Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture Spring 2015 Look through popular magazines, and see if you can find advertisements that objectify women in order to sell a product. Alternately, you may use an advertisement on television (but make sure to provide a link to the ad so I can see it!). Study these images then write a paper about objectification that deals with all or some of the following: • What effect(s), if any, do you think the objectification of women’s bodies has on our culture? • Jean Kilbourne states “turning a human being into a thing is almost always the first step toward justifying violence against that person.” What do you think she means by this? Do you agree with her reasoning? Why or why not? • Some people would argue that depicting a woman’s body as an object is a form of art. What is your opinion of this point of view? Explain your reasoning. • Why do you think that women are objectified more often than men are? • How does sexualization and objectification play out differently across racial lines? • Kilbourne explains that the consequences of being objectified are different – and more serious – for women than for men. Do you agree? How is the world different for women than it is for men? How do objectified images of women interact with those in our culture differently from the way images of men do? Why is it important to look at images in the context of the culture? • What is the difference between sexual objectification and sexual subjectification? (Ros Gill ) • How do ads construct violent white masculinity and how does that vision of masculinity hurt both men and women? Throughout your written analysis, be sure to make clear and specific reference to the images you selected, and please submit these images with your paper. Make sure you engage with and reference to at least 4 of the following authors: Kilbourne, Bordo, Hunter & Soto, Rose, Durham, Gill, Katz, Schuchardt, Ono and Buescher. Guidelines:  Keep your content focused on structural, systemic, institutional factors rather than the individual: BE ANALYTICAL NOT ANECDOTAL.  Avoid using the first person or including personal stories/reactions. You must make sure to actively engage with your readings: these essays need to be informed and framed by the theoretical material you have been reading this semester.  Keep within the 4-6 page limit; use 12-point font, double spacing and 1-inch margins.  Use formal writing conventions (introduction/thesis statement, body, conclusion) and correct grammar. Resources may be cited within the text of your paper, i.e. (Walters, 2013).

Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture Spring 2015 Look through popular magazines, and see if you can find advertisements that objectify women in order to sell a product. Alternately, you may use an advertisement on television (but make sure to provide a link to the ad so I can see it!). Study these images then write a paper about objectification that deals with all or some of the following: • What effect(s), if any, do you think the objectification of women’s bodies has on our culture? • Jean Kilbourne states “turning a human being into a thing is almost always the first step toward justifying violence against that person.” What do you think she means by this? Do you agree with her reasoning? Why or why not? • Some people would argue that depicting a woman’s body as an object is a form of art. What is your opinion of this point of view? Explain your reasoning. • Why do you think that women are objectified more often than men are? • How does sexualization and objectification play out differently across racial lines? • Kilbourne explains that the consequences of being objectified are different – and more serious – for women than for men. Do you agree? How is the world different for women than it is for men? How do objectified images of women interact with those in our culture differently from the way images of men do? Why is it important to look at images in the context of the culture? • What is the difference between sexual objectification and sexual subjectification? (Ros Gill ) • How do ads construct violent white masculinity and how does that vision of masculinity hurt both men and women? Throughout your written analysis, be sure to make clear and specific reference to the images you selected, and please submit these images with your paper. Make sure you engage with and reference to at least 4 of the following authors: Kilbourne, Bordo, Hunter & Soto, Rose, Durham, Gill, Katz, Schuchardt, Ono and Buescher. Guidelines:  Keep your content focused on structural, systemic, institutional factors rather than the individual: BE ANALYTICAL NOT ANECDOTAL.  Avoid using the first person or including personal stories/reactions. You must make sure to actively engage with your readings: these essays need to be informed and framed by the theoretical material you have been reading this semester.  Keep within the 4-6 page limit; use 12-point font, double spacing and 1-inch margins.  Use formal writing conventions (introduction/thesis statement, body, conclusion) and correct grammar. Resources may be cited within the text of your paper, i.e. (Walters, 2013).

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Question 1 1. When the rules of perspective are applied in order to represent unusual points of view, we call this ________. a. foreshortening b. chiaroscuro c. convergence d. highlight e. overlapping 10 points Question 2 1. A flat work of art has two dimensions: ________ and width. a. breadth b. depth c. size d. mass e. height 10 points Question 3 1. Méret Oppenheim was part of an art movement that rejected rational, conscious thought. Her fur-lined teacup and saucer, Object, conjures an unexpected and illogical sensation for the viewer by using ________ texture. a. smooth b. familiar c. expected d. subversive e. silky 10 points Question 4 1. In James Allen’s etching The Connectors, an image of workers erecting the Empire State Building, the artist created a feeling of great height by using ________ line to lead the viewer’s eye diagonally downward. a. horizontal b. communicative c. regular d. directional e. implied 10 points Question 5 1. Because it is three-dimensional, a form has these three spatial measurements: height, width, and ________. a. mass b. length c. size d. depth e. strength 10 points Question 6 1. The ancient Egyptian depiction of the journey of the Sun god Re (0.1) was painted on ________. a. stone b. a coffin c. the wall of a tomb d. copper e. a vase 10 points Question 7 1. The area covered by a pattern is called the ________. a. field b. motif c. background d. size e. foreground 10 points Question 8 1. ________ balance is achieved when two halves of a composition are not mirror images of each other. a. unified b. radial c. varied d. asymmetrical e. symmetrical 10 points Question 9 1. In Audrey Flack’s Marilyn Monroe, the burning candle, the flower, and the hourglass are typical of a kind of symbolism in art that reminds us of death. This kind of symbolism is known as ________. a. vanitas b. feminism c. abstract d. eternal e. none of the other answers 10 points Question 10 1. Tibetan Buddhist monks create colored sand images with a radial design. This representation of the universe is called a ________. a. prayer wheel b. rotunda c. mandala d. prayer flag e. lotus 10 points Question 11 1. In The School of Athens, Raphael focused our attention on two Greek philosophers positioned in the center of the work. They are ________ and ________. a. Plato . . . Aristotle b. Aristotle . . . Socrates c. Diogenes . . . Socrates d. Diogenes . . . Aristotle e. Socrates . . . Plato 10 points Question 12 1. In his Obey campaign poster Shepard Fairey used a striking contrast between positive and ________ shapes to attract the attention of the public. a. figure–ground reversal b. implied c. geometric d. organic e. negative 10 points Question 13 1. The Italian architect Andrea Palladio created a radial design in his plan for the Villa Capra. This building is also called the ________. a. Colosseum b. Pantheon c. Villa Rotonda d. Villa Caprese e. Parthenon 10 points Question 14 1. The French artist Georges Seurat employed a new technique to create a jewel-like diffusion of light and vibration of color in his work The Circus. This type of painting, made up of small dots of color, is known as ________. a. Fauvism b. Luminism c. pointillism d. Pop art e. Impressionism 10 points Question 15 1. The rarity of an artwork, and its value, are often closely related. True False 10 points Question 16 1. By orienting lines so that they attract attention to a specific area of a work of art the artist is using ________. a. actual line b. implied line c. directional line d. measured line e. chaotic line 10 points Question 17 1. Kindred Spirits by Asher Brown Durand uses the effects of ________ to give a sense of the vastness of the American landscape. a. pencil drawing b. geometry c. atmospheric perspective d. foreshortening e. color 10 points Question 18 1. The opposite of emphasis is ________. a. subordination b. tone c. focal point d. color e. proportion 10 points Question 19 1. Gustav Klimt’s portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer was typical of his portraits of the wives and sisters of ________. a. foreign tourists b. Nazi rulers c. German scientists d. Austrian businessmen e. important politicians 10 points Question 20 1. The combination of jarring vertical and diagonal lines in Vincent van Gogh’s The Bedroom creates an atmosphere of ________. a. happiness b. rest c. anxiety d. expectation e. calm 10 points Question 21 1. If the clothing of the saint was the only light area in The Funeral of St. Bonaventure, the viewer’s eye would not be easily drawn to any other areas of the composition. True False 10 points Question 22 1. Miriam Schapiro’s collage Baby Blocks combines two different kinds of shape. ________ is the term used to describe a shape that suggests the natural world, while the term geometric suggests mathematical regularity. a. conceptual b. implied c. organic d. regular e. artificial 10 points Question 23 1. Any of the ________ of art can help focus our interest on specific areas of a work of art. a. styles b. elements c. periods d. tones e. themes 10 points Question 24 1. An artwork can be described as non-objective if its subject matter is ________. a. three-dimensional b. difficult c. unrecognizable d. recognizable e. animals 10 points Question 25 1. Match the methodological approach with its definition: biographical analysis feminist analysis formal analysis contextual analysis 2. iconographical analysis a. analyzes the use of formal elements in a work. b. considers the role of women in an artwork c. interprets objects and figures in the artwork as symbols d. considers the artist’s personal experiences e. considers the religious, political, and social environment in which the artwork was made and viewed 10 points Question 26 1. Alexander Calder invented the ________, a type of suspended, balanced sculpture that uses air currents to power its movement. a. mime b. relief c. mobile d. stabile e. zoetrope 10 points Question 27 1. Louise Nevelson’s work White Vertical Water is a realistic depiction of fish in a river. True False 10 points Question 28 1. William G. Wall’s Fort Edward was published as a ________. a. print b. watercolor c. photograph d. oil painting e. newspaper article 10 points Question 29 1. Artemisia Gentileschi worked during this stylistic and historical period. a. Surrealism b. Impressionism c. Baroque d. Renaissance e. Pop art 10 points Question 30 1. The process of using a series of parallel lines set close to one another to differentiate planes of value in a work of art is called ________. a. highlight b. core shadow c. perspective d. hatching e. palette 10 points Question 31 1. The artist Canaletto, in his drawing of the Ducal Palace in Venice, created an impression of three dimensions by using line to show the division between ________. a. planes b. two figures c. colors d. time periods e. mountains 10 points Question 32 1. Marisol’s work Father Damien was created to memorialize the heroism of a priest who lost his life helping the victims of leprosy. This sculpture stands in front of the State Capitol Building in the U.S. State of ________. a. Arizona b. Pennsylvania c. Utah d. Tennessee e. Hawaii 10 points Question 33 1. The medium of Marc Quinn’s Self is: a. clay b. the artist’s toenail clippings c. wood d. real human hair e. the artist’s own blood 10 points Question 34 1. The work now known as the Watts Towers was in fact given a different title by its creator. That title was ________. a. Nuestro Pueblo b. LA Towers c. Found Objects d. it had no title originally e. Skyscrapers 1 and 2 10 points Question 35 1. Why do we presume that the head of a woman from Benin (0.18) was made for someone wealthy? a. because it was made to be shown in a museum b. because it strongly resembles the Queen c. because it has a price carved on the back d. because it was made from rare ivory e. it was definitely not made for anyone wealthy 10 points Question 36 1. Shahzia Sikander’s art is best described as Abstract Expressionism Naturalist sculpture Pop Art Miniature Painting 10 points Question 37 1. A sunset is a work of art. True False 10 points Question 38 1. A mens’ urinal became a well known artwork in the 20th century. True False 10 points Question 39 1. Which artist has torn out people’s lawns to design and build edible gardens across the country? Andrea Zittel Fritz Haeg Ruben Ortiz Torres Mark Newport

Question 1 1. When the rules of perspective are applied in order to represent unusual points of view, we call this ________. a. foreshortening b. chiaroscuro c. convergence d. highlight e. overlapping 10 points Question 2 1. A flat work of art has two dimensions: ________ and width. a. breadth b. depth c. size d. mass e. height 10 points Question 3 1. Méret Oppenheim was part of an art movement that rejected rational, conscious thought. Her fur-lined teacup and saucer, Object, conjures an unexpected and illogical sensation for the viewer by using ________ texture. a. smooth b. familiar c. expected d. subversive e. silky 10 points Question 4 1. In James Allen’s etching The Connectors, an image of workers erecting the Empire State Building, the artist created a feeling of great height by using ________ line to lead the viewer’s eye diagonally downward. a. horizontal b. communicative c. regular d. directional e. implied 10 points Question 5 1. Because it is three-dimensional, a form has these three spatial measurements: height, width, and ________. a. mass b. length c. size d. depth e. strength 10 points Question 6 1. The ancient Egyptian depiction of the journey of the Sun god Re (0.1) was painted on ________. a. stone b. a coffin c. the wall of a tomb d. copper e. a vase 10 points Question 7 1. The area covered by a pattern is called the ________. a. field b. motif c. background d. size e. foreground 10 points Question 8 1. ________ balance is achieved when two halves of a composition are not mirror images of each other. a. unified b. radial c. varied d. asymmetrical e. symmetrical 10 points Question 9 1. In Audrey Flack’s Marilyn Monroe, the burning candle, the flower, and the hourglass are typical of a kind of symbolism in art that reminds us of death. This kind of symbolism is known as ________. a. vanitas b. feminism c. abstract d. eternal e. none of the other answers 10 points Question 10 1. Tibetan Buddhist monks create colored sand images with a radial design. This representation of the universe is called a ________. a. prayer wheel b. rotunda c. mandala d. prayer flag e. lotus 10 points Question 11 1. In The School of Athens, Raphael focused our attention on two Greek philosophers positioned in the center of the work. They are ________ and ________. a. Plato . . . Aristotle b. Aristotle . . . Socrates c. Diogenes . . . Socrates d. Diogenes . . . Aristotle e. Socrates . . . Plato 10 points Question 12 1. In his Obey campaign poster Shepard Fairey used a striking contrast between positive and ________ shapes to attract the attention of the public. a. figure–ground reversal b. implied c. geometric d. organic e. negative 10 points Question 13 1. The Italian architect Andrea Palladio created a radial design in his plan for the Villa Capra. This building is also called the ________. a. Colosseum b. Pantheon c. Villa Rotonda d. Villa Caprese e. Parthenon 10 points Question 14 1. The French artist Georges Seurat employed a new technique to create a jewel-like diffusion of light and vibration of color in his work The Circus. This type of painting, made up of small dots of color, is known as ________. a. Fauvism b. Luminism c. pointillism d. Pop art e. Impressionism 10 points Question 15 1. The rarity of an artwork, and its value, are often closely related. True False 10 points Question 16 1. By orienting lines so that they attract attention to a specific area of a work of art the artist is using ________. a. actual line b. implied line c. directional line d. measured line e. chaotic line 10 points Question 17 1. Kindred Spirits by Asher Brown Durand uses the effects of ________ to give a sense of the vastness of the American landscape. a. pencil drawing b. geometry c. atmospheric perspective d. foreshortening e. color 10 points Question 18 1. The opposite of emphasis is ________. a. subordination b. tone c. focal point d. color e. proportion 10 points Question 19 1. Gustav Klimt’s portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer was typical of his portraits of the wives and sisters of ________. a. foreign tourists b. Nazi rulers c. German scientists d. Austrian businessmen e. important politicians 10 points Question 20 1. The combination of jarring vertical and diagonal lines in Vincent van Gogh’s The Bedroom creates an atmosphere of ________. a. happiness b. rest c. anxiety d. expectation e. calm 10 points Question 21 1. If the clothing of the saint was the only light area in The Funeral of St. Bonaventure, the viewer’s eye would not be easily drawn to any other areas of the composition. True False 10 points Question 22 1. Miriam Schapiro’s collage Baby Blocks combines two different kinds of shape. ________ is the term used to describe a shape that suggests the natural world, while the term geometric suggests mathematical regularity. a. conceptual b. implied c. organic d. regular e. artificial 10 points Question 23 1. Any of the ________ of art can help focus our interest on specific areas of a work of art. a. styles b. elements c. periods d. tones e. themes 10 points Question 24 1. An artwork can be described as non-objective if its subject matter is ________. a. three-dimensional b. difficult c. unrecognizable d. recognizable e. animals 10 points Question 25 1. Match the methodological approach with its definition: biographical analysis feminist analysis formal analysis contextual analysis 2. iconographical analysis a. analyzes the use of formal elements in a work. b. considers the role of women in an artwork c. interprets objects and figures in the artwork as symbols d. considers the artist’s personal experiences e. considers the religious, political, and social environment in which the artwork was made and viewed 10 points Question 26 1. Alexander Calder invented the ________, a type of suspended, balanced sculpture that uses air currents to power its movement. a. mime b. relief c. mobile d. stabile e. zoetrope 10 points Question 27 1. Louise Nevelson’s work White Vertical Water is a realistic depiction of fish in a river. True False 10 points Question 28 1. William G. Wall’s Fort Edward was published as a ________. a. print b. watercolor c. photograph d. oil painting e. newspaper article 10 points Question 29 1. Artemisia Gentileschi worked during this stylistic and historical period. a. Surrealism b. Impressionism c. Baroque d. Renaissance e. Pop art 10 points Question 30 1. The process of using a series of parallel lines set close to one another to differentiate planes of value in a work of art is called ________. a. highlight b. core shadow c. perspective d. hatching e. palette 10 points Question 31 1. The artist Canaletto, in his drawing of the Ducal Palace in Venice, created an impression of three dimensions by using line to show the division between ________. a. planes b. two figures c. colors d. time periods e. mountains 10 points Question 32 1. Marisol’s work Father Damien was created to memorialize the heroism of a priest who lost his life helping the victims of leprosy. This sculpture stands in front of the State Capitol Building in the U.S. State of ________. a. Arizona b. Pennsylvania c. Utah d. Tennessee e. Hawaii 10 points Question 33 1. The medium of Marc Quinn’s Self is: a. clay b. the artist’s toenail clippings c. wood d. real human hair e. the artist’s own blood 10 points Question 34 1. The work now known as the Watts Towers was in fact given a different title by its creator. That title was ________. a. Nuestro Pueblo b. LA Towers c. Found Objects d. it had no title originally e. Skyscrapers 1 and 2 10 points Question 35 1. Why do we presume that the head of a woman from Benin (0.18) was made for someone wealthy? a. because it was made to be shown in a museum b. because it strongly resembles the Queen c. because it has a price carved on the back d. because it was made from rare ivory e. it was definitely not made for anyone wealthy 10 points Question 36 1. Shahzia Sikander’s art is best described as Abstract Expressionism Naturalist sculpture Pop Art Miniature Painting 10 points Question 37 1. A sunset is a work of art. True False 10 points Question 38 1. A mens’ urinal became a well known artwork in the 20th century. True False 10 points Question 39 1. Which artist has torn out people’s lawns to design and build edible gardens across the country? Andrea Zittel Fritz Haeg Ruben Ortiz Torres Mark Newport

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