BI 102 Lab 1 Writing Assignment How did the different concentrations of sucrose impact osmotic rate? This assignment requires you to evaluate a hypothesis and communicate the results of your experiment on the rate of osmosis into sucrose solutions of varying concentrations. The questions below are meant to guide you to reporting the key findings of your experiment and help you think through how to explain the findings and draw conclusions from them in a scientific manner. ASSIGNMENT: Please respond to the following questions to complete your laboratory write up. For this assignment you will only focus on the osmosis of water into sucrose concentrations of varying concentration. Make sure that your write up is accurate, and clearly written so that it is easily readable. A grading rubric is provided on the second page of this assignment. To earn full points on your write up, you must provide answers that align to the “meets” column of your grading rubric as well as meeting all “Quality of Writing and Mechanics” elements described in the rubric. There are also some tips on pages 3-4 of this assignment to help you succeed. FORMAT: • Type your responses, using 1.5 or double spacing. • Include the section headings (Hypothesis, Results, Analysis) and question number (example: 1, 2, 3, etc) in your answers but do not rewrite the question. • Graphs may be made with a computer program (example: Microsoft excel, Mac numbers, etc) or may be neatly produced with a ruler on graphing paper. • Print out the cover sheet on page 2 of this assignment, read and sign the academic honesty statement, and submit it with your write up. Your instructor WILL NOT accept a write up without the signed cover sheet. DUE DATE: Your write up is due at the beginning of class next week. Late assignments will have 1 point deducted per day up to 5 days, at which point the assignment will be assigned 0 points. Hypothesis and Prediction – Part 1 of Rubric 1. What did you think was going to happen in this experiment and why? You may find it helpful to state your answers to these questions as an “if-then” hypothesis-prediction. Be sure you have included a biological rationale that explains WHY you made this hypothesis/prediction. (You worked on this in question 2 on page 10 of this lab activity) Results – Part 2 of Rubric 2. How did the different concentrations of sucrose impact osmotic rate? Answer this question by creating a line graph that shows the results of your experiment. If you need assistance building a graph, there is a Guide to Graphing resource available on your Moodle lab course site. Analysis- Part 3 of Rubric 3. Explain why you think that the results shown in your graph support or refute your hypothesis (remember we never “prove” anything in science). Consider all your data and the overall data pattern as you answer this question. Don’t ignore unusual data that may not seem to fit into a specific patterns (“outliers”). Explain what you think might be behind these unusual data points. 4. What is the biological significance of your results? What biological concepts explain completely why these events happened in the experiment? How do these results help you understand the biology of the cell and how materials move back and forth across the cell membrane? (A hint: refer back to questions 1A-1F on page 10 of this lab activity). Think about giving a specific example. References- Mechanics Checklist 5. Provide at least one full citation (make sure you include an in-text citation that pinpoints where you used this resource) for a resource you made use of in performing the experiment, understanding the concepts and writing this assignment. (Perhaps your lab manual? Your textbook? A website?) If you used more than one resource, you need to cite each one! If you need help with citations, a Guide to Citing References is available on your Moodle lab course site. Please print out and submit this cover sheet with your lab writeup! Lab Writeup Assignment (1) Assessment Rubric-­‐ 10 points total Name: ________________________________________ Element Misses (1 point) Approaches (2 points) Meets (3 points) Hypothesis Clarity/Specificity Testability Rationale ___Hypothesis is unclear and hardto- understand ___Hypothesis is not testable ___No biological rationale for hypothesis or rationale is fully inaccurate ___Hypothesis included is clearly stated, but not specific or lacks specific details __Hypothesis is testable, but not in a feasible way in this lab ___Some foundation for hypothesis, but based in part on biological inaccuracy ___Hypothesis included is clearly stated and very specific ___Hypothesis is testable and could be tested within lab parameters ___Rationale for hypothesis is grounded in accurate biological information Graph Title Axes Variables Key Graph clarity Data accuracy ___Graph lacks a title ___Axes are not labeled ___Variables not addressed in graph ___No key or way to tell data points apart ___Graph is hard to read and comparisons cannot be made: Inappropriate graph type or use of scale ___Data graphed is inaccurate or does not relate to experiment ___Graph has a title that is not very descriptive ___Axes are either unlabeled, or units are unclear or wrong ___Variables addressed in graph, but not on correct axes ___Key included, but is hard to understand ___Graph is somewhat readable, comparisons can be made with difficulty: Appropriate graph type, but not scaled well ___Data graphed is partially accurate; some data is missing ___Graph has a concise, descriptive title ___Axes are labeled, including clarification of units used ___Variables on correct axes ___A clear, easy-to-use key to data points is included ___Graph is clearly readable and comparisons between treatments are easy to make: Graph type and scale are appropriate to data ___Data graphed is accurate and includes all relevant data, including controls (if needed) Analysis Hypothesis Scientific language Data addressed Explanation ___Hypothesis is not addressed ___Hypothesis is described using language like proven, true, or right ___No explanations for data patterns observed in graph or data does not support conclusions. ___No biological explanation for data trends or explanations are completely inaccurate ___Hypothesis is mentioned, but not linked well to data ___Hypothesis is not consistently described as supported or refuted ___Some data considered in conclusions but other data is ignored. Any unusual “outliers” are ignored ___Explanations include minimal or some inaccurate biological concepts ___Hypothesis is evaluated based upon data ___Hypothesis is consistently described as supported or refuted ___All data collected is considered and addressed by conclusions, including presence of outliers, ___Explanations include relevant and accurate biological concepts Quality of Writing and Mechanics: Worth 1 point. Writeup should meet all of the following criteria! Yes No ☐ ☐ Write up includes your name, the date, and your lab section ☐ ☐ Write up is free from spelling and grammatical errors (make sure you proofread!!) ☐ ☐ Write up is clear and easy-to-understand ☐ ☐ Write up includes full citation for at least one reference with corresponding in-text citation ☐ ☐ All portions of write up are clearly labeled, and question numbers are included Plagiarism refers to the use of original work, ideas, or text that are not your own. This includes cut-and-paste from websites, copying directly from texts, and copying the work of others, including fellow students. Telling someone your answers to the questions (including telling someone how to make their graph, question #2), or asking for the answers to any question, is cheating. (Asking someone how to make the graph for this assignment is NOT the same as asking for help learning excel or some other software). All forms of cheating, including plagiarism and copying of work will result in an immediate zero for the exam, quiz, or assignment. In the case of copying, all parties involved in the unethical behavior will earn zeros. Cheating students will be referred to the Student Conduct Committee for further action. You also have the right to appeal to the Student Conduct Committee. I have read and understand the plagiarism statement. ____________________________________________________ Signature Guidelines for Good Quality Scientific Reports Hypothesis and Prediction: The hypothesis is a tentative explanation for the phenomenon. Remember that: • A good hypothesis and prediction is testable (and should be testable under the conditions of our lab environment; For example, if your hypothesis requires shooting a rocket into space, then its not really testable under our laboratory conditions). • Your explanation can be ruled out through testing, or falsified. • A good hypothesis and prediction is detailed and specific in what it is testing. • A good hypothesis provides a rationale or explanation for why you think your prediction is reasonable and this rationale is based on what we know about biology. • A good prediction is specific and can be tested with a specific experiment. Examples*: I think that diet soda will float and regular soda will sink. {This hypothesis misses the goal. It is not specific as we don’t know where the sodas are floating and sinking, and it does not provide any explanation to explain why the hypothesis makes sense} Because diet soda does not contain sugar and regular soda does, the diet soda will float in a bucket of water, while regular soda will sink. {This hypothesis approaches the goal. It is more specific about the conditions, and it provides a partial explanation about why the hypothesis makes sense, but the connection between sugar and sinking is unclear} If diet soda does not contain sugar, then its density (mass/volume) is lower than that of regular soda which does contain sugar, and so diet soda will float in a bucket of water while regular soda sinks. {This hypothesis meets the goal. It is specific and the rationale- sugar affects density and density is what determines floating or sinking in water- is clearly articulated} *Note that these examples are for different experiments and investigations and NOT about your osmosis lab. They are provided only to help you think about what you need to include in your write up. Graph: The graph is a visual representation of the data you gathered while testing your hypothesis. Remember that: • A graph needs a concise title that clearly describes the data that it is showing. • Data must be put on the correct axes of the graph. In general, the data you collected (representing what you are trying to find out about) goes on the vertical (Y) axis. The supporting data that that describes how, when or under what conditions you collected your data goes on the horizontal (X) axis. (For this reason time nearly always goes on the X-axis). • Axes must be labeled, including the units in which data were recorded • Data points should be clearly marked and identified; a key is helpful if more than one group of data is included in the graph. • The scale of a graph is important. It should be consistent (there should be no change in the units or increments on a single axis) and appropriate to the data you collected Examples: {This graph misses the goal. There is no title, nor is there a key to help distinguish what the data points mean. The scale is too large- from 0 to 100 with an increment of 50, when the maximum number in the graph is 25- and makes it hard to interpret this graph. The x-axis is labeled, but without units (the months) and the y-axis has units, but the label is incomplete- number of what?} {This graph meets the goal. There is a descriptive title, and all of the axes are clearly labeled with units. There is a key so that we can distinguish what each set of data points represent. The dependent variable (number of individuals) is correctly placed on the y-axis with the independent variable of time placed on the x-axis. The scale of 0-30 is appropriate to the data, with each line on the x-axis representing an increment of 5.} 0 50 100 Number Month 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 March April May June July Number of individuals Month (2011) Population size of three different madtom catiCish in the Marais de Cygnes River in Spring/Summer 2011 Brindled madtom Neosho madtom Slender madtom Analysis: You need to evaluate your hypothesis based on the data patterns shown by your graph. Remember that: • You use data to determine support or refute your hypothesis. It is only possible to support a hypothesis, not to “prove” one (that would require testing every possible permutation and combination of factors). Your evaluation of your hypothesis should not be contradicted by the pattern shown by your data. • Refer back to the prediction you made as part of your hypothesis and use your data to justify your decision to support or refute your hypothesis. • In the “if” part of your hypothesis you should have provided a rationale, or explanation for the prediction you made in your hypothesis (“then” part of hypothesis”). Use this to help you explain why you think you observed the specific pattern of data revealed in your graph. • You should consider all of the data you collected in examining the support (or lack of support for your hypothesis). If there are unusual data points or “outliers” that don’t seem to fit the general pattern in your graph, explain what you think those mean. Examples: I was right. Diet Pepsi floated and so did Apricot Nectar. Regular Pepsi sank. Obviously the regular Pepsi was heavier. This helps us understand the concept of density, which is a really important one. {This analysis misses the goal. The hypothesis isn’t actually mentioned and the data is only briefly described. There is no explanation of the importance of the Apricot Nectar results. Finally, there is no connection to how these results help understand density or why it is biologically important} I hypothesized that diet soda would float, and all three cans of diet Pepsi did float while the regular Pepsi sank. This supports my hypothesis. Both types of Pepsi were 8.5 fluid ounces in volume, but the regular Pepsi also contained 16 grams of sugar. This means that the regular Pepsi had 16 more grams of mass provided by the sugar in the same amount of volume. This would lead to an increase in density, which explains why the regular soda cans sank. When we put in a can of Apricot Nectar, which had 19 grams of sugar, it floated. This was unexpected, but I think it is explained by the fact that an Apricot Nectar can had a volume of 7 fluid ounces, but the dimensions of the can are the same as that of a Pepsi can. A same-sized can with less liquid probably has an air space that helped it float. The results of this experiment help us understand how the air bladder of a fish, which creates an air space inside the fish, helps it float in the water and also how seaweeds and other living things with air spaces or other factors that decrease their density keep from sinking to the bottom of the water. {This analysis meets the goal. It clearly ties the hypothesis to the results and outlines what they mean. It describes how the results support the hypothesis, but also explains a possible reason behind the unusual results of the Apricot Nectar. Finally, there is a link to how this experiment helps us understand biology}

BI 102 Lab 1 Writing Assignment How did the different concentrations of sucrose impact osmotic rate? This assignment requires you to evaluate a hypothesis and communicate the results of your experiment on the rate of osmosis into sucrose solutions of varying concentrations. The questions below are meant to guide you to reporting the key findings of your experiment and help you think through how to explain the findings and draw conclusions from them in a scientific manner. ASSIGNMENT: Please respond to the following questions to complete your laboratory write up. For this assignment you will only focus on the osmosis of water into sucrose concentrations of varying concentration. Make sure that your write up is accurate, and clearly written so that it is easily readable. A grading rubric is provided on the second page of this assignment. To earn full points on your write up, you must provide answers that align to the “meets” column of your grading rubric as well as meeting all “Quality of Writing and Mechanics” elements described in the rubric. There are also some tips on pages 3-4 of this assignment to help you succeed. FORMAT: • Type your responses, using 1.5 or double spacing. • Include the section headings (Hypothesis, Results, Analysis) and question number (example: 1, 2, 3, etc) in your answers but do not rewrite the question. • Graphs may be made with a computer program (example: Microsoft excel, Mac numbers, etc) or may be neatly produced with a ruler on graphing paper. • Print out the cover sheet on page 2 of this assignment, read and sign the academic honesty statement, and submit it with your write up. Your instructor WILL NOT accept a write up without the signed cover sheet. DUE DATE: Your write up is due at the beginning of class next week. Late assignments will have 1 point deducted per day up to 5 days, at which point the assignment will be assigned 0 points. Hypothesis and Prediction – Part 1 of Rubric 1. What did you think was going to happen in this experiment and why? You may find it helpful to state your answers to these questions as an “if-then” hypothesis-prediction. Be sure you have included a biological rationale that explains WHY you made this hypothesis/prediction. (You worked on this in question 2 on page 10 of this lab activity) Results – Part 2 of Rubric 2. How did the different concentrations of sucrose impact osmotic rate? Answer this question by creating a line graph that shows the results of your experiment. If you need assistance building a graph, there is a Guide to Graphing resource available on your Moodle lab course site. Analysis- Part 3 of Rubric 3. Explain why you think that the results shown in your graph support or refute your hypothesis (remember we never “prove” anything in science). Consider all your data and the overall data pattern as you answer this question. Don’t ignore unusual data that may not seem to fit into a specific patterns (“outliers”). Explain what you think might be behind these unusual data points. 4. What is the biological significance of your results? What biological concepts explain completely why these events happened in the experiment? How do these results help you understand the biology of the cell and how materials move back and forth across the cell membrane? (A hint: refer back to questions 1A-1F on page 10 of this lab activity). Think about giving a specific example. References- Mechanics Checklist 5. Provide at least one full citation (make sure you include an in-text citation that pinpoints where you used this resource) for a resource you made use of in performing the experiment, understanding the concepts and writing this assignment. (Perhaps your lab manual? Your textbook? A website?) If you used more than one resource, you need to cite each one! If you need help with citations, a Guide to Citing References is available on your Moodle lab course site. Please print out and submit this cover sheet with your lab writeup! Lab Writeup Assignment (1) Assessment Rubric-­‐ 10 points total Name: ________________________________________ Element Misses (1 point) Approaches (2 points) Meets (3 points) Hypothesis Clarity/Specificity Testability Rationale ___Hypothesis is unclear and hardto- understand ___Hypothesis is not testable ___No biological rationale for hypothesis or rationale is fully inaccurate ___Hypothesis included is clearly stated, but not specific or lacks specific details __Hypothesis is testable, but not in a feasible way in this lab ___Some foundation for hypothesis, but based in part on biological inaccuracy ___Hypothesis included is clearly stated and very specific ___Hypothesis is testable and could be tested within lab parameters ___Rationale for hypothesis is grounded in accurate biological information Graph Title Axes Variables Key Graph clarity Data accuracy ___Graph lacks a title ___Axes are not labeled ___Variables not addressed in graph ___No key or way to tell data points apart ___Graph is hard to read and comparisons cannot be made: Inappropriate graph type or use of scale ___Data graphed is inaccurate or does not relate to experiment ___Graph has a title that is not very descriptive ___Axes are either unlabeled, or units are unclear or wrong ___Variables addressed in graph, but not on correct axes ___Key included, but is hard to understand ___Graph is somewhat readable, comparisons can be made with difficulty: Appropriate graph type, but not scaled well ___Data graphed is partially accurate; some data is missing ___Graph has a concise, descriptive title ___Axes are labeled, including clarification of units used ___Variables on correct axes ___A clear, easy-to-use key to data points is included ___Graph is clearly readable and comparisons between treatments are easy to make: Graph type and scale are appropriate to data ___Data graphed is accurate and includes all relevant data, including controls (if needed) Analysis Hypothesis Scientific language Data addressed Explanation ___Hypothesis is not addressed ___Hypothesis is described using language like proven, true, or right ___No explanations for data patterns observed in graph or data does not support conclusions. ___No biological explanation for data trends or explanations are completely inaccurate ___Hypothesis is mentioned, but not linked well to data ___Hypothesis is not consistently described as supported or refuted ___Some data considered in conclusions but other data is ignored. Any unusual “outliers” are ignored ___Explanations include minimal or some inaccurate biological concepts ___Hypothesis is evaluated based upon data ___Hypothesis is consistently described as supported or refuted ___All data collected is considered and addressed by conclusions, including presence of outliers, ___Explanations include relevant and accurate biological concepts Quality of Writing and Mechanics: Worth 1 point. Writeup should meet all of the following criteria! Yes No ☐ ☐ Write up includes your name, the date, and your lab section ☐ ☐ Write up is free from spelling and grammatical errors (make sure you proofread!!) ☐ ☐ Write up is clear and easy-to-understand ☐ ☐ Write up includes full citation for at least one reference with corresponding in-text citation ☐ ☐ All portions of write up are clearly labeled, and question numbers are included Plagiarism refers to the use of original work, ideas, or text that are not your own. This includes cut-and-paste from websites, copying directly from texts, and copying the work of others, including fellow students. Telling someone your answers to the questions (including telling someone how to make their graph, question #2), or asking for the answers to any question, is cheating. (Asking someone how to make the graph for this assignment is NOT the same as asking for help learning excel or some other software). All forms of cheating, including plagiarism and copying of work will result in an immediate zero for the exam, quiz, or assignment. In the case of copying, all parties involved in the unethical behavior will earn zeros. Cheating students will be referred to the Student Conduct Committee for further action. You also have the right to appeal to the Student Conduct Committee. I have read and understand the plagiarism statement. ____________________________________________________ Signature Guidelines for Good Quality Scientific Reports Hypothesis and Prediction: The hypothesis is a tentative explanation for the phenomenon. Remember that: • A good hypothesis and prediction is testable (and should be testable under the conditions of our lab environment; For example, if your hypothesis requires shooting a rocket into space, then its not really testable under our laboratory conditions). • Your explanation can be ruled out through testing, or falsified. • A good hypothesis and prediction is detailed and specific in what it is testing. • A good hypothesis provides a rationale or explanation for why you think your prediction is reasonable and this rationale is based on what we know about biology. • A good prediction is specific and can be tested with a specific experiment. Examples*: I think that diet soda will float and regular soda will sink. {This hypothesis misses the goal. It is not specific as we don’t know where the sodas are floating and sinking, and it does not provide any explanation to explain why the hypothesis makes sense} Because diet soda does not contain sugar and regular soda does, the diet soda will float in a bucket of water, while regular soda will sink. {This hypothesis approaches the goal. It is more specific about the conditions, and it provides a partial explanation about why the hypothesis makes sense, but the connection between sugar and sinking is unclear} If diet soda does not contain sugar, then its density (mass/volume) is lower than that of regular soda which does contain sugar, and so diet soda will float in a bucket of water while regular soda sinks. {This hypothesis meets the goal. It is specific and the rationale- sugar affects density and density is what determines floating or sinking in water- is clearly articulated} *Note that these examples are for different experiments and investigations and NOT about your osmosis lab. They are provided only to help you think about what you need to include in your write up. Graph: The graph is a visual representation of the data you gathered while testing your hypothesis. Remember that: • A graph needs a concise title that clearly describes the data that it is showing. • Data must be put on the correct axes of the graph. In general, the data you collected (representing what you are trying to find out about) goes on the vertical (Y) axis. The supporting data that that describes how, when or under what conditions you collected your data goes on the horizontal (X) axis. (For this reason time nearly always goes on the X-axis). • Axes must be labeled, including the units in which data were recorded • Data points should be clearly marked and identified; a key is helpful if more than one group of data is included in the graph. • The scale of a graph is important. It should be consistent (there should be no change in the units or increments on a single axis) and appropriate to the data you collected Examples: {This graph misses the goal. There is no title, nor is there a key to help distinguish what the data points mean. The scale is too large- from 0 to 100 with an increment of 50, when the maximum number in the graph is 25- and makes it hard to interpret this graph. The x-axis is labeled, but without units (the months) and the y-axis has units, but the label is incomplete- number of what?} {This graph meets the goal. There is a descriptive title, and all of the axes are clearly labeled with units. There is a key so that we can distinguish what each set of data points represent. The dependent variable (number of individuals) is correctly placed on the y-axis with the independent variable of time placed on the x-axis. The scale of 0-30 is appropriate to the data, with each line on the x-axis representing an increment of 5.} 0 50 100 Number Month 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 March April May June July Number of individuals Month (2011) Population size of three different madtom catiCish in the Marais de Cygnes River in Spring/Summer 2011 Brindled madtom Neosho madtom Slender madtom Analysis: You need to evaluate your hypothesis based on the data patterns shown by your graph. Remember that: • You use data to determine support or refute your hypothesis. It is only possible to support a hypothesis, not to “prove” one (that would require testing every possible permutation and combination of factors). Your evaluation of your hypothesis should not be contradicted by the pattern shown by your data. • Refer back to the prediction you made as part of your hypothesis and use your data to justify your decision to support or refute your hypothesis. • In the “if” part of your hypothesis you should have provided a rationale, or explanation for the prediction you made in your hypothesis (“then” part of hypothesis”). Use this to help you explain why you think you observed the specific pattern of data revealed in your graph. • You should consider all of the data you collected in examining the support (or lack of support for your hypothesis). If there are unusual data points or “outliers” that don’t seem to fit the general pattern in your graph, explain what you think those mean. Examples: I was right. Diet Pepsi floated and so did Apricot Nectar. Regular Pepsi sank. Obviously the regular Pepsi was heavier. This helps us understand the concept of density, which is a really important one. {This analysis misses the goal. The hypothesis isn’t actually mentioned and the data is only briefly described. There is no explanation of the importance of the Apricot Nectar results. Finally, there is no connection to how these results help understand density or why it is biologically important} I hypothesized that diet soda would float, and all three cans of diet Pepsi did float while the regular Pepsi sank. This supports my hypothesis. Both types of Pepsi were 8.5 fluid ounces in volume, but the regular Pepsi also contained 16 grams of sugar. This means that the regular Pepsi had 16 more grams of mass provided by the sugar in the same amount of volume. This would lead to an increase in density, which explains why the regular soda cans sank. When we put in a can of Apricot Nectar, which had 19 grams of sugar, it floated. This was unexpected, but I think it is explained by the fact that an Apricot Nectar can had a volume of 7 fluid ounces, but the dimensions of the can are the same as that of a Pepsi can. A same-sized can with less liquid probably has an air space that helped it float. The results of this experiment help us understand how the air bladder of a fish, which creates an air space inside the fish, helps it float in the water and also how seaweeds and other living things with air spaces or other factors that decrease their density keep from sinking to the bottom of the water. {This analysis meets the goal. It clearly ties the hypothesis to the results and outlines what they mean. It describes how the results support the hypothesis, but also explains a possible reason behind the unusual results of the Apricot Nectar. Finally, there is a link to how this experiment helps us understand biology}

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Slap is an acronym that can assist a professional mental health practitioner in assessing for sucide plan . which of the following is not a step in the slap modal a) Specificity which relates to how detailed and specific the plan for suicide are. b) Lethality which relate to how deadly are the means that the client plans to use c) Access to means or how available are the means for suicide. d) Power of implement or what is the likelihood that the client has the will to commit auicide.

Slap is an acronym that can assist a professional mental health practitioner in assessing for sucide plan . which of the following is not a step in the slap modal a) Specificity which relates to how detailed and specific the plan for suicide are. b) Lethality which relate to how deadly are the means that the client plans to use c) Access to means or how available are the means for suicide. d) Power of implement or what is the likelihood that the client has the will to commit auicide.

answer c
IT 7358 – Human interface Technology Assignment 3 – Observation Exercise The purpose of this exercise is for you to begin learning how to make and record observations of people involved in an activity of some kind. To do this project you will need a pad of paper, a notebook or something else to write on, and a pen or pencil. To begin this exercise, you will be making an observation in a public space. Specifically, you will be observing a cafeteria setting, such as found in the basement of the IU main library, dorm cafeteria, Union cafeteria etc. Choose a time during which there is a good amount of activity. Be aware that too little activity will not give you enough data to work with, and might make people feel like they’re being watched. Once you have chosen the position from which you will make your observations, go through the following steps: • Record the date, day of week, time of day, weather, and other factors you think may have some bearing on what you are observing. • Describe the setting. Note features of the physical environment that seem to be significant. Write a brief and general description of what’s going on. This is mainly for background and context. • Also record your reactions and thoughts about what is going on, but you should keep these reactions distinct from description – perhaps in the margins, or on the back of the page. • Describe in detail the activity you are observing. At this point, you should strive for your description to be concrete, specific, and chronological. For example, it is better to record, “Six people standing single file in line, holding trays horizontal at waist height, advancing several steps in cascading fashion when the cashier says ‘next.’ On each tray is…” instead of “people waiting in line to pay for their food.” Your guiding question right now is ‘What’s going on here?’ Your notes for this part of the exercise should be event-by-event narrative, not generalizations. • Separately (again, in the margins or somewhere else) record the perceptions, motives, and values of the people you are watching. As you observe, begin to focus on something that seems interesting to you, such as a pattern that emerges or a particular aspect of what you are observing. Stop when you’ve done roughly 20 minutes of detailed go back over your notes and fill in any important but missing details from memory, adding questions that came up for you as you were observing, and ideas you could investigate in the future if you were going to do further study. You can also begin adding any of your own interpretations of what you observed.

IT 7358 – Human interface Technology Assignment 3 – Observation Exercise The purpose of this exercise is for you to begin learning how to make and record observations of people involved in an activity of some kind. To do this project you will need a pad of paper, a notebook or something else to write on, and a pen or pencil. To begin this exercise, you will be making an observation in a public space. Specifically, you will be observing a cafeteria setting, such as found in the basement of the IU main library, dorm cafeteria, Union cafeteria etc. Choose a time during which there is a good amount of activity. Be aware that too little activity will not give you enough data to work with, and might make people feel like they’re being watched. Once you have chosen the position from which you will make your observations, go through the following steps: • Record the date, day of week, time of day, weather, and other factors you think may have some bearing on what you are observing. • Describe the setting. Note features of the physical environment that seem to be significant. Write a brief and general description of what’s going on. This is mainly for background and context. • Also record your reactions and thoughts about what is going on, but you should keep these reactions distinct from description – perhaps in the margins, or on the back of the page. • Describe in detail the activity you are observing. At this point, you should strive for your description to be concrete, specific, and chronological. For example, it is better to record, “Six people standing single file in line, holding trays horizontal at waist height, advancing several steps in cascading fashion when the cashier says ‘next.’ On each tray is…” instead of “people waiting in line to pay for their food.” Your guiding question right now is ‘What’s going on here?’ Your notes for this part of the exercise should be event-by-event narrative, not generalizations. • Separately (again, in the margins or somewhere else) record the perceptions, motives, and values of the people you are watching. As you observe, begin to focus on something that seems interesting to you, such as a pattern that emerges or a particular aspect of what you are observing. Stop when you’ve done roughly 20 minutes of detailed go back over your notes and fill in any important but missing details from memory, adding questions that came up for you as you were observing, and ideas you could investigate in the future if you were going to do further study. You can also begin adding any of your own interpretations of what you observed.

Place: Cafeteria Date: 27/05/2013 Day of week: Monday Time of … Read More...
Perception checking – 1000 words Apply the perception checking process to at least 3 different individuals Write a paper including each of the following in some way: (They need not be in this order) A brief description or outline of the basic steps in the perception checking process A detailed description of your experience in at least 1 of the applications of the process A brief mention of the other applications A summary of how it worked for you–what you learned and how you think it might apply in your life As with all writing assignments in this class, Write using the active voice wherever possible Develop a good structure with opening and closing statements and supporting material Pay attention to spelling, grammar, sentence and paragraph structure Write in the most interesting way you can

Perception checking – 1000 words Apply the perception checking process to at least 3 different individuals Write a paper including each of the following in some way: (They need not be in this order) A brief description or outline of the basic steps in the perception checking process A detailed description of your experience in at least 1 of the applications of the process A brief mention of the other applications A summary of how it worked for you–what you learned and how you think it might apply in your life As with all writing assignments in this class, Write using the active voice wherever possible Develop a good structure with opening and closing statements and supporting material Pay attention to spelling, grammar, sentence and paragraph structure Write in the most interesting way you can

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Question 1 1. The ________________________ presents the movement in cash and bank balances over a period. 1 points Question 2 1. Which of the following departments is not a support center? marketing telecommunications guest transportation human resources 1 points Question 3 1. The distinction between operating and nonoperating income relates to: Continuity of income. Primary activities of the reporting entity. Consistency of income stream. Reliability of measurements. 1 points Question 4 1. Change statements include a: Retained earnings statement, balance sheet, and cash flow statement. Balance sheet, cash flow statement, and income statement. Cash flow statement, income statement, and retained earnings statement. Retained earnings statement, balance sheet, and income statement. 1 points Question 5 1. Pro forma earnings: Could be considered management’s view of permanent earnings. Are needed for the correction of errors. Are standardized under generally accepted accounting principles Are useful to compare two different firms’ performance. 1 points Question 6 1. The purpose of the statement of retained earnings is to show: the lifetime earnings retained by the corporation. the lifetime cash flow. the lifetime sales. all of the above. 1 points Question 7 1. The study of an individual financial statement item over several accounting periods is called: Ratio analysis. Vertical analysis. Horizontal analysis. Time and motion analysis. 1 points Question 8 1. Which of the following is not an example of an internal user of a company’s financial statements? member of the board of directors department head stockholder top-level manager 1 points Question 9 1. The accounting principle that requires revenue to be reported when earned is the: Matching principle Revenue recognition principle Time period principle Accrual reporting principle Going-concern principle 1 points Question 10 1. Which of the following questions can not be answered by analyzing information presented on a monthly income statement? How profitable was the hospitality operation at the end of the month? How much was spent last month to market the operation’s services? How much cash was on hand at the end of the month? What was the cost of sales for the month? 1 points Question 11 1. The sources of hotel revenue might be: profits and sales. sales, interest income, and dividend income. net income. all of the above. 1 points Question 12 1. Vertical analysis is a tool to evaluate individual financial statement items or groups of items in terms of a specific base amount. True False 1 points Question 13 1. The following is a portion of a comparative analysis: This Year Change Cost of Sales $400,000 (30,000) The cost of sales last year was: $370,000. $430,000. $30,000. $60,000. 1 points Question 14 1. Since everyone knows what an income statement is, there is no need to put a heading on this report. True False 1 points Question 15 1. An analytical procedure in which each income statement amount is stated as a percentage of a base amount, in this case, net sales. 1 points Question 16 1. Groups outside the business who require accounting and financial information. This includes suppliers, bankers, stockholders, and investors. 1 points Question 17 1. Interpretation of data shown on a common-size income statement can be simplified by: zeroing out the income statement bookkeeping accounts. classifying dividends as a business expense. restating the percentages as a component of the sales dollar. redesigning the statement. 1 points Question 18 1. The following information is provided: Dividends paid this year $ 30,000 Dividends declared this year 40,000 Net income this year 100,000 Retained earnings, start of year 150,000 The retained earnings at the end of this year are: $180,000. $220,000. $210,000. $260,000. 1 points Question 19 1. Horizontal analysis is also known as: Liquidity analysis. Absolute analysis. Revenue analysis. Trend analysis. 1 points Question 20 1. At the end of Year 1, the income statement for the Roadside Inn showed net income at $50,000. At the end of Year 2, the income statement showed $100,000 in net income. A horizontal analysis of the income statements would show the relative difference between the two years as: $50,000. $20,000. 100%. 50%. 1 points Question 21 1. Financial statement analysis is the application of analytical tools to general-purpose financial statements and related data for making business decisions. True False 1 points Question 22 1. Following is a portion of an income statement: 20X8 20X7 Sales $180,000 $190,000 In a comparative analysis, the percentage change from 20X7 to 20X8 is: A 105% decrease. A 94.7% Decrease A 5.6% Decrease A 5.3% Decrease 1 points Question 23 1. A fiscal year consists of any twelve consecutive months. True False 1 points Question 24 1. Financial statements intended for internal users. These statements present detailed information on each responsibility area ant the hotel as a whole. 1 points Question 25 1. Financial statements are usually prepared at the end of each fiscal period. True False

Question 1 1. The ________________________ presents the movement in cash and bank balances over a period. 1 points Question 2 1. Which of the following departments is not a support center? marketing telecommunications guest transportation human resources 1 points Question 3 1. The distinction between operating and nonoperating income relates to: Continuity of income. Primary activities of the reporting entity. Consistency of income stream. Reliability of measurements. 1 points Question 4 1. Change statements include a: Retained earnings statement, balance sheet, and cash flow statement. Balance sheet, cash flow statement, and income statement. Cash flow statement, income statement, and retained earnings statement. Retained earnings statement, balance sheet, and income statement. 1 points Question 5 1. Pro forma earnings: Could be considered management’s view of permanent earnings. Are needed for the correction of errors. Are standardized under generally accepted accounting principles Are useful to compare two different firms’ performance. 1 points Question 6 1. The purpose of the statement of retained earnings is to show: the lifetime earnings retained by the corporation. the lifetime cash flow. the lifetime sales. all of the above. 1 points Question 7 1. The study of an individual financial statement item over several accounting periods is called: Ratio analysis. Vertical analysis. Horizontal analysis. Time and motion analysis. 1 points Question 8 1. Which of the following is not an example of an internal user of a company’s financial statements? member of the board of directors department head stockholder top-level manager 1 points Question 9 1. The accounting principle that requires revenue to be reported when earned is the: Matching principle Revenue recognition principle Time period principle Accrual reporting principle Going-concern principle 1 points Question 10 1. Which of the following questions can not be answered by analyzing information presented on a monthly income statement? How profitable was the hospitality operation at the end of the month? How much was spent last month to market the operation’s services? How much cash was on hand at the end of the month? What was the cost of sales for the month? 1 points Question 11 1. The sources of hotel revenue might be: profits and sales. sales, interest income, and dividend income. net income. all of the above. 1 points Question 12 1. Vertical analysis is a tool to evaluate individual financial statement items or groups of items in terms of a specific base amount. True False 1 points Question 13 1. The following is a portion of a comparative analysis: This Year Change Cost of Sales $400,000 (30,000) The cost of sales last year was: $370,000. $430,000. $30,000. $60,000. 1 points Question 14 1. Since everyone knows what an income statement is, there is no need to put a heading on this report. True False 1 points Question 15 1. An analytical procedure in which each income statement amount is stated as a percentage of a base amount, in this case, net sales. 1 points Question 16 1. Groups outside the business who require accounting and financial information. This includes suppliers, bankers, stockholders, and investors. 1 points Question 17 1. Interpretation of data shown on a common-size income statement can be simplified by: zeroing out the income statement bookkeeping accounts. classifying dividends as a business expense. restating the percentages as a component of the sales dollar. redesigning the statement. 1 points Question 18 1. The following information is provided: Dividends paid this year $ 30,000 Dividends declared this year 40,000 Net income this year 100,000 Retained earnings, start of year 150,000 The retained earnings at the end of this year are: $180,000. $220,000. $210,000. $260,000. 1 points Question 19 1. Horizontal analysis is also known as: Liquidity analysis. Absolute analysis. Revenue analysis. Trend analysis. 1 points Question 20 1. At the end of Year 1, the income statement for the Roadside Inn showed net income at $50,000. At the end of Year 2, the income statement showed $100,000 in net income. A horizontal analysis of the income statements would show the relative difference between the two years as: $50,000. $20,000. 100%. 50%. 1 points Question 21 1. Financial statement analysis is the application of analytical tools to general-purpose financial statements and related data for making business decisions. True False 1 points Question 22 1. Following is a portion of an income statement: 20X8 20X7 Sales $180,000 $190,000 In a comparative analysis, the percentage change from 20X7 to 20X8 is: A 105% decrease. A 94.7% Decrease A 5.6% Decrease A 5.3% Decrease 1 points Question 23 1. A fiscal year consists of any twelve consecutive months. True False 1 points Question 24 1. Financial statements intended for internal users. These statements present detailed information on each responsibility area ant the hotel as a whole. 1 points Question 25 1. Financial statements are usually prepared at the end of each fiscal period. True False

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Nature and Culture Prof. David Backes Catalog of Personal Property Our possessions have symbolic meaning, both in a personal sense and in a cultural sense. A good way to reflect on the meaning of ownership, and of our own consumption patterns, is to make a list of everything we own. And that is what you will do for this assignment. I want you to spend a few hours taking an inventory of your possessions, and making a reasonably detailed list of what you own. (If you own several dozen books, for example, write that down. But you don’t need to give an exact count, or list the titles and authors. ) Once you’ve made the list, I want you to look it over carefully, think about it, and type a page or two about the meaning of possessions in your life, now and in the future. Most of you are young enough that you don’t have too many possessions yet, but here are some questions I’d like you to think about and that may help you decide what to write about in your brief essay. • Do you think that your life would be happier if you had more money? Why? What income do you think you will need to fulfill your dreams? • Do you use student loans or credit cards to pay for things you want but don’t need? Do you worry about your ability to repay the amount you’ve borrowed? What does this say about the role of material possessions in your life? • Have you ever thought about how the things you buy and the things you do have an impact on the environment and also on the world’s poorest people? Do you think awareness of this will affect how you choose to live? Why? • To raise a similar point, but in a different way: when you are making buying decisions, do you consider whether the items are environmentally or socially friendly? Why? • Do you often feel rushed, with too much to do and not enough time to do it? How does your answer compare with your ideas about the amount of money you need to fulfill your dreams? • What’s more important to you? A high-paying job, or a job that is truly fulfilling? How does your answer compare with your ideas about the amount of money you need to fulfill your dreams? “We Americans are great on fillers, as if what we have, what we are, is not enough. We have a cultural tendency toward denial, but, being affluent, we strangle ourselves with what we can buy. We have only to look at the houses we build to see how we build against space, the way we drink against pain and loneliness. We fill up space as if it were a pie shell, with things whose opacity further obstructs our ability to see what is already there.” — Gretel Ehrlich —

Nature and Culture Prof. David Backes Catalog of Personal Property Our possessions have symbolic meaning, both in a personal sense and in a cultural sense. A good way to reflect on the meaning of ownership, and of our own consumption patterns, is to make a list of everything we own. And that is what you will do for this assignment. I want you to spend a few hours taking an inventory of your possessions, and making a reasonably detailed list of what you own. (If you own several dozen books, for example, write that down. But you don’t need to give an exact count, or list the titles and authors. ) Once you’ve made the list, I want you to look it over carefully, think about it, and type a page or two about the meaning of possessions in your life, now and in the future. Most of you are young enough that you don’t have too many possessions yet, but here are some questions I’d like you to think about and that may help you decide what to write about in your brief essay. • Do you think that your life would be happier if you had more money? Why? What income do you think you will need to fulfill your dreams? • Do you use student loans or credit cards to pay for things you want but don’t need? Do you worry about your ability to repay the amount you’ve borrowed? What does this say about the role of material possessions in your life? • Have you ever thought about how the things you buy and the things you do have an impact on the environment and also on the world’s poorest people? Do you think awareness of this will affect how you choose to live? Why? • To raise a similar point, but in a different way: when you are making buying decisions, do you consider whether the items are environmentally or socially friendly? Why? • Do you often feel rushed, with too much to do and not enough time to do it? How does your answer compare with your ideas about the amount of money you need to fulfill your dreams? • What’s more important to you? A high-paying job, or a job that is truly fulfilling? How does your answer compare with your ideas about the amount of money you need to fulfill your dreams? “We Americans are great on fillers, as if what we have, what we are, is not enough. We have a cultural tendency toward denial, but, being affluent, we strangle ourselves with what we can buy. We have only to look at the houses we build to see how we build against space, the way we drink against pain and loneliness. We fill up space as if it were a pie shell, with things whose opacity further obstructs our ability to see what is already there.” — Gretel Ehrlich —

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