Define: 41 Things Philosophy is: 1. Ignorant 2. Selfish 3. Ironic 4. Plain 5. Misunderstood 6. A failure 7. Poor 8. Unscientific 9. Unteachable 10. Foolish 11. Abnormal 12. Divine trickery 13. Egalitarian 14. A divine calling 15. Laborious 16. Countercultural 17. Uncomfortable 18. Virtuous 19. Dangerous 20. Simplistic<br />21. Polemical 22. Therapeutic 23. “conformist” 24. Embarrassi ng 25. Invulnerable 26. Annoying 27. Pneumatic 28. Apolitic al 29. Docile/teachable 30. Messianic 31. Pious 32. Impract ical 33. Happy 34. Necessary 35. Death-defying 36. Fallible 37. Immortal 38. Confident 39. Painful 40. agnostic</br

Define: 41 Things Philosophy is: 1. Ignorant 2. Selfish 3. Ironic 4. Plain 5. Misunderstood 6. A failure 7. Poor 8. Unscientific 9. Unteachable 10. Foolish 11. Abnormal 12. Divine trickery 13. Egalitarian 14. A divine calling 15. Laborious 16. Countercultural 17. Uncomfortable 18. Virtuous 19. Dangerous 20. Simplistic
21. Polemical 22. Therapeutic 23. “conformist” 24. Embarrassi ng 25. Invulnerable 26. Annoying 27. Pneumatic 28. Apolitic al 29. Docile/teachable 30. Messianic 31. Pious 32. Impract ical 33. Happy 34. Necessary 35. Death-defying 36. Fallible 37. Immortal 38. Confident 39. Painful 40. agnostic

Ignorant- A person is said to be ignorant if he … Read More...
What do Epicurus and Lucretius have to say about death? What do you think of their arguments?

What do Epicurus and Lucretius have to say about death? What do you think of their arguments?

Epicurus One of the big worries that Epicurus attempts to … Read More...
Questions from Ishmael, Part 1 Type your answers to the following questions: 1. How do animals typically react to life in a zoo, according to Ishmael? And how, as a young gorilla, did zoo life affect him personally? 2. What does Ishmael mean by “Takers” and “Leavers?” Do these terms have any connotations to you (and if so, describe them), or do you see them as neutral? 3. Describe our culture’s origin myth, according to Ishmael. 4. After the events described in our culture’s origin myth, what was the next major event in human history that is essential in describing “how things came to be this way.” In the book it’s called “the middle of the story.” Describe this event, detailing what it meant for humankind. 5. According to Ishmael, how do Takers envision the role of humans “in the divine scheme?” What is humankind’s purpose? How has this perspective affected human/nature relationships? 6. According to Ishmael, how do most Takers envision the future of humanity? As part of your answer, describe how most Takers say we should deal with problems such as energy shortages and pollution. 7. What is Daniel Quinn trying to get you to perceive about the state of our culture’s relationship with nature? How does his story-telling approach affect your perception about environmental issues? To what extent is his approach successful, and why?

Questions from Ishmael, Part 1 Type your answers to the following questions: 1. How do animals typically react to life in a zoo, according to Ishmael? And how, as a young gorilla, did zoo life affect him personally? 2. What does Ishmael mean by “Takers” and “Leavers?” Do these terms have any connotations to you (and if so, describe them), or do you see them as neutral? 3. Describe our culture’s origin myth, according to Ishmael. 4. After the events described in our culture’s origin myth, what was the next major event in human history that is essential in describing “how things came to be this way.” In the book it’s called “the middle of the story.” Describe this event, detailing what it meant for humankind. 5. According to Ishmael, how do Takers envision the role of humans “in the divine scheme?” What is humankind’s purpose? How has this perspective affected human/nature relationships? 6. According to Ishmael, how do most Takers envision the future of humanity? As part of your answer, describe how most Takers say we should deal with problems such as energy shortages and pollution. 7. What is Daniel Quinn trying to get you to perceive about the state of our culture’s relationship with nature? How does his story-telling approach affect your perception about environmental issues? To what extent is his approach successful, and why?

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