Lab Report Name Simple Harmonic motion Date: Objective or purpose: The main objective of this lab is to find the value of the spring constant (k) according to Hooke’s law. This lab also teaches us curve fitting and its application here in this lab.

Lab Report Name Simple Harmonic motion Date: Objective or purpose: The main objective of this lab is to find the value of the spring constant (k) according to Hooke’s law. This lab also teaches us curve fitting and its application here in this lab.

Name Simple Harmonic motion Date:           … Read More...
Individual case study Due date: 1:00pm AEST, Thursday, Week 11 All students are to submit electronically – max file size is 2Mb. ASSESSMENT Weighting: 35% Length: No set length 2 I…Assignment 2 SPECIFICATIONS CIS8011_Digital Innovation Assignment 2 (30%) (1500 words maximum) This assignment continues from the first assignment and your task is to write a report on the following a…1 CSE2DES/CSE5DES – Assignment 1 Due Date: 10 am Monday 22nd September 2014 Assessment: This assignment 1 is worth 15% of the final mark for CSE2DES/CSE5DES. This is an individual assignment. Copying,…All questions are from the textbook: Fatseas, Victor & Williams, John, Cost Management (2013) 3rd edition, McGraw HillMLC 703: PRINCIPLES OF INCOME TAX LAW INSTRUCTIONS Please note that the following will not form part of the word count: ? References, including statute and cases; ? Diagrams; ? Tables; ? Calculations….WRITTEN ESSAY Outline This assessment has been written to develop your understanding of Human Resource Management, assessing learning outcomes a, b, c, h and i: “The external environmental (e.g. econo…Subject: INTERNATIONAL MARKETING B01ITMK208 Assessment item 2: International Marketing Analysis Weighting: 30% Due: Week 10. A daily penalty of 5% will be applied to late assignments. Task: You are a …B01ITMK208 INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT ASSIGNMENT INSTRUCTIONS KEY INFORMATION Maximum Length: 2500 words Due: Week 8. Note that late submission will attract a penalty. Weighting: 30% Instructions: Read …Subject: Advertising Management BO1ADMG207 Assessment item 2: IMC Report Weighting: 30% Due: Week 8. A daily penalty of 5% will be applied to late assignments. Task: You are the Australian-based Marke…Attached are two Memos, please have a lookgetEconomics topic Assignment 2 Value: 40% Due date: 01-Sep-2014 Return date: 22-Sep-2014 Length: about 1500-2000 words each Submission method options Alternative submission method Task Analytical essays…Accounting for Business Decisions –HI5001 Trimester 2 2014 The assignment allows students to exhibit their knowledge and understanding of the subject matter of Accounting. The students will use the sk…HOLMES INSTITUTE FACULTY OF HIGHER EDUCATION HI6007 SPSS Assignment 02 Due Friday 4pm week 11 WORTH 30% The data set you need to do the assignment can be found on Blackboard in the folder “Assignments…Assignmnet of Economic Assignment (Written report): 25% 1. Organize yourselves into groups. Each group is to have Four or Five members. 2. Groups need to choose a topic from the list of topics provide…2. Rio Tinto Annual Report Financial Analysis [10 marks] Consider the sources below and answer the following questions. Source 1: Rio Tinto Annual Report 2012 (see report uploaded on the portal) Sourc…Quantitative Methods for Business Business Statistics Assignment – Semester, 2 2014 Total Marks: 60, Worth: 20% of final assessment This assignment requires a considerable amount of computer work and …BUACC 2613 Management Accounting 1 Semester 2, 2014 Assignment Contribution to overall assessment: 25% Due date: 26/09/2014 • This assignment has two parts: o Part 1

Individual case study Due date: 1:00pm AEST, Thursday, Week 11 All students are to submit electronically – max file size is 2Mb. ASSESSMENT Weighting: 35% Length: No set length 2 I…Assignment 2 SPECIFICATIONS CIS8011_Digital Innovation Assignment 2 (30%) (1500 words maximum) This assignment continues from the first assignment and your task is to write a report on the following a…1 CSE2DES/CSE5DES – Assignment 1 Due Date: 10 am Monday 22nd September 2014 Assessment: This assignment 1 is worth 15% of the final mark for CSE2DES/CSE5DES. This is an individual assignment. Copying,…All questions are from the textbook: Fatseas, Victor & Williams, John, Cost Management (2013) 3rd edition, McGraw HillMLC 703: PRINCIPLES OF INCOME TAX LAW INSTRUCTIONS Please note that the following will not form part of the word count: ? References, including statute and cases; ? Diagrams; ? Tables; ? Calculations….WRITTEN ESSAY Outline This assessment has been written to develop your understanding of Human Resource Management, assessing learning outcomes a, b, c, h and i: “The external environmental (e.g. econo…Subject: INTERNATIONAL MARKETING B01ITMK208 Assessment item 2: International Marketing Analysis Weighting: 30% Due: Week 10. A daily penalty of 5% will be applied to late assignments. Task: You are a …B01ITMK208 INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT ASSIGNMENT INSTRUCTIONS KEY INFORMATION Maximum Length: 2500 words Due: Week 8. Note that late submission will attract a penalty. Weighting: 30% Instructions: Read …Subject: Advertising Management BO1ADMG207 Assessment item 2: IMC Report Weighting: 30% Due: Week 8. A daily penalty of 5% will be applied to late assignments. Task: You are the Australian-based Marke…Attached are two Memos, please have a lookgetEconomics topic Assignment 2 Value: 40% Due date: 01-Sep-2014 Return date: 22-Sep-2014 Length: about 1500-2000 words each Submission method options Alternative submission method Task Analytical essays…Accounting for Business Decisions –HI5001 Trimester 2 2014 The assignment allows students to exhibit their knowledge and understanding of the subject matter of Accounting. The students will use the sk…HOLMES INSTITUTE FACULTY OF HIGHER EDUCATION HI6007 SPSS Assignment 02 Due Friday 4pm week 11 WORTH 30% The data set you need to do the assignment can be found on Blackboard in the folder “Assignments…Assignmnet of Economic Assignment (Written report): 25% 1. Organize yourselves into groups. Each group is to have Four or Five members. 2. Groups need to choose a topic from the list of topics provide…2. Rio Tinto Annual Report Financial Analysis [10 marks] Consider the sources below and answer the following questions. Source 1: Rio Tinto Annual Report 2012 (see report uploaded on the portal) Sourc…Quantitative Methods for Business Business Statistics Assignment – Semester, 2 2014 Total Marks: 60, Worth: 20% of final assessment This assignment requires a considerable amount of computer work and …BUACC 2613 Management Accounting 1 Semester 2, 2014 Assignment Contribution to overall assessment: 25% Due date: 26/09/2014 • This assignment has two parts: o Part 1

info@checkyourstudy.com
Question 10 (1 point) In contrast to Freud’s theory, object relations theorists Question 10 options: focus on internal drives and conflicts. are interested in the intellectual and emotional development of the infant. are interested in an infant’s relationship with his or her parents. do not believe that children develop unconscious representations of significant objects in their environment. ________________________________________ Question 11 (1 point) The psychologists who developed the frustration aggression hypothesis used or adapted each of the following concepts from Freudian theory except one. Which one? Question 11 options: displacement sublimation catharsis reinforcement Question 12 (1 point) Although he changed his mind during his career, which of the following did Freud eventually decide was the cause of human aggression? Question 12 options: a death instinct frustration projection unresolved Oedipal conflicts Question 13 (1 point) Freud wrote about all of the following types of anxiety except one. Which one? Question 13 options: reality anxiety neurotic anxiety moral anxiety performance anxiety Question 14 (1 point) Which of the following is true about neurotic anxiety, as conceived by Freud? Question 14 options: It is experienced when id impulses are close to breaking into consciousness. It prevents the ego from utilizing defense mechanisms. It is created when id impulses violate society’s moral code. People experiencing neurotic anxiety usually are aware of what is making them anxious. Question 15 (1 point) One explanation for why aggression leads to more aggression is that it is reinforced by the cathartic release of tension. Question 15 options: True False ________________________________________ ________________________________________ Question 1 (1 point) A man is said to have one personality trait that dominates his personality. Allport would identify this personality trait as a Question 1 options: 1) common trait. 2) central trait. 3) cardinal trait. 4) secondary trait. Question 2 (1 point) Which of the following is true about the trait approach to personality? Question 2 options: 1) Trait researchers generally are not interested in understanding and predicting the behavior of a single individual. 2) It is not easy to make comparisons across people with the trait approach. 3) The trait approach has been responsible for generating a number of useful approaches to psychotherapy. 4) Trait theorists place a greater emphasis on discovering the mechanisms underlying behavior than do theorists from other approaches to personality. Question 3 (1 point) Many researchers fail to produce strong links between personality traits and behavior. Epstein has argued that the reason for this failure is because Question 3 options: 1) researchers don’t perform the correct statistical analysis. 2) researchers don’t measure personality traits correctly. 3) researchers don’t measure behavior correctly. 4) none of the above Question 4 (1 point) Which theorist had a strong influence on Henry Murray’s theorizing about personality? Question 4 options: 1) Gordon Allport 2) Alfred Adler 3) Sigmund Freud 4) Carl Jung Question 5 (1 point) Sometimes test makers include the same test questions more than once on the test. This is done to detect which potential problem? Question 5 options: 1) faking good 2) faking bad 3) carelessness and sabotage 4) social desirability

Question 10 (1 point) In contrast to Freud’s theory, object relations theorists Question 10 options: focus on internal drives and conflicts. are interested in the intellectual and emotional development of the infant. are interested in an infant’s relationship with his or her parents. do not believe that children develop unconscious representations of significant objects in their environment. ________________________________________ Question 11 (1 point) The psychologists who developed the frustration aggression hypothesis used or adapted each of the following concepts from Freudian theory except one. Which one? Question 11 options: displacement sublimation catharsis reinforcement Question 12 (1 point) Although he changed his mind during his career, which of the following did Freud eventually decide was the cause of human aggression? Question 12 options: a death instinct frustration projection unresolved Oedipal conflicts Question 13 (1 point) Freud wrote about all of the following types of anxiety except one. Which one? Question 13 options: reality anxiety neurotic anxiety moral anxiety performance anxiety Question 14 (1 point) Which of the following is true about neurotic anxiety, as conceived by Freud? Question 14 options: It is experienced when id impulses are close to breaking into consciousness. It prevents the ego from utilizing defense mechanisms. It is created when id impulses violate society’s moral code. People experiencing neurotic anxiety usually are aware of what is making them anxious. Question 15 (1 point) One explanation for why aggression leads to more aggression is that it is reinforced by the cathartic release of tension. Question 15 options: True False ________________________________________ ________________________________________ Question 1 (1 point) A man is said to have one personality trait that dominates his personality. Allport would identify this personality trait as a Question 1 options: 1) common trait. 2) central trait. 3) cardinal trait. 4) secondary trait. Question 2 (1 point) Which of the following is true about the trait approach to personality? Question 2 options: 1) Trait researchers generally are not interested in understanding and predicting the behavior of a single individual. 2) It is not easy to make comparisons across people with the trait approach. 3) The trait approach has been responsible for generating a number of useful approaches to psychotherapy. 4) Trait theorists place a greater emphasis on discovering the mechanisms underlying behavior than do theorists from other approaches to personality. Question 3 (1 point) Many researchers fail to produce strong links between personality traits and behavior. Epstein has argued that the reason for this failure is because Question 3 options: 1) researchers don’t perform the correct statistical analysis. 2) researchers don’t measure personality traits correctly. 3) researchers don’t measure behavior correctly. 4) none of the above Question 4 (1 point) Which theorist had a strong influence on Henry Murray’s theorizing about personality? Question 4 options: 1) Gordon Allport 2) Alfred Adler 3) Sigmund Freud 4) Carl Jung Question 5 (1 point) Sometimes test makers include the same test questions more than once on the test. This is done to detect which potential problem? Question 5 options: 1) faking good 2) faking bad 3) carelessness and sabotage 4) social desirability

No expert has answered this question yet. You can browse … Read More...
Chapter 15 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 16, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Fluid Pressure in a U-Tube A U-tube is filled with water, and the two arms are capped. The tube is cylindrical, and the right arm has twice the radius of the left arm. The caps have negligible mass, are watertight, and can freely slide up and down the tube. Part A A one-inch depth of sand is poured onto the cap on each arm. After the caps have moved (if necessary) to reestablish equilibrium, is the right cap higher, lower, or the same height as the left cap? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Pressure in the Ocean The pressure at 10 below the surface of the ocean is about 2.00×105 . Part A higher lower the same height m Pa Which of the following statements is true? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Now consider the pressure 20 below the surface of the ocean. Which of the following statements is true? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Relating Pressure and Height in a Container Learning Goal: To understand the derivation of the law relating height and pressure in a container. The weight of a column of seawater 1 in cross section and 10 high is about 2.00×105 . The weight of a column of seawater 1 in cross section and 10 high plus the weight of a column of air with the same cross section extending up to the top of the atmosphere is about 2.00×105 . The weight of 1 of seawater at 10 below the surface of the ocean is about 2.00×105 . The density of seawater is about 2.00×105 times the density of air at sea level. m2 m N m2 m N m3 m N m The pressure is twice that at a depth of 10 . The pressure is the same as that at a depth of 10 . The pressure is equal to that at a depth of 10 plus the weight per 1 cross sectional area of a column of seawater 10 high. The pressure is equal to the weight per 1 cross sectional area of a column of seawater 20 high. m m m m2 m m2 m In this problem, you will derive the law relating pressure to height in a container by analyzing a particular system. A container of uniform cross-sectional area is filled with liquid of uniform density . Consider a thin horizontal layer of liquid (thickness ) at a height as measured from the bottom of the container. Let the pressure exerted upward on the bottom of the layer be and the pressure exerted downward on the top be . Assume throughout the problem that the system is in equilibrium (the container has not been recently shaken or moved, etc.). Part A What is , the magnitude of the force exerted upward on the bottom of the liquid? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is , the magnitude of the force exerted downward on the top of the liquid? A  dy y p p + dp Fup Fup = Fdown You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C What is the weight of the thin layer of liquid? Express your answer in terms of quantities given in the problem introduction and , the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D Since the liquid is in equilibrium, the net force on the thin layer of liquid is zero. Complete the force equation for the sum of the vertical forces acting on the liquid layer described in the problem introduction. Express your answer in terms of quantities given in the problem introduction and taking upward forces to be positive. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Fdown = wlayer g wlayer = Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). A Submerged Ball A ball of mass and volume is lowered on a string into a fluid of density . Assume that the object would sink to the bottom if it were not supported by the string. Part A  = = i Fy,i mb V f What is the tension in the string when the ball is fully submerged but not touching the bottom, as shown in the figure? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the given quantities and , the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Archimedes’ Principle Learning Goal: To understand the applications of Archimedes’ principle. Archimedes’ principle is a powerful tool for solving many problems involving equilibrium in fluids. It states the following: When a body is partially or completely submerged in a fluid (either a liquid or a gas), the fluid exerts an upward force on the body equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the body. As a result of the upward Archimedes force (often called the buoyant force), some objects may float in a fluid, and all of them appear to weigh less. This is the familiar phenomenon of buoyancy. Quantitatively, the buoyant force can be found as , where is the force, is the density of the fluid, is the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity, and is the volume of the displaced fluid. In this problem, you will be asked several qualitative questions that should help you develop a feel for Archimedes’ principle. An object is placed in a fluid and then released. Assume that the object either floats to the surface (settling so that the object is partly above and partly below the fluid surface) or sinks to the bottom. (Note that for Parts A through D, you should assume that the object has settled in equilibrium.) Part A Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force is equal to the weight of fluid displaced by the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? T g T = Fbuoyant = fluidgV Fbuoyant fluid g V You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force is equal to the weight of the amount of fluid that has the same total volume as the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force equals the weight of the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? for every object submerged partially or completely in a fluid only for an object that floats only for an object that sinks for no object submerged in a fluid for an object that is partially submerged in a fluid only for an object that floats for an object completely submerged in a fluid for no object partially or completely submerged in a fluid You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force is less than the weight of the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? ANSWER: Now apply what you know to some more complicated situations. Part E An object is floating in equilibrium on the surface of a liquid. The object is then removed and placed in another container, filled with a denser liquid. What would you observe? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: for every object submerged partially or completely in a fluid for an object that floats only for an object that sinks for no object submerged in a fluid for every object submerged partially or completely in a fluid for an object that floats for an object that sinks for no object submerged in a fluid Part F An object is floating in equilibrium on the surface of a liquid. The object is then removed and placed in another container, filled with a less dense liquid. What would you observe? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part G Two objects, T and B, have identical size and shape and have uniform density. They are carefully placed in a container filled with a liquid. Both objects float in equilibrium. Less of object T is submerged than of object B, which floats, fully submerged, closer to the bottom of the container. Which of the following statements is true? ANSWER: The object would sink all the way to the bottom. The object would float submerged more deeply than in the first container. The object would float submerged less deeply than in the first container. More than one of these outcomes is possible. The object would sink all the way to the bottom. The object would float submerged more deeply than in the first container. The object would float submerged less deeply than in the first container. More than one of these outcomes is possible. Object T has a greater density than object B. Object B has a greater density than object T. Both objects have the same density. ± Buoyant Force Conceptual Question A rectangular wooden block of weight floats with exactly one-half of its volume below the waterline. Part A What is the buoyant force acting on the block? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B W The buoyant force cannot be determined. 2W W 1 W 2 The density of water is 1.00 . What is the density of the block? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). g/cm3 2.00 between 1.00 and 2.00 1.00 between 0.50 and 1.00 0.50 The density cannot be determined. g/cm3 g/cm3 g/cm3 g/cm3 g/cm3 Flow Velocity of Blood Conceptual Question Arteriosclerotic plaques forming on the inner walls of arteries can decrease the effective cross-sectional area of an artery. Even small changes in the effective area of an artery can lead to very large changes in the blood pressure in the artery and possibly to the collapse of the blood vessel. Imagine a healthy artery, with blood flow velocity of and mass per unit volume of . The kinetic energy per unit volume of blood is given by Imagine that plaque has narrowed an artery to one-fifth of its normal cross-sectional area (an 80% blockage). Part A Compared to normal blood flow velocity, , what is the velocity of blood as it passes through this blockage? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C v0 = 0.14 m/s  = 1050 kg/m3 K0 =  . 1 2 v20 v0 80v0 20v0 5v0 v0/5 This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). For parts D – F imagine that plaque has grown to a 90% blockage. Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). ± Playing with a Water Hose Two children, Ferdinand and Isabella, are playing with a water hose on a sunny summer day. Isabella is holding the hose in her hand 1.0 meters above the ground and is trying to spray Ferdinand, who is standing 10.0 meters away. Part A Will Isabella be able to spray Ferdinand if the water is flowing out of the hose at a constant speed of 3.5 meters per second? Assume that the hose is pointed parallel to the ground and take the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity to be 9.81 meters per second, per second. You did not open hints for this part. v0 g ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Tactics Box 15.2 Finding Whether an Object Floats or Sinks Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 15.2 Finding whether an object floats or sinks. If you hold an object underwater and then release it, it can float to the surface, sink, or remain “hanging” in the water, depending on whether the fluid density is larger than, smaller than, or equal to the object’s average density . These conditions are summarized in this Tactics Box. Yes No f avg TACTICS BOX 15.2 Finding whether an object floats or sinks Object sinks Object floats Object has neutral buoyancy An object sinks if it weighs more than the fluid it displaces, that is, if its average density is greater than the density of the fluid: . An object floats on the surface if it weighs less than the fluid it displaces, that is, if its average density is less than the density of the fluid: . An object hangs motionless in the fluid if it weighs exactly the same as the fluid it displaces. It has neutral buoyancy if its average density equals the density of the fluid: . Part A Ice at 0.0 has a density of 917 . A 3.00 ice cube is gently released inside a small container filled with oil and is observed to be neutrally buoyant. What is the density of the oil, ? Express your answer in kilograms per meter cubed to three significant figures. ANSWER: Part B Once the ice cube melts, what happens to the liquid water that it produces? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: avg > f avg < f avg = f 'C kg/m3 cm3 oil oil = kg/m3 Part C What happens if some ethyl alcohol of density 790 is poured into the container after the ice cube has melted? ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. The liquid water sinks to the bottom of the container. The liquid water rises to the surface and floats on top of the oil. The liquid water is in static equilibrium at the location where the ice cube was originally placed. kg/m3 A layer of ethyl alcohol forms between the oil and the water. The layer of ethyl alcohol forms at the bottom of the container. The layer of ethyl alcohol forms on the surface.

Chapter 15 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 16, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Fluid Pressure in a U-Tube A U-tube is filled with water, and the two arms are capped. The tube is cylindrical, and the right arm has twice the radius of the left arm. The caps have negligible mass, are watertight, and can freely slide up and down the tube. Part A A one-inch depth of sand is poured onto the cap on each arm. After the caps have moved (if necessary) to reestablish equilibrium, is the right cap higher, lower, or the same height as the left cap? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Pressure in the Ocean The pressure at 10 below the surface of the ocean is about 2.00×105 . Part A higher lower the same height m Pa Which of the following statements is true? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Now consider the pressure 20 below the surface of the ocean. Which of the following statements is true? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Relating Pressure and Height in a Container Learning Goal: To understand the derivation of the law relating height and pressure in a container. The weight of a column of seawater 1 in cross section and 10 high is about 2.00×105 . The weight of a column of seawater 1 in cross section and 10 high plus the weight of a column of air with the same cross section extending up to the top of the atmosphere is about 2.00×105 . The weight of 1 of seawater at 10 below the surface of the ocean is about 2.00×105 . The density of seawater is about 2.00×105 times the density of air at sea level. m2 m N m2 m N m3 m N m The pressure is twice that at a depth of 10 . The pressure is the same as that at a depth of 10 . The pressure is equal to that at a depth of 10 plus the weight per 1 cross sectional area of a column of seawater 10 high. The pressure is equal to the weight per 1 cross sectional area of a column of seawater 20 high. m m m m2 m m2 m In this problem, you will derive the law relating pressure to height in a container by analyzing a particular system. A container of uniform cross-sectional area is filled with liquid of uniform density . Consider a thin horizontal layer of liquid (thickness ) at a height as measured from the bottom of the container. Let the pressure exerted upward on the bottom of the layer be and the pressure exerted downward on the top be . Assume throughout the problem that the system is in equilibrium (the container has not been recently shaken or moved, etc.). Part A What is , the magnitude of the force exerted upward on the bottom of the liquid? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is , the magnitude of the force exerted downward on the top of the liquid? A  dy y p p + dp Fup Fup = Fdown You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C What is the weight of the thin layer of liquid? Express your answer in terms of quantities given in the problem introduction and , the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D Since the liquid is in equilibrium, the net force on the thin layer of liquid is zero. Complete the force equation for the sum of the vertical forces acting on the liquid layer described in the problem introduction. Express your answer in terms of quantities given in the problem introduction and taking upward forces to be positive. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Fdown = wlayer g wlayer = Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). A Submerged Ball A ball of mass and volume is lowered on a string into a fluid of density . Assume that the object would sink to the bottom if it were not supported by the string. Part A  = = i Fy,i mb V f What is the tension in the string when the ball is fully submerged but not touching the bottom, as shown in the figure? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the given quantities and , the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Archimedes’ Principle Learning Goal: To understand the applications of Archimedes’ principle. Archimedes’ principle is a powerful tool for solving many problems involving equilibrium in fluids. It states the following: When a body is partially or completely submerged in a fluid (either a liquid or a gas), the fluid exerts an upward force on the body equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the body. As a result of the upward Archimedes force (often called the buoyant force), some objects may float in a fluid, and all of them appear to weigh less. This is the familiar phenomenon of buoyancy. Quantitatively, the buoyant force can be found as , where is the force, is the density of the fluid, is the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity, and is the volume of the displaced fluid. In this problem, you will be asked several qualitative questions that should help you develop a feel for Archimedes’ principle. An object is placed in a fluid and then released. Assume that the object either floats to the surface (settling so that the object is partly above and partly below the fluid surface) or sinks to the bottom. (Note that for Parts A through D, you should assume that the object has settled in equilibrium.) Part A Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force is equal to the weight of fluid displaced by the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? T g T = Fbuoyant = fluidgV Fbuoyant fluid g V You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force is equal to the weight of the amount of fluid that has the same total volume as the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force equals the weight of the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? for every object submerged partially or completely in a fluid only for an object that floats only for an object that sinks for no object submerged in a fluid for an object that is partially submerged in a fluid only for an object that floats for an object completely submerged in a fluid for no object partially or completely submerged in a fluid You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force is less than the weight of the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? ANSWER: Now apply what you know to some more complicated situations. Part E An object is floating in equilibrium on the surface of a liquid. The object is then removed and placed in another container, filled with a denser liquid. What would you observe? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: for every object submerged partially or completely in a fluid for an object that floats only for an object that sinks for no object submerged in a fluid for every object submerged partially or completely in a fluid for an object that floats for an object that sinks for no object submerged in a fluid Part F An object is floating in equilibrium on the surface of a liquid. The object is then removed and placed in another container, filled with a less dense liquid. What would you observe? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part G Two objects, T and B, have identical size and shape and have uniform density. They are carefully placed in a container filled with a liquid. Both objects float in equilibrium. Less of object T is submerged than of object B, which floats, fully submerged, closer to the bottom of the container. Which of the following statements is true? ANSWER: The object would sink all the way to the bottom. The object would float submerged more deeply than in the first container. The object would float submerged less deeply than in the first container. More than one of these outcomes is possible. The object would sink all the way to the bottom. The object would float submerged more deeply than in the first container. The object would float submerged less deeply than in the first container. More than one of these outcomes is possible. Object T has a greater density than object B. Object B has a greater density than object T. Both objects have the same density. ± Buoyant Force Conceptual Question A rectangular wooden block of weight floats with exactly one-half of its volume below the waterline. Part A What is the buoyant force acting on the block? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B W The buoyant force cannot be determined. 2W W 1 W 2 The density of water is 1.00 . What is the density of the block? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). g/cm3 2.00 between 1.00 and 2.00 1.00 between 0.50 and 1.00 0.50 The density cannot be determined. g/cm3 g/cm3 g/cm3 g/cm3 g/cm3 Flow Velocity of Blood Conceptual Question Arteriosclerotic plaques forming on the inner walls of arteries can decrease the effective cross-sectional area of an artery. Even small changes in the effective area of an artery can lead to very large changes in the blood pressure in the artery and possibly to the collapse of the blood vessel. Imagine a healthy artery, with blood flow velocity of and mass per unit volume of . The kinetic energy per unit volume of blood is given by Imagine that plaque has narrowed an artery to one-fifth of its normal cross-sectional area (an 80% blockage). Part A Compared to normal blood flow velocity, , what is the velocity of blood as it passes through this blockage? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C v0 = 0.14 m/s  = 1050 kg/m3 K0 =  . 1 2 v20 v0 80v0 20v0 5v0 v0/5 This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). For parts D – F imagine that plaque has grown to a 90% blockage. Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). ± Playing with a Water Hose Two children, Ferdinand and Isabella, are playing with a water hose on a sunny summer day. Isabella is holding the hose in her hand 1.0 meters above the ground and is trying to spray Ferdinand, who is standing 10.0 meters away. Part A Will Isabella be able to spray Ferdinand if the water is flowing out of the hose at a constant speed of 3.5 meters per second? Assume that the hose is pointed parallel to the ground and take the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity to be 9.81 meters per second, per second. You did not open hints for this part. v0 g ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Tactics Box 15.2 Finding Whether an Object Floats or Sinks Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 15.2 Finding whether an object floats or sinks. If you hold an object underwater and then release it, it can float to the surface, sink, or remain “hanging” in the water, depending on whether the fluid density is larger than, smaller than, or equal to the object’s average density . These conditions are summarized in this Tactics Box. Yes No f avg TACTICS BOX 15.2 Finding whether an object floats or sinks Object sinks Object floats Object has neutral buoyancy An object sinks if it weighs more than the fluid it displaces, that is, if its average density is greater than the density of the fluid: . An object floats on the surface if it weighs less than the fluid it displaces, that is, if its average density is less than the density of the fluid: . An object hangs motionless in the fluid if it weighs exactly the same as the fluid it displaces. It has neutral buoyancy if its average density equals the density of the fluid: . Part A Ice at 0.0 has a density of 917 . A 3.00 ice cube is gently released inside a small container filled with oil and is observed to be neutrally buoyant. What is the density of the oil, ? Express your answer in kilograms per meter cubed to three significant figures. ANSWER: Part B Once the ice cube melts, what happens to the liquid water that it produces? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: avg > f avg < f avg = f 'C kg/m3 cm3 oil oil = kg/m3 Part C What happens if some ethyl alcohol of density 790 is poured into the container after the ice cube has melted? ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. The liquid water sinks to the bottom of the container. The liquid water rises to the surface and floats on top of the oil. The liquid water is in static equilibrium at the location where the ice cube was originally placed. kg/m3 A layer of ethyl alcohol forms between the oil and the water. The layer of ethyl alcohol forms at the bottom of the container. The layer of ethyl alcohol forms on the surface.

please email info@checkyourstudy.com Chapter 15 Practice Problems (Practice – no … Read More...
PART 1: (Total 350 pts – 35pts per hazard x 10 hazards) Each identified hazard should contain the following elements (Element 1 ~ 7 below). Furthermore, each student will need to provide his/her responses in a pragraph format for each element by JUSTIFYING/SUPPORTING his/her responses: ELEMENT 1) Explain Hazard you identified. What kind of exposure does each hazard have on employee ? What is the hazard? What could go wrong? Think in terms of “What ifs?” or “What could happen?” In this section, you are to describe a situation(s) and discuss what could happen (5pts). ELEMENT 2) Who would be at risk? Be specific group of individuals who would be at risk meaning don’t just say “employees” or “students” are affected. Rather be sure to JUSTIFY your position/response. (5pts) ELEMENT 3) Identify Risk Level for each hazard you identified. When you determine risk level, it is critical that you JUSTIFY as to why you selected certain Frequency and Severity level. (5pts) ELEMENT 4) Citation. If you were a Compliance Safety and Health Officer (CSHO), which SPECIFIC standard/regulation would you cite this hazard under and WHY? You must provide exact standard (eg: 29CFR 1910.261(a)(1)(i)….) and state what it says AND relate your identified hazards with the standard/regulation. Eg: What was violated, etc. (5pts) ELEMENT 5) What is/are the abatement(s) or control measure(s) for each identified hazards and why? In other words, what or HOW would you correct this situation and WHY? This is where you must discuss “Two Stage Approach.” (5pts) It is important for you to select an appropriate corrective measure(s) to protect your employees. Again, we are here to protect human, property, and the environment. We can’t just say “just because.” We will need to have a good reason(s) or justification(s) as to WHY we take a certain approach or a corrective measure to protect human, propert, and the environment. Therefore, strong justification is critical in this section – when you do so, make sure to cite follow APA format. ELEMENT 6) Once you applied your control measure(s), you are to reassess Residual Risk to make sure that you have either eliminated or lowered your risk level to an acceptable level. ELEMENT 7) Supprting Resources: Each student must use at least two (2) “credible” resources PER HAZARD to support his/her responses. This EXCLUDE OSHA/citations. (5pts) seven (7) elements. NOTE 2: APA format needs to be followed for this Part 1. (See attached Sample) PART 2: (Total 15pts) Once you identified 10 hazards (two hazards/standard), you are to prioritize those hazards from most critical to least based on item 2 you did in Part 1. Furthermore, each student will need to prepare ONE PAGE, STAND ALONE document which outlines PRIORITIZATION of those hazards he/she identified and provide the information as as to which hazards need to be control the most. PART 3: (Total 20pts) Based on the above findings, you are to create 1 page report that includes above findings. Remember, one page does not necessary mean a vertical view of 8 1/2 by 11 paper. When you submit this REPORT, think in terms of you submitting this report to your boss. (This is a hands-on practice as to how you will compile a report. If you don’t know how to develop a report, I encourage you to research to determine types of report and come up with your own version. Remember, you will most likely to submit a report in a future that is not more than one page……

PART 1: (Total 350 pts – 35pts per hazard x 10 hazards) Each identified hazard should contain the following elements (Element 1 ~ 7 below). Furthermore, each student will need to provide his/her responses in a pragraph format for each element by JUSTIFYING/SUPPORTING his/her responses: ELEMENT 1) Explain Hazard you identified. What kind of exposure does each hazard have on employee ? What is the hazard? What could go wrong? Think in terms of “What ifs?” or “What could happen?” In this section, you are to describe a situation(s) and discuss what could happen (5pts). ELEMENT 2) Who would be at risk? Be specific group of individuals who would be at risk meaning don’t just say “employees” or “students” are affected. Rather be sure to JUSTIFY your position/response. (5pts) ELEMENT 3) Identify Risk Level for each hazard you identified. When you determine risk level, it is critical that you JUSTIFY as to why you selected certain Frequency and Severity level. (5pts) ELEMENT 4) Citation. If you were a Compliance Safety and Health Officer (CSHO), which SPECIFIC standard/regulation would you cite this hazard under and WHY? You must provide exact standard (eg: 29CFR 1910.261(a)(1)(i)….) and state what it says AND relate your identified hazards with the standard/regulation. Eg: What was violated, etc. (5pts) ELEMENT 5) What is/are the abatement(s) or control measure(s) for each identified hazards and why? In other words, what or HOW would you correct this situation and WHY? This is where you must discuss “Two Stage Approach.” (5pts) It is important for you to select an appropriate corrective measure(s) to protect your employees. Again, we are here to protect human, property, and the environment. We can’t just say “just because.” We will need to have a good reason(s) or justification(s) as to WHY we take a certain approach or a corrective measure to protect human, propert, and the environment. Therefore, strong justification is critical in this section – when you do so, make sure to cite follow APA format. ELEMENT 6) Once you applied your control measure(s), you are to reassess Residual Risk to make sure that you have either eliminated or lowered your risk level to an acceptable level. ELEMENT 7) Supprting Resources: Each student must use at least two (2) “credible” resources PER HAZARD to support his/her responses. This EXCLUDE OSHA/citations. (5pts) seven (7) elements. NOTE 2: APA format needs to be followed for this Part 1. (See attached Sample) PART 2: (Total 15pts) Once you identified 10 hazards (two hazards/standard), you are to prioritize those hazards from most critical to least based on item 2 you did in Part 1. Furthermore, each student will need to prepare ONE PAGE, STAND ALONE document which outlines PRIORITIZATION of those hazards he/she identified and provide the information as as to which hazards need to be control the most. PART 3: (Total 20pts) Based on the above findings, you are to create 1 page report that includes above findings. Remember, one page does not necessary mean a vertical view of 8 1/2 by 11 paper. When you submit this REPORT, think in terms of you submitting this report to your boss. (This is a hands-on practice as to how you will compile a report. If you don’t know how to develop a report, I encourage you to research to determine types of report and come up with your own version. Remember, you will most likely to submit a report in a future that is not more than one page……

info@checkyourstudy.com
Read this article and answer this question in 2 pages : Answers should be from the below article only. What is the difference between “standards-based” and “standards-embedded” curriculum? what are the curricular implications of this difference? Article: In 2007, at the dawn of 21st century in education, it is impossible to talk about teaching, curriculum, schools, or education without discussing standards . standards-based v. standards-embedded curriculum We are in an age of accountability where our success as educators is determined by individual and group mastery of specific standards dem- onstrated by standardized test per- formance. Even before No Child Left Behind (NCLB), standards and measures were used to determine if schools and students were success- ful (McClure, 2005). But, NCLB has increased the pace, intensity, and high stakes of this trend. Gifted and talented students and their teach- ers are significantly impacted by these local or state proficiency stan- dards and grade-level assessments (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2006). This article explores how to use these standards in the develop- ment of high-quality curriculum for gifted students. NCLB, High-Stakes State Testing, and Standards- Based Instruction There are a few potentially positive outcomes of this evolution to public accountability. All stakeholders have had to ask themselves, “Are students learning? If so, what are they learning and how do we know?” In cases where we have been allowed to thoughtfully evaluate curriculum and instruction, we have also asked, “What’s worth learning?” “When’s the best time to learn it?” and “Who needs to learn it?” Even though state achievement tests are only a single measure, citizens are now offered a yardstick, albeit a nar- row one, for comparing communities, schools, and in some cases, teachers. Some testing reports allow teachers to identify for parents what their chil- dren can do and what they can not do. Testing also has focused attention on the not-so-new observations that pov- erty, discrimination and prejudices, and language proficiency impacts learning. With enough ceiling (e.g., above-grade-level assessments), even gifted students’ actual achievement and readiness levels can be identi- fied and provide a starting point for appropriately differentiated instruc- tion (Tomlinson, 2001). Unfortunately, as a veteran teacher for more than three decades and as a teacher-educator, my recent observa- tions of and conversations with class- room and gifted teachers have usually revealed negative outcomes. For gifted children, their actual achievement level is often unrecognized by teachers because both the tests and the reporting of the results rarely reach above the student’s grade-level placement. Assessments also focus on a huge number of state stan- dards for a given school year that cre- ate “overload” (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006) and have a devastating impact on the development and implementation of rich and relevant curriculum and instruction. In too many scenarios, I see teachers teach- ing directly to the test. And, in the worst cases, some teachers actually teach The Test. In those cases, The Test itself becomes the curriculum. Consistently I hear, “Oh, I used to teach a great unit on ________ but I can’t do it any- more because I have to teach the standards.” Or, “I have to teach my favorite units in April and May after testing.” If the outcomes can’t be boiled down to simple “I can . . .” state- ments that can be posted on a school’s walls, then teachers seem to omit poten- tially meaningful learning opportunities from the school year. In many cases, real education and learning are being trivial- ized. We seem to have lost sight of the more significant purpose of teaching and learning: individual growth and develop- ment. We also have surrendered much of the joy of learning, as the incidentals, the tangents, the “bird walks” are cut short or elimi- nated because teachers hear the con- stant ticking clock of the countdown to the state test and feel the pressure of the way-too-many standards that have to be covered in a mere 180 school days. The accountability movement has pushed us away from seeing the whole child: “Students are not machines, as the standards movement suggests; they are volatile, complicated, and paradoxical” (Cookson, 2001, p. 42). How does this impact gifted chil- dren? In many heterogeneous class- rooms, teachers have retreated to traditional subject delineations and traditional instruction in an effort to ensure direct standards-based instruc- tion even though “no solid basis exists in the research literature for the ways we currently develop, place, and align educational standards in school cur- ricula” (Zenger & Zenger, 2002, p. 212). Grade-level standards are often particularly inappropriate for the gifted and talented whose pace of learning, achievement levels, and depth of knowledge are significantly beyond their chronological peers. A broad-based, thematically rich, and challenging curriculum is the heart of education for the gifted. Virgil Ward, one of the earliest voices for a differen- tial education for the gifted, said, “It is insufficient to consider the curriculum for the gifted in terms of traditional subjects and instructional processes” (Ward, 1980, p. 5). VanTassel-Baska Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum gifted child today 45 Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum and Stambaugh (2006) described three dimensions of successful curriculum for gifted students: content mastery, pro- cess and product, and epistemological concept, “understanding and appre- ciating systems of knowledge rather than individual elements of those systems” (p. 9). Overemphasis on testing and grade-level standards limits all three and therefore limits learning for gifted students. Hirsch (2001) concluded that “broad gen- eral knowledge is the best entrée to deep knowledge” (p. 23) and that it is highly correlated with general ability to learn. He continued, “the best way to learn a subject is to learn its gen- eral principles and to study an ample number of diverse examples that illustrate those principles” (Hirsch, 2001, p. 23). Principle-based learn- ing applies to both gifted and general education children. In order to meet the needs of gifted and general education students, cur- riculum should be differentiated in ways that are relevant and engaging. Curriculum content, processes, and products should provide challenge, depth, and complexity, offering multiple opportunities for problem solving, creativity, and exploration. In specific content areas, the cur- riculum should reflect the elegance and sophistication unique to the discipline. Even with this expanded view of curriculum in mind, we still must find ways to address the current reality of state standards and assess- ments. Standards-Embedded Curriculum How can educators address this chal- lenge? As in most things, a change of perspective can be helpful. Standards- based curriculum as described above should be replaced with standards- embedded curriculum. Standards- embedded curriculum begins with broad questions and topics, either discipline specific or interdisciplinary. Once teachers have given thoughtful consideration to relevant, engaging, and important content and the con- nections that support meaning-making (Jensen, 1998), they next select stan- dards that are relevant to this content and to summative assessments. This process is supported by the backward planning advocated in Understanding by Design by Wiggins and McTighe (2005) and its predecessors, as well as current thinkers in other fields, such as Covey (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006). It is a critical component of differenti- ating instruction for advanced learners (Tomlinson, 2001) and a significant factor in the Core Parallel in the Parallel Curriculum Model (Tomlinson et al., 2002). Teachers choose from standards in multiple disciplines at both above and below grade level depending on the needs of the students and the classroom or program structure. Preassessment data and the results of prior instruc- tion also inform this process of embed- ding appropriate standards. For gifted students, this formative assessment will result in “more advanced curricula available at younger ages, ensuring that all levels of the standards are traversed in the process” (VanTassel-Baska & Little, 2003, p. 3). Once the essential questions, key content, and relevant standards are selected and sequenced, they are embedded into a coherent unit design and instructional decisions (grouping, pacing, instructional methodology) can be made. For gifted students, this includes the identification of appropri- ate resources, often including advanced texts, mentors, and independent research, as appropriate to the child’s developmental level and interest. Applying Standards- Embedded Curriculum What does this look like in practice? In reading the possible class- room applications below, consider these three Ohio Academic Content Standards for third grade: 1. Math: “Read thermometers in both Fahrenheit and Celsius scales” (“Academic Content Standards: K–12 Mathematics,” n.d., p. 71). 2. Social Studies: “Compare some of the cultural practices and products of various groups of people who have lived in the local community including artistic expression, religion, language, and food. Compare the cultural practices and products of the local community with those of other communities in Ohio, the United States, and countries of the world” (Academic Content Standards: K–12 Social Studies, n.d., p. 122). 3. Life Science: “Observe and explore how fossils provide evidence about animals that lived long ago and the nature of the environment at that time” (Academic Content Standards: K–12 Science, n.d., p. 57). When students are fortunate to have a teacher who is dedicated to helping all of them make good use of their time, the gifted may have a preassessment opportunity where they can demonstrate their familiarity with the content and potential mastery of a standard at their grade level. Students who pass may get to read by them- selves for the brief period while the rest of the class works on the single outcome. Sometimes more experienced teachers will create opportunities for gifted and advanced students Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum to work on a standard in the same domain or strand at the next higher grade level (i.e., accelerate through the standards). For example, a stu- dent might be able to work on a Life Science standard for fourth grade that progresses to other communities such as ecosystems. These above-grade-level standards can provide rich material for differentiation, advanced problem solving, and more in-depth curriculum integration. In another classroom scenario, a teacher may focus on the math stan- dard above, identifying the standard number on his lesson plan. He creates or collects paper thermometers, some showing measurement in Celsius and some in Fahrenheit. He also has some real thermometers. He demonstrates thermometer use with boiling water and with freezing water and reads the different temperatures. Students complete a worksheet that has them read thermometers in Celsius and Fahrenheit. The more advanced students may learn how to convert between the two scales. Students then practice with several questions on the topic that are similar in structure and content to those that have been on past proficiency tests. They are coached in how to answer them so that the stan- dard, instruction, formative assess- ment, and summative assessment are all aligned. Then, each student writes a statement that says, “I can read a thermometer using either Celsius or Fahrenheit scales.” Both of these examples describe a standards-based environment, where the starting point is the standard. Direct instruction to that standard is followed by an observable student behavior that demonstrates specific mastery of that single standard. The standard becomes both the start- ing point and the ending point of the curriculum. Education, rather than opening up a student’s mind, becomes a series of closed links in a chain. Whereas the above lessons may be differentiated to some extent, they have no context; they may relate only to the next standard on the list, such as, “Telling time to the nearest minute and finding elapsed time using a cal- endar or a clock.” How would a “standards-embed- ded” model of curriculum design be different? It would begin with the development of an essential ques- tion such as, “Who or what lived here before me? How were they different from me? How were they the same? How do we know?” These questions might be more relevant to our con- temporary highly mobile students. It would involve place and time. Using this intriguing line of inquiry, students might work on the social studies stan- dard as part of the study of their home- town, their school, or even their house or apartment. Because where people live and what they do is influenced by the weather, students could look into weather patterns of their area and learn how to measure temperature using a Fahrenheit scale so they could see if it is similar now to what it was a century ago. Skipping ahead to consideration of the social studies standard, students could then choose another country, preferably one that uses Celsius, and do the same investigation of fossils, communities, and the like. Students could complete a weather comparison, looking at the temperature in Celsius as people in other parts of the world, such as those in Canada, do. Thus, learning is contextualized and connected, dem- onstrating both depth and complexity. This approach takes a lot more work and time. It is a sophisticated integrated view of curriculum devel- opment and involves in-depth knowl- edge of the content areas, as well as an understanding of the scope and sequence of the standards in each dis- cipline. Teachers who develop vital single-discipline units, as well as inter- disciplinary teaching units, begin with a central topic surrounded by subtopics and connections to other areas. Then they connect important terms, facts, or concepts to the subtopics. Next, the skilled teacher/curriculum devel- oper embeds relevant, multileveled standards and objectives appropriate to a given student or group of stu- dents into the unit. Finally, teachers select the instructional strategies and develop student assessments. These assessments include, but are not lim- ited to, the types of questions asked on standardized and state assessments. Comparing Standards- Based and Standards- Embedded Curriculum Design Following is an articulation of the differences between standards-based and standards-embedded curriculum design. (See Figure 1.) 1. The starting point. Standards- based curriculum begins with the grade-level standard and the underlying assumption that every student needs to master that stan- dard at that moment in time. In standards-embedded curriculum, the multifaceted essential ques- tion and students’ needs are the starting points. 2. Preassessment. In standards- based curriculum and teaching, if a preassessment is provided, it cov- ers a single standard or two. In a standards-embedded curriculum, preassessment includes a broader range of grade-level and advanced standards, as well as students’ knowledge of surrounding content such as background experiences with the subject, relevant skills (such as reading and writing), and continued on page ?? even learning style or interests. gifted child today 47 Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum Standards Based Standards Embedded Starting Points The grade-level standard. Whole class’ general skill level Essential questions and content relevant to individual students and groups. Preassessment Targeted to a single grade-level standard. Short-cycle assessments. Background knowledge. Multiple grade-level standards from multiple areas connected by the theme of the unit. Includes annual learning style and interest inventories. Acceleration/ Enrichment To next grade-level standard in the same strand. To above-grade-level standards, as well as into broader thematically connected content. Language Arts Divided into individual skills. Reading and writing skills often separated from real-world relevant contexts. The language arts are embedded in all units and themes and connected to differentiated processes and products across all content areas. Instruction Lesson planning begins with the standard as the objective. Sequential direct instruction progresses through the standards in each content area separately. Strategies are selected to introduce, practice, and demonstrate mastery of all grade-level standards in all content areas in one school year. Lesson planning begins with essential questions, topics, and significant themes. Integrated instruction is designed around connections among content areas and embeds all relevant standards. Assessment Format modeled after the state test. Variety of assessments including questions similar to the state test format. Teacher Role Monitor of standards mastery. Time manager. Facilitator of instructional design and student engagement with learning, as well as assessor of achievement. Student Self- Esteem “I can . . .” statements. Star Charts. Passing “the test.” Completed projects/products. Making personal connections to learning and the theme/topic. Figure 1. Standards based v. standards-embedded instruction and gifted students. and the potential political outcry of “stepping on the toes” of the next grade’s teacher. Few classroom teachers have been provided with the in-depth professional develop- ment and understanding of curric- ulum compacting that would allow them to implement this effectively. In standards-embedded curricu- lum, enrichment and extensions of learning are more possible and more interesting because ideas, top- ics, and questions lend themselves more easily to depth and complex- ity than isolated skills. 4. Language arts. In standards- based classrooms, the language arts have been redivided into sepa- rate skills, with reading separated from writing, and writing sepa- rated from grammar. To many concrete thinkers, whole-language approaches seem antithetical to teaching “to the standards.” In a standards-embedded classroom, integrated language arts skills (reading, writing, listening, speak- ing, presenting, and even pho- nics) are embedded into the study of every unit. Especially for the gifted, the communication and language arts are essential, regard- less of domain-specific talents (Ward, 1980) and should be com- ponents of all curriculum because they are the underpinnings of scholarship in all areas. 5. Instruction. A standards-based classroom lends itself to direct instruction and sequential pro- gression from one standard to the next. A standards-embedded class- room requires a variety of more open-ended instructional strate- gies and materials that extend and diversify learning rather than focus it narrowly. Creativity and differ- entiation in instruction and stu- dent performance are supported more effectively in a standards- embedded approach. 6. Assessment. A standards-based classroom uses targeted assess- ments focused on the structure and content of questions on the externally imposed standardized test (i.e., proficiency tests). A stan- dards-embedded classroom lends itself to greater use of authentic assessment and differentiated 3. Acceleration/Enrichment. In a standards-based curriculum, the narrow definition of the learning outcome (a test item) often makes acceleration or curriculum compact- ing the only path for differentiating instruction for gifted, talented, and/ or advanced learners. This rarely happens, however, because of lack of materials, knowledge, o

Read this article and answer this question in 2 pages : Answers should be from the below article only. What is the difference between “standards-based” and “standards-embedded” curriculum? what are the curricular implications of this difference? Article: In 2007, at the dawn of 21st century in education, it is impossible to talk about teaching, curriculum, schools, or education without discussing standards . standards-based v. standards-embedded curriculum We are in an age of accountability where our success as educators is determined by individual and group mastery of specific standards dem- onstrated by standardized test per- formance. Even before No Child Left Behind (NCLB), standards and measures were used to determine if schools and students were success- ful (McClure, 2005). But, NCLB has increased the pace, intensity, and high stakes of this trend. Gifted and talented students and their teach- ers are significantly impacted by these local or state proficiency stan- dards and grade-level assessments (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2006). This article explores how to use these standards in the develop- ment of high-quality curriculum for gifted students. NCLB, High-Stakes State Testing, and Standards- Based Instruction There are a few potentially positive outcomes of this evolution to public accountability. All stakeholders have had to ask themselves, “Are students learning? If so, what are they learning and how do we know?” In cases where we have been allowed to thoughtfully evaluate curriculum and instruction, we have also asked, “What’s worth learning?” “When’s the best time to learn it?” and “Who needs to learn it?” Even though state achievement tests are only a single measure, citizens are now offered a yardstick, albeit a nar- row one, for comparing communities, schools, and in some cases, teachers. Some testing reports allow teachers to identify for parents what their chil- dren can do and what they can not do. Testing also has focused attention on the not-so-new observations that pov- erty, discrimination and prejudices, and language proficiency impacts learning. With enough ceiling (e.g., above-grade-level assessments), even gifted students’ actual achievement and readiness levels can be identi- fied and provide a starting point for appropriately differentiated instruc- tion (Tomlinson, 2001). Unfortunately, as a veteran teacher for more than three decades and as a teacher-educator, my recent observa- tions of and conversations with class- room and gifted teachers have usually revealed negative outcomes. For gifted children, their actual achievement level is often unrecognized by teachers because both the tests and the reporting of the results rarely reach above the student’s grade-level placement. Assessments also focus on a huge number of state stan- dards for a given school year that cre- ate “overload” (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006) and have a devastating impact on the development and implementation of rich and relevant curriculum and instruction. In too many scenarios, I see teachers teach- ing directly to the test. And, in the worst cases, some teachers actually teach The Test. In those cases, The Test itself becomes the curriculum. Consistently I hear, “Oh, I used to teach a great unit on ________ but I can’t do it any- more because I have to teach the standards.” Or, “I have to teach my favorite units in April and May after testing.” If the outcomes can’t be boiled down to simple “I can . . .” state- ments that can be posted on a school’s walls, then teachers seem to omit poten- tially meaningful learning opportunities from the school year. In many cases, real education and learning are being trivial- ized. We seem to have lost sight of the more significant purpose of teaching and learning: individual growth and develop- ment. We also have surrendered much of the joy of learning, as the incidentals, the tangents, the “bird walks” are cut short or elimi- nated because teachers hear the con- stant ticking clock of the countdown to the state test and feel the pressure of the way-too-many standards that have to be covered in a mere 180 school days. The accountability movement has pushed us away from seeing the whole child: “Students are not machines, as the standards movement suggests; they are volatile, complicated, and paradoxical” (Cookson, 2001, p. 42). How does this impact gifted chil- dren? In many heterogeneous class- rooms, teachers have retreated to traditional subject delineations and traditional instruction in an effort to ensure direct standards-based instruc- tion even though “no solid basis exists in the research literature for the ways we currently develop, place, and align educational standards in school cur- ricula” (Zenger & Zenger, 2002, p. 212). Grade-level standards are often particularly inappropriate for the gifted and talented whose pace of learning, achievement levels, and depth of knowledge are significantly beyond their chronological peers. A broad-based, thematically rich, and challenging curriculum is the heart of education for the gifted. Virgil Ward, one of the earliest voices for a differen- tial education for the gifted, said, “It is insufficient to consider the curriculum for the gifted in terms of traditional subjects and instructional processes” (Ward, 1980, p. 5). VanTassel-Baska Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum gifted child today 45 Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum and Stambaugh (2006) described three dimensions of successful curriculum for gifted students: content mastery, pro- cess and product, and epistemological concept, “understanding and appre- ciating systems of knowledge rather than individual elements of those systems” (p. 9). Overemphasis on testing and grade-level standards limits all three and therefore limits learning for gifted students. Hirsch (2001) concluded that “broad gen- eral knowledge is the best entrée to deep knowledge” (p. 23) and that it is highly correlated with general ability to learn. He continued, “the best way to learn a subject is to learn its gen- eral principles and to study an ample number of diverse examples that illustrate those principles” (Hirsch, 2001, p. 23). Principle-based learn- ing applies to both gifted and general education children. In order to meet the needs of gifted and general education students, cur- riculum should be differentiated in ways that are relevant and engaging. Curriculum content, processes, and products should provide challenge, depth, and complexity, offering multiple opportunities for problem solving, creativity, and exploration. In specific content areas, the cur- riculum should reflect the elegance and sophistication unique to the discipline. Even with this expanded view of curriculum in mind, we still must find ways to address the current reality of state standards and assess- ments. Standards-Embedded Curriculum How can educators address this chal- lenge? As in most things, a change of perspective can be helpful. Standards- based curriculum as described above should be replaced with standards- embedded curriculum. Standards- embedded curriculum begins with broad questions and topics, either discipline specific or interdisciplinary. Once teachers have given thoughtful consideration to relevant, engaging, and important content and the con- nections that support meaning-making (Jensen, 1998), they next select stan- dards that are relevant to this content and to summative assessments. This process is supported by the backward planning advocated in Understanding by Design by Wiggins and McTighe (2005) and its predecessors, as well as current thinkers in other fields, such as Covey (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006). It is a critical component of differenti- ating instruction for advanced learners (Tomlinson, 2001) and a significant factor in the Core Parallel in the Parallel Curriculum Model (Tomlinson et al., 2002). Teachers choose from standards in multiple disciplines at both above and below grade level depending on the needs of the students and the classroom or program structure. Preassessment data and the results of prior instruc- tion also inform this process of embed- ding appropriate standards. For gifted students, this formative assessment will result in “more advanced curricula available at younger ages, ensuring that all levels of the standards are traversed in the process” (VanTassel-Baska & Little, 2003, p. 3). Once the essential questions, key content, and relevant standards are selected and sequenced, they are embedded into a coherent unit design and instructional decisions (grouping, pacing, instructional methodology) can be made. For gifted students, this includes the identification of appropri- ate resources, often including advanced texts, mentors, and independent research, as appropriate to the child’s developmental level and interest. Applying Standards- Embedded Curriculum What does this look like in practice? In reading the possible class- room applications below, consider these three Ohio Academic Content Standards for third grade: 1. Math: “Read thermometers in both Fahrenheit and Celsius scales” (“Academic Content Standards: K–12 Mathematics,” n.d., p. 71). 2. Social Studies: “Compare some of the cultural practices and products of various groups of people who have lived in the local community including artistic expression, religion, language, and food. Compare the cultural practices and products of the local community with those of other communities in Ohio, the United States, and countries of the world” (Academic Content Standards: K–12 Social Studies, n.d., p. 122). 3. Life Science: “Observe and explore how fossils provide evidence about animals that lived long ago and the nature of the environment at that time” (Academic Content Standards: K–12 Science, n.d., p. 57). When students are fortunate to have a teacher who is dedicated to helping all of them make good use of their time, the gifted may have a preassessment opportunity where they can demonstrate their familiarity with the content and potential mastery of a standard at their grade level. Students who pass may get to read by them- selves for the brief period while the rest of the class works on the single outcome. Sometimes more experienced teachers will create opportunities for gifted and advanced students Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum to work on a standard in the same domain or strand at the next higher grade level (i.e., accelerate through the standards). For example, a stu- dent might be able to work on a Life Science standard for fourth grade that progresses to other communities such as ecosystems. These above-grade-level standards can provide rich material for differentiation, advanced problem solving, and more in-depth curriculum integration. In another classroom scenario, a teacher may focus on the math stan- dard above, identifying the standard number on his lesson plan. He creates or collects paper thermometers, some showing measurement in Celsius and some in Fahrenheit. He also has some real thermometers. He demonstrates thermometer use with boiling water and with freezing water and reads the different temperatures. Students complete a worksheet that has them read thermometers in Celsius and Fahrenheit. The more advanced students may learn how to convert between the two scales. Students then practice with several questions on the topic that are similar in structure and content to those that have been on past proficiency tests. They are coached in how to answer them so that the stan- dard, instruction, formative assess- ment, and summative assessment are all aligned. Then, each student writes a statement that says, “I can read a thermometer using either Celsius or Fahrenheit scales.” Both of these examples describe a standards-based environment, where the starting point is the standard. Direct instruction to that standard is followed by an observable student behavior that demonstrates specific mastery of that single standard. The standard becomes both the start- ing point and the ending point of the curriculum. Education, rather than opening up a student’s mind, becomes a series of closed links in a chain. Whereas the above lessons may be differentiated to some extent, they have no context; they may relate only to the next standard on the list, such as, “Telling time to the nearest minute and finding elapsed time using a cal- endar or a clock.” How would a “standards-embed- ded” model of curriculum design be different? It would begin with the development of an essential ques- tion such as, “Who or what lived here before me? How were they different from me? How were they the same? How do we know?” These questions might be more relevant to our con- temporary highly mobile students. It would involve place and time. Using this intriguing line of inquiry, students might work on the social studies stan- dard as part of the study of their home- town, their school, or even their house or apartment. Because where people live and what they do is influenced by the weather, students could look into weather patterns of their area and learn how to measure temperature using a Fahrenheit scale so they could see if it is similar now to what it was a century ago. Skipping ahead to consideration of the social studies standard, students could then choose another country, preferably one that uses Celsius, and do the same investigation of fossils, communities, and the like. Students could complete a weather comparison, looking at the temperature in Celsius as people in other parts of the world, such as those in Canada, do. Thus, learning is contextualized and connected, dem- onstrating both depth and complexity. This approach takes a lot more work and time. It is a sophisticated integrated view of curriculum devel- opment and involves in-depth knowl- edge of the content areas, as well as an understanding of the scope and sequence of the standards in each dis- cipline. Teachers who develop vital single-discipline units, as well as inter- disciplinary teaching units, begin with a central topic surrounded by subtopics and connections to other areas. Then they connect important terms, facts, or concepts to the subtopics. Next, the skilled teacher/curriculum devel- oper embeds relevant, multileveled standards and objectives appropriate to a given student or group of stu- dents into the unit. Finally, teachers select the instructional strategies and develop student assessments. These assessments include, but are not lim- ited to, the types of questions asked on standardized and state assessments. Comparing Standards- Based and Standards- Embedded Curriculum Design Following is an articulation of the differences between standards-based and standards-embedded curriculum design. (See Figure 1.) 1. The starting point. Standards- based curriculum begins with the grade-level standard and the underlying assumption that every student needs to master that stan- dard at that moment in time. In standards-embedded curriculum, the multifaceted essential ques- tion and students’ needs are the starting points. 2. Preassessment. In standards- based curriculum and teaching, if a preassessment is provided, it cov- ers a single standard or two. In a standards-embedded curriculum, preassessment includes a broader range of grade-level and advanced standards, as well as students’ knowledge of surrounding content such as background experiences with the subject, relevant skills (such as reading and writing), and continued on page ?? even learning style or interests. gifted child today 47 Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum Standards Based Standards Embedded Starting Points The grade-level standard. Whole class’ general skill level Essential questions and content relevant to individual students and groups. Preassessment Targeted to a single grade-level standard. Short-cycle assessments. Background knowledge. Multiple grade-level standards from multiple areas connected by the theme of the unit. Includes annual learning style and interest inventories. Acceleration/ Enrichment To next grade-level standard in the same strand. To above-grade-level standards, as well as into broader thematically connected content. Language Arts Divided into individual skills. Reading and writing skills often separated from real-world relevant contexts. The language arts are embedded in all units and themes and connected to differentiated processes and products across all content areas. Instruction Lesson planning begins with the standard as the objective. Sequential direct instruction progresses through the standards in each content area separately. Strategies are selected to introduce, practice, and demonstrate mastery of all grade-level standards in all content areas in one school year. Lesson planning begins with essential questions, topics, and significant themes. Integrated instruction is designed around connections among content areas and embeds all relevant standards. Assessment Format modeled after the state test. Variety of assessments including questions similar to the state test format. Teacher Role Monitor of standards mastery. Time manager. Facilitator of instructional design and student engagement with learning, as well as assessor of achievement. Student Self- Esteem “I can . . .” statements. Star Charts. Passing “the test.” Completed projects/products. Making personal connections to learning and the theme/topic. Figure 1. Standards based v. standards-embedded instruction and gifted students. and the potential political outcry of “stepping on the toes” of the next grade’s teacher. Few classroom teachers have been provided with the in-depth professional develop- ment and understanding of curric- ulum compacting that would allow them to implement this effectively. In standards-embedded curricu- lum, enrichment and extensions of learning are more possible and more interesting because ideas, top- ics, and questions lend themselves more easily to depth and complex- ity than isolated skills. 4. Language arts. In standards- based classrooms, the language arts have been redivided into sepa- rate skills, with reading separated from writing, and writing sepa- rated from grammar. To many concrete thinkers, whole-language approaches seem antithetical to teaching “to the standards.” In a standards-embedded classroom, integrated language arts skills (reading, writing, listening, speak- ing, presenting, and even pho- nics) are embedded into the study of every unit. Especially for the gifted, the communication and language arts are essential, regard- less of domain-specific talents (Ward, 1980) and should be com- ponents of all curriculum because they are the underpinnings of scholarship in all areas. 5. Instruction. A standards-based classroom lends itself to direct instruction and sequential pro- gression from one standard to the next. A standards-embedded class- room requires a variety of more open-ended instructional strate- gies and materials that extend and diversify learning rather than focus it narrowly. Creativity and differ- entiation in instruction and stu- dent performance are supported more effectively in a standards- embedded approach. 6. Assessment. A standards-based classroom uses targeted assess- ments focused on the structure and content of questions on the externally imposed standardized test (i.e., proficiency tests). A stan- dards-embedded classroom lends itself to greater use of authentic assessment and differentiated 3. Acceleration/Enrichment. In a standards-based curriculum, the narrow definition of the learning outcome (a test item) often makes acceleration or curriculum compact- ing the only path for differentiating instruction for gifted, talented, and/ or advanced learners. This rarely happens, however, because of lack of materials, knowledge, o

Standard based Curriculum In standard based curriculum, the initial point … Read More...
Assignment One Suggested Due Date: July 17th In this assignment you will read three articles You will answer questions about Hayek, Lucas, and Mankiw et. al. which consider just those particular articles. Then at the end of the assignment there is a cluster of questions that deal with both Lucas and Mankiw et al where you will have an opportunity to compare and contrast those two articles. When you have completed the assignment, place it in the appropriate drop box in WTClass. Hayek: The Use of Knowledge in Society http://www.econlib.org/library/Essays/hykKnw1.html Adapted from Michael K. Salemi “The Use of Knowledge in Society” F. A. Hayek Discussion Questions 1.1. “The peculiar character of the problem of a rational economic order is determined precisely by the fact that the knowledge of the circumstances of which we must make use never exists in concentrated or integrated form, but solely as the dispersed bits of incomplete and frequently contradictory knowledge which all the separate individuals possess (H.3)” a. What does Hayek mean by a “rational economic order”? b. What does Hayek mean by “dispersed bits of incomplete and frequently contradictory knowledge”? c. Why is Hayek critical of the common assumptions in economic analysis that buyers, sellers, producers and the economist all know every relevant thing about the economy? d. What, in summary, does Hayek mean by the quoted statement? 1.2. What, according to Hayek, is the information needed to operate effectively in a complex market economy? a. What does Hayek mean by “planning”? b. What is the minimum information needed by economic planners and individuals? c. Does the minimum differ for planners and for individuals? How? Why? d. What happens when some individuals possess more information than other individuals? e. What does Hayek mean when he says (H.16) “…the sort of knowledge with which I have been concerned is knowledge of the kind which by its nature cannot enter into statistics and therefore cannot be conveyed to any central authority in statistical form”? f. Why, according to Hayek, can the “information problem” be solved by “the price system”? 1.3. Why, according to Hayek, is the true function of the price system the communication of information? a. Why does Hayek use the term ‘marvel’ in his discussion of the economy of knowledge? b. What does Hayek mean when he says (H.26) “…man has been able to develop that division of labor on which our civilization is based because he happened to stumble upon a method which made it possible”? Read Robert Lucas’ “Some Macroeconomics for the 21st Century” in the Journal of Economic Perspectives. (Skip the appendix.) All four of these links go to the same article. Some of the links might not be accessible to you, but I think that at least one of them should work for all of you. https://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/jep.14.1.159 http://www.jstor.org/stable/2647059 http://www.econ.psu.edu/~aur10/Econ%20570%20Fall%202009/Lucas%20JEP%202000.pdf http://faculty.georgetown.edu/mh5/class/econ102/readings/Macro_21st_Century.pdf 1. According to Lucas, why has the world’s economy grown so much since 1960? 2. According to Lucas, why do some nations grow faster than others? 3. According to Lucas, why will growth and inequality decrease in the next 100 years? 4. Is Lucas’ model in this paper “economics?” Read Greg Mankiw, Romer and Wiel’s article in The Quarterly Journal of Economics. http://www.econ.nyu.edu/user/debraj/Courses/Readings/MankiwRomerWeil.pdf 1. Many economists think the Solow Growth Model is of limited use. (One of my professors at OU stated that it took economists 50 years to figure out that their growth model has nothing to do with growth.) But does the Solow model give “…the right answer to the questions it is designed to address?” 2. Why is human capital important when testing the Solow model against the data? 3. Explain how the authors conclude that the incomes of the world’s nations are converging? Now that you’ve answered questions about Lucas and Mankiw et al separately, consider this question: Both of these papers develop the notion that the economies of the world’s nations will tend to “converge” over time. Compare and contrast the way(s) in which the papers advance the idea of convergence. Assignment Two Due Date July 24th This assignment is very straight forward. You’ll read two papers and answer questions about each of them. Read Krugman’s paper on unemployment http://www.kc.frb.org/PUBLICAT/ECONREV/EconRevArchive/1994/4Q94KRUG.pdf 1. What is the difference between structural and cyclical unemployment? In this context, what is the difference between Europe and the US? What is the evidence that Krugman uses to back his opinion? 2. What is the natural rate of unemployment? Why is it higher/rising in Europe? Again, what is the evidence? 3. What is the relationship between the rising unemployment in Europe and the rise in inequality in the US. (What does Krugman mean by inequality?) 4. What is NOT to blame for either the rise in unemployment or inequality? 5. What policies, if any, can be put into place to combat rising inequality/unemployment? 6. Are you convinced by Krugman’s argument which rules out globalization as the likely cause for high European unemployment and high US wage inequality? 7. Consider Table 2 in Krugman. Why does Krugman include Table 2 in his paper? In other words, what point is strengthened by the data in Table 2 and why is it crucial to Krugman’s larger thesis? NOW, recreate the data for Table 2 for either the UK or US for the latest year possible. Has anything changed as a result of the Great Recession? Read Thomas Sargent’s paper about the credibility of “Reaganonomics.” http://minneapolisfed.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/ref/collection/p15334coll1/id/366 http://minneapolisfed.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15334coll1/id/366/rec/1 You might like this: http://www.ispot.tv/ad/7Lj9/ally-bank-predictions-featuring-thomas-sargent 1. What is a dynamic game? 2. Why should we think of monetary and fiscal policy as dynamic game? Who are the players and what are the strategies? 3. When are government budgets inflationary? (Again, think in terms of a game.) 4. What are the consequences if the monetary authority does not coordinate with fiscal policy agents? 5. Has Sargent done of good job characterizing the interplay between policymakers in the government, the central bank, and the public? 6. What is the connection between policy coordination and credibility? 7. Why, according to Sargent, were Reagan’s fiscal and monetary policy regimes “incredible?” Explain carefully. Assignment Three Due Date July 31 Read Taylor, Miskin, Obstfeld and Rogoff. Answer the questions for each article, then answer the final cluster that requires you to consider Miskin, Obstfeld and Rogoff. Suggested due date: January 2nd. Read John Taylor’s article about monetary transmission mechanisms. http://web.econ.unito.it/bagliano/ecmon_readings/taylor_jep95.pdf Also, to understand traditional monetary policy, listen to this: http://www.econtalk.org/archives/2008/08/john_taylor_on.html These questions refer to the article, not the podcast. 1. How does monetary policy (or changes in monetary policy) affect output and inflation? In other words, what is the monetary policy transmission mechanism? 2. What is the importance of financial market prices in Taylor’s view? 3. What is the importance of rational expectations and rigidities in the prices of labor and goods? 4. What is a reaction function? Why is a reaction function important? 5. What is an “optimal monetary policy rule?” 6. Has the monetary transmission mechanism changed? How? 7. What are the criticisms of Taylor’s views? How does he respond? What do you think? Read Mishkin’s article about global financial instability. http://pubs.aeaweb.org/doi/pdfplus/10.1257/jep.13.4.3 1. What is a financial crisis? 2. How did adverse selection and moral hazard contribute to the financial crisis in Mexico and East Asia in the 1990s? What are adverse selection and moral hazard? 3. Did irresponsible monetary and fiscal policy contribute to the crisis in the 90s? Why or why not? 4. How is it possible for the IMF to help in a crisis when a domestic central bank might not be able to help. 5. What should the US learn (or have learned??) from the crisis in the 90s? Read Rogoff’s article about global financial instability. http://pubs.aeaweb.org/doi/pdfplus/10.1257/jep.13.4.21 http://pubs.aeaweb.org/doi/pdfplus/10.1257/jep.13.4.21 Answer the questions and place the answers in the appropriate drop box in WTClass. 1. According to Rogoff, is the status quo in international lending viable or not? Explain. 2. Can the IMF handle international financial crises? Why or why not? 3. Rogoff gives six solutions to save the global financial system (deep pockets lender of last resort, an international financial crisis manager, an international bankruptcy court, an international regulator, international deposit insurance corporation, and a world monetary authority.) What is wrong with all of these? 4. Can developing economies cope with speculative capital flows without help? Explain. 5. What will be (should be) the role that equity financing play in developing country projects? Read Obstfeld on Global Capital Markets: http://www.nber.org/papers/w6559.pdf 1. Look at table 1 and figure 1. How does Obstfeld use the data in that table to suggest that 1) markets became less open then more open in the 20th century. 2. What is the “openness trilemma?” What are the economic and/or policy trade-offs with having a global, open and integrated financial system? 3. How does economic integration impact a nation’s ability to tax capital? Can you think of some high profile cases in the news lately that illustrate this fact? (Hint: you should be able to.) 4. What is the international diversification puzzle? What market failures have arisen (if any) have arisen due to more integration and openness? Comparing Obstfeld, Miskin, and Rogoff 1. Would the authors’ advice about policies to reduce the costs of financial integration be the same? Why or why not? 2. Would the authors’ agree that we need an international regulatory body to stave off international financial crises? Why or why not? 3. What is your opinion? Is it good to have a global financial market? Why or why not? Assignment Four Due Date August 7 Straight forward assignment: Read and answer the questions. Read Arnold Kling’s history of the policies that created the great recession http://mercatus.org/publication/not-what-they-had-mind-history-policies-produced-financial-crisis-2008 1. Using only the executive summary, what does Kling think caused the Financial Crisis of 2008? (Use only one sentence.) 2. One page 5, what is “the fact?” and what does this “fact” mean to you? 3. Briefly summarize the four components of the Financial Crisis? 4. On page 10, Kling states, “These property bubbles (in the U.K. and Spain) cannot be blamed on U.S. policy.” How confident are you on that point? Is Kling wrong? 5. Kling’s matrix of causes, gives almost all weight to what two factors? What three factors are almost completely not responsible? 6. Many have blamed designer financial (my term) like CDS and CDO and the shadow banking system for the collapse. How do these fit into Kling’s narrative? 7. Outline the progression of policy that caused/responded to economic conditions in the 30s, 70s and 80s and 00s. 8. What role did the mortgage interest deduction have on housing market? 9. What institution invented and allowed the expansion of mortgage-backed securities? 10. What is regulatory arbitrage? 11. Why did the Basel agreement create an advantage for mortgage securitization? 12. Did the Federal Reserve (and presumably other regulatory agencies know and even encourage regulatory capital arbitrage? What author does Kling cite to establish this? 13. What did the 2002 modification of the Basel Rules do to capital requirements? (See figure 4) 14. Summarize the Shadow Regulatory Committee’s statement 160. 15. Did non market institutions, such as the IMF and Bernanke, think, in 2006, that financial innovation had make the banking sector more or less fragile? 16. What is time inconsistency? (You can look this up elsewhere.) 17. How might “barriers to entry” by related to “safety and soundness?” 18. A Curmudgeon is an old man who is easily annoyed and angered. He also complains a lot. (I had to look it up.) I think I’ll change my xbox gamertag to this word, but I’ll bet it is taken. 19. How did credit scoring and credit default swaps enlarge the mortgage securities market? 20. Why, up until 2007, did we think that monetary expansion was all that was needed to mitigate the impact of financial crises? 21. Suppose that financial markets are inherently unstable. What does this mean are two goals of regulation and regulators? 22. Why are type two errors so problematic? (Two reasons.) 23. How could we make the banking sector easy to fix? Assignment Five Due August 13 Read the linked lectures and answer the questions. Lecture 1 http://econlog.econlib.org/archives/2008/11/lectures_in_mac.html 1.1 Why do you think macroeconomic realities must be reconciled with microeconomic analysis? (This is not a rhetorical question, but it will be hard for you to answer. There is no “wrong” answer you could give. Just think about it for a few minutes.) Lecture 2 http://econlog.econlib.org/archives/2008/11/lectures_in_mac_1.html 2.1 Consider this article after you have read Hayek. How do prices and wages perform the function of “central planning?” 2.2 Kling makes that claim that, because most workers do not do manual labor anymore, the economy is different that it was in 1930. Assuming he is correct, do you think central planning would be harder today or easier? Why? Lecture 3 http://econlog.econlib.org/archives/2008/11/lectures_on_mac.html 3.1 Give a one sentence definition of structural unemployment, of frictional unemployment and of cyclical unemployment. Lecture 4 http://econlog.econlib.org/archives/2008/11/lectures_on_mac_1.html 4.1 So, why does the economy adjust employment rather than wages? Lecture 5 http://econlog.econlib.org/archives/2008/11/lectures_on_mac_2.html 5.1 Kling gives 5 reasons the DotCom recession was worse than the previous two recessions (at least in duration). Which reason do you think is the most compelling? Lecture 6 http://econlog.econlib.org/archives/2008/11/lectures_on_mac_3.html 6.1 Why are Keynesian remedies (blunt fiscal and monetary policy measures) less appropriate in a post industrial economy, according to Kling? Lecture 7 http://econlog.econlib.org/archives/2008/11/lectures_on_mac_4.html 7.1 Why is it so hard to separate finance and government, according to Kling? Lecture 8 http://econlog.econlib.org/archives/2008/11/lectures_on_mac_5.html 8.1 Why is American Express Travelers Checks so interesting? Do credit cards work in a similar way? (I really don’t know the answer to this one. I just know that credit cards have made travelers checks obsolete.) Lecture 9. http://econlog.econlib.org/archives/2008/12/lectures_on_mac_6.html 9.1 According to this article, why do we have banks (financial sector or financial intermediation?) Lecture 10 http://econlog.econlib.org/archives/2008/12/lectures_on_mac_7.html 10.1 Why are banks better than barter, according to this leture? 10.2 Politics tends to favor bailouts of failed firms. Why is this exactly wrong?

Assignment One Suggested Due Date: July 17th In this assignment you will read three articles You will answer questions about Hayek, Lucas, and Mankiw et. al. which consider just those particular articles. Then at the end of the assignment there is a cluster of questions that deal with both Lucas and Mankiw et al where you will have an opportunity to compare and contrast those two articles. When you have completed the assignment, place it in the appropriate drop box in WTClass. Hayek: The Use of Knowledge in Society http://www.econlib.org/library/Essays/hykKnw1.html Adapted from Michael K. Salemi “The Use of Knowledge in Society” F. A. Hayek Discussion Questions 1.1. “The peculiar character of the problem of a rational economic order is determined precisely by the fact that the knowledge of the circumstances of which we must make use never exists in concentrated or integrated form, but solely as the dispersed bits of incomplete and frequently contradictory knowledge which all the separate individuals possess (H.3)” a. What does Hayek mean by a “rational economic order”? b. What does Hayek mean by “dispersed bits of incomplete and frequently contradictory knowledge”? c. Why is Hayek critical of the common assumptions in economic analysis that buyers, sellers, producers and the economist all know every relevant thing about the economy? d. What, in summary, does Hayek mean by the quoted statement? 1.2. What, according to Hayek, is the information needed to operate effectively in a complex market economy? a. What does Hayek mean by “planning”? b. What is the minimum information needed by economic planners and individuals? c. Does the minimum differ for planners and for individuals? How? Why? d. What happens when some individuals possess more information than other individuals? e. What does Hayek mean when he says (H.16) “…the sort of knowledge with which I have been concerned is knowledge of the kind which by its nature cannot enter into statistics and therefore cannot be conveyed to any central authority in statistical form”? f. Why, according to Hayek, can the “information problem” be solved by “the price system”? 1.3. Why, according to Hayek, is the true function of the price system the communication of information? a. Why does Hayek use the term ‘marvel’ in his discussion of the economy of knowledge? b. What does Hayek mean when he says (H.26) “…man has been able to develop that division of labor on which our civilization is based because he happened to stumble upon a method which made it possible”? Read Robert Lucas’ “Some Macroeconomics for the 21st Century” in the Journal of Economic Perspectives. (Skip the appendix.) All four of these links go to the same article. Some of the links might not be accessible to you, but I think that at least one of them should work for all of you. https://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/jep.14.1.159 http://www.jstor.org/stable/2647059 http://www.econ.psu.edu/~aur10/Econ%20570%20Fall%202009/Lucas%20JEP%202000.pdf http://faculty.georgetown.edu/mh5/class/econ102/readings/Macro_21st_Century.pdf 1. According to Lucas, why has the world’s economy grown so much since 1960? 2. According to Lucas, why do some nations grow faster than others? 3. According to Lucas, why will growth and inequality decrease in the next 100 years? 4. Is Lucas’ model in this paper “economics?” Read Greg Mankiw, Romer and Wiel’s article in The Quarterly Journal of Economics. http://www.econ.nyu.edu/user/debraj/Courses/Readings/MankiwRomerWeil.pdf 1. Many economists think the Solow Growth Model is of limited use. (One of my professors at OU stated that it took economists 50 years to figure out that their growth model has nothing to do with growth.) But does the Solow model give “…the right answer to the questions it is designed to address?” 2. Why is human capital important when testing the Solow model against the data? 3. Explain how the authors conclude that the incomes of the world’s nations are converging? Now that you’ve answered questions about Lucas and Mankiw et al separately, consider this question: Both of these papers develop the notion that the economies of the world’s nations will tend to “converge” over time. Compare and contrast the way(s) in which the papers advance the idea of convergence. Assignment Two Due Date July 24th This assignment is very straight forward. You’ll read two papers and answer questions about each of them. Read Krugman’s paper on unemployment http://www.kc.frb.org/PUBLICAT/ECONREV/EconRevArchive/1994/4Q94KRUG.pdf 1. What is the difference between structural and cyclical unemployment? In this context, what is the difference between Europe and the US? What is the evidence that Krugman uses to back his opinion? 2. What is the natural rate of unemployment? Why is it higher/rising in Europe? Again, what is the evidence? 3. What is the relationship between the rising unemployment in Europe and the rise in inequality in the US. (What does Krugman mean by inequality?) 4. What is NOT to blame for either the rise in unemployment or inequality? 5. What policies, if any, can be put into place to combat rising inequality/unemployment? 6. Are you convinced by Krugman’s argument which rules out globalization as the likely cause for high European unemployment and high US wage inequality? 7. Consider Table 2 in Krugman. Why does Krugman include Table 2 in his paper? In other words, what point is strengthened by the data in Table 2 and why is it crucial to Krugman’s larger thesis? NOW, recreate the data for Table 2 for either the UK or US for the latest year possible. Has anything changed as a result of the Great Recession? Read Thomas Sargent’s paper about the credibility of “Reaganonomics.” http://minneapolisfed.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/ref/collection/p15334coll1/id/366 http://minneapolisfed.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15334coll1/id/366/rec/1 You might like this: http://www.ispot.tv/ad/7Lj9/ally-bank-predictions-featuring-thomas-sargent 1. What is a dynamic game? 2. Why should we think of monetary and fiscal policy as dynamic game? Who are the players and what are the strategies? 3. When are government budgets inflationary? (Again, think in terms of a game.) 4. What are the consequences if the monetary authority does not coordinate with fiscal policy agents? 5. Has Sargent done of good job characterizing the interplay between policymakers in the government, the central bank, and the public? 6. What is the connection between policy coordination and credibility? 7. Why, according to Sargent, were Reagan’s fiscal and monetary policy regimes “incredible?” Explain carefully. Assignment Three Due Date July 31 Read Taylor, Miskin, Obstfeld and Rogoff. Answer the questions for each article, then answer the final cluster that requires you to consider Miskin, Obstfeld and Rogoff. Suggested due date: January 2nd. Read John Taylor’s article about monetary transmission mechanisms. http://web.econ.unito.it/bagliano/ecmon_readings/taylor_jep95.pdf Also, to understand traditional monetary policy, listen to this: http://www.econtalk.org/archives/2008/08/john_taylor_on.html These questions refer to the article, not the podcast. 1. How does monetary policy (or changes in monetary policy) affect output and inflation? In other words, what is the monetary policy transmission mechanism? 2. What is the importance of financial market prices in Taylor’s view? 3. What is the importance of rational expectations and rigidities in the prices of labor and goods? 4. What is a reaction function? Why is a reaction function important? 5. What is an “optimal monetary policy rule?” 6. Has the monetary transmission mechanism changed? How? 7. What are the criticisms of Taylor’s views? How does he respond? What do you think? Read Mishkin’s article about global financial instability. http://pubs.aeaweb.org/doi/pdfplus/10.1257/jep.13.4.3 1. What is a financial crisis? 2. How did adverse selection and moral hazard contribute to the financial crisis in Mexico and East Asia in the 1990s? What are adverse selection and moral hazard? 3. Did irresponsible monetary and fiscal policy contribute to the crisis in the 90s? Why or why not? 4. How is it possible for the IMF to help in a crisis when a domestic central bank might not be able to help. 5. What should the US learn (or have learned??) from the crisis in the 90s? Read Rogoff’s article about global financial instability. http://pubs.aeaweb.org/doi/pdfplus/10.1257/jep.13.4.21 http://pubs.aeaweb.org/doi/pdfplus/10.1257/jep.13.4.21 Answer the questions and place the answers in the appropriate drop box in WTClass. 1. According to Rogoff, is the status quo in international lending viable or not? Explain. 2. Can the IMF handle international financial crises? Why or why not? 3. Rogoff gives six solutions to save the global financial system (deep pockets lender of last resort, an international financial crisis manager, an international bankruptcy court, an international regulator, international deposit insurance corporation, and a world monetary authority.) What is wrong with all of these? 4. Can developing economies cope with speculative capital flows without help? Explain. 5. What will be (should be) the role that equity financing play in developing country projects? Read Obstfeld on Global Capital Markets: http://www.nber.org/papers/w6559.pdf 1. Look at table 1 and figure 1. How does Obstfeld use the data in that table to suggest that 1) markets became less open then more open in the 20th century. 2. What is the “openness trilemma?” What are the economic and/or policy trade-offs with having a global, open and integrated financial system? 3. How does economic integration impact a nation’s ability to tax capital? Can you think of some high profile cases in the news lately that illustrate this fact? (Hint: you should be able to.) 4. What is the international diversification puzzle? What market failures have arisen (if any) have arisen due to more integration and openness? Comparing Obstfeld, Miskin, and Rogoff 1. Would the authors’ advice about policies to reduce the costs of financial integration be the same? Why or why not? 2. Would the authors’ agree that we need an international regulatory body to stave off international financial crises? Why or why not? 3. What is your opinion? Is it good to have a global financial market? Why or why not? Assignment Four Due Date August 7 Straight forward assignment: Read and answer the questions. Read Arnold Kling’s history of the policies that created the great recession http://mercatus.org/publication/not-what-they-had-mind-history-policies-produced-financial-crisis-2008 1. Using only the executive summary, what does Kling think caused the Financial Crisis of 2008? (Use only one sentence.) 2. One page 5, what is “the fact?” and what does this “fact” mean to you? 3. Briefly summarize the four components of the Financial Crisis? 4. On page 10, Kling states, “These property bubbles (in the U.K. and Spain) cannot be blamed on U.S. policy.” How confident are you on that point? Is Kling wrong? 5. Kling’s matrix of causes, gives almost all weight to what two factors? What three factors are almost completely not responsible? 6. Many have blamed designer financial (my term) like CDS and CDO and the shadow banking system for the collapse. How do these fit into Kling’s narrative? 7. Outline the progression of policy that caused/responded to economic conditions in the 30s, 70s and 80s and 00s. 8. What role did the mortgage interest deduction have on housing market? 9. What institution invented and allowed the expansion of mortgage-backed securities? 10. What is regulatory arbitrage? 11. Why did the Basel agreement create an advantage for mortgage securitization? 12. Did the Federal Reserve (and presumably other regulatory agencies know and even encourage regulatory capital arbitrage? What author does Kling cite to establish this? 13. What did the 2002 modification of the Basel Rules do to capital requirements? (See figure 4) 14. Summarize the Shadow Regulatory Committee’s statement 160. 15. Did non market institutions, such as the IMF and Bernanke, think, in 2006, that financial innovation had make the banking sector more or less fragile? 16. What is time inconsistency? (You can look this up elsewhere.) 17. How might “barriers to entry” by related to “safety and soundness?” 18. A Curmudgeon is an old man who is easily annoyed and angered. He also complains a lot. (I had to look it up.) I think I’ll change my xbox gamertag to this word, but I’ll bet it is taken. 19. How did credit scoring and credit default swaps enlarge the mortgage securities market? 20. Why, up until 2007, did we think that monetary expansion was all that was needed to mitigate the impact of financial crises? 21. Suppose that financial markets are inherently unstable. What does this mean are two goals of regulation and regulators? 22. Why are type two errors so problematic? (Two reasons.) 23. How could we make the banking sector easy to fix? Assignment Five Due August 13 Read the linked lectures and answer the questions. Lecture 1 http://econlog.econlib.org/archives/2008/11/lectures_in_mac.html 1.1 Why do you think macroeconomic realities must be reconciled with microeconomic analysis? (This is not a rhetorical question, but it will be hard for you to answer. There is no “wrong” answer you could give. Just think about it for a few minutes.) Lecture 2 http://econlog.econlib.org/archives/2008/11/lectures_in_mac_1.html 2.1 Consider this article after you have read Hayek. How do prices and wages perform the function of “central planning?” 2.2 Kling makes that claim that, because most workers do not do manual labor anymore, the economy is different that it was in 1930. Assuming he is correct, do you think central planning would be harder today or easier? Why? Lecture 3 http://econlog.econlib.org/archives/2008/11/lectures_on_mac.html 3.1 Give a one sentence definition of structural unemployment, of frictional unemployment and of cyclical unemployment. Lecture 4 http://econlog.econlib.org/archives/2008/11/lectures_on_mac_1.html 4.1 So, why does the economy adjust employment rather than wages? Lecture 5 http://econlog.econlib.org/archives/2008/11/lectures_on_mac_2.html 5.1 Kling gives 5 reasons the DotCom recession was worse than the previous two recessions (at least in duration). Which reason do you think is the most compelling? Lecture 6 http://econlog.econlib.org/archives/2008/11/lectures_on_mac_3.html 6.1 Why are Keynesian remedies (blunt fiscal and monetary policy measures) less appropriate in a post industrial economy, according to Kling? Lecture 7 http://econlog.econlib.org/archives/2008/11/lectures_on_mac_4.html 7.1 Why is it so hard to separate finance and government, according to Kling? Lecture 8 http://econlog.econlib.org/archives/2008/11/lectures_on_mac_5.html 8.1 Why is American Express Travelers Checks so interesting? Do credit cards work in a similar way? (I really don’t know the answer to this one. I just know that credit cards have made travelers checks obsolete.) Lecture 9. http://econlog.econlib.org/archives/2008/12/lectures_on_mac_6.html 9.1 According to this article, why do we have banks (financial sector or financial intermediation?) Lecture 10 http://econlog.econlib.org/archives/2008/12/lectures_on_mac_7.html 10.1 Why are banks better than barter, according to this leture? 10.2 Politics tends to favor bailouts of failed firms. Why is this exactly wrong?

info@checkyourstudy.com