Define: 41 Things Philosophy is: 1. Ignorant 2. Selfish 3. Ironic 4. Plain 5. Misunderstood 6. A failure 7. Poor 8. Unscientific 9. Unteachable 10. Foolish 11. Abnormal 12. Divine trickery 13. Egalitarian 14. A divine calling 15. Laborious 16. Countercultural 17. Uncomfortable 18. Virtuous 19. Dangerous 20. Simplistic<br />21. Polemical 22. Therapeutic 23. “conformist” 24. Embarrassi ng 25. Invulnerable 26. Annoying 27. Pneumatic 28. Apolitic al 29. Docile/teachable 30. Messianic 31. Pious 32. Impract ical 33. Happy 34. Necessary 35. Death-defying 36. Fallible 37. Immortal 38. Confident 39. Painful 40. agnostic</br

Define: 41 Things Philosophy is: 1. Ignorant 2. Selfish 3. Ironic 4. Plain 5. Misunderstood 6. A failure 7. Poor 8. Unscientific 9. Unteachable 10. Foolish 11. Abnormal 12. Divine trickery 13. Egalitarian 14. A divine calling 15. Laborious 16. Countercultural 17. Uncomfortable 18. Virtuous 19. Dangerous 20. Simplistic
21. Polemical 22. Therapeutic 23. “conformist” 24. Embarrassi ng 25. Invulnerable 26. Annoying 27. Pneumatic 28. Apolitic al 29. Docile/teachable 30. Messianic 31. Pious 32. Impract ical 33. Happy 34. Necessary 35. Death-defying 36. Fallible 37. Immortal 38. Confident 39. Painful 40. agnostic

Ignorant- A person is said to be ignorant if he … Read More...
Write a 2000 words paper describing recent (2013-now) discoveries of specific network effects found in (a) physical organizations, and (b) virtual organizations. For physical organizations (e.g., telephone networks, sensor networks, and surveillance cameras) describe Knock on effects of local decision makers that have already resulted in organizational corrections. For example, a firm (e.g., Radio Scheck) that sells mobile phones and accessories will experience knock on effect of sales if any of its merchandise receives a low rating. For virtual organizations (e.g., Hollywood, Adventis, United States Department of Agriculture), any change in the organization will have unintended consequences that require adjustments in the virtual organization. State technical details as well as actions taken and consequences, when applicable. You must use multiple sources and cite them all. You must use very reliable sources like IEEE. Random references will not be accepted. Use Only online sources. Make sure that the paper contents are not copied from the websites. It must be 100% plagiarism free. Make sure it is 2000 words minimum.

Write a 2000 words paper describing recent (2013-now) discoveries of specific network effects found in (a) physical organizations, and (b) virtual organizations. For physical organizations (e.g., telephone networks, sensor networks, and surveillance cameras) describe Knock on effects of local decision makers that have already resulted in organizational corrections. For example, a firm (e.g., Radio Scheck) that sells mobile phones and accessories will experience knock on effect of sales if any of its merchandise receives a low rating. For virtual organizations (e.g., Hollywood, Adventis, United States Department of Agriculture), any change in the organization will have unintended consequences that require adjustments in the virtual organization. State technical details as well as actions taken and consequences, when applicable. You must use multiple sources and cite them all. You must use very reliable sources like IEEE. Random references will not be accepted. Use Only online sources. Make sure that the paper contents are not copied from the websites. It must be 100% plagiarism free. Make sure it is 2000 words minimum.

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“No Bats in the Belfry” by Dechaine and Johnson Page 1 by Jennifer M. Dechaine1,2 and James E. Johnson1 1Department of Biological Sciences 2Department of Science Education Central Washington University, Ellensburg, WA NATIONAL CENTER FOR CASE STUDY TEACHING IN SCIENCE Part I – The Basic Question Introduction Imagine going out for a brisk winter snowshoe and suddenly stumbling upon hundreds of bat carcasses littering the forest floor. Unfortunately, this unsettling sight has become all too common in the United States (Figure 1). White-nose syndrome (WNS), first discovered in 2006, has now spread to 20 states and has led to the deaths of over 5.5 million bats (as of January 2012). WNS is a disease caused by the fungus, Pseudogymnoascus destructans. Bats infected with WNS develop white fuzz on their noses (Figure 2, next page) and often exhibit unnatural behavior, such as flying outside during the winter when they should be hibernating. WNS affects at least six different bat species in the United States and quickly decimates bat populations (colony mortality is commonly greater than 90%). Scientists have predicted that if deaths continue at the current rate, several bat species will become locally extinct within 20 years. Bats provide natural pest control by eating harmful insects, such as crop pests and disease carrying insect species, and losing bat populations would have devastating consequences for the U.S. economy. Researchers have sprung into action to study how bats become infected with and transmit P. destructans, but a key component of this research is determining where the fungus came from in the first place. Some have suggested that it is an invasive species from a different country while others think it is a North American fungal species that has recently become better able to cause disease. In this case study, we examine the origin of P. destructans causing WNS in North America. Some Other Important Observations • WNS was first documented at four cave sites in New York State in 2006. • The fungus can be spread among bats by direct contact or spores can be transferred between caves by humans (on clothing) or other animals. • European strains of the fungus occur in low levels across Europe but have led to few bat deaths there. • Bats with WNS frequently awake during hibernation, causing them to use important fat reserves, leading to death. No Bats in the Belfry: The Origin of White- Nose Syndrome in Little Brown Bats Figure 1. Many bats dead in winter from white-nose syndrome. NATIONAL CENTER FOR CASE STUDY TEACHING IN SCIENCE “No Bats in the Belfry” by Dechaine and Johnson Page 2 Questions 1. What is the basic question of this study and why is it interesting? 2. What specific testable hypotheses can you develop to explain the observations and answer the basic question of this study? Write at least two alternative hypotheses. 3. What predictions about the effects of European strains of P. destructans on North American bats can you make if your hypotheses are correct? Write at least one prediction for each of your hypotheses. Figure 2. White fuzz on the muzzle of a little brown bat indicating infection by the disease. NATIONAL CENTER FOR CASE STUDY TEACHING IN SCIENCE “No Bats in the Belfry” by Dechaine and Johnson Page 3 Part II – The Hypothesis As discussed in Part I, researchers had preliminary data suggesting that the pathogen causing WNS is an invasive fungal species (P. destructans) brought to North America from Europe. They had also observed that P. destructans occurs on European bats but rarely causes their death. Preliminary research also suggested that one reason that bats have been dying from WNS is that the disorder arouses them from hibernation, causing the bats to waste fat reserves flying during the winter when food is not readily available. These observations led researchers to speculate that European P. destructans will affect North American bat hibernation at least as severely as does North American P. destructans (Warnecke et al. 2012). Questions 1. Explicitly state the researchers’ null (H0 ) and alternative hypotheses (HA) for this study. 2. Describe an experiment you could use to differentiate between these hypotheses (H0 and HA). NATIONAL CENTER FOR CASE STUDY TEACHING IN SCIENCE “No Bats in the Belfry” by Dechaine and Johnson Page 4 Part III – Experiments and Observations In 2010, Lisa Warnecke and colleagues (2012) isolated P. destructans fungal spores from Europe and North America. They collected 54 male little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) from the wild and divided these bats equally into three treatment groups. • Group 1 was inoculated with the North American P. destructans spores (NAGd treatment). • Group 2 was inoculated with the European P. destructans spores (EUGd treatment). • Group 3 was inoculated using the inoculation serum with no spores (Control treatment). All three groups were put into separate dark chambers that simulated the environmental conditions of a cave. All bats began hibernating within the first week of the study. The researchers used infrared cameras to examine the bats’ hibernation over four consecutive intervals of 26 days each. They then used the cameras to determine the total number of times a bat was aroused from hibernation during each interval. Questions 1. Use the graph below to predict what the results will look like if the null hypothesis is supported. The total arousal counts in the control treatment at each interval is graphed for you (open bars). Justifiy your predictions. 2. Use the graph below to predict what the results will look like if the null hypothesis is rejected. The total arousal counts in the control treatment at each interval is graphed for you (open bars). Justify your predictions. Null Supported Total Arousal counts Interval Null Rejected Total Arousal counts Interval NATIONAL CENTER FOR CASE STUDY TEACHING IN SCIENCE “No Bats in the Belfry” by Dechaine and Johnson Page 5 2 Credits: Title block photo by David A. Riggs (http://www.flickr.com/photos/driggs/6933593833/sizes/l/), cropped, used in accordance with CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/). Figure 1 photo by Kevin Wenner/Pennsylvania Game Commision (http://www. portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/document/901415/white-nose_kills_hundreds_of_bats_in_lackawanna_county_pdf ). Figure 2 photo courtesy of Ryan von Linden/New York Department of Environmental Conservation, http://www.flickr.com/photos/usfwshq/5765048289/sizes/l/in/ set-72157626818845664/, used in accordance with CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en). Case copyright held by the National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science, University at Buffalo, State University of New York. Originally published February 6, 2014. Please see our usage guidelines, which outline our policy concerning permissible reproduction of this work. Part IV – Results Figure 3 (below) shows the real data from the study. There is no data for interval 4 bats that were exposed to the European P. destructans (gray bar) because all of the bats in that group died. Questions 1. How do your predictions compare with the experimental results? Be specific. 2. Do the results support or reject the null hypothesis? 3. If the European P. destructans is causing WNS in North America, how come European bats aren’t dying from the same disease? References U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2012. White-Nose Syndrome. Available at: http://whitenosesyndrome.org/. Last accessed December 20, 2013. Warnecke, L., et al. 2012. Inoculation of bats with European Geomyces destructans supports the novel pathogen hypothesis for the origin of white-nose syndrome. PNAS Online Early Edition: http://www.pnas.org/cgi/ doi/10.1073/pnas.1200374109. Last accessed December 20, 2013. Figure 3. Changes in hibernation patterns in M. lucifugus following inoculation with North American P. destructans (NAGd), European P. destructans (EUGd), or the control serum. Interval Total Arousal counts

“No Bats in the Belfry” by Dechaine and Johnson Page 1 by Jennifer M. Dechaine1,2 and James E. Johnson1 1Department of Biological Sciences 2Department of Science Education Central Washington University, Ellensburg, WA NATIONAL CENTER FOR CASE STUDY TEACHING IN SCIENCE Part I – The Basic Question Introduction Imagine going out for a brisk winter snowshoe and suddenly stumbling upon hundreds of bat carcasses littering the forest floor. Unfortunately, this unsettling sight has become all too common in the United States (Figure 1). White-nose syndrome (WNS), first discovered in 2006, has now spread to 20 states and has led to the deaths of over 5.5 million bats (as of January 2012). WNS is a disease caused by the fungus, Pseudogymnoascus destructans. Bats infected with WNS develop white fuzz on their noses (Figure 2, next page) and often exhibit unnatural behavior, such as flying outside during the winter when they should be hibernating. WNS affects at least six different bat species in the United States and quickly decimates bat populations (colony mortality is commonly greater than 90%). Scientists have predicted that if deaths continue at the current rate, several bat species will become locally extinct within 20 years. Bats provide natural pest control by eating harmful insects, such as crop pests and disease carrying insect species, and losing bat populations would have devastating consequences for the U.S. economy. Researchers have sprung into action to study how bats become infected with and transmit P. destructans, but a key component of this research is determining where the fungus came from in the first place. Some have suggested that it is an invasive species from a different country while others think it is a North American fungal species that has recently become better able to cause disease. In this case study, we examine the origin of P. destructans causing WNS in North America. Some Other Important Observations • WNS was first documented at four cave sites in New York State in 2006. • The fungus can be spread among bats by direct contact or spores can be transferred between caves by humans (on clothing) or other animals. • European strains of the fungus occur in low levels across Europe but have led to few bat deaths there. • Bats with WNS frequently awake during hibernation, causing them to use important fat reserves, leading to death. No Bats in the Belfry: The Origin of White- Nose Syndrome in Little Brown Bats Figure 1. Many bats dead in winter from white-nose syndrome. NATIONAL CENTER FOR CASE STUDY TEACHING IN SCIENCE “No Bats in the Belfry” by Dechaine and Johnson Page 2 Questions 1. What is the basic question of this study and why is it interesting? 2. What specific testable hypotheses can you develop to explain the observations and answer the basic question of this study? Write at least two alternative hypotheses. 3. What predictions about the effects of European strains of P. destructans on North American bats can you make if your hypotheses are correct? Write at least one prediction for each of your hypotheses. Figure 2. White fuzz on the muzzle of a little brown bat indicating infection by the disease. NATIONAL CENTER FOR CASE STUDY TEACHING IN SCIENCE “No Bats in the Belfry” by Dechaine and Johnson Page 3 Part II – The Hypothesis As discussed in Part I, researchers had preliminary data suggesting that the pathogen causing WNS is an invasive fungal species (P. destructans) brought to North America from Europe. They had also observed that P. destructans occurs on European bats but rarely causes their death. Preliminary research also suggested that one reason that bats have been dying from WNS is that the disorder arouses them from hibernation, causing the bats to waste fat reserves flying during the winter when food is not readily available. These observations led researchers to speculate that European P. destructans will affect North American bat hibernation at least as severely as does North American P. destructans (Warnecke et al. 2012). Questions 1. Explicitly state the researchers’ null (H0 ) and alternative hypotheses (HA) for this study. 2. Describe an experiment you could use to differentiate between these hypotheses (H0 and HA). NATIONAL CENTER FOR CASE STUDY TEACHING IN SCIENCE “No Bats in the Belfry” by Dechaine and Johnson Page 4 Part III – Experiments and Observations In 2010, Lisa Warnecke and colleagues (2012) isolated P. destructans fungal spores from Europe and North America. They collected 54 male little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) from the wild and divided these bats equally into three treatment groups. • Group 1 was inoculated with the North American P. destructans spores (NAGd treatment). • Group 2 was inoculated with the European P. destructans spores (EUGd treatment). • Group 3 was inoculated using the inoculation serum with no spores (Control treatment). All three groups were put into separate dark chambers that simulated the environmental conditions of a cave. All bats began hibernating within the first week of the study. The researchers used infrared cameras to examine the bats’ hibernation over four consecutive intervals of 26 days each. They then used the cameras to determine the total number of times a bat was aroused from hibernation during each interval. Questions 1. Use the graph below to predict what the results will look like if the null hypothesis is supported. The total arousal counts in the control treatment at each interval is graphed for you (open bars). Justifiy your predictions. 2. Use the graph below to predict what the results will look like if the null hypothesis is rejected. The total arousal counts in the control treatment at each interval is graphed for you (open bars). Justify your predictions. Null Supported Total Arousal counts Interval Null Rejected Total Arousal counts Interval NATIONAL CENTER FOR CASE STUDY TEACHING IN SCIENCE “No Bats in the Belfry” by Dechaine and Johnson Page 5 2 Credits: Title block photo by David A. Riggs (http://www.flickr.com/photos/driggs/6933593833/sizes/l/), cropped, used in accordance with CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/). Figure 1 photo by Kevin Wenner/Pennsylvania Game Commision (http://www. portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/document/901415/white-nose_kills_hundreds_of_bats_in_lackawanna_county_pdf ). Figure 2 photo courtesy of Ryan von Linden/New York Department of Environmental Conservation, http://www.flickr.com/photos/usfwshq/5765048289/sizes/l/in/ set-72157626818845664/, used in accordance with CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en). Case copyright held by the National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science, University at Buffalo, State University of New York. Originally published February 6, 2014. Please see our usage guidelines, which outline our policy concerning permissible reproduction of this work. Part IV – Results Figure 3 (below) shows the real data from the study. There is no data for interval 4 bats that were exposed to the European P. destructans (gray bar) because all of the bats in that group died. Questions 1. How do your predictions compare with the experimental results? Be specific. 2. Do the results support or reject the null hypothesis? 3. If the European P. destructans is causing WNS in North America, how come European bats aren’t dying from the same disease? References U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2012. White-Nose Syndrome. Available at: http://whitenosesyndrome.org/. Last accessed December 20, 2013. Warnecke, L., et al. 2012. Inoculation of bats with European Geomyces destructans supports the novel pathogen hypothesis for the origin of white-nose syndrome. PNAS Online Early Edition: http://www.pnas.org/cgi/ doi/10.1073/pnas.1200374109. Last accessed December 20, 2013. Figure 3. Changes in hibernation patterns in M. lucifugus following inoculation with North American P. destructans (NAGd), European P. destructans (EUGd), or the control serum. Interval Total Arousal counts

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After reading the supplement article on Business Analytics linked to the week 1 schedule, write an essay on how business analytics impacts you today, or its potential role in your chosen career path. Do research for your paper, or interview someone who works in your area. The goals of this paper are two-fold: (1) focus on high quality writing, using the COBE Writing Styles Guide for writing help and citations. (2) consider the importance of BI from a personal/work/career perspective.

After reading the supplement article on Business Analytics linked to the week 1 schedule, write an essay on how business analytics impacts you today, or its potential role in your chosen career path. Do research for your paper, or interview someone who works in your area. The goals of this paper are two-fold: (1) focus on high quality writing, using the COBE Writing Styles Guide for writing help and citations. (2) consider the importance of BI from a personal/work/career perspective.

  Business analytics importance and its potential     Introduction … Read More...
Chapter 07 Reading Questions Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 23, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 17 Part A A lake is currently at high pool, with the same amount of water flowing into the lake as is flowing over the spillway. Which of the following temporary changes would increase the resident time of water in this lake? ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 16 Part A A large reservoir behind a dam is rapidly rising, as rain and melting snow add more water than is being released out of the dam’s spillway. In this situation, _____. ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 1 Part A Which one of the following statements is correct? ANSWER: Double the rate of water flow into the lake and double the rate of water flow out of the lake, while keeping the lake at the same level. Keep the inflow into the lake the same, but release twice as much water from the lake, resulting in a lowering of the lake level. Decrease the inflow into the lake by half, and decrease the outflow of the lake by half. None of the choices would increase the resident time in the lake. the net flux is positive and the capital of water within the reservoir is decreasing the net flux is positive and the capital of water within the reservoir is increasing the net flux is negative and the capital of water within the reservoir is increasing the net flux is negative and the capital of water within the reservoir is decreasing Chapter 07 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 1 of 8 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 18 Part A A raging river cascades down a granite mountain and eventually reaches the ocean. At the mouth of the river is a beautiful sandy beach composed of fine grains of granite particles from the river. The entire process of producing this sand is a result of _____. ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 4 Part A The physical and chemical properties of soils are primarily determined by _____. ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 19 Part A Several inches of rain fall over a field of tall corn, soaking into the soil and draining into ditches. Within an hour, there is no standing water and the humidity over the field rises quickly. At a nearby shopping mall, the rainwater fell onto blacktop and drained to sewer pipes, which carried the water directly into a stream. Which of the following occurred in The cycling time of an element or molecule in an ecosystem is equal to the sum of all the flux times. The cycling time is how long it takes an element or molecule to pass through a biogeochemical cycle. The cycling time of water moving through an ecosystem is typically shorter than the resident time in any pool in this system. The amount of time that water spends in an ocean is the cycling time. mineral evaporation erosion, weathering, transport, and then deposition erosion, dissolution, and precipitation organisms consuming and eroding granite the properties of rock from which the soils develop the amount of precipitation that the soil experiences the range of temperatures that the soil experiences the types of animals that live and move through the soils Chapter 07 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 2 of 8 5/21/2014 8:01 PM the cornfield but not in the parking lot? ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 6 Part A Most of the water on Earth is found in _____. ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 5 Part A Which one of the following primarily results from the effects of solar energy? ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 20 Part A A rural Minnesota farmer grows a variety of vegetables to feed her family. In addition, she cuts down some of her dead trees for firewood to heat her home in the winter. This farmer is adding to the flux of the carbon cycle in her region by _____. precipitation evaporation runoff transpiration the polar ice caps lakes and streams aquifers the oceans evaporation of water from a lake the formation of ice on the top of a pond movement of ocean tides the movement of water over a waterfall Chapter 07 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 3 of 8 5/21/2014 8:01 PM ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 8 Part A In a terrestrial ecosystem, most carbon is stored in the biomass of _____. ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 7 Part A In which of the following countries would we expect that the terrestrial ecosystems have the highest net primary production and biomass? ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 22 Part A Some farmers in the Midwest of the United States rotate their crops from year to year, switching from soybeans to corn on the same fields. What is one of the advantages of doing this? encouraging photosynthesis as she raises crops burning carbon-based fuels by consuming vegetables grown on her farm All of the choices are correct. the animals living there air the top layers of soil containing dead organisms living plants China Australia Brazil United States Chapter 07 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 4 of 8 5/21/2014 8:01 PM ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 10 Part A Most nitrogen enters the biosphere through the process of _____ ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 9 Part A Where do we expect to find the least amount of nitrogen? ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 12 Part A Along the west coast of the United States, upwellings bring deep ocean waters to the surface, carrying with them _____, which greatly increases NPP. ANSWER: The corn crop benefits from reactive nitrogen added to the soil by the soybean crop. Both crops require the same fertilizing supplies, so farmers save by buying fertilizer in bulk. Soybeans add large amounts of carbon dioxide to the soil, which helps the corn crop. Corn adds large amounts of phosphorus to the soil, which helps the soybean crop. nitrogen fixation in which bacteria convert N2 to NH3 cellular respiration, in which animals convert N2 to NH4 fermentation in which bacteria convert N2 to HNO3 photosynthesis, in which plants convert N2 to NO2 in Earth’s crust in plants in animals in the atmosphere Chapter 07 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 5 of 8 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 11 Part A Which one of the following statements about the carbon, phosphorus, and nitrogen cycles is true? ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 24 Part A A large coal-burning power plant is about 50 miles upwind from a lake that used to be popular for fishing. But now, just five years after the plant was constructed, the fish populations are decreasing dramatically. Which one of the following impacts of this coal-burning power plant is most likely hurting the fish populations in this downwind lake? ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 14 Part A Which one of the following statements about sulfur is correct? ANSWER: oxygen phosphate carbon sulfur Phosphorus is virtually absent in the atmosphere. The major source of carbon used by plants is the soil. Bacteria drive the phosphorus cycle. The major source of nitrogen used by plants is the air. insufficient sunlight reaching the lake low oxygen levels from burning fossil fuels eutrophication of the lake acidification of the lake Chapter 07 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 6 of 8 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 13 Part A Nitrogen and sulfur are important to all organisms because they are important constituents of _____. ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 25 Part A In Iowa, a small, deep lake in the summer becomes stratified with warmer, less-dense water at the surface and colder, denser water near the bottom. As fall air temperatures decrease, the surface water cools and then drops toward the bottom, mixing the lake levels together. As a result of this mixing, _____. ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 15 Part A A fire spreads across hundreds of acres of prairie, burning most of the plant parts above the ground. Compared to before the fire, right after this fire the pool of nutrients in the prairie plants _____. The main pool of sulfur is in the atmosphere where the flux is high and the residence time is long. The main pool of sulfur is in rocks. The flux of sulfur through the atmosphere is high and the residence is short. The main pool of sulfur is in the atmosphere where the flux is low and the residence time is long. The main pool of sulfur is in rocks. The flux of sulfur through the atmosphere is low and the residence is short. nucleic acids glucose phosphates some amino acids nitrogen and phosphorus are added to the lake nitrogen and phosphorus decrease near the surface of the lake nitrogen and phosphorus increase near the surface of the lake None of the choices is correct. Chapter 07 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 7 of 8 5/21/2014 8:01 PM ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0.0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 21 points. and the soil decreases increases and the pool of nutrients in the soil decreases and the soil increases decreases and the pool of nutrients in the soil increases Chapter 07 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 8 of 8 5/21/2014 8:01 PM

Chapter 07 Reading Questions Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 23, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 17 Part A A lake is currently at high pool, with the same amount of water flowing into the lake as is flowing over the spillway. Which of the following temporary changes would increase the resident time of water in this lake? ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 16 Part A A large reservoir behind a dam is rapidly rising, as rain and melting snow add more water than is being released out of the dam’s spillway. In this situation, _____. ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 1 Part A Which one of the following statements is correct? ANSWER: Double the rate of water flow into the lake and double the rate of water flow out of the lake, while keeping the lake at the same level. Keep the inflow into the lake the same, but release twice as much water from the lake, resulting in a lowering of the lake level. Decrease the inflow into the lake by half, and decrease the outflow of the lake by half. None of the choices would increase the resident time in the lake. the net flux is positive and the capital of water within the reservoir is decreasing the net flux is positive and the capital of water within the reservoir is increasing the net flux is negative and the capital of water within the reservoir is increasing the net flux is negative and the capital of water within the reservoir is decreasing Chapter 07 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 1 of 8 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 18 Part A A raging river cascades down a granite mountain and eventually reaches the ocean. At the mouth of the river is a beautiful sandy beach composed of fine grains of granite particles from the river. The entire process of producing this sand is a result of _____. ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 4 Part A The physical and chemical properties of soils are primarily determined by _____. ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 19 Part A Several inches of rain fall over a field of tall corn, soaking into the soil and draining into ditches. Within an hour, there is no standing water and the humidity over the field rises quickly. At a nearby shopping mall, the rainwater fell onto blacktop and drained to sewer pipes, which carried the water directly into a stream. Which of the following occurred in The cycling time of an element or molecule in an ecosystem is equal to the sum of all the flux times. The cycling time is how long it takes an element or molecule to pass through a biogeochemical cycle. The cycling time of water moving through an ecosystem is typically shorter than the resident time in any pool in this system. The amount of time that water spends in an ocean is the cycling time. mineral evaporation erosion, weathering, transport, and then deposition erosion, dissolution, and precipitation organisms consuming and eroding granite the properties of rock from which the soils develop the amount of precipitation that the soil experiences the range of temperatures that the soil experiences the types of animals that live and move through the soils Chapter 07 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 2 of 8 5/21/2014 8:01 PM the cornfield but not in the parking lot? ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 6 Part A Most of the water on Earth is found in _____. ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 5 Part A Which one of the following primarily results from the effects of solar energy? ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 20 Part A A rural Minnesota farmer grows a variety of vegetables to feed her family. In addition, she cuts down some of her dead trees for firewood to heat her home in the winter. This farmer is adding to the flux of the carbon cycle in her region by _____. precipitation evaporation runoff transpiration the polar ice caps lakes and streams aquifers the oceans evaporation of water from a lake the formation of ice on the top of a pond movement of ocean tides the movement of water over a waterfall Chapter 07 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 3 of 8 5/21/2014 8:01 PM ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 8 Part A In a terrestrial ecosystem, most carbon is stored in the biomass of _____. ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 7 Part A In which of the following countries would we expect that the terrestrial ecosystems have the highest net primary production and biomass? ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 22 Part A Some farmers in the Midwest of the United States rotate their crops from year to year, switching from soybeans to corn on the same fields. What is one of the advantages of doing this? encouraging photosynthesis as she raises crops burning carbon-based fuels by consuming vegetables grown on her farm All of the choices are correct. the animals living there air the top layers of soil containing dead organisms living plants China Australia Brazil United States Chapter 07 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 4 of 8 5/21/2014 8:01 PM ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 10 Part A Most nitrogen enters the biosphere through the process of _____ ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 9 Part A Where do we expect to find the least amount of nitrogen? ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 12 Part A Along the west coast of the United States, upwellings bring deep ocean waters to the surface, carrying with them _____, which greatly increases NPP. ANSWER: The corn crop benefits from reactive nitrogen added to the soil by the soybean crop. Both crops require the same fertilizing supplies, so farmers save by buying fertilizer in bulk. Soybeans add large amounts of carbon dioxide to the soil, which helps the corn crop. Corn adds large amounts of phosphorus to the soil, which helps the soybean crop. nitrogen fixation in which bacteria convert N2 to NH3 cellular respiration, in which animals convert N2 to NH4 fermentation in which bacteria convert N2 to HNO3 photosynthesis, in which plants convert N2 to NO2 in Earth’s crust in plants in animals in the atmosphere Chapter 07 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 5 of 8 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 11 Part A Which one of the following statements about the carbon, phosphorus, and nitrogen cycles is true? ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 24 Part A A large coal-burning power plant is about 50 miles upwind from a lake that used to be popular for fishing. But now, just five years after the plant was constructed, the fish populations are decreasing dramatically. Which one of the following impacts of this coal-burning power plant is most likely hurting the fish populations in this downwind lake? ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 14 Part A Which one of the following statements about sulfur is correct? ANSWER: oxygen phosphate carbon sulfur Phosphorus is virtually absent in the atmosphere. The major source of carbon used by plants is the soil. Bacteria drive the phosphorus cycle. The major source of nitrogen used by plants is the air. insufficient sunlight reaching the lake low oxygen levels from burning fossil fuels eutrophication of the lake acidification of the lake Chapter 07 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 6 of 8 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 13 Part A Nitrogen and sulfur are important to all organisms because they are important constituents of _____. ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 25 Part A In Iowa, a small, deep lake in the summer becomes stratified with warmer, less-dense water at the surface and colder, denser water near the bottom. As fall air temperatures decrease, the surface water cools and then drops toward the bottom, mixing the lake levels together. As a result of this mixing, _____. ANSWER: Chapter 7 Reading Quiz Question 15 Part A A fire spreads across hundreds of acres of prairie, burning most of the plant parts above the ground. Compared to before the fire, right after this fire the pool of nutrients in the prairie plants _____. The main pool of sulfur is in the atmosphere where the flux is high and the residence time is long. The main pool of sulfur is in rocks. The flux of sulfur through the atmosphere is high and the residence is short. The main pool of sulfur is in the atmosphere where the flux is low and the residence time is long. The main pool of sulfur is in rocks. The flux of sulfur through the atmosphere is low and the residence is short. nucleic acids glucose phosphates some amino acids nitrogen and phosphorus are added to the lake nitrogen and phosphorus decrease near the surface of the lake nitrogen and phosphorus increase near the surface of the lake None of the choices is correct. Chapter 07 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 7 of 8 5/21/2014 8:01 PM ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0.0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 21 points. and the soil decreases increases and the pool of nutrients in the soil decreases and the soil increases decreases and the pool of nutrients in the soil increases Chapter 07 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 8 of 8 5/21/2014 8:01 PM

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F7.10 The flame spread rate through porous solids increases with concurrent wind velocity. decreases with concurrent wind velocity. is independent of concurrent wind velocity. F7.11 Surface tension accelerates opposed-flow flame spread over liquid fuels. True False F7.12 Opposed-flow flame spread rates over a solid surface are typically much smaller than 1 mm/s. around 1mm/s. much greater than 1 mm/s. F7.13 Upward flame spread rate over a vertical surface is typically between 10 and 1000 mm/s. True False F7.14 The Steiner tunnel test described in ASTM standard E 84 is used to assess the fire performance of interior finish materials based on lateral flame spread over a vertical sample. True False F8.1 Describe the triad of fire growth. F8.2 Liquid pool fires reach steady burning conditions within seconds after ignition. True False F8.3 The heat of gasification of liquid fuels is typically less than 1 kJ/g. between 1 and 3 kJ/g. greater than 3 kJ/g. F8.4 The heat flux from the flame to the surface of real burning objects can usually be determined with sufficient accuracy so that reasonable burning rate predictions can be made. True False F8.5 The mass burning flux generally associated with extinction is 0.5 g/m2s. 5 g/m2s. 50 g/m2s. F8.6 The mass burning flux of a liquid pool fire is a function of only the pool diameter. only the fuel type. pool diameter and fuel type. F8.7 The energy release rate of real objects can be measured in an oxygen bomb calorimeter. an oxygen consumption calorimeter. a room/corner test. F8.8 The peak energy release rate of typical domestic upholstered furniture can be as high as 3000 kW. True False F8.9 Draw a typical curve of the mass burning flux of a char forming fuel as a function of time. F8.10 A fast fire as defined in NFPA 72B grows proportionally to t2 and reaches an energy release rate of 1 MW in 75 sec. 150 sec. 300 sec. F9.1 Air entrainment into turbulent pool fire flames is due to buoyancy. True False F9.2 The frequency of vortex shedding in turbulent pool fire flames increases with pool diameter. decreases with pool diameter. is independent of pool diameter. F9.3 The height of turbulent jet flames for a given fuel type and orifice size is independent of energy release rate. True False F9.4 The exit velocities of fuel vapors leaving a solid or liquid pool fire surface are responsible for entrainment of air in the plume. True False F9.5 The height of a turbulent pool fire flame is a function of only energy release rate. only pool diameter. energy release rate and pool diameter. F9.6 Turbulent pool fire flame heights fluctuate in time within a factor of 2. True False F9.7 The Q* value for jet fires is 102 or greater. 104 or greater. 106 or greater. F9.8 The temperature in the continuous flame region of moderate size turbulent pool fires is approximately 820°C. True False F9.9 The temperature at the maximum flame height of a turbulent pool fire flame is approximately 1200°C. 800°C. 300°C. F9.10 The adiabatic flame temperature of hydrocarbon fuels is 1700-2000°C. 2000-2300°C. 2300-2600°C. F10.1 The stoichiometric air to fuel mass ratio of hydrocarbon fuels is of the order of 1.5 g/g. 15 g/g. 150 g/g. F10.2 Give two examples of products of incomplete combustion that occur in fires. F10.3 Slight amounts of products of incomplete combustion are generated in overventilated fires. True False F10.4 The CO yield of a fire is a function of only the fuel involved. only the ventilation conditions. the fuel and the ventilation conditions. F10.5 A carboxyhemoglobin level of 40% in the blood is usually lethal. True (doubt) False F10.6 Carbon monoxide is the leading killer of people in fires. True False F10.7 HCN is a narcotic gas. an irritant gas. a fuel vapor. F10.8 The hazard to humans from narcotic gases is a function of only the concentration of the gas. only the duration of exposure. the product of concentration and duration of exposure. F10.9 The effects on lethality of CO, HCN, and reduced O2 are additive. True False F10.10 Irritant gases typically cause post-exposure fatalities. True False F10.11 Visibility through smoke improves with increasing optical density. True False F10.12 Heat stress occurs when the skin is exposed to a heat flux of 1 kW/m2. the skin reaches a temperature of 45°C. the body’s core temperature reaches 41°C.

F7.10 The flame spread rate through porous solids increases with concurrent wind velocity. decreases with concurrent wind velocity. is independent of concurrent wind velocity. F7.11 Surface tension accelerates opposed-flow flame spread over liquid fuels. True False F7.12 Opposed-flow flame spread rates over a solid surface are typically much smaller than 1 mm/s. around 1mm/s. much greater than 1 mm/s. F7.13 Upward flame spread rate over a vertical surface is typically between 10 and 1000 mm/s. True False F7.14 The Steiner tunnel test described in ASTM standard E 84 is used to assess the fire performance of interior finish materials based on lateral flame spread over a vertical sample. True False F8.1 Describe the triad of fire growth. F8.2 Liquid pool fires reach steady burning conditions within seconds after ignition. True False F8.3 The heat of gasification of liquid fuels is typically less than 1 kJ/g. between 1 and 3 kJ/g. greater than 3 kJ/g. F8.4 The heat flux from the flame to the surface of real burning objects can usually be determined with sufficient accuracy so that reasonable burning rate predictions can be made. True False F8.5 The mass burning flux generally associated with extinction is 0.5 g/m2s. 5 g/m2s. 50 g/m2s. F8.6 The mass burning flux of a liquid pool fire is a function of only the pool diameter. only the fuel type. pool diameter and fuel type. F8.7 The energy release rate of real objects can be measured in an oxygen bomb calorimeter. an oxygen consumption calorimeter. a room/corner test. F8.8 The peak energy release rate of typical domestic upholstered furniture can be as high as 3000 kW. True False F8.9 Draw a typical curve of the mass burning flux of a char forming fuel as a function of time. F8.10 A fast fire as defined in NFPA 72B grows proportionally to t2 and reaches an energy release rate of 1 MW in 75 sec. 150 sec. 300 sec. F9.1 Air entrainment into turbulent pool fire flames is due to buoyancy. True False F9.2 The frequency of vortex shedding in turbulent pool fire flames increases with pool diameter. decreases with pool diameter. is independent of pool diameter. F9.3 The height of turbulent jet flames for a given fuel type and orifice size is independent of energy release rate. True False F9.4 The exit velocities of fuel vapors leaving a solid or liquid pool fire surface are responsible for entrainment of air in the plume. True False F9.5 The height of a turbulent pool fire flame is a function of only energy release rate. only pool diameter. energy release rate and pool diameter. F9.6 Turbulent pool fire flame heights fluctuate in time within a factor of 2. True False F9.7 The Q* value for jet fires is 102 or greater. 104 or greater. 106 or greater. F9.8 The temperature in the continuous flame region of moderate size turbulent pool fires is approximately 820°C. True False F9.9 The temperature at the maximum flame height of a turbulent pool fire flame is approximately 1200°C. 800°C. 300°C. F9.10 The adiabatic flame temperature of hydrocarbon fuels is 1700-2000°C. 2000-2300°C. 2300-2600°C. F10.1 The stoichiometric air to fuel mass ratio of hydrocarbon fuels is of the order of 1.5 g/g. 15 g/g. 150 g/g. F10.2 Give two examples of products of incomplete combustion that occur in fires. F10.3 Slight amounts of products of incomplete combustion are generated in overventilated fires. True False F10.4 The CO yield of a fire is a function of only the fuel involved. only the ventilation conditions. the fuel and the ventilation conditions. F10.5 A carboxyhemoglobin level of 40% in the blood is usually lethal. True (doubt) False F10.6 Carbon monoxide is the leading killer of people in fires. True False F10.7 HCN is a narcotic gas. an irritant gas. a fuel vapor. F10.8 The hazard to humans from narcotic gases is a function of only the concentration of the gas. only the duration of exposure. the product of concentration and duration of exposure. F10.9 The effects on lethality of CO, HCN, and reduced O2 are additive. True False F10.10 Irritant gases typically cause post-exposure fatalities. True False F10.11 Visibility through smoke improves with increasing optical density. True False F10.12 Heat stress occurs when the skin is exposed to a heat flux of 1 kW/m2. the skin reaches a temperature of 45°C. the body’s core temperature reaches 41°C.

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Increased sociability and talkativeness are effects of alcohol consumption that occur at which of the following blood alcohol concentrations (BACs)?

Increased sociability and talkativeness are effects of alcohol consumption that occur at which of the following blood alcohol concentrations (BACs)?

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