photo of the Oso Landslide below: 4) What type of slide do you think this is (rotational or translational)? What visual evidence in the photo above supports your choice? 5) On the image above and using diagrams from the lecture and your textbook, label the different parts of the slide. Terms you can include, but are not limited to, are: scarp, original surface, toe, head, foot. 6) When the failed material entered the river, it created another type of mass movement; what is this mass movement and why did it make the slide more damaging? Part 2: A little physics (it is a science class after all) We discussed in class how whether or not a slope will fail is based on the balance of gravitational vs. frictional forces using the following diagram and equations: For simplicity, we will ignore FR, the force of the base of the slope supporting the upper slope. In the case shown above, for the slope to be stable, the frictional resistance force, Ff, must be larger than the gravitational force acting down the slope, Fll: Fll < Ff 7) For a slope with angle θ = 30o and coefficient of friction μ = 0.6, is the slope stable? Please show your work, partial credit will be given. Please put a box around your answer. 8) For a slope with θ = 15o, for what values of μ will the slope be unstable? In other words, at what value of μ does, Fll = Ff, such that any decrease in μ will result in a slope failure? Please show your work, partial credit will be given. Please put a box around your answer. 9) For a slope where the cohesion of the vegetation and soil leads to a coefficient of friction of μ = 0.75, above what slope angle θ will the slope fail? Note: please answer in degrees, not radians. Please show your work, partial credit will be given. Please put a box around your answer. 10) Describe why the mass of a potential slide, in the slope force balance used above, does not affect whether or not the slope will fail.

GLG 110: Dangerous World Assignment #2: Landslides Part 1: Disasters in the News On March 22nd 2014, a large landslide occurred near Oso, Washington. As of July 23rd, 2014, all remains had been recovered and the death toll stood at 43 people. Lots of information about the landslide can be found on the American Geophysical Union’s Landslide blog. Read about the landslide here (don’t worry, each entry is quite short): http://blogs.agu.org/landslideblog/2014/03/23/oso-landslide-1/ http://blogs.agu.org/landslideblog/2014/03/24/oso-landslip-useful-resources/ http://blogs.agu.org/landslideblog/2014/03/25/the-steelhead-landslide-1/ http://blogs.agu.org/landslideblog/2014/03/28/oso-mechanisms-1/ http://blogs.agu.org/landslideblog/2014/04/02/steelhead-landslide-in-washington/ Answer the following questions: 1) Describe the factors that led to this landslide: What type of material was involved- how cohesive/prone to failure is it? Was the cause primarily due to a change in slope, a change in friction/cohesion, or addition of mass? What was this cause? 2) Was the cause of this slide natural, man-made, or a combination of both? 3) Discuss the hazard assessment/mitigation efforts in effect before the slide. What evidence in the surrounding geology/geography suggests an existing landslide hazard? Was anything being to done to reduce the risk of a damaging landslide? For questions 4 & 5, use the photo of the Oso Landslide below: 4) What type of slide do you think this is (rotational or translational)? What visual evidence in the photo above supports your choice? 5) On the image above and using diagrams from the lecture and your textbook, label the different parts of the slide. Terms you can include, but are not limited to, are: scarp, original surface, toe, head, foot. 6) When the failed material entered the river, it created another type of mass movement; what is this mass movement and why did it make the slide more damaging? Part 2: A little physics (it is a science class after all) We discussed in class how whether or not a slope will fail is based on the balance of gravitational vs. frictional forces using the following diagram and equations: For simplicity, we will ignore FR, the force of the base of the slope supporting the upper slope. In the case shown above, for the slope to be stable, the frictional resistance force, Ff, must be larger than the gravitational force acting down the slope, Fll: Fll < Ff 7) For a slope with angle θ = 30o and coefficient of friction μ = 0.6, is the slope stable? Please show your work, partial credit will be given. Please put a box around your answer. 8) For a slope with θ = 15o, for what values of μ will the slope be unstable? In other words, at what value of μ does, Fll = Ff, such that any decrease in μ will result in a slope failure? Please show your work, partial credit will be given. Please put a box around your answer. 9) For a slope where the cohesion of the vegetation and soil leads to a coefficient of friction of μ = 0.75, above what slope angle θ will the slope fail? Note: please answer in degrees, not radians. Please show your work, partial credit will be given. Please put a box around your answer. 10) Describe why the mass of a potential slide, in the slope force balance used above, does not affect whether or not the slope will fail.

No expert has answered this question yet. You can browse … Read More...
2. Study Questions for excerpt from Hume’s A Treatise of Human Nature (T I.4.vi) In the third paragraph, Hume tells us what he expects when all his perceptions cease upon his death. What is his expectation?

2. Study Questions for excerpt from Hume’s A Treatise of Human Nature (T I.4.vi) In the third paragraph, Hume tells us what he expects when all his perceptions cease upon his death. What is his expectation?

His expectation is that when all his awareness are uninvolved … Read More...
Death Poetry: Dickinson “Because I Could Not Stop for Death” p. 422 Hardy “Ah, Are You Digging on My Grave?” Frost “Home Burial” Stevens “The Worms at Heaven’s Gate” Thomas “Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night” p. 482 Gunn “Terminal” Ethnic/Racial Identity and Racism Poetry: Long “Flash Forward with The Amistad….” Blake “The Little Black Boy” Toomer “Georgia Dusk” Hughes “Theme for English B” Nelson “The Ballad of Aunt Geneva” Trethewey “Domestic Work, 1937” Find something interesting for these authors , each author has to have a paragraph which at lest 4 sentences.

Death Poetry: Dickinson “Because I Could Not Stop for Death” p. 422 Hardy “Ah, Are You Digging on My Grave?” Frost “Home Burial” Stevens “The Worms at Heaven’s Gate” Thomas “Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night” p. 482 Gunn “Terminal” Ethnic/Racial Identity and Racism Poetry: Long “Flash Forward with The Amistad….” Blake “The Little Black Boy” Toomer “Georgia Dusk” Hughes “Theme for English B” Nelson “The Ballad of Aunt Geneva” Trethewey “Domestic Work, 1937” Find something interesting for these authors , each author has to have a paragraph which at lest 4 sentences.

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