EXPERIMENT 6 FET CHARACTERISTIC CURVES ________________________________________ Bring a diskette to save your data. ________________________________________ OBJECT: The objective of this lab is to investigate the DC characteristics and operation of a field effect transistor (FET). The FET recommended to be used in this lab is 2N5486 n-channel FET. • Gathering data for the DC characteristics ________________________________________ APPARATUS: Dual DC Power Supply, Voltmeter, and 1k resistors, 2N5486 N-Channel FET. ________________________________________ THEORY: A JFET (Junction Field Effect Transistor) is a three terminal device (drain, source, and gate) similar to the BJT. The difference between them is that the JFET is a voltage controlled constant current device, whereas BJT is a current controlled current source device. Whereas for BJT the relationship between an output parameter, iC, and an input parameter, iB, is given by a constant , the relationship in JFET between an output parameter, iD, and an input parameter, vGS, is more complex. PROCEDURE: Measuring ID versus VDS (Output Characteristics) 1. Build the circuit shown below. 2. Obtain the output characteristics i.e. ID versus VDS. a. Set VGS = 0. Vary the voltage across drain (VDS) from 0 to 8 V with steps of 1 V and measure the corresponding drain current (ID). b. Repeat the procedure for different values of VGS. (0V, -0.5V, -1V, -1.5V, -2V, -2.5V, -3.0V, -3.5V, -4.0V). 3. Record the values in Table 1 and plot the graph ID vs. VGS. VGS 0 -0.5 -1.0 -1.5` -2.0 -2.5 -3.0 -3.5 -4.0 VDS ID ID ID ID ID ID ID ID ID 0 0 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0mA 1 0 0.7 mA 0.7 mA 0.66 mA 0.6 mA 0.6 mA 0.5 0.1mA 0mA 2 0 1.5 mA 1.3 mA 1.3mA 1.2 mA 1.1 mA 0.7 0.1mA 0mA 3 0 2.1 mA 2.6 mA 1.9 mA 1.8 mA 1.5 mA 0.8 mA 0.1mA 0mA 4 0 2.7 mA 2.6 mA 2.5 mA 2.4 mA 1.7 mA 0.8 mA 0.1mA 0mA 5 0 3.4 mA 3.3 mA 3.1 mA 2.8 mA 1.8 mA 0.9 mA 0.1mA 0mA 6 0 4.1 mA 3.4 mA 3.7 mA 3.2 mA 1.9 mA 0.9 mA 0.1mA 0mA 7 0 4.7 mA 4.5 mA 4.2 mA 3.4 mA 1.9 mA 0.9 mA 0.1mA 0mA 8 0 5.3 mA 5.1 mA 6.6 mA 3.5 mA 2.0 mA 0.9 mA 0.1mA 0mA Table 1. vds=0:8; id=[0 6.2e-3 9.7e-3 11.3e-3 11.9e-3 12.2e-3 12.3e-3 12.3e-3 12.32e-3]; plot(vds,id);grid on;hold on id2=[0 5.23e-3 8.05e-3 9.15e-3 9.57e-3 9.77e-3 9.88e-3 9.9e-3 9.92e-3]; plot(vds,id2);grid on;hold on id3=[0 4.29e-3 6.41e-3 7.17e-3 7.46e-3 7.60e-3 7.67e-3 7.73e-3 7.76e-3]; plot(vds,id3);grid on;hold on ________________________________________ Measuring ID versus VGS (Transconductance Characteristics) 1. For the same circuit, obtain the transconductance characteristics. i.e. ID versus VGS. a. Set a particular value of voltage for VDS, i.e. 5V. Start with a gate voltage VGS of 0 V, and measure the corresponding drain current (ID). b. Then decrease VGS in steps of 0.5 V until VGS is -4V. c. At each step record the drain current. VDS = 5 V VGS ID 0 3.42 mA -0.5 3.36 mA -1.00 3.27 mA -1.50 3.12 mA -2.00 2.79 mA -2.50 1.84 mA -3.00 0.71 mA -3.50 0.11 mA -4.00 0 mA Table 2. 2. Plot the graph with ID versus VGS using Excel, MATLAB, or some other program. Discussion Questions—Make sure you answer the following questions in your discussion. Use all of the data obtained to answer the following questions: 1. Discuss the output and transconductance curves obtained in lab? Are they what you expected? 2. Are the output characteristics spaced evenly? Should they be? 3. What are the applications of a JFET?

EXPERIMENT 6 FET CHARACTERISTIC CURVES ________________________________________ Bring a diskette to save your data. ________________________________________ OBJECT: The objective of this lab is to investigate the DC characteristics and operation of a field effect transistor (FET). The FET recommended to be used in this lab is 2N5486 n-channel FET. • Gathering data for the DC characteristics ________________________________________ APPARATUS: Dual DC Power Supply, Voltmeter, and 1k resistors, 2N5486 N-Channel FET. ________________________________________ THEORY: A JFET (Junction Field Effect Transistor) is a three terminal device (drain, source, and gate) similar to the BJT. The difference between them is that the JFET is a voltage controlled constant current device, whereas BJT is a current controlled current source device. Whereas for BJT the relationship between an output parameter, iC, and an input parameter, iB, is given by a constant , the relationship in JFET between an output parameter, iD, and an input parameter, vGS, is more complex. PROCEDURE: Measuring ID versus VDS (Output Characteristics) 1. Build the circuit shown below. 2. Obtain the output characteristics i.e. ID versus VDS. a. Set VGS = 0. Vary the voltage across drain (VDS) from 0 to 8 V with steps of 1 V and measure the corresponding drain current (ID). b. Repeat the procedure for different values of VGS. (0V, -0.5V, -1V, -1.5V, -2V, -2.5V, -3.0V, -3.5V, -4.0V). 3. Record the values in Table 1 and plot the graph ID vs. VGS. VGS 0 -0.5 -1.0 -1.5` -2.0 -2.5 -3.0 -3.5 -4.0 VDS ID ID ID ID ID ID ID ID ID 0 0 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0mA 1 0 0.7 mA 0.7 mA 0.66 mA 0.6 mA 0.6 mA 0.5 0.1mA 0mA 2 0 1.5 mA 1.3 mA 1.3mA 1.2 mA 1.1 mA 0.7 0.1mA 0mA 3 0 2.1 mA 2.6 mA 1.9 mA 1.8 mA 1.5 mA 0.8 mA 0.1mA 0mA 4 0 2.7 mA 2.6 mA 2.5 mA 2.4 mA 1.7 mA 0.8 mA 0.1mA 0mA 5 0 3.4 mA 3.3 mA 3.1 mA 2.8 mA 1.8 mA 0.9 mA 0.1mA 0mA 6 0 4.1 mA 3.4 mA 3.7 mA 3.2 mA 1.9 mA 0.9 mA 0.1mA 0mA 7 0 4.7 mA 4.5 mA 4.2 mA 3.4 mA 1.9 mA 0.9 mA 0.1mA 0mA 8 0 5.3 mA 5.1 mA 6.6 mA 3.5 mA 2.0 mA 0.9 mA 0.1mA 0mA Table 1. vds=0:8; id=[0 6.2e-3 9.7e-3 11.3e-3 11.9e-3 12.2e-3 12.3e-3 12.3e-3 12.32e-3]; plot(vds,id);grid on;hold on id2=[0 5.23e-3 8.05e-3 9.15e-3 9.57e-3 9.77e-3 9.88e-3 9.9e-3 9.92e-3]; plot(vds,id2);grid on;hold on id3=[0 4.29e-3 6.41e-3 7.17e-3 7.46e-3 7.60e-3 7.67e-3 7.73e-3 7.76e-3]; plot(vds,id3);grid on;hold on ________________________________________ Measuring ID versus VGS (Transconductance Characteristics) 1. For the same circuit, obtain the transconductance characteristics. i.e. ID versus VGS. a. Set a particular value of voltage for VDS, i.e. 5V. Start with a gate voltage VGS of 0 V, and measure the corresponding drain current (ID). b. Then decrease VGS in steps of 0.5 V until VGS is -4V. c. At each step record the drain current. VDS = 5 V VGS ID 0 3.42 mA -0.5 3.36 mA -1.00 3.27 mA -1.50 3.12 mA -2.00 2.79 mA -2.50 1.84 mA -3.00 0.71 mA -3.50 0.11 mA -4.00 0 mA Table 2. 2. Plot the graph with ID versus VGS using Excel, MATLAB, or some other program. Discussion Questions—Make sure you answer the following questions in your discussion. Use all of the data obtained to answer the following questions: 1. Discuss the output and transconductance curves obtained in lab? Are they what you expected? 2. Are the output characteristics spaced evenly? Should they be? 3. What are the applications of a JFET?

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when supply increase and at the same time demand decrease, we a) cannot predict the change in either the equilibrium quantity or equilibrium price , B) cannot predict equilibrium quantity, but know that equilibrium price will decrease. C) can predict that both equilibrium price and quantity will decrease, d) can predict both equilibrium price and quantity will increase.

when supply increase and at the same time demand decrease, we a) cannot predict the change in either the equilibrium quantity or equilibrium price , B) cannot predict equilibrium quantity, but know that equilibrium price will decrease. C) can predict that both equilibrium price and quantity will decrease, d) can predict both equilibrium price and quantity will increase.

answer C
Chapter 05 Reading Questions Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 23, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 1 Part A In the second stage of the demographic transition, called the mortality transition, the death rate _____ while the birth rate _____. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 2 Part A About a century ago, the population in Latin America moved from an agricultural to an urban-industrial base. During this period birth rates _____, death rates _____, and the overall population _____. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 16 Part A Over the course of human history, the greatest increases in human populations have been due to_____. ANSWER: increases, decreases decreases, decreases decreases, remains high or increases increases, remains high or increases stayed about the same, decreased, and the population grew even faster increased greatly, increased, declined decreased dramatically, decreased, declined stayed about the same, increased, increased Chapter 05 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 1 of 6 5/21/2014 8:00 PM Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 4 Part A Compared to women in the United States, women in poor countries such as Ethiopia typically have _____ children at _____ age. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 18 Part A Women in two developed countries have similar total fertility rates of 3.5. However, women in country A typically have their children about 2 years earlier than women in country B. How will the populations of the two countries compare? ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 19 Part A Overall population growth rates are most likely to be highest when the median age of a population is _____ and a country is in stage _____ of the demographic transition. ANSWER: improved medicine improved water supplies discovery of new land increased food production fewer, an older more, a younger more, an older fewer, a younger The population of country B will increase faster than country A. The population of country A will increase but the population of country B will decline. The population of country A will increase faster than country B. The populations of both countries will be stable, with similar totals and little increase or decrease. Chapter 05 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 2 of 6 5/21/2014 8:00 PM Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 20 Part A An age-structure diagram of a poor country in stage 1 of the demographic transition will be closest to the shape of _____. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 8 Part A Predictions about global growth rates have been difficult because of changes in human values and behavior largely based upon _____. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 9 Part A Because human suffering _____ as the human population approaches its carrying capacity, sustainability of the global human population must be _____ the carrying capacity of the Earth. ANSWER: older, 1 younger, 4 older, 3 younger, 2 the letter O, widest in the middle a pyramid, with a broad base and narrow top the letter V, widest at the top column, with even width from top to bottom shifting weather patterns increasing abilities to travel between countries the spread of infectious disease economic development Chapter 05 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 3 of 6 5/21/2014 8:00 PM Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 10 Part A The IPAT formula is used to estimate the _____. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 12 Part A If everyone in the world had the ecological footprint of people currently living in the United States and Canada, the world would _____. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 22 Part A If the population of the United States continues to grow and consumption levels also increase, we expect that the _____. ANSWER: increases, below decreases, above increases, above decreases, below birth rate of a population shift from one stage to another in the demographic transition age structure of a population ecological footprint of a society have just enough biocapacity without any additional population growth exceed its biocapacity by 40% still have enough biocapacity for 20% more humans exceed its biocapacity by five times over Chapter 05 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 4 of 6 5/21/2014 8:00 PM Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 24 Part A Given the increasing global population and increased rates of consumption in developing countries, the most likely avenue to sustainability is _____. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 13 Part A Which one of the following typically contributes to population growth? ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 14 Part A Members of the neo-Malthusian movement advocated for _____. ANSWER: ecological footprint will eventually exceed the biocapacity of the environment biocapacity will eventually exceed the ecological footprint of the environment United States will eventually become an ecological debtor ecological debt of the United States will continue to increase more efficient use of natural resources the discovery of ways to dramatically increase the global biocapacity to have developed countries use more natural resources from developing countries increase our reliance upon fossil fuels better education empowerment of women high infant mortality economic development Chapter 05 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 5 of 6 5/21/2014 8:00 PM Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 15 Part A China, Mexico, and India have all made progress in reducing the population growth rates in their countries by adopting policies that encourage _____. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 7 Part A Malthus found that populations in the American colonies were increasing _____ than populations on the European continent due to _____. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0.0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 17 points. increasing population size to support greater economic development birth control to limit population growth greater use of natural resources to increase the biocapacity of Earth to support a growing human population greater conservation of natural resources to limit the environmental impact of a growing human population limits on family size women to work only inside of their homes women to start having children at a younger age couples to marry earlier faster, no political conflicts or wars faster, greater resources were available in the American colonies slower, fewer resources were available in the American colonies slower, greater disease in the American colonies Chapter 05 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 6 of 6 5/21/2014 8:00 PM

Chapter 05 Reading Questions Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 23, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 1 Part A In the second stage of the demographic transition, called the mortality transition, the death rate _____ while the birth rate _____. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 2 Part A About a century ago, the population in Latin America moved from an agricultural to an urban-industrial base. During this period birth rates _____, death rates _____, and the overall population _____. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 16 Part A Over the course of human history, the greatest increases in human populations have been due to_____. ANSWER: increases, decreases decreases, decreases decreases, remains high or increases increases, remains high or increases stayed about the same, decreased, and the population grew even faster increased greatly, increased, declined decreased dramatically, decreased, declined stayed about the same, increased, increased Chapter 05 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 1 of 6 5/21/2014 8:00 PM Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 4 Part A Compared to women in the United States, women in poor countries such as Ethiopia typically have _____ children at _____ age. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 18 Part A Women in two developed countries have similar total fertility rates of 3.5. However, women in country A typically have their children about 2 years earlier than women in country B. How will the populations of the two countries compare? ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 19 Part A Overall population growth rates are most likely to be highest when the median age of a population is _____ and a country is in stage _____ of the demographic transition. ANSWER: improved medicine improved water supplies discovery of new land increased food production fewer, an older more, a younger more, an older fewer, a younger The population of country B will increase faster than country A. The population of country A will increase but the population of country B will decline. The population of country A will increase faster than country B. The populations of both countries will be stable, with similar totals and little increase or decrease. Chapter 05 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 2 of 6 5/21/2014 8:00 PM Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 20 Part A An age-structure diagram of a poor country in stage 1 of the demographic transition will be closest to the shape of _____. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 8 Part A Predictions about global growth rates have been difficult because of changes in human values and behavior largely based upon _____. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 9 Part A Because human suffering _____ as the human population approaches its carrying capacity, sustainability of the global human population must be _____ the carrying capacity of the Earth. ANSWER: older, 1 younger, 4 older, 3 younger, 2 the letter O, widest in the middle a pyramid, with a broad base and narrow top the letter V, widest at the top column, with even width from top to bottom shifting weather patterns increasing abilities to travel between countries the spread of infectious disease economic development Chapter 05 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 3 of 6 5/21/2014 8:00 PM Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 10 Part A The IPAT formula is used to estimate the _____. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 12 Part A If everyone in the world had the ecological footprint of people currently living in the United States and Canada, the world would _____. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 22 Part A If the population of the United States continues to grow and consumption levels also increase, we expect that the _____. ANSWER: increases, below decreases, above increases, above decreases, below birth rate of a population shift from one stage to another in the demographic transition age structure of a population ecological footprint of a society have just enough biocapacity without any additional population growth exceed its biocapacity by 40% still have enough biocapacity for 20% more humans exceed its biocapacity by five times over Chapter 05 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 4 of 6 5/21/2014 8:00 PM Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 24 Part A Given the increasing global population and increased rates of consumption in developing countries, the most likely avenue to sustainability is _____. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 13 Part A Which one of the following typically contributes to population growth? ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 14 Part A Members of the neo-Malthusian movement advocated for _____. ANSWER: ecological footprint will eventually exceed the biocapacity of the environment biocapacity will eventually exceed the ecological footprint of the environment United States will eventually become an ecological debtor ecological debt of the United States will continue to increase more efficient use of natural resources the discovery of ways to dramatically increase the global biocapacity to have developed countries use more natural resources from developing countries increase our reliance upon fossil fuels better education empowerment of women high infant mortality economic development Chapter 05 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 5 of 6 5/21/2014 8:00 PM Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 15 Part A China, Mexico, and India have all made progress in reducing the population growth rates in their countries by adopting policies that encourage _____. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 7 Part A Malthus found that populations in the American colonies were increasing _____ than populations on the European continent due to _____. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0.0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 17 points. increasing population size to support greater economic development birth control to limit population growth greater use of natural resources to increase the biocapacity of Earth to support a growing human population greater conservation of natural resources to limit the environmental impact of a growing human population limits on family size women to work only inside of their homes women to start having children at a younger age couples to marry earlier faster, no political conflicts or wars faster, greater resources were available in the American colonies slower, fewer resources were available in the American colonies slower, greater disease in the American colonies Chapter 05 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 6 of 6 5/21/2014 8:00 PM

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In ionic bond formation, the lattice energy of ions ________ as the magnitude of the ion charges _______ and the radii __________. A) increases, decrease, increase B) increases, increase, increase C) decreases, increase, increase D) increases, increase, decrease E) increases, decrease, decrease

In ionic bond formation, the lattice energy of ions ________ as the magnitude of the ion charges _______ and the radii __________. A) increases, decrease, increase B) increases, increase, increase C) decreases, increase, increase D) increases, increase, decrease E) increases, decrease, decrease

D) increases, increase, decrease In ionic bond formation, the lattice … Read More...
For Day 24 Homework Cover Sheet Name:_________________________________________________ 1. Read Pages from 364-371, or watch the videos listed below  Percentage, Ratio and Proportions Problems (11 min) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oLoRCRXTYv4  Direct and Inverse Variation (5 min) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8x0rZklxLLE 2. Attempt problems from page 111 to 113 3. Write a summary and answer questions below from your reading or watching of the videos. a) What is a proportion? b) What is a direct variation? c) What is an inverse variation? List any parts of the video lecture (if there are any) that were unclear or you had trouble understanding. Please be specific and do not just say “All of it”. Questions you had difficulty with or felt stuck on- List the number for the ALEKS topics you were stuck on from the list at the end of the video logs-   ALEKS Topics Mastered Solving a linear equation with several occurrences of the variable: Fractional forms with binomial numerators Translating a sentence into a compound inequality U.S. Customary area unit conversion with whole number values U.S. Customary unit conversion with whole number values U.S. Customary unit conversion with whole number values: Two-step conversion Using two steps to solve an equation with whole numbers Word problem involving multiple rates Word problem on combined variation Word problem on direct variation Word problem on inverse proportions Word problem on inverse variation Word problem on mixed number proportions Word problem on proportions: Problem type 1 Word problem on proportions: Problem type 2 Word problem with linear inequalities: Problem type 1 Word problem with linear inequalities: Problem type 2 Writing a direct variation equation Writing an equation that models variation Areas of rectangles with the same perimeter Circumference ratios Conversions involving measurements in feet and inches Finding an angle measure for a triangle with an extended side Finding an angle measure of a triangle given two angles Finding angle measures of a right or isosceles triangle given angles with variables Finding simple interest without a calculator Finding the missing length in a figure Finding the original price given the sale price and percent discount Finding the percentage increase or decrease: Advanced Finding the perimeter or area of a rectangle given one of these values Finding the radius or the diameter of a circle given its circumference Finding the sale price without a calculator given the original price and percent discount Finding the value for a new score that will yield a given mean Identifying and naming congruent triangles Identifying direct variation equations Identifying direct variation from ordered pairs and writing equations Identifying properties used to solve a linear equation Identifying similar or congruent shapes on a grid Identifying solutions to a linear equation in one variable: Two-step equations Identifying solutions to a linear inequality in one variable Perimeter of a piecewise rectangular figure Sides of polygons having the same perimeter Similar polygons Similar right triangles

For Day 24 Homework Cover Sheet Name:_________________________________________________ 1. Read Pages from 364-371, or watch the videos listed below  Percentage, Ratio and Proportions Problems (11 min) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oLoRCRXTYv4  Direct and Inverse Variation (5 min) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8x0rZklxLLE 2. Attempt problems from page 111 to 113 3. Write a summary and answer questions below from your reading or watching of the videos. a) What is a proportion? b) What is a direct variation? c) What is an inverse variation? List any parts of the video lecture (if there are any) that were unclear or you had trouble understanding. Please be specific and do not just say “All of it”. Questions you had difficulty with or felt stuck on- List the number for the ALEKS topics you were stuck on from the list at the end of the video logs-   ALEKS Topics Mastered Solving a linear equation with several occurrences of the variable: Fractional forms with binomial numerators Translating a sentence into a compound inequality U.S. Customary area unit conversion with whole number values U.S. Customary unit conversion with whole number values U.S. Customary unit conversion with whole number values: Two-step conversion Using two steps to solve an equation with whole numbers Word problem involving multiple rates Word problem on combined variation Word problem on direct variation Word problem on inverse proportions Word problem on inverse variation Word problem on mixed number proportions Word problem on proportions: Problem type 1 Word problem on proportions: Problem type 2 Word problem with linear inequalities: Problem type 1 Word problem with linear inequalities: Problem type 2 Writing a direct variation equation Writing an equation that models variation Areas of rectangles with the same perimeter Circumference ratios Conversions involving measurements in feet and inches Finding an angle measure for a triangle with an extended side Finding an angle measure of a triangle given two angles Finding angle measures of a right or isosceles triangle given angles with variables Finding simple interest without a calculator Finding the missing length in a figure Finding the original price given the sale price and percent discount Finding the percentage increase or decrease: Advanced Finding the perimeter or area of a rectangle given one of these values Finding the radius or the diameter of a circle given its circumference Finding the sale price without a calculator given the original price and percent discount Finding the value for a new score that will yield a given mean Identifying and naming congruent triangles Identifying direct variation equations Identifying direct variation from ordered pairs and writing equations Identifying properties used to solve a linear equation Identifying similar or congruent shapes on a grid Identifying solutions to a linear equation in one variable: Two-step equations Identifying solutions to a linear inequality in one variable Perimeter of a piecewise rectangular figure Sides of polygons having the same perimeter Similar polygons Similar right triangles

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Chapter 06 Homework Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 23, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Concept Review: Species Interactions Can you identify the type of species interaction that each label describes? Part A Drag each description to the appropriate bin. ANSWER: Activity: Food Webs Click here to complete this activity. Then answer the questions. Part A In an ecosystem, phytoplankton are _____. ANSWER: Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 1 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Correct Autotrophs, such as phytoplankton, are producers. Part B An earthworm that feeds on the remains of plants and animals is acting as a _____. ANSWER: Correct The earthworm is feeding on the remains of dead organisms. Part C When a human eats a steak, the human is acting as a _____. ANSWER: Correct By feeding on a primary consumer, the human is acting as a secondary consumer. Part D A cow eating grass is an example of a _____. ANSWER: Correct By feeding on a producer, the cow is acting as a primary consumer. Part E primary consumers tertiary consumers detritivores producers secondary consumers tertiary consumer secondary consumer producer detritivore primary consumer primary consumer detritivore secondary consumer producer tertiary consumer detritivore producer tertiary consumer secondary consumer primary consumer Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 2 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM A seal that just ate a clam is eaten by a shark. The shark is acting as a _____. ANSWER: Correct The shark that ate the seal that ate the clam that ate the algae is the tertiary consumer. Activity: Pyramids of Production Click here to complete this activity. Then answer the questions. Part A _____ are secondary consumers. ANSWER: Correct Secondary consumers are animals that eat other animals; thus, they are carnivores. Part B Approximately _____% of the energy at one trophic level is passed on to the next highest trophic level. ANSWER: Correct Approximately 5–10% of the energy at one trophic level is passed on to the next highest trophic level. producer primary consumer tertiary consumer secondary consumer detritivore Producers Herbivores Plants Cows Carnivores 0–5 5–10 10–15 15–20 90–100 Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 3 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Part C 10,000 kcal of producer could support approximately _____ kcal of tertiary consumer. ANSWER: Correct This is the number of kcal of tertiary consumer that could be supported. Activity: Primary Succession Click here to complete this activity. Then answer the question. Part A Which of these is a starting point for primary succession? ANSWER: Correct Such a surface lacks any life and is thus a starting point for primary succession. Part B The first colonizing organisms during primary succession tend to be: ANSWER: 1,000 100 10 1 0 a surface exposed by a retreating glacier abandoned farmland an abandoned city a neglected yard none of these is a starting point for primary succession small shrubs trees lichens and mosses herbs Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 4 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Correct After the glacier retreats, bare ground is eventually colonized by lichens and mosses. Part C Which one of the following is a general characteristic of plants that are early colonizers during primary succession? ANSWER: Correct After the glacier retreats, bare ground is eventually colonized by lichens and mosses, then by deciduous trees with wind-borne seeds. Concept Review: Secondary Succession Can you order the steps of secondary succession? Part A Order the labels in the flowchart to complete the model of secondary succession as observed in a deciduous forest of eastern North America. ANSWER: Current Events: In Yellowstone, Killing One Kind of Trout to Save Another (New York Times, 8/23/2011) Read this New York Times article and then answer the questions. In Yellowstone, Killing One Kind of Trout to Save Another (8/23/2011) Registration with The New York Times provides instant access to breaking news on NYTimes.com. To register, go to http://www.nytimes.com/register. Visit http://www.nytimes.com/content/help/rights/terms/terms-of-service.html to review the current NYT Terms of Service. Part A Which of the following would be the best discovery regarding the Judas fish? ANSWER: plants are able to fix their own nitrogen plants can outcompete other plants that invade the area plants have wind-dispersed seeds plants are shade-tolerant Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 5 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Part B Which of the following is true? ANSWER: Part C Why is protecting cutthroat trout in Yellowstone so important? ANSWER: Part D Which of the following is true? ANSWER: Part E Why don’t bears in Yellowstone eat lake trout? ANSWER: Part F How did rainbow trout become established worldwide? ANSWER: Learning where lake trout feed. Learning where lake trout hibernate. Learning where lake trout spawn. Learning where lake trout migrate to during fall. Officials are working only in certain areas to eliminate lake trout. Officials are working to eliminate lake trout throughout Wyoming. Officials are working to eliminate lake trout throughout the Great Lakes. All states in the U.S. are working to eliminate lake trout. Because many other species depend on cutthroat trout. Because local people depend on cutthroat trout for food. Because Yellowstone is the only place cutthroat trout are found. Because cutthroat trout are listed as a threatened species. Cutthroat trout are to Yellowstone Lake as rainbow trout are to Yellowstone Lake. Cutthroat trout are to Yellowstone Lake as Asian carp are to the Great Lakes. Lake trout are to Yellowstone Lake as see lamprey are to the Great Lakes. Lake trout are to the Great Lakes as Asian carp are to the Yellowstone Lake. They don’t like the taste. They cannot find them. Lake trout skin is too tough. Lake trout are too small for bears to be interested. Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 6 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Current Events: In Thailand, Love of Food Carries Deadly Risks (New York Times, 4/25/2011) Read this New York Times article and then answer the questions. In Thailand, Love of Food Carries Deadly Risks (4/25/2011) Registration with The New York Times provides instant access to breaking news on NYTimes.com. To register, go to http://www.nytimes.com/register. Visit http://www.nytimes.com/content/help/rights/terms/terms-of-service.html to review the current NYT Terms of Service. Part A Rather than stop eating fish, what should Thai people do to eliminate the risk of liver fluke infection? ANSWER: Part B Liver flukes are transmitted through which of the following? ANSWER: Part C Getting rid of which of the following would help decrease the population of liver flukes? ANSWER: Part D Pla som is a unique dish because it is what? ANSWER: Part E Due to warming oceans caused by climate change. Natural process of migration. Accidental introduction via ships. Purposeful stocking. Consume ethyl alcohol while eating fish. Add more garlic. Cook it thoroughly. Pick the flukes out by hand. urine saliva feces blood rats mosquitoes frogs snails pickled frozen fermented blanched Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 7 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM You have liver flukes. What are your chances of getting liver cancer? ANSWER: Part F You are a scientist studying liver flukes in Thailand. Where should you look for them? ANSWER: ABC News Video: The Cuttlefish Watch the ABC News video (2:20 minutes). Then answer the questions below. Part A The changes to the cuttlefish’s skin are related to _______. ANSWER: Correct Part B Camouflage contributes to the cuttlefish’s survival by enabling it to _______. 1-5% 5-10% 10-15% 15-20% The northwestern part of the country. The southeastern part of the country. The southwestern part of the country. The northeastern part of the country. camouflage elimination of waste reproductive strategies feeding behavior Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 8 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM ANSWER: Correct Part C Cuttlefish placed in a sandy environment with white rocks will camouflage their skin in a pattern called _______. ANSWER: Correct Part D In the presence of a black-and-white striped background, a cuttlefish was observed to _______. ANSWER: Correct Part E Which question was raised but not answered in the video? ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 48.5%. You received 16 out of a possible total of 33 points. sneak up on prey mimic poisonous species hide from predators warn potential predators that it is poisonous universal camouflage disruptive camouflage warning coloration camouflage tide-pool camouflage move its arm to match the orientation of the stripes turn completely white and hide in the white stripe turn completely black and hide in the black stripe exhibit the exact striping pattern of its surroundings Why does the cuttlefish change its skin pattern? What happens when a cuttlefish is placed in an unnatural environment? Is the cuttlefish able to grow a protective shell? How do cuttlefish camouflage themselves even though they are colorblind? Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 9 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM

Chapter 06 Homework Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 23, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Concept Review: Species Interactions Can you identify the type of species interaction that each label describes? Part A Drag each description to the appropriate bin. ANSWER: Activity: Food Webs Click here to complete this activity. Then answer the questions. Part A In an ecosystem, phytoplankton are _____. ANSWER: Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 1 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Correct Autotrophs, such as phytoplankton, are producers. Part B An earthworm that feeds on the remains of plants and animals is acting as a _____. ANSWER: Correct The earthworm is feeding on the remains of dead organisms. Part C When a human eats a steak, the human is acting as a _____. ANSWER: Correct By feeding on a primary consumer, the human is acting as a secondary consumer. Part D A cow eating grass is an example of a _____. ANSWER: Correct By feeding on a producer, the cow is acting as a primary consumer. Part E primary consumers tertiary consumers detritivores producers secondary consumers tertiary consumer secondary consumer producer detritivore primary consumer primary consumer detritivore secondary consumer producer tertiary consumer detritivore producer tertiary consumer secondary consumer primary consumer Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 2 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM A seal that just ate a clam is eaten by a shark. The shark is acting as a _____. ANSWER: Correct The shark that ate the seal that ate the clam that ate the algae is the tertiary consumer. Activity: Pyramids of Production Click here to complete this activity. Then answer the questions. Part A _____ are secondary consumers. ANSWER: Correct Secondary consumers are animals that eat other animals; thus, they are carnivores. Part B Approximately _____% of the energy at one trophic level is passed on to the next highest trophic level. ANSWER: Correct Approximately 5–10% of the energy at one trophic level is passed on to the next highest trophic level. producer primary consumer tertiary consumer secondary consumer detritivore Producers Herbivores Plants Cows Carnivores 0–5 5–10 10–15 15–20 90–100 Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 3 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Part C 10,000 kcal of producer could support approximately _____ kcal of tertiary consumer. ANSWER: Correct This is the number of kcal of tertiary consumer that could be supported. Activity: Primary Succession Click here to complete this activity. Then answer the question. Part A Which of these is a starting point for primary succession? ANSWER: Correct Such a surface lacks any life and is thus a starting point for primary succession. Part B The first colonizing organisms during primary succession tend to be: ANSWER: 1,000 100 10 1 0 a surface exposed by a retreating glacier abandoned farmland an abandoned city a neglected yard none of these is a starting point for primary succession small shrubs trees lichens and mosses herbs Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 4 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Correct After the glacier retreats, bare ground is eventually colonized by lichens and mosses. Part C Which one of the following is a general characteristic of plants that are early colonizers during primary succession? ANSWER: Correct After the glacier retreats, bare ground is eventually colonized by lichens and mosses, then by deciduous trees with wind-borne seeds. Concept Review: Secondary Succession Can you order the steps of secondary succession? Part A Order the labels in the flowchart to complete the model of secondary succession as observed in a deciduous forest of eastern North America. ANSWER: Current Events: In Yellowstone, Killing One Kind of Trout to Save Another (New York Times, 8/23/2011) Read this New York Times article and then answer the questions. In Yellowstone, Killing One Kind of Trout to Save Another (8/23/2011) Registration with The New York Times provides instant access to breaking news on NYTimes.com. To register, go to http://www.nytimes.com/register. Visit http://www.nytimes.com/content/help/rights/terms/terms-of-service.html to review the current NYT Terms of Service. Part A Which of the following would be the best discovery regarding the Judas fish? ANSWER: plants are able to fix their own nitrogen plants can outcompete other plants that invade the area plants have wind-dispersed seeds plants are shade-tolerant Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 5 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Part B Which of the following is true? ANSWER: Part C Why is protecting cutthroat trout in Yellowstone so important? ANSWER: Part D Which of the following is true? ANSWER: Part E Why don’t bears in Yellowstone eat lake trout? ANSWER: Part F How did rainbow trout become established worldwide? ANSWER: Learning where lake trout feed. Learning where lake trout hibernate. Learning where lake trout spawn. Learning where lake trout migrate to during fall. Officials are working only in certain areas to eliminate lake trout. Officials are working to eliminate lake trout throughout Wyoming. Officials are working to eliminate lake trout throughout the Great Lakes. All states in the U.S. are working to eliminate lake trout. Because many other species depend on cutthroat trout. Because local people depend on cutthroat trout for food. Because Yellowstone is the only place cutthroat trout are found. Because cutthroat trout are listed as a threatened species. Cutthroat trout are to Yellowstone Lake as rainbow trout are to Yellowstone Lake. Cutthroat trout are to Yellowstone Lake as Asian carp are to the Great Lakes. Lake trout are to Yellowstone Lake as see lamprey are to the Great Lakes. Lake trout are to the Great Lakes as Asian carp are to the Yellowstone Lake. They don’t like the taste. They cannot find them. Lake trout skin is too tough. Lake trout are too small for bears to be interested. Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 6 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Current Events: In Thailand, Love of Food Carries Deadly Risks (New York Times, 4/25/2011) Read this New York Times article and then answer the questions. In Thailand, Love of Food Carries Deadly Risks (4/25/2011) Registration with The New York Times provides instant access to breaking news on NYTimes.com. To register, go to http://www.nytimes.com/register. Visit http://www.nytimes.com/content/help/rights/terms/terms-of-service.html to review the current NYT Terms of Service. Part A Rather than stop eating fish, what should Thai people do to eliminate the risk of liver fluke infection? ANSWER: Part B Liver flukes are transmitted through which of the following? ANSWER: Part C Getting rid of which of the following would help decrease the population of liver flukes? ANSWER: Part D Pla som is a unique dish because it is what? ANSWER: Part E Due to warming oceans caused by climate change. Natural process of migration. Accidental introduction via ships. Purposeful stocking. Consume ethyl alcohol while eating fish. Add more garlic. Cook it thoroughly. Pick the flukes out by hand. urine saliva feces blood rats mosquitoes frogs snails pickled frozen fermented blanched Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 7 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM You have liver flukes. What are your chances of getting liver cancer? ANSWER: Part F You are a scientist studying liver flukes in Thailand. Where should you look for them? ANSWER: ABC News Video: The Cuttlefish Watch the ABC News video (2:20 minutes). Then answer the questions below. Part A The changes to the cuttlefish’s skin are related to _______. ANSWER: Correct Part B Camouflage contributes to the cuttlefish’s survival by enabling it to _______. 1-5% 5-10% 10-15% 15-20% The northwestern part of the country. The southeastern part of the country. The southwestern part of the country. The northeastern part of the country. camouflage elimination of waste reproductive strategies feeding behavior Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 8 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM ANSWER: Correct Part C Cuttlefish placed in a sandy environment with white rocks will camouflage their skin in a pattern called _______. ANSWER: Correct Part D In the presence of a black-and-white striped background, a cuttlefish was observed to _______. ANSWER: Correct Part E Which question was raised but not answered in the video? ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 48.5%. You received 16 out of a possible total of 33 points. sneak up on prey mimic poisonous species hide from predators warn potential predators that it is poisonous universal camouflage disruptive camouflage warning coloration camouflage tide-pool camouflage move its arm to match the orientation of the stripes turn completely white and hide in the white stripe turn completely black and hide in the black stripe exhibit the exact striping pattern of its surroundings Why does the cuttlefish change its skin pattern? What happens when a cuttlefish is placed in an unnatural environment? Is the cuttlefish able to grow a protective shell? How do cuttlefish camouflage themselves even though they are colorblind? Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 9 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM

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Describe at least two strategies that a companies can use to overcome the challenges associated with transportation infrastructure congestion.

Describe at least two strategies that a companies can use to overcome the challenges associated with transportation infrastructure congestion.

Transportation and inventory economics are serious network design deliberations. In … Read More...
Fact Debate Brief Introduction Crime doesn’t pay; it should be punished. Even since childhood, a slap on the hand has prevented possible criminals from ever committing the same offense; whether it was successful or not depended on how much that child wanted that cookie. While a slap on the wrist might or might not be an effective deterrent, the same can be said about the death penalty. Every day, somewhere in the world, a criminal is stopped permanently from committing any future costs, but this is by the means of the death. While effective in stopping one person permanently, it does nothing about the crime world as a whole. While it is necessary to end the career of a criminal, no matter what his or her crime is, we must not end it by taking a life. Through this paper, the death penalty will be proven ineffective at deterring crime by use of other environmental factors. Definition: The death penalty is defined as the universal punishment of death as legally applied by a fair court system. It is important for it to be a fair legal system, as not to confuse it with genocide, mob mentality, or any other ruling without trial. Claim 1: Use of the death penalty is in decline Ground 1: According to the book The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective by Roger Hood and Carolyn Hoyle, published Dec. 8th, 2014, the Oxford professors in criminology say “As in most of the rest of the world, the death penalty in the US is in decline and distributed unevenly in frequency of use” even addressing that, as of April 2014, 18 states no longer have a death penalty, and even Oregon and Washington are considering removing their death penalty laws. Furthermore, in 2013, only 9 of these states still retaining the death penalty actually executed someone. Warrant 1: The death penalty can be reinstated at any time, but so far, it hasn’t been. At the same time, more states consider getting rid of it altogether. Therefore, it becomes clear that even states don’t want to be involved with this process showing that this is a disliked process. Claim 2: Even states with death penalty in effect still have high crime rates. Ground 2: With the reports gathered from fbi.gov, lawstreetmedia.com, a website based around political expertise and research determined the ranking of each state based on violent crime, published September 12th, 2014. Of the top ten most violent states, only three of which had the death penalty instituted (Maryland #9, New Mexico #4, Alaska #3). The other seven still had the system in place, and, despite it, still have a high amount of violent crime. On the opposite end of the spectrum, at the bottom ten most violent states, four of which, including the bottom-most states, do not have the death penalty in place. Warrant 2: With this ranking, it literally proves that the death penalty does not deter crime, or that there is a correlation between having the death penalty and having a decrease in the crime rate. Therefore, the idea of death penalty deterring crime is a null term in the sense that there is no, or a flawed connection. Claim 3: Violent crime is decreasing (but not because if the death penalty) Ground 3 A: According to an article published by The Economist, dated July 23rd, 2013, the rate of violent crime is in fact decreasing, but not because of the death penalty, but rather, because we have more police. From 1995 to 2010, policing has increased one-fifth, and with it, a decline in crime rate. In fact, in cities such as Detroit where policing has been cut, an opposite effect, an increase in crime, has been reported. Ground 3 B: An article from the Wall Street Journal, dated May 28th, 2011, also cites a decline in violent, only this time, citing the reason as a correlation with poverty levels. In 2009, at the start of the housing crisis, crime rates also dropped noticeably. Oddly enough, this article points out the belief that unemployment is often associated with crime; instead, the evidence presented is environmental in nature. Warrant 3: Crime rate isn’t deterred by death penalty, but rather, our surroundings. Seeing as how conditions have improved, so has the state of peace. Therefore, it becomes clear that the death penalty is ineffective at deterring crime because other key factors present more possibility for improvement of society. Claim 4: The death penalty is a historically flawed system. Ground 4A: According to the book The Death Penalty: Constitutional Issues, Commentaries, and Case Briefs by Scott Vollum, published in 2005, addresses how the case of the death penalty emerged to where it is today. While the book is now a decade old, it is used for historical context, particularly, in describing the first execution that took place in 1608. While it is true that most of these executions weren’t as well-grounded as the modern ones that take place now, they still had no effect in deterring crime. Why? Because even after America was established and more sane, the death penalty still had to be used because criminals still had violent behaviors. Ground 4B: According to data from Mother Jones, published May 17th, 2013, the reason why the crime rate was so high in the past could possibly be due to yet another environmental factor (affected by change over time), exposure to lead. Since the removal of lead from paint started over a hundred years ago, there has been a decline in homicide. Why is this important? Lead poisoning in child’s brain, if not lethal, can affect development and lead to mental disability, lower IQ, and lack of reasoning. Warrant 4: By examining history as a whole, there is a greater correlation between other factors that have resulted in a decline in violent crime. The decline in the crime rate has been an ongoing process, but has shown a faster decline due to other environmental factors, rather than the instatement of the death penalty. Claim 5: The world’s violent crime rate is changing, but not due to the death penalty. Ground 5A: According to article published by Amnesty USA in March of 2014, the number of executions under the death penalty reported in 2013 had increased by 15%. However, the rate of violent crime in the world has decreased significantly in the last decade. But, Latvia, for example, has permanently banned the death penalty since 2012. In 2014, the country was viewed overall as safe and low in violent crime rate. Ground 5B: However, while it is true that there is a decline in violent crime rate worldwide, The World Bank, April 17, 2013, reports that the rate of global poverty is decreasing. In a similar vein to the US, because wealth is being distributed better and conditions are improving overall, there is a steady decline in crime rate. Warrant 5: By examining the world as a whole, it becomes clear that it doesn’t matter if the death penalty is in place, violent crime will still exist. However, mirroring the US, as simple conditions improve, so does lifestyle. The death penalty does not deter crime in the world, rather a better quality of life is responsible for that. Works Cited “Death Sentences and Executions 2013.” Amnesty International USA. Amnesty USA, 26 Mar. 2014. Web. 15 Mar. 2015. <http://www.amnestyusa.org/research/reports/death-sentences-and-executions-2013>. D. K. “Why Is Crime Falling?” The Economist. The Economist Newspaper, 23 July 2013. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. <http://www.economist.com/blogs/economist-explains/2013/07/economist-explains-16>. Drum, Kevin. “The US Murder Rate Is on Track to Be Lowest in a Century.”Mother Jones. Mother Jones, 17 May 2013. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. <http://www.motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2013/05/us-murder-rate-track-be-lowest-century>. Hood, Roger, and Carolyn Hoyle. The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2002. 45. Print. Rizzo, Kevin. “Slideshow: America’s Safest and Most Dangerous States 2014.”Law Street Media. Law Street TM, 12 Sept. 2014. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. <http://lawstreetmedia.com/blogs/crime/safest-and-most-dangerous-states-2014/#slideshow>. Vollum, Scott. The Death Penalty: Constitutional Issues, Commentaries, and Case Briefs. Newark, NJ: LexisNexis, 2005. 2. Print. Theis, David. “Remarkable Declines in Global Poverty, But Major Challenges Remain.” The World Bank. The World Bank, 17 Apr. 2013. Web. 15 Mar. 2015. <http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/press-release/2013/04/17/remarkable-declines-in-global-poverty-but-major-challenges-remain>. Wilson, James Q. “Hard Times, Fewer Crimes.” WSJ. The Wall Street Journal, 28 May 2011. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. <http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052702304066504576345553135009870>.

Fact Debate Brief Introduction Crime doesn’t pay; it should be punished. Even since childhood, a slap on the hand has prevented possible criminals from ever committing the same offense; whether it was successful or not depended on how much that child wanted that cookie. While a slap on the wrist might or might not be an effective deterrent, the same can be said about the death penalty. Every day, somewhere in the world, a criminal is stopped permanently from committing any future costs, but this is by the means of the death. While effective in stopping one person permanently, it does nothing about the crime world as a whole. While it is necessary to end the career of a criminal, no matter what his or her crime is, we must not end it by taking a life. Through this paper, the death penalty will be proven ineffective at deterring crime by use of other environmental factors. Definition: The death penalty is defined as the universal punishment of death as legally applied by a fair court system. It is important for it to be a fair legal system, as not to confuse it with genocide, mob mentality, or any other ruling without trial. Claim 1: Use of the death penalty is in decline Ground 1: According to the book The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective by Roger Hood and Carolyn Hoyle, published Dec. 8th, 2014, the Oxford professors in criminology say “As in most of the rest of the world, the death penalty in the US is in decline and distributed unevenly in frequency of use” even addressing that, as of April 2014, 18 states no longer have a death penalty, and even Oregon and Washington are considering removing their death penalty laws. Furthermore, in 2013, only 9 of these states still retaining the death penalty actually executed someone. Warrant 1: The death penalty can be reinstated at any time, but so far, it hasn’t been. At the same time, more states consider getting rid of it altogether. Therefore, it becomes clear that even states don’t want to be involved with this process showing that this is a disliked process. Claim 2: Even states with death penalty in effect still have high crime rates. Ground 2: With the reports gathered from fbi.gov, lawstreetmedia.com, a website based around political expertise and research determined the ranking of each state based on violent crime, published September 12th, 2014. Of the top ten most violent states, only three of which had the death penalty instituted (Maryland #9, New Mexico #4, Alaska #3). The other seven still had the system in place, and, despite it, still have a high amount of violent crime. On the opposite end of the spectrum, at the bottom ten most violent states, four of which, including the bottom-most states, do not have the death penalty in place. Warrant 2: With this ranking, it literally proves that the death penalty does not deter crime, or that there is a correlation between having the death penalty and having a decrease in the crime rate. Therefore, the idea of death penalty deterring crime is a null term in the sense that there is no, or a flawed connection. Claim 3: Violent crime is decreasing (but not because if the death penalty) Ground 3 A: According to an article published by The Economist, dated July 23rd, 2013, the rate of violent crime is in fact decreasing, but not because of the death penalty, but rather, because we have more police. From 1995 to 2010, policing has increased one-fifth, and with it, a decline in crime rate. In fact, in cities such as Detroit where policing has been cut, an opposite effect, an increase in crime, has been reported. Ground 3 B: An article from the Wall Street Journal, dated May 28th, 2011, also cites a decline in violent, only this time, citing the reason as a correlation with poverty levels. In 2009, at the start of the housing crisis, crime rates also dropped noticeably. Oddly enough, this article points out the belief that unemployment is often associated with crime; instead, the evidence presented is environmental in nature. Warrant 3: Crime rate isn’t deterred by death penalty, but rather, our surroundings. Seeing as how conditions have improved, so has the state of peace. Therefore, it becomes clear that the death penalty is ineffective at deterring crime because other key factors present more possibility for improvement of society. Claim 4: The death penalty is a historically flawed system. Ground 4A: According to the book The Death Penalty: Constitutional Issues, Commentaries, and Case Briefs by Scott Vollum, published in 2005, addresses how the case of the death penalty emerged to where it is today. While the book is now a decade old, it is used for historical context, particularly, in describing the first execution that took place in 1608. While it is true that most of these executions weren’t as well-grounded as the modern ones that take place now, they still had no effect in deterring crime. Why? Because even after America was established and more sane, the death penalty still had to be used because criminals still had violent behaviors. Ground 4B: According to data from Mother Jones, published May 17th, 2013, the reason why the crime rate was so high in the past could possibly be due to yet another environmental factor (affected by change over time), exposure to lead. Since the removal of lead from paint started over a hundred years ago, there has been a decline in homicide. Why is this important? Lead poisoning in child’s brain, if not lethal, can affect development and lead to mental disability, lower IQ, and lack of reasoning. Warrant 4: By examining history as a whole, there is a greater correlation between other factors that have resulted in a decline in violent crime. The decline in the crime rate has been an ongoing process, but has shown a faster decline due to other environmental factors, rather than the instatement of the death penalty. Claim 5: The world’s violent crime rate is changing, but not due to the death penalty. Ground 5A: According to article published by Amnesty USA in March of 2014, the number of executions under the death penalty reported in 2013 had increased by 15%. However, the rate of violent crime in the world has decreased significantly in the last decade. But, Latvia, for example, has permanently banned the death penalty since 2012. In 2014, the country was viewed overall as safe and low in violent crime rate. Ground 5B: However, while it is true that there is a decline in violent crime rate worldwide, The World Bank, April 17, 2013, reports that the rate of global poverty is decreasing. In a similar vein to the US, because wealth is being distributed better and conditions are improving overall, there is a steady decline in crime rate. Warrant 5: By examining the world as a whole, it becomes clear that it doesn’t matter if the death penalty is in place, violent crime will still exist. However, mirroring the US, as simple conditions improve, so does lifestyle. The death penalty does not deter crime in the world, rather a better quality of life is responsible for that. Works Cited “Death Sentences and Executions 2013.” Amnesty International USA. Amnesty USA, 26 Mar. 2014. Web. 15 Mar. 2015. . D. K. “Why Is Crime Falling?” The Economist. The Economist Newspaper, 23 July 2013. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. . Drum, Kevin. “The US Murder Rate Is on Track to Be Lowest in a Century.”Mother Jones. Mother Jones, 17 May 2013. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. . Hood, Roger, and Carolyn Hoyle. The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2002. 45. Print. Rizzo, Kevin. “Slideshow: America’s Safest and Most Dangerous States 2014.”Law Street Media. Law Street TM, 12 Sept. 2014. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. . Vollum, Scott. The Death Penalty: Constitutional Issues, Commentaries, and Case Briefs. Newark, NJ: LexisNexis, 2005. 2. Print. Theis, David. “Remarkable Declines in Global Poverty, But Major Challenges Remain.” The World Bank. The World Bank, 17 Apr. 2013. Web. 15 Mar. 2015. . Wilson, James Q. “Hard Times, Fewer Crimes.” WSJ. The Wall Street Journal, 28 May 2011. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. .

Fact Debate Brief Introduction Crime doesn’t pay; it should be … Read More...
http://www.econlib.org/library/Smith/smWN1.html#B.I,%20Ch.1,%20Of%20the%20Division%20of%20Labor What does Smith mean by division of labor, and how does it affect production? A. He means that each person does their own work to benefit themselves by creating goods. This creates well-crafted goods. B. He argues that in order to become more efficient, we need to put everyone in the same workhouses and eliminate division. C. He says that the division of labor provides farmers with the opportunity to become involved in manufacturing. D. He means that each person makes one small part of a good very quickly, but this is bad for the quality of production overall. E. He means that by having each individual specialize in one thing, they can work together to create products more efficiently and effectively. Which of the following is NOT an example of the circumstances by which the division of labor improves efficiency? A. A doll-making company stops allowing each employee to make one whole doll each and instead appoints each employee to create one part of the doll. B. A family of rug makers buys a loom to speed up their production. C. A mechanic opens a new shop to be nearer to the market. D. A factory changes the responsibilities of its employees so that one group handles heavy boxes and the other group does precision sewing. E. A baker who used to make a dozen cookies at a time buys a giant mixer and oven that enable him to make 20 dozen cookies at a time. Considering the global system of states, what do you think the allegory of the pins has to offer? A. It suggests that there could be a natural harmony of interests among states because they can divide labor among themselves to the benefit of everyone. B. It suggests that states can never be secure enough to cooperate because every state is equally capable of producing the same things. C. It suggests that a central authority is necessary to help states cooperate, in the same way that a manager oversees operations at a factory. D. The allegory of the pins is a great way to think about how wars come about, because states won’t cooperate with each other like pin-makers do. E. The allegory of the pins shows us that there is no natural harmony of interests between states. Smith sees the development of industry, technology, and the division of labor as A. generally positive but not progressive. The lives of many people may improve, but the world will generally stay the same. B. generally positive and progressive. The world is improving because of these changes, and it will continue to improve. C. generally negative. The creation of new technologies and the division of labor are harmful to all humans, both the wealthy and the poor. D. generally negative. The creation of the division of labor only benefits the wealthy at the expense of the poor. E. both positive and negative. Smith thinks that technology hurts us, while the division of labor helps society progress and develop. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RUwS1uAdUcI What point is Hans Rosling trying to make when he describes the global health pre-test? A. He is trying to show how the average person has no idea of the true state of global health. B. He is trying to illustrate how we tend to carry around outdated notions about the state of global health. C. He is trying to make us see that the less-developed countries are far worse off than we ever thought. D. He is trying to drive home the idea that global health has not improved over time despite foreign aid and improvements in medicine. E. He is trying to warn us about the rapid growth in world population. Rosling shows us that we tend to think about global health in terms of “we and them.” Who are the “we” and who are the “them”? A. “We” refers to academics, students, and scholars; “them” refers to the uneducated. B. “We” refers to the average person; “them” refers to politicians and global leaders. C. “We” refers to the wealthy; “them” refers to the poor. D. “We” refers to the Western world; “them” refers to the Third World. E. “We” refers to students; “them” refers to professors. In the life expectancy and fertility rate demonstration, what do the statistics reveal? A. Over time, developed countries produced small families and long lives, whereas developing countries produced large families and short lives. B. The world today looks much like it did in 1962 despite our attempts to help poorer countries develop. C. All countries in the world, even the poorer ones, are trending toward longer lives and smaller families. D. Developed countries are trending toward smaller families but shorter lives. E. All countries tend to make gains and losses in fertility and lifespan, but in the long run there is no significant change. What point does Rosling make about life expectancy in Vietnam as compared to the United States? To what does he attribute the change? A. He indicates that economic change preceded social change. B. He suggests that markets and free trade resulted in the increase in life expectancy. C. He says that the data indicates that the Vietnam War contributed to the decrease in life expectancy during that time, but that it recovered shortly thereafter. D. He says that social change in Asia preceded economic change, and life expectancy in Vietnam increased despite the war. E. He indicates that Vietnam was equal to the United States in life expectancy before the war. According to Rosling, how are regional statistics about child survival rates and GDP potentially misleading? A. Countries have an incentive to lie about the actual survival rates because they want foreign assistance. B. Statistics for the individual countries in a region are often vastly different. C. Regional statistics give us a strong sense of how we can understand development within one region, but it does not allow us to compare across regions. D. The data available over time and from countries within regions is often poorly collected and incomplete. E. Child survival rates cannot be compared regionally, since each culture has a different sense of how important children are. What is Rosling’s main point about statistical databases? A. The data is available but not readily accessible, so we need to create networks to solve that problem. B. The data that comes from these databases is often flawed and unreliable. C. It doesn’t matter whether we have access to these databases because the data can’t be used in an interesting way. D. Statistics can’t tell us very much, but we should do our best to make use of the information we do have. E. The information that could be true is too hard to sort out from what isn’t true because we don’t know how strong the data really is. http://www.marxists.org/archive/lenin/works/1916/imp-hsc/ch10.htm#v22zz99h-298-GUESS Click the link at left to read Chapter 10 of Imperialism, The Highest Stage of Capitalism, then answer the questions below. According to Lenin, what is the fundamental source of a monopoly? A. It is a natural effect of human behavior. B. It is the result of governments and police systems. C. Its source is rooted in democracy. D. It comes from the concentration of production at a high stage. E. It is what follows a socialist system. What are the principal types or manifestations of monopoly capitalism? A. Monopolistic capitalist associations like cartels, syndicates and trusts; and monopolies as a result of colonial policy. B. Monopolization of raw materials and monopolization of finance capital. C. Monopolization of governing structures and monopolies of oligarchies. D. Monopolist capitalist associations like cartels, syndicates and trusts; and monopolies as a result of colonial policy AND monopolization of raw materials and monopolization of finance capital. E. Monopolization of raw materials and monopolization of finance capital AND monopolization of governing structures and monopolies of oligarchies. What is the definition of a rentier state according to Lenin? A. A state that colonizes other states. B. A state whose bourgeoisie live off the export of capital. C. A poor state. D. A wealthy state. E. A colonized state. Overall Lenin’s analysis of the state of capitalism is concerned with: A. The interactions between states. B. The interactions within states. C. The ownership of industry and organizations. D. The interactions within states AND the ownership of industry and organizations. E. All of these options. http://view.vzaar.com/1194665/flashplayer Watch the video at left, and then answer the questions below. The Marshall Plan was developed by the United States after World War II. What was its purpose? A. to feed the hungry of Europe B. to stem the spread of communism C. to maintain an American military presence in Europe D. to feed the hungry of Europe AND to stem the spread of communism E. to stem the spread of communism AND to maintain an American military presence in Europe What kind of aid was sent at first? A. foods, fertilizers, and machines for agriculture B. books, paper, and radios for education C. clothing, medical supplies, and construction equipment D. mostly cash in the form of loans and grants E. people with business expertise to help develop the economy What kind of aid did the United States send to Greece to help its farmers? A. tractors B. mules C. seeds D. fertilizer E. all of these options What was one way that the United States influenced public opinion in Italy during the elections described in the video? A. The United States provided significant food aid to Italy so that the Italians would be inclined to vote against the Communists. B. The Italians had been impressed by the strength and loyalty of the American soldiers, and were inclined to listen to them during the elections. C. There was a large number of young Italians who followed American fashion and culture. D. Italian immigrants in the United States wrote letters to their families in Italy urging them not to vote for Communists. E. The Greeks showed the Italians how much the Americans had helped them, warning that supporting a Communist candidate would mean sacrificing American aid. How did Pope Pius XII undermine the strength of the Communist Party in Italy? A. He encouraged Italians to go out and vote. B. He warned that the Communist Party would legalize abortion. C. He excommunicated many members of the Communist Party. D. He made a speech in support of capitalism. E. He declared that Communists should not be baptized. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KVhWqwnZ1eM Use the video at left to answer the questions below. Hans Rosling shares how his students discuss “we” versus “them.” To whom are his students referring? A. the United States and Mexico B. Christians and Muslims C. Democrats and Republicans D. Europe and Asia E. none of these options According to Rosling, what factors contribute to a better quality of life for people in developing countries? A. family planning B. soap and water C. investment D. vaccinations E. all of these options Using his data, Rosling demonstrates a great shift in Mexico. What change does his data demonstrate? A. a decrease in drug usage B. a decrease in the number of jobs available C. an increase in average life expenctancy D. an increase in the rate of violent crime E. all of these options Instead of “developing” and “developed,” Rosling divides countries into four categories. Which of the following is NOT one of them? A. high-income countries B. middle-income countries C. low-income countries D. no-income countries E. collapsing countries Rosling discusses the increased life expectancy in both China and the United States. How are the situations different? A. The U.S. and China are on different continents. B. The life expectancy in China rose much higher than it did in the U.S. C. China first expanded its life expectancy and then grew economically, whereas the U.S. did the reverse. D. Average income and life expectancy steadily increased in the U.S., but they steadily decreased in China. E. all of these options Rosling shows a chart that demonstrates the regional income distribution of the world from 1970 to 2015. During that time, what has happened in South and East Asia? A. Money has flowed out of Asia to developing countries in Africa. B. The average income of citizens of South and East Asia has increased over the last 30 years. C. The average income of citizens of South and East Asia has decreased over the last 30 years. D. The average income of citizens of South and East Asia has surpassed that of Europe and North America. E. There has been no change. Click here to access GapMinder, the data visualizer that Hans Rosling uses. In 2010, which of the following countries had both a higher per-capita GDP and a higher life expectancy than the United States? A. France B. Japan C. Denmark D. Singapore E. Kuwait http://www.garretthardinsociety.org/articles/art_tragedy_of_the_commons.html http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8a4S23uXIcM The Tragedy of the Commons What is the rough definition of the “commons” given in the article? A. any private property on which others trespass B. behavior that everyone considers to be normal C. a cow that lives in a herd D. government-administered benefits, like unemployment or Social Security E. a shared resource What does Hardin mean by describing pollution as a reverse tragedy of the commons? A. Rather than causing a problem, it resolves a problem. B. Pollution costs us money rather than making us money. C. We are putting something into the commons rather than removing something from it. D. It starts at the other end of the biological pyramid. E. Humans see less of it as time goes on. Hardin says “the air and waters surrounding us cannot readily be fenced, and so the tragedy of the commons as a cesspool must be prevented by different means.” What are those means? A. establishing more international treaties to protect the environment B. using laws or taxes to make the polluter pay for pollution C. punishing consumers for generating waste D. raising awareness about environmental issues E. developing greener products Pacific Garbage Dump According to the news report, what percent of the Gyre is made of plastic? A. 50 percent B. 60 percent C. 70 percent D. 80 percent E. 90 percent Where does the majority of the plastic in the Gyre come from? A. barges that dump trash in the ocean B. storm drains from land C. people throwing litter off boats into the ocean D. remnants from movie sets filmed at sea E. fishing boats processing their catch What does Charles Moore mean by the “throwaway concept”? A. the habitual use of disposable plastic packaging B. the mistaken view that marine ecosystems are infinitely renewable C. a general lack of interest in recycling D. the willingness to discard effective but small-scale environmental policies in deference to broader E. people throwing away their lives in pursuit of money In what way does the Great Pacific Gyre represent issues like global warming a tragedy of the commons? A. because all the plastic trash in it comes from the United States B. because it kills the albatross and makes it impossible for them to reproduce C. surbecause the countries rounding the Pacific Ocean are polluting the water in a way that affects the quality of the resource for all, but no one is specifically accountable for it D. because it causes marine life to compete for increasingly scarce nutrients in the ocean E. because nations in the region all collectively agreed to dump their trash in the Pacific http://www.npr.org/news/specials/climate/video/ http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/climateconnections/climate-map http://www.npr.org/news/specials/climate/video/wildchronicles.html Use the links provided at left to answer the questions below. Global Warming: It’s All About Carbon How does carbon give us fuel? A. When you burn things that contain carbon the bonds break, giving off energy. B. Burning things creates carbon out of other elements as a result of combustion. C. Carbon is created after oxygen and hydrogen get released. D. Carbon bonds are created thereby giving off energy. E. Carbon is made into fuel by refining oil. National Geographic Climate Map What geographic areas have seen the most significant changes in temperature? A. The African continent. B. The Pacific Ocean. C. The Atlantic Ocean. D. The Arctic Ocean. E. The Indian Ocean. Why does it matter that rain fall steadily rather than in downpours? A. For those countries accustomed to steady rain fall, downpours are actually more efficient ways to catch water. B. Downpours in regions accustomed to steady fall makes them more prone to flooding and damage. C. In general, as long as regions get either steady fall or downpours most things will stay the same. D. Downpours are always more beneficial to crop growth than steady rain. E. Steady rain is always more beneficial to crop growth than downpours. Climate Change Threatens Kona Coffee What is unique about the climate in Hawaii, making it a good place to grow coffee? A. The elevation is high, the nights are cool and the days are humid. B. The elevation is low, the nights are warm and the days are dry. C. The elevation is high, the nights are warm and the days are dry. D. The elevation is low, the nights are cool and the days are dry. E. The elevation is high, the nights are warm and the days are humid. What specific temperature pattern have experts noted about the region where Kona coffee is grown in Hawaii? A. There has been no significant change but the bean production has dropped. B. The nights have warmed up, even though the days have cooled. C. There has been an increase in bean production with the change in climate. D. The nights have cooled even more so than before. E. There has been universally hot days all the way around.

http://www.econlib.org/library/Smith/smWN1.html#B.I,%20Ch.1,%20Of%20the%20Division%20of%20Labor What does Smith mean by division of labor, and how does it affect production? A. He means that each person does their own work to benefit themselves by creating goods. This creates well-crafted goods. B. He argues that in order to become more efficient, we need to put everyone in the same workhouses and eliminate division. C. He says that the division of labor provides farmers with the opportunity to become involved in manufacturing. D. He means that each person makes one small part of a good very quickly, but this is bad for the quality of production overall. E. He means that by having each individual specialize in one thing, they can work together to create products more efficiently and effectively. Which of the following is NOT an example of the circumstances by which the division of labor improves efficiency? A. A doll-making company stops allowing each employee to make one whole doll each and instead appoints each employee to create one part of the doll. B. A family of rug makers buys a loom to speed up their production. C. A mechanic opens a new shop to be nearer to the market. D. A factory changes the responsibilities of its employees so that one group handles heavy boxes and the other group does precision sewing. E. A baker who used to make a dozen cookies at a time buys a giant mixer and oven that enable him to make 20 dozen cookies at a time. Considering the global system of states, what do you think the allegory of the pins has to offer? A. It suggests that there could be a natural harmony of interests among states because they can divide labor among themselves to the benefit of everyone. B. It suggests that states can never be secure enough to cooperate because every state is equally capable of producing the same things. C. It suggests that a central authority is necessary to help states cooperate, in the same way that a manager oversees operations at a factory. D. The allegory of the pins is a great way to think about how wars come about, because states won’t cooperate with each other like pin-makers do. E. The allegory of the pins shows us that there is no natural harmony of interests between states. Smith sees the development of industry, technology, and the division of labor as A. generally positive but not progressive. The lives of many people may improve, but the world will generally stay the same. B. generally positive and progressive. The world is improving because of these changes, and it will continue to improve. C. generally negative. The creation of new technologies and the division of labor are harmful to all humans, both the wealthy and the poor. D. generally negative. The creation of the division of labor only benefits the wealthy at the expense of the poor. E. both positive and negative. Smith thinks that technology hurts us, while the division of labor helps society progress and develop. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RUwS1uAdUcI What point is Hans Rosling trying to make when he describes the global health pre-test? A. He is trying to show how the average person has no idea of the true state of global health. B. He is trying to illustrate how we tend to carry around outdated notions about the state of global health. C. He is trying to make us see that the less-developed countries are far worse off than we ever thought. D. He is trying to drive home the idea that global health has not improved over time despite foreign aid and improvements in medicine. E. He is trying to warn us about the rapid growth in world population. Rosling shows us that we tend to think about global health in terms of “we and them.” Who are the “we” and who are the “them”? A. “We” refers to academics, students, and scholars; “them” refers to the uneducated. B. “We” refers to the average person; “them” refers to politicians and global leaders. C. “We” refers to the wealthy; “them” refers to the poor. D. “We” refers to the Western world; “them” refers to the Third World. E. “We” refers to students; “them” refers to professors. In the life expectancy and fertility rate demonstration, what do the statistics reveal? A. Over time, developed countries produced small families and long lives, whereas developing countries produced large families and short lives. B. The world today looks much like it did in 1962 despite our attempts to help poorer countries develop. C. All countries in the world, even the poorer ones, are trending toward longer lives and smaller families. D. Developed countries are trending toward smaller families but shorter lives. E. All countries tend to make gains and losses in fertility and lifespan, but in the long run there is no significant change. What point does Rosling make about life expectancy in Vietnam as compared to the United States? To what does he attribute the change? A. He indicates that economic change preceded social change. B. He suggests that markets and free trade resulted in the increase in life expectancy. C. He says that the data indicates that the Vietnam War contributed to the decrease in life expectancy during that time, but that it recovered shortly thereafter. D. He says that social change in Asia preceded economic change, and life expectancy in Vietnam increased despite the war. E. He indicates that Vietnam was equal to the United States in life expectancy before the war. According to Rosling, how are regional statistics about child survival rates and GDP potentially misleading? A. Countries have an incentive to lie about the actual survival rates because they want foreign assistance. B. Statistics for the individual countries in a region are often vastly different. C. Regional statistics give us a strong sense of how we can understand development within one region, but it does not allow us to compare across regions. D. The data available over time and from countries within regions is often poorly collected and incomplete. E. Child survival rates cannot be compared regionally, since each culture has a different sense of how important children are. What is Rosling’s main point about statistical databases? A. The data is available but not readily accessible, so we need to create networks to solve that problem. B. The data that comes from these databases is often flawed and unreliable. C. It doesn’t matter whether we have access to these databases because the data can’t be used in an interesting way. D. Statistics can’t tell us very much, but we should do our best to make use of the information we do have. E. The information that could be true is too hard to sort out from what isn’t true because we don’t know how strong the data really is. http://www.marxists.org/archive/lenin/works/1916/imp-hsc/ch10.htm#v22zz99h-298-GUESS Click the link at left to read Chapter 10 of Imperialism, The Highest Stage of Capitalism, then answer the questions below. According to Lenin, what is the fundamental source of a monopoly? A. It is a natural effect of human behavior. B. It is the result of governments and police systems. C. Its source is rooted in democracy. D. It comes from the concentration of production at a high stage. E. It is what follows a socialist system. What are the principal types or manifestations of monopoly capitalism? A. Monopolistic capitalist associations like cartels, syndicates and trusts; and monopolies as a result of colonial policy. B. Monopolization of raw materials and monopolization of finance capital. C. Monopolization of governing structures and monopolies of oligarchies. D. Monopolist capitalist associations like cartels, syndicates and trusts; and monopolies as a result of colonial policy AND monopolization of raw materials and monopolization of finance capital. E. Monopolization of raw materials and monopolization of finance capital AND monopolization of governing structures and monopolies of oligarchies. What is the definition of a rentier state according to Lenin? A. A state that colonizes other states. B. A state whose bourgeoisie live off the export of capital. C. A poor state. D. A wealthy state. E. A colonized state. Overall Lenin’s analysis of the state of capitalism is concerned with: A. The interactions between states. B. The interactions within states. C. The ownership of industry and organizations. D. The interactions within states AND the ownership of industry and organizations. E. All of these options. http://view.vzaar.com/1194665/flashplayer Watch the video at left, and then answer the questions below. The Marshall Plan was developed by the United States after World War II. What was its purpose? A. to feed the hungry of Europe B. to stem the spread of communism C. to maintain an American military presence in Europe D. to feed the hungry of Europe AND to stem the spread of communism E. to stem the spread of communism AND to maintain an American military presence in Europe What kind of aid was sent at first? A. foods, fertilizers, and machines for agriculture B. books, paper, and radios for education C. clothing, medical supplies, and construction equipment D. mostly cash in the form of loans and grants E. people with business expertise to help develop the economy What kind of aid did the United States send to Greece to help its farmers? A. tractors B. mules C. seeds D. fertilizer E. all of these options What was one way that the United States influenced public opinion in Italy during the elections described in the video? A. The United States provided significant food aid to Italy so that the Italians would be inclined to vote against the Communists. B. The Italians had been impressed by the strength and loyalty of the American soldiers, and were inclined to listen to them during the elections. C. There was a large number of young Italians who followed American fashion and culture. D. Italian immigrants in the United States wrote letters to their families in Italy urging them not to vote for Communists. E. The Greeks showed the Italians how much the Americans had helped them, warning that supporting a Communist candidate would mean sacrificing American aid. How did Pope Pius XII undermine the strength of the Communist Party in Italy? A. He encouraged Italians to go out and vote. B. He warned that the Communist Party would legalize abortion. C. He excommunicated many members of the Communist Party. D. He made a speech in support of capitalism. E. He declared that Communists should not be baptized. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KVhWqwnZ1eM Use the video at left to answer the questions below. Hans Rosling shares how his students discuss “we” versus “them.” To whom are his students referring? A. the United States and Mexico B. Christians and Muslims C. Democrats and Republicans D. Europe and Asia E. none of these options According to Rosling, what factors contribute to a better quality of life for people in developing countries? A. family planning B. soap and water C. investment D. vaccinations E. all of these options Using his data, Rosling demonstrates a great shift in Mexico. What change does his data demonstrate? A. a decrease in drug usage B. a decrease in the number of jobs available C. an increase in average life expenctancy D. an increase in the rate of violent crime E. all of these options Instead of “developing” and “developed,” Rosling divides countries into four categories. Which of the following is NOT one of them? A. high-income countries B. middle-income countries C. low-income countries D. no-income countries E. collapsing countries Rosling discusses the increased life expectancy in both China and the United States. How are the situations different? A. The U.S. and China are on different continents. B. The life expectancy in China rose much higher than it did in the U.S. C. China first expanded its life expectancy and then grew economically, whereas the U.S. did the reverse. D. Average income and life expectancy steadily increased in the U.S., but they steadily decreased in China. E. all of these options Rosling shows a chart that demonstrates the regional income distribution of the world from 1970 to 2015. During that time, what has happened in South and East Asia? A. Money has flowed out of Asia to developing countries in Africa. B. The average income of citizens of South and East Asia has increased over the last 30 years. C. The average income of citizens of South and East Asia has decreased over the last 30 years. D. The average income of citizens of South and East Asia has surpassed that of Europe and North America. E. There has been no change. Click here to access GapMinder, the data visualizer that Hans Rosling uses. In 2010, which of the following countries had both a higher per-capita GDP and a higher life expectancy than the United States? A. France B. Japan C. Denmark D. Singapore E. Kuwait http://www.garretthardinsociety.org/articles/art_tragedy_of_the_commons.html http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8a4S23uXIcM The Tragedy of the Commons What is the rough definition of the “commons” given in the article? A. any private property on which others trespass B. behavior that everyone considers to be normal C. a cow that lives in a herd D. government-administered benefits, like unemployment or Social Security E. a shared resource What does Hardin mean by describing pollution as a reverse tragedy of the commons? A. Rather than causing a problem, it resolves a problem. B. Pollution costs us money rather than making us money. C. We are putting something into the commons rather than removing something from it. D. It starts at the other end of the biological pyramid. E. Humans see less of it as time goes on. Hardin says “the air and waters surrounding us cannot readily be fenced, and so the tragedy of the commons as a cesspool must be prevented by different means.” What are those means? A. establishing more international treaties to protect the environment B. using laws or taxes to make the polluter pay for pollution C. punishing consumers for generating waste D. raising awareness about environmental issues E. developing greener products Pacific Garbage Dump According to the news report, what percent of the Gyre is made of plastic? A. 50 percent B. 60 percent C. 70 percent D. 80 percent E. 90 percent Where does the majority of the plastic in the Gyre come from? A. barges that dump trash in the ocean B. storm drains from land C. people throwing litter off boats into the ocean D. remnants from movie sets filmed at sea E. fishing boats processing their catch What does Charles Moore mean by the “throwaway concept”? A. the habitual use of disposable plastic packaging B. the mistaken view that marine ecosystems are infinitely renewable C. a general lack of interest in recycling D. the willingness to discard effective but small-scale environmental policies in deference to broader E. people throwing away their lives in pursuit of money In what way does the Great Pacific Gyre represent issues like global warming a tragedy of the commons? A. because all the plastic trash in it comes from the United States B. because it kills the albatross and makes it impossible for them to reproduce C. surbecause the countries rounding the Pacific Ocean are polluting the water in a way that affects the quality of the resource for all, but no one is specifically accountable for it D. because it causes marine life to compete for increasingly scarce nutrients in the ocean E. because nations in the region all collectively agreed to dump their trash in the Pacific http://www.npr.org/news/specials/climate/video/ http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/climateconnections/climate-map http://www.npr.org/news/specials/climate/video/wildchronicles.html Use the links provided at left to answer the questions below. Global Warming: It’s All About Carbon How does carbon give us fuel? A. When you burn things that contain carbon the bonds break, giving off energy. B. Burning things creates carbon out of other elements as a result of combustion. C. Carbon is created after oxygen and hydrogen get released. D. Carbon bonds are created thereby giving off energy. E. Carbon is made into fuel by refining oil. National Geographic Climate Map What geographic areas have seen the most significant changes in temperature? A. The African continent. B. The Pacific Ocean. C. The Atlantic Ocean. D. The Arctic Ocean. E. The Indian Ocean. Why does it matter that rain fall steadily rather than in downpours? A. For those countries accustomed to steady rain fall, downpours are actually more efficient ways to catch water. B. Downpours in regions accustomed to steady fall makes them more prone to flooding and damage. C. In general, as long as regions get either steady fall or downpours most things will stay the same. D. Downpours are always more beneficial to crop growth than steady rain. E. Steady rain is always more beneficial to crop growth than downpours. Climate Change Threatens Kona Coffee What is unique about the climate in Hawaii, making it a good place to grow coffee? A. The elevation is high, the nights are cool and the days are humid. B. The elevation is low, the nights are warm and the days are dry. C. The elevation is high, the nights are warm and the days are dry. D. The elevation is low, the nights are cool and the days are dry. E. The elevation is high, the nights are warm and the days are humid. What specific temperature pattern have experts noted about the region where Kona coffee is grown in Hawaii? A. There has been no significant change but the bean production has dropped. B. The nights have warmed up, even though the days have cooled. C. There has been an increase in bean production with the change in climate. D. The nights have cooled even more so than before. E. There has been universally hot days all the way around.

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