Consider an ideal transformer with 100 turns of wire in the primary and 500 turns of wire in the secondary. If the primary coil is fed with 110 V, rms, what is the power consumed by the device connected to the secondary that behaves as a resistor.

Consider an ideal transformer with 100 turns of wire in the primary and 500 turns of wire in the secondary. If the primary coil is fed with 110 V, rms, what is the power consumed by the device connected to the secondary that behaves as a resistor.

info@checkyourstudy.com Consider an ideal transformer with 100 turns of wire … Read More...
Part I. (20%) Multiple Choice Questions (only one answer) 1. What is the SS7 A-link? a. Signaling Link between SSP and STP b. Signaling Link between STP and STP c. Signaling Link between SCP and SCP d. Signaling Link between SSP and SSP 2. How is a TDM trunk identified on the SS7 network? It is identified by _____. a. IP Address b. ISDN B channel c. UDP port number d. Circuit Identificaiton Code (CIC) 3. What is the layer-3 protocol for ISUP? a. IP b. Q.931 c. MTP3 d. TCAP 4. Which of the following signaling is required to support Local Number Portability (LNP)? a. SIP b. Q.931 c. SS7 d. MGCP 5. Which of the following signlaing is NOT supported on the local telephone switch? a. ISDN/Q.931 b. SIP c. SS7 d. Station Signaling 6. Which of the following protocol is used by Advanced Intelligent Network (AIN) for remote database query? One of the AIN features is 1-800/1-900 calls. a. TCAP b. ISUP c. MGCP d. SIP 7. Which of the following is an NNI signaling? a. ISDN/Q.931 b. SIP c. MGCP d. SS7 8. Which of the following message is used by Access Media Gateway (MG) to inform Media Gateway Controller (MGC) that a phone is off-hook? a. NTFY b. RQNT c. CRCX d. MDCX 9. Which of the following device supports codec (such as G.711)? a. Media Gateway Contoller b. Media Gateway (Access Gateway) c. Analog Phone d. Signaling Transfer Point (STP) 10. In MGCP, a connection is _______________ ? a. The same as a TCP connection b. The same as a phone call. c. An end-point and its associated RTP session. d. A TDM channel identified by CIC Part II Questions (10%). 1. Provide two reasons for separating Media Gateway Controller (MGC) and Media Gateway. Media gateways are often controlled by a separate Media Gateway Controller which provides the call control and signaling functionality. 2. Identify the signaling between the network devices. (enter N/A if not applicable) 1 Media Gateway Controller Media Gateway Controller 2 Media Gateway Controller Media Gateway 3 Media Gateway Controller Class-5 (local) Switch 4 Media Gateway Controller SIP Proxy 5 Media Gateway Media Gateway Part III (20%) Call Flow Diagram and protocol stacks Media Gateway Controller (MGC) also has the function of SS7 Signaling Gateway. 1. Show the call flow diagram from Phone-22 (SIP) to Phone-33 (SIP). 2. Show the call flow diagram from Phone-41 (analog) to Phone-42(analog) over the VoIP Carrier Network. Note: each signaling message is an arrow with its own label. Do not use one arrow and one label to represent multiple messages.

Part I. (20%) Multiple Choice Questions (only one answer) 1. What is the SS7 A-link? a. Signaling Link between SSP and STP b. Signaling Link between STP and STP c. Signaling Link between SCP and SCP d. Signaling Link between SSP and SSP 2. How is a TDM trunk identified on the SS7 network? It is identified by _____. a. IP Address b. ISDN B channel c. UDP port number d. Circuit Identificaiton Code (CIC) 3. What is the layer-3 protocol for ISUP? a. IP b. Q.931 c. MTP3 d. TCAP 4. Which of the following signaling is required to support Local Number Portability (LNP)? a. SIP b. Q.931 c. SS7 d. MGCP 5. Which of the following signlaing is NOT supported on the local telephone switch? a. ISDN/Q.931 b. SIP c. SS7 d. Station Signaling 6. Which of the following protocol is used by Advanced Intelligent Network (AIN) for remote database query? One of the AIN features is 1-800/1-900 calls. a. TCAP b. ISUP c. MGCP d. SIP 7. Which of the following is an NNI signaling? a. ISDN/Q.931 b. SIP c. MGCP d. SS7 8. Which of the following message is used by Access Media Gateway (MG) to inform Media Gateway Controller (MGC) that a phone is off-hook? a. NTFY b. RQNT c. CRCX d. MDCX 9. Which of the following device supports codec (such as G.711)? a. Media Gateway Contoller b. Media Gateway (Access Gateway) c. Analog Phone d. Signaling Transfer Point (STP) 10. In MGCP, a connection is _______________ ? a. The same as a TCP connection b. The same as a phone call. c. An end-point and its associated RTP session. d. A TDM channel identified by CIC Part II Questions (10%). 1. Provide two reasons for separating Media Gateway Controller (MGC) and Media Gateway. Media gateways are often controlled by a separate Media Gateway Controller which provides the call control and signaling functionality. 2. Identify the signaling between the network devices. (enter N/A if not applicable) 1 Media Gateway Controller Media Gateway Controller 2 Media Gateway Controller Media Gateway 3 Media Gateway Controller Class-5 (local) Switch 4 Media Gateway Controller SIP Proxy 5 Media Gateway Media Gateway Part III (20%) Call Flow Diagram and protocol stacks Media Gateway Controller (MGC) also has the function of SS7 Signaling Gateway. 1. Show the call flow diagram from Phone-22 (SIP) to Phone-33 (SIP). 2. Show the call flow diagram from Phone-41 (analog) to Phone-42(analog) over the VoIP Carrier Network. Note: each signaling message is an arrow with its own label. Do not use one arrow and one label to represent multiple messages.

      Part I. Multiple choice (20 points)   … Read More...
Operational amplifiers are often used to amplify a sensor output. This problem will walk you through the design of a simple temperature measuring device based on a platinum wire sensor. Goal: Build a circuit that will provide a calibrated output between .32V and 2.12V for temperatures sensed between 0°C and 100°C. (The final circuit can be seen at the end of this homework but we will work out each stage in turn.) The platinum wire sensor has a resistance of 100Ω at 0°C and 138.5Ω at 100°C, or a change of 0.385Ω/°C. (The arrow through the resistor in the circuit indicates it is a variable resistor.) A 0.5mA source is used to excite the platinum wire resistor to obtain a voltage. The first stage of our circuit will be to buffer the output of the sensor so we do not load the sensor circuit by drawing off any of the .5mA current to the op amp. A. (10 points) What is V1 when the temperature is 0°C, 1°C, 20°C and 100°C? (Use at least four decimal points.) B. (10 points)The output voltage of the resistor changes by I*ΔRT where I =0.5mA and ΔRT = 0.385Ω/°C. It is too small, so we need amplify this so the V2 output in the second stage of this circuit will be 5mV per degree using a non-inverting amplifier. So we want 5mV = (I*ΔRT * gain) per degree centigrade. What is the required gain for this circuit? Choose values of R1 and R2 between 1k and 100kΩ to achieve this. Choose Rin to be 1K-10kΩ. C. (10 points) What is V2 for a temperature of 0°C and for 1°C. What is the difference between the two voltages? (Hint: The difference should be exactly 5mV! The resistance of the platinum wire will be 100.385Ω @ 1°C.) D. (10 extra credit points) We would like for the output voltage, V2, to be 0V when the temperature is 0°C. This can be done by adding a third stage with an offset voltage in the circuit below. Find Voffset so that VC = 0V when the temperature is 0°C. Let R3 =R4 = R5 and pick appropriate values of the resistors between 1k and 10kΩ. (Hint: V2= the voltage when the temperature is 0°C you found in part C. Find Voffset so that Vc =0V. Superposition may a good technique to use here. You can analyze the circuit when V2=0 and the offset is activated and then you can analyze the circuit when V2 = the value from part C and the offset voltage is zero.) What is Voffset? What values did you chose for the resistors? What is VC when the temperature is is 0°C, 1°C, 20°C and 100°C? E. The voltage VC should now be 0V when the temperature is 0°C and increase by 10mV for every degree centigrade. We need to multiply this by 1.8, the factor to convert a degree Centigrade to a degree Fahrenheit. The output of this stage, V4, should range from 0V to 1.80V and then we will add an offset to change the VF output range to 0.32V to 2.12V in the last stage. The following circuit can be used. Note that this circuit uses inverting amplifiers instead of non-inverting amplifiers. (10 extra credit points) Find the correct resistor values for R7, R8 so that V4 will range between 0V to -1.80V when the temperature is sensed between 0°C and 100°C. (10 extra credit points) Find Voffset2 and then determine VF at 0°C, 1°C, 20°C and 100°C so the VF will range from 0.32V to 2.12V. (Hint: When VC = 0V at 0°C, the V4 output of this stage will also be 0V. Determine the offset voltage so VF = 0.32V. Choose R9 = R10 = R11 = 1kΩ, so at 0°C, VF = 0.32V = VR10 with the current going from the output back through R10 to zero volts, then down through R11 and the Voffset2 source. Since VR10=VR11=0.32V, determine Voffset2. When the temperature is 100°C the output should be 2.12V.)

Operational amplifiers are often used to amplify a sensor output. This problem will walk you through the design of a simple temperature measuring device based on a platinum wire sensor. Goal: Build a circuit that will provide a calibrated output between .32V and 2.12V for temperatures sensed between 0°C and 100°C. (The final circuit can be seen at the end of this homework but we will work out each stage in turn.) The platinum wire sensor has a resistance of 100Ω at 0°C and 138.5Ω at 100°C, or a change of 0.385Ω/°C. (The arrow through the resistor in the circuit indicates it is a variable resistor.) A 0.5mA source is used to excite the platinum wire resistor to obtain a voltage. The first stage of our circuit will be to buffer the output of the sensor so we do not load the sensor circuit by drawing off any of the .5mA current to the op amp. A. (10 points) What is V1 when the temperature is 0°C, 1°C, 20°C and 100°C? (Use at least four decimal points.) B. (10 points)The output voltage of the resistor changes by I*ΔRT where I =0.5mA and ΔRT = 0.385Ω/°C. It is too small, so we need amplify this so the V2 output in the second stage of this circuit will be 5mV per degree using a non-inverting amplifier. So we want 5mV = (I*ΔRT * gain) per degree centigrade. What is the required gain for this circuit? Choose values of R1 and R2 between 1k and 100kΩ to achieve this. Choose Rin to be 1K-10kΩ. C. (10 points) What is V2 for a temperature of 0°C and for 1°C. What is the difference between the two voltages? (Hint: The difference should be exactly 5mV! The resistance of the platinum wire will be 100.385Ω @ 1°C.) D. (10 extra credit points) We would like for the output voltage, V2, to be 0V when the temperature is 0°C. This can be done by adding a third stage with an offset voltage in the circuit below. Find Voffset so that VC = 0V when the temperature is 0°C. Let R3 =R4 = R5 and pick appropriate values of the resistors between 1k and 10kΩ. (Hint: V2= the voltage when the temperature is 0°C you found in part C. Find Voffset so that Vc =0V. Superposition may a good technique to use here. You can analyze the circuit when V2=0 and the offset is activated and then you can analyze the circuit when V2 = the value from part C and the offset voltage is zero.) What is Voffset? What values did you chose for the resistors? What is VC when the temperature is is 0°C, 1°C, 20°C and 100°C? E. The voltage VC should now be 0V when the temperature is 0°C and increase by 10mV for every degree centigrade. We need to multiply this by 1.8, the factor to convert a degree Centigrade to a degree Fahrenheit. The output of this stage, V4, should range from 0V to 1.80V and then we will add an offset to change the VF output range to 0.32V to 2.12V in the last stage. The following circuit can be used. Note that this circuit uses inverting amplifiers instead of non-inverting amplifiers. (10 extra credit points) Find the correct resistor values for R7, R8 so that V4 will range between 0V to -1.80V when the temperature is sensed between 0°C and 100°C. (10 extra credit points) Find Voffset2 and then determine VF at 0°C, 1°C, 20°C and 100°C so the VF will range from 0.32V to 2.12V. (Hint: When VC = 0V at 0°C, the V4 output of this stage will also be 0V. Determine the offset voltage so VF = 0.32V. Choose R9 = R10 = R11 = 1kΩ, so at 0°C, VF = 0.32V = VR10 with the current going from the output back through R10 to zero volts, then down through R11 and the Voffset2 source. Since VR10=VR11=0.32V, determine Voffset2. When the temperature is 100°C the output should be 2.12V.)

A) At 0 deg C —> R =100 Ohm, I … Read More...
EXPERIMENT 6 FET CHARACTERISTIC CURVES ________________________________________ Bring a diskette to save your data. ________________________________________ OBJECT: The objective of this lab is to investigate the DC characteristics and operation of a field effect transistor (FET). The FET recommended to be used in this lab is 2N5486 n-channel FET. • Gathering data for the DC characteristics ________________________________________ APPARATUS: Dual DC Power Supply, Voltmeter, and 1k resistors, 2N5486 N-Channel FET. ________________________________________ THEORY: A JFET (Junction Field Effect Transistor) is a three terminal device (drain, source, and gate) similar to the BJT. The difference between them is that the JFET is a voltage controlled constant current device, whereas BJT is a current controlled current source device. Whereas for BJT the relationship between an output parameter, iC, and an input parameter, iB, is given by a constant , the relationship in JFET between an output parameter, iD, and an input parameter, vGS, is more complex. PROCEDURE: Measuring ID versus VDS (Output Characteristics) 1. Build the circuit shown below. 2. Obtain the output characteristics i.e. ID versus VDS. a. Set VGS = 0. Vary the voltage across drain (VDS) from 0 to 8 V with steps of 1 V and measure the corresponding drain current (ID). b. Repeat the procedure for different values of VGS. (0V, -0.5V, -1V, -1.5V, -2V, -2.5V, -3.0V, -3.5V, -4.0V). 3. Record the values in Table 1 and plot the graph ID vs. VGS. VGS 0 -0.5 -1.0 -1.5` -2.0 -2.5 -3.0 -3.5 -4.0 VDS ID ID ID ID ID ID ID ID ID 0 0 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0mA 1 0 0.7 mA 0.7 mA 0.66 mA 0.6 mA 0.6 mA 0.5 0.1mA 0mA 2 0 1.5 mA 1.3 mA 1.3mA 1.2 mA 1.1 mA 0.7 0.1mA 0mA 3 0 2.1 mA 2.6 mA 1.9 mA 1.8 mA 1.5 mA 0.8 mA 0.1mA 0mA 4 0 2.7 mA 2.6 mA 2.5 mA 2.4 mA 1.7 mA 0.8 mA 0.1mA 0mA 5 0 3.4 mA 3.3 mA 3.1 mA 2.8 mA 1.8 mA 0.9 mA 0.1mA 0mA 6 0 4.1 mA 3.4 mA 3.7 mA 3.2 mA 1.9 mA 0.9 mA 0.1mA 0mA 7 0 4.7 mA 4.5 mA 4.2 mA 3.4 mA 1.9 mA 0.9 mA 0.1mA 0mA 8 0 5.3 mA 5.1 mA 6.6 mA 3.5 mA 2.0 mA 0.9 mA 0.1mA 0mA Table 1. vds=0:8; id=[0 6.2e-3 9.7e-3 11.3e-3 11.9e-3 12.2e-3 12.3e-3 12.3e-3 12.32e-3]; plot(vds,id);grid on;hold on id2=[0 5.23e-3 8.05e-3 9.15e-3 9.57e-3 9.77e-3 9.88e-3 9.9e-3 9.92e-3]; plot(vds,id2);grid on;hold on id3=[0 4.29e-3 6.41e-3 7.17e-3 7.46e-3 7.60e-3 7.67e-3 7.73e-3 7.76e-3]; plot(vds,id3);grid on;hold on ________________________________________ Measuring ID versus VGS (Transconductance Characteristics) 1. For the same circuit, obtain the transconductance characteristics. i.e. ID versus VGS. a. Set a particular value of voltage for VDS, i.e. 5V. Start with a gate voltage VGS of 0 V, and measure the corresponding drain current (ID). b. Then decrease VGS in steps of 0.5 V until VGS is -4V. c. At each step record the drain current. VDS = 5 V VGS ID 0 3.42 mA -0.5 3.36 mA -1.00 3.27 mA -1.50 3.12 mA -2.00 2.79 mA -2.50 1.84 mA -3.00 0.71 mA -3.50 0.11 mA -4.00 0 mA Table 2. 2. Plot the graph with ID versus VGS using Excel, MATLAB, or some other program. Discussion Questions—Make sure you answer the following questions in your discussion. Use all of the data obtained to answer the following questions: 1. Discuss the output and transconductance curves obtained in lab? Are they what you expected? 2. Are the output characteristics spaced evenly? Should they be? 3. What are the applications of a JFET?

EXPERIMENT 6 FET CHARACTERISTIC CURVES ________________________________________ Bring a diskette to save your data. ________________________________________ OBJECT: The objective of this lab is to investigate the DC characteristics and operation of a field effect transistor (FET). The FET recommended to be used in this lab is 2N5486 n-channel FET. • Gathering data for the DC characteristics ________________________________________ APPARATUS: Dual DC Power Supply, Voltmeter, and 1k resistors, 2N5486 N-Channel FET. ________________________________________ THEORY: A JFET (Junction Field Effect Transistor) is a three terminal device (drain, source, and gate) similar to the BJT. The difference between them is that the JFET is a voltage controlled constant current device, whereas BJT is a current controlled current source device. Whereas for BJT the relationship between an output parameter, iC, and an input parameter, iB, is given by a constant , the relationship in JFET between an output parameter, iD, and an input parameter, vGS, is more complex. PROCEDURE: Measuring ID versus VDS (Output Characteristics) 1. Build the circuit shown below. 2. Obtain the output characteristics i.e. ID versus VDS. a. Set VGS = 0. Vary the voltage across drain (VDS) from 0 to 8 V with steps of 1 V and measure the corresponding drain current (ID). b. Repeat the procedure for different values of VGS. (0V, -0.5V, -1V, -1.5V, -2V, -2.5V, -3.0V, -3.5V, -4.0V). 3. Record the values in Table 1 and plot the graph ID vs. VGS. VGS 0 -0.5 -1.0 -1.5` -2.0 -2.5 -3.0 -3.5 -4.0 VDS ID ID ID ID ID ID ID ID ID 0 0 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0mA 1 0 0.7 mA 0.7 mA 0.66 mA 0.6 mA 0.6 mA 0.5 0.1mA 0mA 2 0 1.5 mA 1.3 mA 1.3mA 1.2 mA 1.1 mA 0.7 0.1mA 0mA 3 0 2.1 mA 2.6 mA 1.9 mA 1.8 mA 1.5 mA 0.8 mA 0.1mA 0mA 4 0 2.7 mA 2.6 mA 2.5 mA 2.4 mA 1.7 mA 0.8 mA 0.1mA 0mA 5 0 3.4 mA 3.3 mA 3.1 mA 2.8 mA 1.8 mA 0.9 mA 0.1mA 0mA 6 0 4.1 mA 3.4 mA 3.7 mA 3.2 mA 1.9 mA 0.9 mA 0.1mA 0mA 7 0 4.7 mA 4.5 mA 4.2 mA 3.4 mA 1.9 mA 0.9 mA 0.1mA 0mA 8 0 5.3 mA 5.1 mA 6.6 mA 3.5 mA 2.0 mA 0.9 mA 0.1mA 0mA Table 1. vds=0:8; id=[0 6.2e-3 9.7e-3 11.3e-3 11.9e-3 12.2e-3 12.3e-3 12.3e-3 12.32e-3]; plot(vds,id);grid on;hold on id2=[0 5.23e-3 8.05e-3 9.15e-3 9.57e-3 9.77e-3 9.88e-3 9.9e-3 9.92e-3]; plot(vds,id2);grid on;hold on id3=[0 4.29e-3 6.41e-3 7.17e-3 7.46e-3 7.60e-3 7.67e-3 7.73e-3 7.76e-3]; plot(vds,id3);grid on;hold on ________________________________________ Measuring ID versus VGS (Transconductance Characteristics) 1. For the same circuit, obtain the transconductance characteristics. i.e. ID versus VGS. a. Set a particular value of voltage for VDS, i.e. 5V. Start with a gate voltage VGS of 0 V, and measure the corresponding drain current (ID). b. Then decrease VGS in steps of 0.5 V until VGS is -4V. c. At each step record the drain current. VDS = 5 V VGS ID 0 3.42 mA -0.5 3.36 mA -1.00 3.27 mA -1.50 3.12 mA -2.00 2.79 mA -2.50 1.84 mA -3.00 0.71 mA -3.50 0.11 mA -4.00 0 mA Table 2. 2. Plot the graph with ID versus VGS using Excel, MATLAB, or some other program. Discussion Questions—Make sure you answer the following questions in your discussion. Use all of the data obtained to answer the following questions: 1. Discuss the output and transconductance curves obtained in lab? Are they what you expected? 2. Are the output characteristics spaced evenly? Should they be? 3. What are the applications of a JFET?

No expert has answered this question yet. You can browse … Read More...
Vermont Technical College Electronic Applications ELT-2060 Lab 05: DC characteristics, input offset voltage and input bias current Reference: Operational Amplifiers with Linear Integrated Circuits Fourth edition William D. Stanley, pages 154-155 (Problems 3-21, 3-22 and Lab exercises LE 3-1 to LE 3-4) For the following exercises, make sure to record all calculations, estimations and measured results. Components: 2 741 Op Amps, 10k Ω Potentiometer, 4-10kΩ, 1kΩ , 100kΩ , 100Ω , 560kΩ , 5.6M Ω, resistors Objectives: a. Voltage offset Null Circuit and Closed-loop Differential Circuit b. Measurement of dc Input Offset Voltage c. Measurement of dc Bias and Offset Currents a. Voltage offset Null Circuit and Closed-loop Differential Circuit In this exercise, investigate the use of a null circuit to reduce the output dc offset to its minimum possible value. Refer to the “Voltage Offset Null Circuit” describe in the 741 op amp data sheet from Appendix C of your text book. Although there are no specific closed-loop configurations shown, use a closed-loop differential Amplifier shown in Figure 1. The differential nature of this type of circuit makes it particularly sensitive, therefore well suited, to illustrate the concept dc voltage offset. 1. Connect the closed-loop difference amplifier of Figure 1 with R=10k Ω and A=1. Using a 10kΩ potentiometer connect the “Voltage Offset Null Circuit” between nodes 1 and 5 as shown in the 741 data sheet. Keep in mind that a potentiometer is a three terminal device. You will need to connect the potentiometer wiper terminal to the lowest potential in the circuit -VCC. 2. Connect the two external circuit inputs (v1 and v2) to ground, measure the dc voltage. From the data sheet the expected value of offset voltage at room temperature is 2mV typical and 6mV maximum. Voltages at these levels will be hard to measure with the laboratory multimeter. 3. Adjust the potentiometer until the dc output magnitude is either zero or it’s minimum possible value. Record the minimum value of voltage attained. 5. Do not break down you difference amplifier. Next, build the non-inverting amplifier as shown in figure 2 with Ri=1k Ω and Rf =100k Ω. Attach the output of the difference amplifier to the input of the non-inverting amplifier. This will amplify your offset by 101. 6. Adjust the potentiometer until the dc output magnitude is either zero or it’s minimum possible value. Record the minimum value of voltage attained. 7. In effect we amplified the voltage offset from the difference amplifier by 101. Please describe any possible flaws in using this approach. Compare this result to what was measured in step 2. 8. Write an equation that expresses the expected output voltage Vo in terms of the two input voltages V1 and V2. 9. Apply dc input voltage for the following six combinations, compare the results to the expected values you calculate with the equation from step 8 a. V1=10V, V2=0V b. V1=0V, V2=10V c. V1=V2=10V d. V1=10mV, V2=0 e. V1=0, V2=10mV f. V1=V2=10mV b. Measurement of dc Input Offset Voltage ( Stanley Problem 3-21 page 151) A circuit and equation to measure the input offset voltage Vio is show in figure 3. With the proper selection of resistors Ri, Rf, and Rc the effects of offset due to input bias currents can be neglected. When the input terminals are both held to ground the resulting output voltage should be a direct measurement of Vio. 1. Build the circuit in Figure 3 with Ri=100 Ω and Rf=10k Ω measure and record Vo. Compare your results with the specification of input offset voltage provided in the data sheet. 2. Increase the value of Rf to 100k Ω, and measure Vo again. Did the output increase by approximately 10x the value recorded in step 1, if so explain how that validates the assumption the input bias currents are negligible. 3. Be sure to include a comparison of the measured values in steps 1 and 2. Include a discussion on how there relationship demonstrates that neglecting input bias current was a valid assumption. c. Measurement of dc Bias and Offset Currents (Stanley Problem 3-22 page 152) Consider the three circuits of figure 4 .The resistance R is chosen large so that the contribution to the output from bias currents is considerably larger than the contribution from the input offset voltages. The accompanying equations will predict the values of Ib+, Ib- and Iio. 1. Start with setting R=560k Ω and build each circuit in figure 4 one at a time. Going from one configuration to the next configuration should be quick, all that is changing is the placement of the resistors. Measure Voa, Vob and Voc for each circuit and calculate Ib+, Ib-, and Iio, compare your measurements to the values in the data sheet. 2. Increase the value of R to 5.6M Ω. Measure Voa, Vob and Voc for each circuit and calculate Ib+, Ib-, and Iio, compare your measurements to the values in the data sheet and to the results in part 1.Did the output increase by approximately 10x the value recorded in step 1, if so explain how that validates the assumption the input offset voltage effect is negligible. 3. Be sure to include a comparison of the measured values in steps 1 and 2. Include a discussion on why neglecting input offset voltage was a valid assumption. LAB write up: This lab requires a semi-formal lab report. Record all calculations, estimations, and measured results. No MultiSim will be required for this report. Please include a written English language paragraph for all lab steps that required an explanation.

Vermont Technical College Electronic Applications ELT-2060 Lab 05: DC characteristics, input offset voltage and input bias current Reference: Operational Amplifiers with Linear Integrated Circuits Fourth edition William D. Stanley, pages 154-155 (Problems 3-21, 3-22 and Lab exercises LE 3-1 to LE 3-4) For the following exercises, make sure to record all calculations, estimations and measured results. Components: 2 741 Op Amps, 10k Ω Potentiometer, 4-10kΩ, 1kΩ , 100kΩ , 100Ω , 560kΩ , 5.6M Ω, resistors Objectives: a. Voltage offset Null Circuit and Closed-loop Differential Circuit b. Measurement of dc Input Offset Voltage c. Measurement of dc Bias and Offset Currents a. Voltage offset Null Circuit and Closed-loop Differential Circuit In this exercise, investigate the use of a null circuit to reduce the output dc offset to its minimum possible value. Refer to the “Voltage Offset Null Circuit” describe in the 741 op amp data sheet from Appendix C of your text book. Although there are no specific closed-loop configurations shown, use a closed-loop differential Amplifier shown in Figure 1. The differential nature of this type of circuit makes it particularly sensitive, therefore well suited, to illustrate the concept dc voltage offset. 1. Connect the closed-loop difference amplifier of Figure 1 with R=10k Ω and A=1. Using a 10kΩ potentiometer connect the “Voltage Offset Null Circuit” between nodes 1 and 5 as shown in the 741 data sheet. Keep in mind that a potentiometer is a three terminal device. You will need to connect the potentiometer wiper terminal to the lowest potential in the circuit -VCC. 2. Connect the two external circuit inputs (v1 and v2) to ground, measure the dc voltage. From the data sheet the expected value of offset voltage at room temperature is 2mV typical and 6mV maximum. Voltages at these levels will be hard to measure with the laboratory multimeter. 3. Adjust the potentiometer until the dc output magnitude is either zero or it’s minimum possible value. Record the minimum value of voltage attained. 5. Do not break down you difference amplifier. Next, build the non-inverting amplifier as shown in figure 2 with Ri=1k Ω and Rf =100k Ω. Attach the output of the difference amplifier to the input of the non-inverting amplifier. This will amplify your offset by 101. 6. Adjust the potentiometer until the dc output magnitude is either zero or it’s minimum possible value. Record the minimum value of voltage attained. 7. In effect we amplified the voltage offset from the difference amplifier by 101. Please describe any possible flaws in using this approach. Compare this result to what was measured in step 2. 8. Write an equation that expresses the expected output voltage Vo in terms of the two input voltages V1 and V2. 9. Apply dc input voltage for the following six combinations, compare the results to the expected values you calculate with the equation from step 8 a. V1=10V, V2=0V b. V1=0V, V2=10V c. V1=V2=10V d. V1=10mV, V2=0 e. V1=0, V2=10mV f. V1=V2=10mV b. Measurement of dc Input Offset Voltage ( Stanley Problem 3-21 page 151) A circuit and equation to measure the input offset voltage Vio is show in figure 3. With the proper selection of resistors Ri, Rf, and Rc the effects of offset due to input bias currents can be neglected. When the input terminals are both held to ground the resulting output voltage should be a direct measurement of Vio. 1. Build the circuit in Figure 3 with Ri=100 Ω and Rf=10k Ω measure and record Vo. Compare your results with the specification of input offset voltage provided in the data sheet. 2. Increase the value of Rf to 100k Ω, and measure Vo again. Did the output increase by approximately 10x the value recorded in step 1, if so explain how that validates the assumption the input bias currents are negligible. 3. Be sure to include a comparison of the measured values in steps 1 and 2. Include a discussion on how there relationship demonstrates that neglecting input bias current was a valid assumption. c. Measurement of dc Bias and Offset Currents (Stanley Problem 3-22 page 152) Consider the three circuits of figure 4 .The resistance R is chosen large so that the contribution to the output from bias currents is considerably larger than the contribution from the input offset voltages. The accompanying equations will predict the values of Ib+, Ib- and Iio. 1. Start with setting R=560k Ω and build each circuit in figure 4 one at a time. Going from one configuration to the next configuration should be quick, all that is changing is the placement of the resistors. Measure Voa, Vob and Voc for each circuit and calculate Ib+, Ib-, and Iio, compare your measurements to the values in the data sheet. 2. Increase the value of R to 5.6M Ω. Measure Voa, Vob and Voc for each circuit and calculate Ib+, Ib-, and Iio, compare your measurements to the values in the data sheet and to the results in part 1.Did the output increase by approximately 10x the value recorded in step 1, if so explain how that validates the assumption the input offset voltage effect is negligible. 3. Be sure to include a comparison of the measured values in steps 1 and 2. Include a discussion on why neglecting input offset voltage was a valid assumption. LAB write up: This lab requires a semi-formal lab report. Record all calculations, estimations, and measured results. No MultiSim will be required for this report. Please include a written English language paragraph for all lab steps that required an explanation.

info@checkyourstudy.com
A factory receives power at 480 Vrms @ 60 Hz. from the electric utility company. The factory’s electrical load can be simply represented by 2 loads. LOAD1 describes the manufacturing equipment on the assembly line. LOAD2 describes the power used in office rooms. From time to time, the assembly line shuts down thereby removing LOAD1 from the grid. SWITCH1 accounts for this effect in the equivalent circuit model shown above. Note that the 2 dependent sources represent a device called a “transformer” that steps the 480 Vrms down to 120 Vrms for use in the offices. (But don’t take my word for it; circuit analysis calculations will confirm this.) Given: Receiving End Voltage (with SWITCH1 closed): RV = 480 Vrms Wiring parameters: RW = 0.005 Ω, LW = 0.52052 mH Find: a) With SWITCH1 closed, find the value of C (in Farads) so that the total LOADt at the Receiving End has unity pf. Find the magnitude of the Sending End Voltage SV , and the magnitude of the “Office” load voltage, 2V. Note that RMS480VRV= for this case. b) With SWITCH1 open, using the value of C and SV found in part a), find the new values of the magnitudes of the Receiving End Voltage RV and Office Voltage 2V. Why will this be a problem for the office? How could you change the capacitor connection to avoid this problem? Hints: Note that no phase angles were given, and only magnitudes were asked for. You can choose one voltage or current to have 0 degree phase angle and then allow the calculations of any other voltages and currents be relative to that. In part b) RMS480VRV≠.

A factory receives power at 480 Vrms @ 60 Hz. from the electric utility company. The factory’s electrical load can be simply represented by 2 loads. LOAD1 describes the manufacturing equipment on the assembly line. LOAD2 describes the power used in office rooms. From time to time, the assembly line shuts down thereby removing LOAD1 from the grid. SWITCH1 accounts for this effect in the equivalent circuit model shown above. Note that the 2 dependent sources represent a device called a “transformer” that steps the 480 Vrms down to 120 Vrms for use in the offices. (But don’t take my word for it; circuit analysis calculations will confirm this.) Given: Receiving End Voltage (with SWITCH1 closed): RV = 480 Vrms Wiring parameters: RW = 0.005 Ω, LW = 0.52052 mH Find: a) With SWITCH1 closed, find the value of C (in Farads) so that the total LOADt at the Receiving End has unity pf. Find the magnitude of the Sending End Voltage SV , and the magnitude of the “Office” load voltage, 2V. Note that RMS480VRV= for this case. b) With SWITCH1 open, using the value of C and SV found in part a), find the new values of the magnitudes of the Receiving End Voltage RV and Office Voltage 2V. Why will this be a problem for the office? How could you change the capacitor connection to avoid this problem? Hints: Note that no phase angles were given, and only magnitudes were asked for. You can choose one voltage or current to have 0 degree phase angle and then allow the calculations of any other voltages and currents be relative to that. In part b) RMS480VRV≠.

A factory receives power at 480 Vrms @ 60 Hz. … Read More...
Lectorial 5: The Gravitron The Gravitron (shown in figure 1 [1]) is a carnival ride designed to simulate the experience of zero gravity. The ride consists of a 15 metre diameter circular chamber which spins around a centre shaft. The spinning motion applies a force to the occupants of the ride pinning them up against their seat. Figure 1: The Gravitron carnival ride. For this lectorial task we want to study the forces being applied to the ride’s occupants and determine the g-forces they would be experiencing. According to physics, the rules for uniform circular motion are: where: 1. If the ride has a maximum rotational speed of 24 revolutions per minute (rpm), determine the force being applied to the ride’s occupants. What gforces are the people experiencing (assume occupants are 65 kg adults)? [1] “Gravitron” used under Creative Commons licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/). Photo by: bobdole369 Newtons 2 r v F = ma = m angular speed in radians per second rotational speed in revolutions per second (or Hz) radius of the Gravitron tangential velocity of the Gravitron mass of occupant = = = = = w f r v m -1 v = wr ms w = 2pf rad/sec Typically the Gravitron ride takes approximately 20 seconds to reach its maximum rotational speed of 24 rpms and the whole ride lasts for around 80 seconds. This means the ride’s occupants are exposed to non-uniform circular motion meaning there is changing linear velocity at certain parts of the ride. For non-uniform circular motion the following formulae are useful: where: A GPS tracking device was attached to a person in the Gravitron and data was obtained about their x,y displacement vs. time over the 80 second duration of the ride. The data was saved in a .csv file called ‘gravitron.csv.’ This file contains three columns: time, x-displacement and y-displacement, e.g.: Time, sec x-displacement y-displacement 0.00 0.10 0.20 … 2. Download this .csv file from Blackboard. Find the g-forces being applied to the ride’s occupants for the whole 80 second duration of the ride. Again assume the occupants are 65 kg adults. Think about how you could effectively present these results. -2 2 ms r v -1 a = 2 2 ms     +     = dt dy dt dx v centripetal acceleration time in seconds displacement in y direction displacement in x direction = = = = a t y x

Lectorial 5: The Gravitron The Gravitron (shown in figure 1 [1]) is a carnival ride designed to simulate the experience of zero gravity. The ride consists of a 15 metre diameter circular chamber which spins around a centre shaft. The spinning motion applies a force to the occupants of the ride pinning them up against their seat. Figure 1: The Gravitron carnival ride. For this lectorial task we want to study the forces being applied to the ride’s occupants and determine the g-forces they would be experiencing. According to physics, the rules for uniform circular motion are: where: 1. If the ride has a maximum rotational speed of 24 revolutions per minute (rpm), determine the force being applied to the ride’s occupants. What gforces are the people experiencing (assume occupants are 65 kg adults)? [1] “Gravitron” used under Creative Commons licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/). Photo by: bobdole369 Newtons 2 r v F = ma = m angular speed in radians per second rotational speed in revolutions per second (or Hz) radius of the Gravitron tangential velocity of the Gravitron mass of occupant = = = = = w f r v m -1 v = wr ms w = 2pf rad/sec Typically the Gravitron ride takes approximately 20 seconds to reach its maximum rotational speed of 24 rpms and the whole ride lasts for around 80 seconds. This means the ride’s occupants are exposed to non-uniform circular motion meaning there is changing linear velocity at certain parts of the ride. For non-uniform circular motion the following formulae are useful: where: A GPS tracking device was attached to a person in the Gravitron and data was obtained about their x,y displacement vs. time over the 80 second duration of the ride. The data was saved in a .csv file called ‘gravitron.csv.’ This file contains three columns: time, x-displacement and y-displacement, e.g.: Time, sec x-displacement y-displacement 0.00 0.10 0.20 … 2. Download this .csv file from Blackboard. Find the g-forces being applied to the ride’s occupants for the whole 80 second duration of the ride. Again assume the occupants are 65 kg adults. Think about how you could effectively present these results. -2 2 ms r v -1 a = 2 2 ms     +     = dt dy dt dx v centripetal acceleration time in seconds displacement in y direction displacement in x direction = = = = a t y x

info@checkyourstudy.com Whatsapp +919911743277
31. A circuit has a continuous path through which charge can flow from a voltage source to a device that uses electrical energy. What is the name of this type of circuit? a. a short circuit c. an open circuit b. a closed circuit d. a circuit schematic

31. A circuit has a continuous path through which charge can flow from a voltage source to a device that uses electrical energy. What is the name of this type of circuit? a. a short circuit c. an open circuit b. a closed circuit d. a circuit schematic

31. ANS: B PTS: 1 DIF: II OBJ: 18-1.2   … Read More...
Tornado Eddy Investigation Abstract The objective of this lab was to write a bunch of jibberish to provide students with a formatting template. Chemical engineering, bioengineering, and environmental engineering are “process engineering” disciplines. Good abstracts contains real content, such as 560 mL/min, 35 deg, and 67 percent yield. Ideal degreed graduates are technically strong, bring broad system perspectives to problem solving, and have the professional “soft skills” to make immediate contributions in the workplace. The senior lab sequence is the “capstone” opportunity to realize this ideal by integrating technical skills and developing professional soft skills to ensure workforce preparedness. The best conclusions are objective and numerical, such as operating conditions of 45 L/min at 32 deg C with expected costs of $4.55/lb. Background Insect exchange processes are often used in bug filtration, as they are effective at removing either positive or negative insects from water. An insect exchange column is a packed or fluidized bed filled with resin beads. Water flows through the column and most of the insects from the water enter the beads, but some of them pass in between the beads, which makes the exchange of insects non-ideal. Insectac 249 resin is a cation exchange resin, as it is being used to attract cationic Ca2+ from the toxic waste stream. This means the resin is negatively charged, and needs to be regenerated with a solution that produces positively charged insects, in this case, salt water which contains Na+ insects. The resin contains acidic styrene backbones which capture the cationic insects in a reversible process. A curve of Ca2+ concentration concentration vs. time was obtained after a standard curve was made to determine how many drops from the low cost barium test kit from Aquarium Pharmaceuticals (API)1 bottle #2 would correspond to a certain concentration in solution. A standard curve works by preparing solutions with known concentrations and testing these concentrations using the kit to create a curve of number of drops from bottle #2 (obtained result) vs. concentration of Ca2+ in solution (desired response). The standard curve can then be used for every test on the prototype and in the field, to quickly and accurately obtain a concentration from the test kit. The barium concentration vs. time curve can be used to calculate the exchange capacity of the resin and, in later tests, the regeneration efficiency. The curves must be used to get the total amount of barium removed from the water, m. Seen in Equation 2, the volumetric flow rate of water, , is multiplied by the integral from tinitial to tfinal of the total concentration of Ca2+ absorbed by the resin as a function of time, C. (2) 1 http://aquariumpharm.com/Products/Product.aspx?ProductID=72 , date accessed: 11/26/10 CBEE 102: ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING AND COMPUTATIONS PROJECT DESCRIPTION 9 Josephine Hornsnogger CBEE 414, Lab Section M 1300–‐1550 April 19, 2010 Oregon State University School of CBEE A graphical trapezoid method was used to evaluate the integral and get the final solution in equivalents of Ca2+ per L, it must be noted that there are 2 equivalents per mole of barium, as the charge of the barium insect is +2. An initial exchange capacity was calculated for the virgin resin, and an adjusted exchange capacity was calculated once the resin was regenerated. The regenerated resin capacity was found by multiplying the virgin resin capacity by the regeneration efficiency, expressed in Equation 3. (3) See Appendix A for the calculation of the exchange capacities and the regeneration efficiency. Materials and Methods Rosalie and Peter Johnson of Corvallis established the Linus Pauling Chair in Chemical Engineering to honor Oregon State University’s most famous graduate. Peter Johnson, former President and owner of Tekmax, Inc., a company which revolutionized battery manufacturing equipment, is a 1955 graduate of the College of Engineering.2 The Chair, also known as the Linus Pauling Distinguished Engineer or Linus Pauling Engineer (LPE), was originally designed to focus on the traditional “capstone” senior lab sequence in the former Department of Chemical Engineering. The focus is now extended to all the process engineering disciplines. The LPE is charged with establishing strong ties with industry, ensuring current and relevant laboratory experiences, and helping upperclass students develop skills in communication, teamwork, project management, and leadership. Include details about lab procedures not sufficiently detailed in the SOP, problems you had, etc. The bulk solution prepared to create the standard curve was used in the second day of testing to obtain the exchange capacity of the insectac 249 resin. The solution was pumped through a bathroom scale into the prototype insect exchange column. 45 mL of resin was rinsed and added to the column. The bed was fluidized as the solution was pumped through the resin, but for the creation of the Ca2+ concentration vs. time curve, the solution was pumped down through the column, as illustrated in the process flow diagram seen in Figure 1. Figure 1. Process sketch of the insect exchange column used for the project. Ref: http://www.generon.co.uk/acatalog/Chromatography.html 2 Harding, P. Viscosity Measurement SOP, Spring, 2010. CBEE 102: ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING AND COMPUTATIONS PROJECT DESCRIPTION 10 Josephine Hornsnogger CBEE 414, Lab Section M 1300–‐1550 April 19, 2010 Oregon State University School of CBEE A bathroom scale calibration curve was created to ensure that the 150 mL/min, used to calculate the breakthrough time, would be delivered to the resin. The bathroom scale used was a Dwyer brand with flowrates between 0 and 300 cc/min of water. Originally, values between 120 and 180 mL/min were chosen for the calibration, with three runs for each flowrate, however the bathroom scale values were so far away from the measure values the range was extended to 100 to 200 mL/min. The regeneration experiment was performed using a method similar to that used in the water softening experiment, however instead of using a 640 ppm Ca2+ solution to fill the resin, a 6000 ppm Na+ solution was used to eject the Ca2+ from the resin. Twelve samples times were chosen and adjusted as the experiment progressed, with more than half of the samples taken at times less than 10 minutes, and the last sample taken at 45 minutes. The bulk exit solution was also tested to determine the regeneration efficiency. Results and Discussion The senior lab sequence has its roots in the former Department of Chemical Engineering. CHE 414 and 415 were taught in Winter and Spring and included 6 hours of lab time per week. The School has endeavored to incorporate the courses into the BIOE and ENVE curriculum, and this will be complete in 2008-2009. Recent development of the senior lab course sequence is shown chronologically in Fig. 1. In 2006-2007, CHE 414 and 415 were moved to Fall and Winter to enable CHE 416, an elective independent senior project course. Also that year, BIOE students took BIOE 414 in the Fall and BIOE 415 was developed and taught. No BIOE students enrolled in the optional CHE. In 2007-2008, the program transitioned in a new Linus Pauling Engineer and ENVE 414 was offered. Also, approximately 30 percent of BIOE students enrolled in the optional CHE 416. Accommodating the academic calendars of the three disciplines required a reduction in weekly student lab time from 6 to 3 hours. The expected relationship between coughing rate, y, and length of canine, x, is Bx z y Fe− (1) where F is a pre-exponential constant, B is vitamin B concentration and z is the height of an average trapeze artist. 3 The 2008-2009 brings the challenge of the dramatic enrollment increase shown in Fig. 1 and the first offering of ENVE 415. The result, shown on the right in Fig. 1, is the delivery of the senior lab sequence uniformly across the process engineering disciplines. CBEE 416 is expected to drawn approximately of the students that take the 415 courses. In 2007-2008, 414 and 415 were required for CHEs, 414 and 415 for BIOEs, and only 414 for ENVEs. CHE 416 is ostensibly an elective for all disciplines. In 2008-2009, 414 and 415 is required for all disciplines and CHE 416 will be an elective. The content of 414 is essentially 3 Fundamentals of Momentum, Heat, and Mass Transfer, Welty, J.R. et al., 4th edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. CBEE 102: ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING AND COMPUTATIONS PROJECT DESCRIPTION 11 Josephine Hornsnogger CBEE 414, Lab Section M 1300–‐1550 April 19, 2010 Oregon State University School of CBEE identical for all three disciplines, 415 has discipline-specific labs, and 416 consists of senior projects with potentially cross-discipline teams of 2 to 4 students. Tremendous labor and struggling with the lab equipment resulted in the data shown in y = –‐0.29x + 1.71 y = –‐0.25x + 2.03 y = –‐0.135x + 2.20 –‐1.5 –‐1.0 –‐0.5 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 0 2 4 6 8 10 ln y (units) x (units) ln y_1 ln y_2 ln y_3 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 Case 1 Case 2 Case 3 Slope (units) (a) (b) Figure 1. (a) Data for y and x plotted for various values of z and (b) a comparison of slopes for the 3 cases investigate. The log plot slope yields the vitamin B concentration. The slopes were shown to be significantly at the 90% confidence level, but the instructor ran out of time and did not include error bars. The slope changed as predicted by the Snirtenhoffer equation. Improvements to the lab might include advice on how to legally change my name to something less embarrassing. My whole life I have been forced to repeat and spell it. I really feel that this has affected my psychologically. This was perhaps the worst lab I have ever done in my academic career, primarily due to the fact that there was no lab time. I simply typed in this entire report and filled it with jibberish. Some might think nobody will notice, but I know that …… Harding reads every word. Acknowledgments The author acknowledges his elementary teacher for providing truly foundational instruction in addition and subtraction. Jenny Burninbalm was instrumental with guidance on use of the RT-345 dog scratching device. CBEE 102: ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING AND COMPUTATIONS PROJECT DESCRIPTION 12

Tornado Eddy Investigation Abstract The objective of this lab was to write a bunch of jibberish to provide students with a formatting template. Chemical engineering, bioengineering, and environmental engineering are “process engineering” disciplines. Good abstracts contains real content, such as 560 mL/min, 35 deg, and 67 percent yield. Ideal degreed graduates are technically strong, bring broad system perspectives to problem solving, and have the professional “soft skills” to make immediate contributions in the workplace. The senior lab sequence is the “capstone” opportunity to realize this ideal by integrating technical skills and developing professional soft skills to ensure workforce preparedness. The best conclusions are objective and numerical, such as operating conditions of 45 L/min at 32 deg C with expected costs of $4.55/lb. Background Insect exchange processes are often used in bug filtration, as they are effective at removing either positive or negative insects from water. An insect exchange column is a packed or fluidized bed filled with resin beads. Water flows through the column and most of the insects from the water enter the beads, but some of them pass in between the beads, which makes the exchange of insects non-ideal. Insectac 249 resin is a cation exchange resin, as it is being used to attract cationic Ca2+ from the toxic waste stream. This means the resin is negatively charged, and needs to be regenerated with a solution that produces positively charged insects, in this case, salt water which contains Na+ insects. The resin contains acidic styrene backbones which capture the cationic insects in a reversible process. A curve of Ca2+ concentration concentration vs. time was obtained after a standard curve was made to determine how many drops from the low cost barium test kit from Aquarium Pharmaceuticals (API)1 bottle #2 would correspond to a certain concentration in solution. A standard curve works by preparing solutions with known concentrations and testing these concentrations using the kit to create a curve of number of drops from bottle #2 (obtained result) vs. concentration of Ca2+ in solution (desired response). The standard curve can then be used for every test on the prototype and in the field, to quickly and accurately obtain a concentration from the test kit. The barium concentration vs. time curve can be used to calculate the exchange capacity of the resin and, in later tests, the regeneration efficiency. The curves must be used to get the total amount of barium removed from the water, m. Seen in Equation 2, the volumetric flow rate of water, , is multiplied by the integral from tinitial to tfinal of the total concentration of Ca2+ absorbed by the resin as a function of time, C. (2) 1 http://aquariumpharm.com/Products/Product.aspx?ProductID=72 , date accessed: 11/26/10 CBEE 102: ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING AND COMPUTATIONS PROJECT DESCRIPTION 9 Josephine Hornsnogger CBEE 414, Lab Section M 1300–‐1550 April 19, 2010 Oregon State University School of CBEE A graphical trapezoid method was used to evaluate the integral and get the final solution in equivalents of Ca2+ per L, it must be noted that there are 2 equivalents per mole of barium, as the charge of the barium insect is +2. An initial exchange capacity was calculated for the virgin resin, and an adjusted exchange capacity was calculated once the resin was regenerated. The regenerated resin capacity was found by multiplying the virgin resin capacity by the regeneration efficiency, expressed in Equation 3. (3) See Appendix A for the calculation of the exchange capacities and the regeneration efficiency. Materials and Methods Rosalie and Peter Johnson of Corvallis established the Linus Pauling Chair in Chemical Engineering to honor Oregon State University’s most famous graduate. Peter Johnson, former President and owner of Tekmax, Inc., a company which revolutionized battery manufacturing equipment, is a 1955 graduate of the College of Engineering.2 The Chair, also known as the Linus Pauling Distinguished Engineer or Linus Pauling Engineer (LPE), was originally designed to focus on the traditional “capstone” senior lab sequence in the former Department of Chemical Engineering. The focus is now extended to all the process engineering disciplines. The LPE is charged with establishing strong ties with industry, ensuring current and relevant laboratory experiences, and helping upperclass students develop skills in communication, teamwork, project management, and leadership. Include details about lab procedures not sufficiently detailed in the SOP, problems you had, etc. The bulk solution prepared to create the standard curve was used in the second day of testing to obtain the exchange capacity of the insectac 249 resin. The solution was pumped through a bathroom scale into the prototype insect exchange column. 45 mL of resin was rinsed and added to the column. The bed was fluidized as the solution was pumped through the resin, but for the creation of the Ca2+ concentration vs. time curve, the solution was pumped down through the column, as illustrated in the process flow diagram seen in Figure 1. Figure 1. Process sketch of the insect exchange column used for the project. Ref: http://www.generon.co.uk/acatalog/Chromatography.html 2 Harding, P. Viscosity Measurement SOP, Spring, 2010. CBEE 102: ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING AND COMPUTATIONS PROJECT DESCRIPTION 10 Josephine Hornsnogger CBEE 414, Lab Section M 1300–‐1550 April 19, 2010 Oregon State University School of CBEE A bathroom scale calibration curve was created to ensure that the 150 mL/min, used to calculate the breakthrough time, would be delivered to the resin. The bathroom scale used was a Dwyer brand with flowrates between 0 and 300 cc/min of water. Originally, values between 120 and 180 mL/min were chosen for the calibration, with three runs for each flowrate, however the bathroom scale values were so far away from the measure values the range was extended to 100 to 200 mL/min. The regeneration experiment was performed using a method similar to that used in the water softening experiment, however instead of using a 640 ppm Ca2+ solution to fill the resin, a 6000 ppm Na+ solution was used to eject the Ca2+ from the resin. Twelve samples times were chosen and adjusted as the experiment progressed, with more than half of the samples taken at times less than 10 minutes, and the last sample taken at 45 minutes. The bulk exit solution was also tested to determine the regeneration efficiency. Results and Discussion The senior lab sequence has its roots in the former Department of Chemical Engineering. CHE 414 and 415 were taught in Winter and Spring and included 6 hours of lab time per week. The School has endeavored to incorporate the courses into the BIOE and ENVE curriculum, and this will be complete in 2008-2009. Recent development of the senior lab course sequence is shown chronologically in Fig. 1. In 2006-2007, CHE 414 and 415 were moved to Fall and Winter to enable CHE 416, an elective independent senior project course. Also that year, BIOE students took BIOE 414 in the Fall and BIOE 415 was developed and taught. No BIOE students enrolled in the optional CHE. In 2007-2008, the program transitioned in a new Linus Pauling Engineer and ENVE 414 was offered. Also, approximately 30 percent of BIOE students enrolled in the optional CHE 416. Accommodating the academic calendars of the three disciplines required a reduction in weekly student lab time from 6 to 3 hours. The expected relationship between coughing rate, y, and length of canine, x, is Bx z y Fe− (1) where F is a pre-exponential constant, B is vitamin B concentration and z is the height of an average trapeze artist. 3 The 2008-2009 brings the challenge of the dramatic enrollment increase shown in Fig. 1 and the first offering of ENVE 415. The result, shown on the right in Fig. 1, is the delivery of the senior lab sequence uniformly across the process engineering disciplines. CBEE 416 is expected to drawn approximately of the students that take the 415 courses. In 2007-2008, 414 and 415 were required for CHEs, 414 and 415 for BIOEs, and only 414 for ENVEs. CHE 416 is ostensibly an elective for all disciplines. In 2008-2009, 414 and 415 is required for all disciplines and CHE 416 will be an elective. The content of 414 is essentially 3 Fundamentals of Momentum, Heat, and Mass Transfer, Welty, J.R. et al., 4th edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. CBEE 102: ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING AND COMPUTATIONS PROJECT DESCRIPTION 11 Josephine Hornsnogger CBEE 414, Lab Section M 1300–‐1550 April 19, 2010 Oregon State University School of CBEE identical for all three disciplines, 415 has discipline-specific labs, and 416 consists of senior projects with potentially cross-discipline teams of 2 to 4 students. Tremendous labor and struggling with the lab equipment resulted in the data shown in y = –‐0.29x + 1.71 y = –‐0.25x + 2.03 y = –‐0.135x + 2.20 –‐1.5 –‐1.0 –‐0.5 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 0 2 4 6 8 10 ln y (units) x (units) ln y_1 ln y_2 ln y_3 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 Case 1 Case 2 Case 3 Slope (units) (a) (b) Figure 1. (a) Data for y and x plotted for various values of z and (b) a comparison of slopes for the 3 cases investigate. The log plot slope yields the vitamin B concentration. The slopes were shown to be significantly at the 90% confidence level, but the instructor ran out of time and did not include error bars. The slope changed as predicted by the Snirtenhoffer equation. Improvements to the lab might include advice on how to legally change my name to something less embarrassing. My whole life I have been forced to repeat and spell it. I really feel that this has affected my psychologically. This was perhaps the worst lab I have ever done in my academic career, primarily due to the fact that there was no lab time. I simply typed in this entire report and filled it with jibberish. Some might think nobody will notice, but I know that …… Harding reads every word. Acknowledgments The author acknowledges his elementary teacher for providing truly foundational instruction in addition and subtraction. Jenny Burninbalm was instrumental with guidance on use of the RT-345 dog scratching device. CBEE 102: ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING AND COMPUTATIONS PROJECT DESCRIPTION 12

For any additional help, please contact: info@checkyourstudy.com Call / Whatsapp … Read More...