The third task : Tutorial Topic 5 – IT and Information Systems Search business magazines and other sources of information for recent articles that discuss the use of information technology in delivering significant business benefits to an organisation. Use other sources to find additional information about the organisation. For the tutorial, prepare a brief report on your findings, and identify the application area(s) in the organisation that IT has supported. HOW TO DO THIS: 1. Identify an organisation big enough to have material published about it. 2. Write short introduction/description of the organisation 3. Identify business magazines that publish articles about IT 4. Other sources of information could be the organisations website 5. Or the company that is selling the information technology 6. Brief report – what is a report? what is the writing style of a report? Examples of information sourses: 1. http://www.infoworld.com/about 2. http://www.emeraldinsight.com/learning/management_thinking/articles/?subject=ebusiness 3. http://www.computerworlduk.com/it-business/ 4. http://www.businessweek.com/reports 5. http://www.informationweek.com/ 6. http://www.webroot.com/us/en/business/resources/articles/ or search for Business IT articles

The third task : Tutorial Topic 5 – IT and Information Systems Search business magazines and other sources of information for recent articles that discuss the use of information technology in delivering significant business benefits to an organisation. Use other sources to find additional information about the organisation. For the tutorial, prepare a brief report on your findings, and identify the application area(s) in the organisation that IT has supported. HOW TO DO THIS: 1. Identify an organisation big enough to have material published about it. 2. Write short introduction/description of the organisation 3. Identify business magazines that publish articles about IT 4. Other sources of information could be the organisations website 5. Or the company that is selling the information technology 6. Brief report – what is a report? what is the writing style of a report? Examples of information sourses: 1. http://www.infoworld.com/about 2. http://www.emeraldinsight.com/learning/management_thinking/articles/?subject=ebusiness 3. http://www.computerworlduk.com/it-business/ 4. http://www.businessweek.com/reports 5. http://www.informationweek.com/ 6. http://www.webroot.com/us/en/business/resources/articles/ or search for Business IT articles

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Objective: Persuade readers that they should fear a threat of your choosing, real or fabricated. Due Date: Wednesday, November 18th Length: 4-5 pages Format: typed, double-spaced, standard font and margins For this essay, you will be putting together all the aspects of argument that we have been learning about over the last few weeks. You will be using those elements to convince your readers that some issue of your choosing is a threat to them. This issue can be a real threat that you believe people should actually be aware of, or it can be a threat that is not real but that you treat as real (whether it be a fictional/legendary threat or something that is perhaps a small threat but that you present as a big one). Your job is to convince your audience to take this threat seriously, and to do that, you will need to make use of emotional appeal (especially to fear—think back to essays one and two), logical appeal (partly use of details/facts/ evidence we discussed in essay four, but also through definition such as we worked on in essay three), and ethical appeal (your own credibility—think back to issues besides logic and evidence covered in essay four). You may choose to include outside sources if you wish, but you must cite them if you use them and indicate when you are using the words of the original source. We will discuss how to find and to cite them to prepare you to use them correctly. If writing about a fictional threat, you may wish to make up sources. If you do so, I leave it up to you whether you formally cite them (though you must do this if you are using real sources) or informally refer to them in a manner similar to what we saw in the articles we read for essay four. Turning in an essay in which significant portions are not written by you and/or without outside sources cited will result in an essay grade of zero (and not revisable for a higher grade). If you are unsure what to cite, let me know. For ideas, you may want to browse the website snopes.com. This site contains lists and research about many feasible topics for this essay. Try not to use Snopes itself as a source—most entries there contain a list of sources that would be more appropriate for you to utilize and credit in your research. You may also choose to write about a topic covered by one of the essay four articles—if you liked an issue but felt that the warning about it was not very credible, you can use this paper as an opportunity to write about that topic but in a believable, convincing way. Whatever you choose as your topic, by the end of it, you want your reader to believe that what you discuss is a real threat to them. Essay Five: Argument Paper/Warning Assignment Description English 101, Sections 26 & 30 Fall 2015 Skills We Will Cover In This Unit: • finding & citing sources • utilizing emotional, logical, and ethical appeal SCHEDULE GRADING Incomplete papers or papers that stray from the assigned topic/purpose will receive a D or F. C B A To earn at least a C, the paper should: • have a clearly established threat that it attempts to warn the reader about • cite any information obtained from outside sources • be written in such a way as it can be easily understood by the reader To earn a B, the paper should fulfill the criteria above, plus: • include at least one section intended to appeal to the reader’s emotions (especially fear) • include logical support in the form of evidence, details, or other forms of establishing logical reasoning • be organized well, which includes having a clear sense of structure and transitioning into new ideas • include only the information and discussion necessary to accomplish the purpose of the assignment • have only a few grammatical errors, and those should not interfere with understanding To earn an A, the paper should fulfill the criteria for a B paper, plus: • possess strong unity of ideas • skillfully utilize all three rhetorical appeals • make a convincing case that the threat is real • be nearly free of grammatical or wording problems FRI OCT 30 MON NOV 2 discuss “We Are Training Our Kids to Kill” (p. 481) WED NOV 4 discuss “How Bingeing Became the New College Sport” (p. 476) FRI NOV 6 Homecoming—no classes after noon, no Blackboard assignment MON NOV 9 Discuss “The Real Skinny” (p. 492) No class—Blackboard assignment: online scavenger hunt (opens Monday, due by 11:59pm on Sunday 11/1) WED NOV 11 FRI NOV 13 No class—Blackboard assignment: essay five peer review. Post your draft by noon Friday, respond to two classmates’ by 11:59pm on Monday 11/16. You may wish to review skills from previous assignments as you work on this essay: • essay one: telling a story, creating an emotional response • essay two: how to create emotional response, utilizing evidence • essay three: defining important terms, using logic • essay four: establishing character and credibility WED OCT 28 Discuss “Our Unhealthy Obsession with Sickness (p. 469) MON OCT 26 Essay Four Due; Essay Five Assigned; meet in 70-122 MON NOV 16 No class—Dr. Hill at BTW Symposium (you can attend, too!) Meet in 70-122 for research time and citing instruction MON NOV 18 Essay five due; final portfolio assigned

Objective: Persuade readers that they should fear a threat of your choosing, real or fabricated. Due Date: Wednesday, November 18th Length: 4-5 pages Format: typed, double-spaced, standard font and margins For this essay, you will be putting together all the aspects of argument that we have been learning about over the last few weeks. You will be using those elements to convince your readers that some issue of your choosing is a threat to them. This issue can be a real threat that you believe people should actually be aware of, or it can be a threat that is not real but that you treat as real (whether it be a fictional/legendary threat or something that is perhaps a small threat but that you present as a big one). Your job is to convince your audience to take this threat seriously, and to do that, you will need to make use of emotional appeal (especially to fear—think back to essays one and two), logical appeal (partly use of details/facts/ evidence we discussed in essay four, but also through definition such as we worked on in essay three), and ethical appeal (your own credibility—think back to issues besides logic and evidence covered in essay four). You may choose to include outside sources if you wish, but you must cite them if you use them and indicate when you are using the words of the original source. We will discuss how to find and to cite them to prepare you to use them correctly. If writing about a fictional threat, you may wish to make up sources. If you do so, I leave it up to you whether you formally cite them (though you must do this if you are using real sources) or informally refer to them in a manner similar to what we saw in the articles we read for essay four. Turning in an essay in which significant portions are not written by you and/or without outside sources cited will result in an essay grade of zero (and not revisable for a higher grade). If you are unsure what to cite, let me know. For ideas, you may want to browse the website snopes.com. This site contains lists and research about many feasible topics for this essay. Try not to use Snopes itself as a source—most entries there contain a list of sources that would be more appropriate for you to utilize and credit in your research. You may also choose to write about a topic covered by one of the essay four articles—if you liked an issue but felt that the warning about it was not very credible, you can use this paper as an opportunity to write about that topic but in a believable, convincing way. Whatever you choose as your topic, by the end of it, you want your reader to believe that what you discuss is a real threat to them. Essay Five: Argument Paper/Warning Assignment Description English 101, Sections 26 & 30 Fall 2015 Skills We Will Cover In This Unit: • finding & citing sources • utilizing emotional, logical, and ethical appeal SCHEDULE GRADING Incomplete papers or papers that stray from the assigned topic/purpose will receive a D or F. C B A To earn at least a C, the paper should: • have a clearly established threat that it attempts to warn the reader about • cite any information obtained from outside sources • be written in such a way as it can be easily understood by the reader To earn a B, the paper should fulfill the criteria above, plus: • include at least one section intended to appeal to the reader’s emotions (especially fear) • include logical support in the form of evidence, details, or other forms of establishing logical reasoning • be organized well, which includes having a clear sense of structure and transitioning into new ideas • include only the information and discussion necessary to accomplish the purpose of the assignment • have only a few grammatical errors, and those should not interfere with understanding To earn an A, the paper should fulfill the criteria for a B paper, plus: • possess strong unity of ideas • skillfully utilize all three rhetorical appeals • make a convincing case that the threat is real • be nearly free of grammatical or wording problems FRI OCT 30 MON NOV 2 discuss “We Are Training Our Kids to Kill” (p. 481) WED NOV 4 discuss “How Bingeing Became the New College Sport” (p. 476) FRI NOV 6 Homecoming—no classes after noon, no Blackboard assignment MON NOV 9 Discuss “The Real Skinny” (p. 492) No class—Blackboard assignment: online scavenger hunt (opens Monday, due by 11:59pm on Sunday 11/1) WED NOV 11 FRI NOV 13 No class—Blackboard assignment: essay five peer review. Post your draft by noon Friday, respond to two classmates’ by 11:59pm on Monday 11/16. You may wish to review skills from previous assignments as you work on this essay: • essay one: telling a story, creating an emotional response • essay two: how to create emotional response, utilizing evidence • essay three: defining important terms, using logic • essay four: establishing character and credibility WED OCT 28 Discuss “Our Unhealthy Obsession with Sickness (p. 469) MON OCT 26 Essay Four Due; Essay Five Assigned; meet in 70-122 MON NOV 16 No class—Dr. Hill at BTW Symposium (you can attend, too!) Meet in 70-122 for research time and citing instruction MON NOV 18 Essay five due; final portfolio assigned

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Identify legislative and regulative requirements relative to information security for a bank

Identify legislative and regulative requirements relative to information security for a bank

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What to Expect from Logistics Manager’s Presentation at the Meeting. The CEO has asked the Logistics Manager to develop an action plan to improve inventory record accuracy, reduce staff numbers, where feasible, and ensure that customer service levels for ‘Tier l’ customer orders will consistently average 99% for the next 3 years. The Logistics Manager is also part of a cross-functional team looking at acquisition of an Asian-based distribution company offering a ready-made distribution channel for WWL’s products through its established presence in South China. Whilst WWL has currently no offshore customers, the Logistics Manager’s Supply Chain Strategy will address the Company’s continued push for international expansion. The Logistics Manager will present the top 3 priorities for supply chain improvement, for peer review at tomorrow’s management meeting.

What to Expect from Logistics Manager’s Presentation at the Meeting. The CEO has asked the Logistics Manager to develop an action plan to improve inventory record accuracy, reduce staff numbers, where feasible, and ensure that customer service levels for ‘Tier l’ customer orders will consistently average 99% for the next 3 years. The Logistics Manager is also part of a cross-functional team looking at acquisition of an Asian-based distribution company offering a ready-made distribution channel for WWL’s products through its established presence in South China. Whilst WWL has currently no offshore customers, the Logistics Manager’s Supply Chain Strategy will address the Company’s continued push for international expansion. The Logistics Manager will present the top 3 priorities for supply chain improvement, for peer review at tomorrow’s management meeting.

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Faculty of Science Technology and Engineering Department of Physics Senior Laboratory Faraday rotation AIM To show that optical activity is induced in a certain type of glass when it is in a magnetic field. To investigate the degree of rotation of linearly polarised light as a function of the applied magnetic field and hence determine a parameter which is characteristic of each material and known as Verdet’s constant. BACKGROUND INFORMATION A brief description of the properties and production of polarised light is given in the section labelled: Notes on polarisation. This should be read before proceeding with this experiment. Additional details may be found in the references listed at the end of this experiment. Whereas some materials, such as quartz, are naturally optically active, optical activity can be induced in others by the application of a magnetic field. For such materials, the angle through which the plane of polarisation of a linearly polarised beam is rotated () depends on the thickness of the sample (L), the strength of the magnetic field (B) and on the properties of the particular material. The latter is described by means of a parameter introduced by Verdet, which is wavelength dependent. Thus:  = V B L Lamp Polariser Solenoid Polariser Glass rod A Solenoid power supply Viewing mirror EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE The experimental arrangement is shown in the diagram. Unpolarised white light is produced by a hot filament and viewed using a mirror. • The light from the globe passes through two polarisers as well as the specially doped glass rod. Select one of the colour filters provided and place in the light path. Each of these filters transmits a relatively narrow band of wavelengths centred around a dominant wavelength as listed in the table. Filter No. Dominant Wavelength 98 4350 Å 50 4500 75 4900 58 5300 72 B 6060 92 6700 With the power supply for the coil switched off, (do not simply turn the potentiometer to zero: this still allows some current to flow) adjust one of the polarisers until minimum light is transmitted to the mirror. Minimum transmission can be determined visually. • Decide which polariser you will work with and do not alter the other one during the measurements. • The magnetic field is generated by a current in a solenoid (coil) placed around the glass rod. As the current in the coil is increased, the magnitude of the magnetic field will increase as shown on the calibration curve below. The degree of optical activity will also increase, resulting in some angle of rotation of the plane of polarisation. Hence you will need to rotate your chosen polariser to regain a minimum setting. 0 1 2 3 4 5 0.00 0.02 0.04 0.06 0.08 I (amps) B (tesla) Magnetic field (B) produced by current (I) in solenoid • Record the rotation angle () for coil currents of 0,1,2,3,4 and 5 amps. Avoid having the current in the coil switched on except when measurements are actually being taken as it can easily overheat. If the coil becomes too hot to touch, switch it off and wait for it to cool before proceeding. • Plot  as a function of B and, given that the length of the glass rod is 30 cm, determine Verdet’s constant for this material at the wavelength () in use. • Repeat the experiment for each of the wavelengths available using the filter set provided. • Calculate the logarithm for each V and  and tabulate the results. By plotting log V against log , determine the relationship between V and . [Hint: m log(x) = log (xm) and log(xy) = log(x) + log(y)]. • Calculate the errors involved in your determination of V. The uncertainty in a value of B may be taken as the uncertainty in reading the scale of the calibration curve) • The magnetic field direction can be reversed by reversing the direction of current flow in the coil. Describe the effect of this reversal and provide an explanation. Reference Optics Hecht.

Faculty of Science Technology and Engineering Department of Physics Senior Laboratory Faraday rotation AIM To show that optical activity is induced in a certain type of glass when it is in a magnetic field. To investigate the degree of rotation of linearly polarised light as a function of the applied magnetic field and hence determine a parameter which is characteristic of each material and known as Verdet’s constant. BACKGROUND INFORMATION A brief description of the properties and production of polarised light is given in the section labelled: Notes on polarisation. This should be read before proceeding with this experiment. Additional details may be found in the references listed at the end of this experiment. Whereas some materials, such as quartz, are naturally optically active, optical activity can be induced in others by the application of a magnetic field. For such materials, the angle through which the plane of polarisation of a linearly polarised beam is rotated () depends on the thickness of the sample (L), the strength of the magnetic field (B) and on the properties of the particular material. The latter is described by means of a parameter introduced by Verdet, which is wavelength dependent. Thus:  = V B L Lamp Polariser Solenoid Polariser Glass rod A Solenoid power supply Viewing mirror EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE The experimental arrangement is shown in the diagram. Unpolarised white light is produced by a hot filament and viewed using a mirror. • The light from the globe passes through two polarisers as well as the specially doped glass rod. Select one of the colour filters provided and place in the light path. Each of these filters transmits a relatively narrow band of wavelengths centred around a dominant wavelength as listed in the table. Filter No. Dominant Wavelength 98 4350 Å 50 4500 75 4900 58 5300 72 B 6060 92 6700 With the power supply for the coil switched off, (do not simply turn the potentiometer to zero: this still allows some current to flow) adjust one of the polarisers until minimum light is transmitted to the mirror. Minimum transmission can be determined visually. • Decide which polariser you will work with and do not alter the other one during the measurements. • The magnetic field is generated by a current in a solenoid (coil) placed around the glass rod. As the current in the coil is increased, the magnitude of the magnetic field will increase as shown on the calibration curve below. The degree of optical activity will also increase, resulting in some angle of rotation of the plane of polarisation. Hence you will need to rotate your chosen polariser to regain a minimum setting. 0 1 2 3 4 5 0.00 0.02 0.04 0.06 0.08 I (amps) B (tesla) Magnetic field (B) produced by current (I) in solenoid • Record the rotation angle () for coil currents of 0,1,2,3,4 and 5 amps. Avoid having the current in the coil switched on except when measurements are actually being taken as it can easily overheat. If the coil becomes too hot to touch, switch it off and wait for it to cool before proceeding. • Plot  as a function of B and, given that the length of the glass rod is 30 cm, determine Verdet’s constant for this material at the wavelength () in use. • Repeat the experiment for each of the wavelengths available using the filter set provided. • Calculate the logarithm for each V and  and tabulate the results. By plotting log V against log , determine the relationship between V and . [Hint: m log(x) = log (xm) and log(xy) = log(x) + log(y)]. • Calculate the errors involved in your determination of V. The uncertainty in a value of B may be taken as the uncertainty in reading the scale of the calibration curve) • The magnetic field direction can be reversed by reversing the direction of current flow in the coil. Describe the effect of this reversal and provide an explanation. Reference Optics Hecht.

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Tornado Eddy Investigation Abstract The objective of this lab was to write a bunch of jibberish to provide students with a formatting template. Chemical engineering, bioengineering, and environmental engineering are “process engineering” disciplines. Good abstracts contains real content, such as 560 mL/min, 35 deg, and 67 percent yield. Ideal degreed graduates are technically strong, bring broad system perspectives to problem solving, and have the professional “soft skills” to make immediate contributions in the workplace. The senior lab sequence is the “capstone” opportunity to realize this ideal by integrating technical skills and developing professional soft skills to ensure workforce preparedness. The best conclusions are objective and numerical, such as operating conditions of 45 L/min at 32 deg C with expected costs of $4.55/lb. Background Insect exchange processes are often used in bug filtration, as they are effective at removing either positive or negative insects from water. An insect exchange column is a packed or fluidized bed filled with resin beads. Water flows through the column and most of the insects from the water enter the beads, but some of them pass in between the beads, which makes the exchange of insects non-ideal. Insectac 249 resin is a cation exchange resin, as it is being used to attract cationic Ca2+ from the toxic waste stream. This means the resin is negatively charged, and needs to be regenerated with a solution that produces positively charged insects, in this case, salt water which contains Na+ insects. The resin contains acidic styrene backbones which capture the cationic insects in a reversible process. A curve of Ca2+ concentration concentration vs. time was obtained after a standard curve was made to determine how many drops from the low cost barium test kit from Aquarium Pharmaceuticals (API)1 bottle #2 would correspond to a certain concentration in solution. A standard curve works by preparing solutions with known concentrations and testing these concentrations using the kit to create a curve of number of drops from bottle #2 (obtained result) vs. concentration of Ca2+ in solution (desired response). The standard curve can then be used for every test on the prototype and in the field, to quickly and accurately obtain a concentration from the test kit. The barium concentration vs. time curve can be used to calculate the exchange capacity of the resin and, in later tests, the regeneration efficiency. The curves must be used to get the total amount of barium removed from the water, m. Seen in Equation 2, the volumetric flow rate of water, , is multiplied by the integral from tinitial to tfinal of the total concentration of Ca2+ absorbed by the resin as a function of time, C. (2) 1 http://aquariumpharm.com/Products/Product.aspx?ProductID=72 , date accessed: 11/26/10 CBEE 102: ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING AND COMPUTATIONS PROJECT DESCRIPTION 9 Josephine Hornsnogger CBEE 414, Lab Section M 1300–‐1550 April 19, 2010 Oregon State University School of CBEE A graphical trapezoid method was used to evaluate the integral and get the final solution in equivalents of Ca2+ per L, it must be noted that there are 2 equivalents per mole of barium, as the charge of the barium insect is +2. An initial exchange capacity was calculated for the virgin resin, and an adjusted exchange capacity was calculated once the resin was regenerated. The regenerated resin capacity was found by multiplying the virgin resin capacity by the regeneration efficiency, expressed in Equation 3. (3) See Appendix A for the calculation of the exchange capacities and the regeneration efficiency. Materials and Methods Rosalie and Peter Johnson of Corvallis established the Linus Pauling Chair in Chemical Engineering to honor Oregon State University’s most famous graduate. Peter Johnson, former President and owner of Tekmax, Inc., a company which revolutionized battery manufacturing equipment, is a 1955 graduate of the College of Engineering.2 The Chair, also known as the Linus Pauling Distinguished Engineer or Linus Pauling Engineer (LPE), was originally designed to focus on the traditional “capstone” senior lab sequence in the former Department of Chemical Engineering. The focus is now extended to all the process engineering disciplines. The LPE is charged with establishing strong ties with industry, ensuring current and relevant laboratory experiences, and helping upperclass students develop skills in communication, teamwork, project management, and leadership. Include details about lab procedures not sufficiently detailed in the SOP, problems you had, etc. The bulk solution prepared to create the standard curve was used in the second day of testing to obtain the exchange capacity of the insectac 249 resin. The solution was pumped through a bathroom scale into the prototype insect exchange column. 45 mL of resin was rinsed and added to the column. The bed was fluidized as the solution was pumped through the resin, but for the creation of the Ca2+ concentration vs. time curve, the solution was pumped down through the column, as illustrated in the process flow diagram seen in Figure 1. Figure 1. Process sketch of the insect exchange column used for the project. Ref: http://www.generon.co.uk/acatalog/Chromatography.html 2 Harding, P. Viscosity Measurement SOP, Spring, 2010. CBEE 102: ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING AND COMPUTATIONS PROJECT DESCRIPTION 10 Josephine Hornsnogger CBEE 414, Lab Section M 1300–‐1550 April 19, 2010 Oregon State University School of CBEE A bathroom scale calibration curve was created to ensure that the 150 mL/min, used to calculate the breakthrough time, would be delivered to the resin. The bathroom scale used was a Dwyer brand with flowrates between 0 and 300 cc/min of water. Originally, values between 120 and 180 mL/min were chosen for the calibration, with three runs for each flowrate, however the bathroom scale values were so far away from the measure values the range was extended to 100 to 200 mL/min. The regeneration experiment was performed using a method similar to that used in the water softening experiment, however instead of using a 640 ppm Ca2+ solution to fill the resin, a 6000 ppm Na+ solution was used to eject the Ca2+ from the resin. Twelve samples times were chosen and adjusted as the experiment progressed, with more than half of the samples taken at times less than 10 minutes, and the last sample taken at 45 minutes. The bulk exit solution was also tested to determine the regeneration efficiency. Results and Discussion The senior lab sequence has its roots in the former Department of Chemical Engineering. CHE 414 and 415 were taught in Winter and Spring and included 6 hours of lab time per week. The School has endeavored to incorporate the courses into the BIOE and ENVE curriculum, and this will be complete in 2008-2009. Recent development of the senior lab course sequence is shown chronologically in Fig. 1. In 2006-2007, CHE 414 and 415 were moved to Fall and Winter to enable CHE 416, an elective independent senior project course. Also that year, BIOE students took BIOE 414 in the Fall and BIOE 415 was developed and taught. No BIOE students enrolled in the optional CHE. In 2007-2008, the program transitioned in a new Linus Pauling Engineer and ENVE 414 was offered. Also, approximately 30 percent of BIOE students enrolled in the optional CHE 416. Accommodating the academic calendars of the three disciplines required a reduction in weekly student lab time from 6 to 3 hours. The expected relationship between coughing rate, y, and length of canine, x, is Bx z y Fe− (1) where F is a pre-exponential constant, B is vitamin B concentration and z is the height of an average trapeze artist. 3 The 2008-2009 brings the challenge of the dramatic enrollment increase shown in Fig. 1 and the first offering of ENVE 415. The result, shown on the right in Fig. 1, is the delivery of the senior lab sequence uniformly across the process engineering disciplines. CBEE 416 is expected to drawn approximately of the students that take the 415 courses. In 2007-2008, 414 and 415 were required for CHEs, 414 and 415 for BIOEs, and only 414 for ENVEs. CHE 416 is ostensibly an elective for all disciplines. In 2008-2009, 414 and 415 is required for all disciplines and CHE 416 will be an elective. The content of 414 is essentially 3 Fundamentals of Momentum, Heat, and Mass Transfer, Welty, J.R. et al., 4th edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. CBEE 102: ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING AND COMPUTATIONS PROJECT DESCRIPTION 11 Josephine Hornsnogger CBEE 414, Lab Section M 1300–‐1550 April 19, 2010 Oregon State University School of CBEE identical for all three disciplines, 415 has discipline-specific labs, and 416 consists of senior projects with potentially cross-discipline teams of 2 to 4 students. Tremendous labor and struggling with the lab equipment resulted in the data shown in y = –‐0.29x + 1.71 y = –‐0.25x + 2.03 y = –‐0.135x + 2.20 –‐1.5 –‐1.0 –‐0.5 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 0 2 4 6 8 10 ln y (units) x (units) ln y_1 ln y_2 ln y_3 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 Case 1 Case 2 Case 3 Slope (units) (a) (b) Figure 1. (a) Data for y and x plotted for various values of z and (b) a comparison of slopes for the 3 cases investigate. The log plot slope yields the vitamin B concentration. The slopes were shown to be significantly at the 90% confidence level, but the instructor ran out of time and did not include error bars. The slope changed as predicted by the Snirtenhoffer equation. Improvements to the lab might include advice on how to legally change my name to something less embarrassing. My whole life I have been forced to repeat and spell it. I really feel that this has affected my psychologically. This was perhaps the worst lab I have ever done in my academic career, primarily due to the fact that there was no lab time. I simply typed in this entire report and filled it with jibberish. Some might think nobody will notice, but I know that …… Harding reads every word. Acknowledgments The author acknowledges his elementary teacher for providing truly foundational instruction in addition and subtraction. Jenny Burninbalm was instrumental with guidance on use of the RT-345 dog scratching device. CBEE 102: ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING AND COMPUTATIONS PROJECT DESCRIPTION 12

Tornado Eddy Investigation Abstract The objective of this lab was to write a bunch of jibberish to provide students with a formatting template. Chemical engineering, bioengineering, and environmental engineering are “process engineering” disciplines. Good abstracts contains real content, such as 560 mL/min, 35 deg, and 67 percent yield. Ideal degreed graduates are technically strong, bring broad system perspectives to problem solving, and have the professional “soft skills” to make immediate contributions in the workplace. The senior lab sequence is the “capstone” opportunity to realize this ideal by integrating technical skills and developing professional soft skills to ensure workforce preparedness. The best conclusions are objective and numerical, such as operating conditions of 45 L/min at 32 deg C with expected costs of $4.55/lb. Background Insect exchange processes are often used in bug filtration, as they are effective at removing either positive or negative insects from water. An insect exchange column is a packed or fluidized bed filled with resin beads. Water flows through the column and most of the insects from the water enter the beads, but some of them pass in between the beads, which makes the exchange of insects non-ideal. Insectac 249 resin is a cation exchange resin, as it is being used to attract cationic Ca2+ from the toxic waste stream. This means the resin is negatively charged, and needs to be regenerated with a solution that produces positively charged insects, in this case, salt water which contains Na+ insects. The resin contains acidic styrene backbones which capture the cationic insects in a reversible process. A curve of Ca2+ concentration concentration vs. time was obtained after a standard curve was made to determine how many drops from the low cost barium test kit from Aquarium Pharmaceuticals (API)1 bottle #2 would correspond to a certain concentration in solution. A standard curve works by preparing solutions with known concentrations and testing these concentrations using the kit to create a curve of number of drops from bottle #2 (obtained result) vs. concentration of Ca2+ in solution (desired response). The standard curve can then be used for every test on the prototype and in the field, to quickly and accurately obtain a concentration from the test kit. The barium concentration vs. time curve can be used to calculate the exchange capacity of the resin and, in later tests, the regeneration efficiency. The curves must be used to get the total amount of barium removed from the water, m. Seen in Equation 2, the volumetric flow rate of water, , is multiplied by the integral from tinitial to tfinal of the total concentration of Ca2+ absorbed by the resin as a function of time, C. (2) 1 http://aquariumpharm.com/Products/Product.aspx?ProductID=72 , date accessed: 11/26/10 CBEE 102: ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING AND COMPUTATIONS PROJECT DESCRIPTION 9 Josephine Hornsnogger CBEE 414, Lab Section M 1300–‐1550 April 19, 2010 Oregon State University School of CBEE A graphical trapezoid method was used to evaluate the integral and get the final solution in equivalents of Ca2+ per L, it must be noted that there are 2 equivalents per mole of barium, as the charge of the barium insect is +2. An initial exchange capacity was calculated for the virgin resin, and an adjusted exchange capacity was calculated once the resin was regenerated. The regenerated resin capacity was found by multiplying the virgin resin capacity by the regeneration efficiency, expressed in Equation 3. (3) See Appendix A for the calculation of the exchange capacities and the regeneration efficiency. Materials and Methods Rosalie and Peter Johnson of Corvallis established the Linus Pauling Chair in Chemical Engineering to honor Oregon State University’s most famous graduate. Peter Johnson, former President and owner of Tekmax, Inc., a company which revolutionized battery manufacturing equipment, is a 1955 graduate of the College of Engineering.2 The Chair, also known as the Linus Pauling Distinguished Engineer or Linus Pauling Engineer (LPE), was originally designed to focus on the traditional “capstone” senior lab sequence in the former Department of Chemical Engineering. The focus is now extended to all the process engineering disciplines. The LPE is charged with establishing strong ties with industry, ensuring current and relevant laboratory experiences, and helping upperclass students develop skills in communication, teamwork, project management, and leadership. Include details about lab procedures not sufficiently detailed in the SOP, problems you had, etc. The bulk solution prepared to create the standard curve was used in the second day of testing to obtain the exchange capacity of the insectac 249 resin. The solution was pumped through a bathroom scale into the prototype insect exchange column. 45 mL of resin was rinsed and added to the column. The bed was fluidized as the solution was pumped through the resin, but for the creation of the Ca2+ concentration vs. time curve, the solution was pumped down through the column, as illustrated in the process flow diagram seen in Figure 1. Figure 1. Process sketch of the insect exchange column used for the project. Ref: http://www.generon.co.uk/acatalog/Chromatography.html 2 Harding, P. Viscosity Measurement SOP, Spring, 2010. CBEE 102: ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING AND COMPUTATIONS PROJECT DESCRIPTION 10 Josephine Hornsnogger CBEE 414, Lab Section M 1300–‐1550 April 19, 2010 Oregon State University School of CBEE A bathroom scale calibration curve was created to ensure that the 150 mL/min, used to calculate the breakthrough time, would be delivered to the resin. The bathroom scale used was a Dwyer brand with flowrates between 0 and 300 cc/min of water. Originally, values between 120 and 180 mL/min were chosen for the calibration, with three runs for each flowrate, however the bathroom scale values were so far away from the measure values the range was extended to 100 to 200 mL/min. The regeneration experiment was performed using a method similar to that used in the water softening experiment, however instead of using a 640 ppm Ca2+ solution to fill the resin, a 6000 ppm Na+ solution was used to eject the Ca2+ from the resin. Twelve samples times were chosen and adjusted as the experiment progressed, with more than half of the samples taken at times less than 10 minutes, and the last sample taken at 45 minutes. The bulk exit solution was also tested to determine the regeneration efficiency. Results and Discussion The senior lab sequence has its roots in the former Department of Chemical Engineering. CHE 414 and 415 were taught in Winter and Spring and included 6 hours of lab time per week. The School has endeavored to incorporate the courses into the BIOE and ENVE curriculum, and this will be complete in 2008-2009. Recent development of the senior lab course sequence is shown chronologically in Fig. 1. In 2006-2007, CHE 414 and 415 were moved to Fall and Winter to enable CHE 416, an elective independent senior project course. Also that year, BIOE students took BIOE 414 in the Fall and BIOE 415 was developed and taught. No BIOE students enrolled in the optional CHE. In 2007-2008, the program transitioned in a new Linus Pauling Engineer and ENVE 414 was offered. Also, approximately 30 percent of BIOE students enrolled in the optional CHE 416. Accommodating the academic calendars of the three disciplines required a reduction in weekly student lab time from 6 to 3 hours. The expected relationship between coughing rate, y, and length of canine, x, is Bx z y Fe− (1) where F is a pre-exponential constant, B is vitamin B concentration and z is the height of an average trapeze artist. 3 The 2008-2009 brings the challenge of the dramatic enrollment increase shown in Fig. 1 and the first offering of ENVE 415. The result, shown on the right in Fig. 1, is the delivery of the senior lab sequence uniformly across the process engineering disciplines. CBEE 416 is expected to drawn approximately of the students that take the 415 courses. In 2007-2008, 414 and 415 were required for CHEs, 414 and 415 for BIOEs, and only 414 for ENVEs. CHE 416 is ostensibly an elective for all disciplines. In 2008-2009, 414 and 415 is required for all disciplines and CHE 416 will be an elective. The content of 414 is essentially 3 Fundamentals of Momentum, Heat, and Mass Transfer, Welty, J.R. et al., 4th edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. CBEE 102: ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING AND COMPUTATIONS PROJECT DESCRIPTION 11 Josephine Hornsnogger CBEE 414, Lab Section M 1300–‐1550 April 19, 2010 Oregon State University School of CBEE identical for all three disciplines, 415 has discipline-specific labs, and 416 consists of senior projects with potentially cross-discipline teams of 2 to 4 students. Tremendous labor and struggling with the lab equipment resulted in the data shown in y = –‐0.29x + 1.71 y = –‐0.25x + 2.03 y = –‐0.135x + 2.20 –‐1.5 –‐1.0 –‐0.5 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 0 2 4 6 8 10 ln y (units) x (units) ln y_1 ln y_2 ln y_3 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 Case 1 Case 2 Case 3 Slope (units) (a) (b) Figure 1. (a) Data for y and x plotted for various values of z and (b) a comparison of slopes for the 3 cases investigate. The log plot slope yields the vitamin B concentration. The slopes were shown to be significantly at the 90% confidence level, but the instructor ran out of time and did not include error bars. The slope changed as predicted by the Snirtenhoffer equation. Improvements to the lab might include advice on how to legally change my name to something less embarrassing. My whole life I have been forced to repeat and spell it. I really feel that this has affected my psychologically. This was perhaps the worst lab I have ever done in my academic career, primarily due to the fact that there was no lab time. I simply typed in this entire report and filled it with jibberish. Some might think nobody will notice, but I know that …… Harding reads every word. Acknowledgments The author acknowledges his elementary teacher for providing truly foundational instruction in addition and subtraction. Jenny Burninbalm was instrumental with guidance on use of the RT-345 dog scratching device. CBEE 102: ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING AND COMPUTATIONS PROJECT DESCRIPTION 12

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15. Which of the following statements is CORRECT? a. One disadvantage of organizing a business as a corporation rather than a partnership is that the equity investors in a corporation are exposed to unlimited liability. b. Using restrictive covenants in debt agreements is an effective way to reduce conflicts between stockholders and managers. c. Managers generally welcome hostile takeovers since the “raider” generally offers a price for the stock that is higher than the price before the takeover action started. d. The managers of established, stable companies sometimes attempt to get their state legislatures to impose rules that make it more difficult for raiders to succeed with hostile takeovers. e. The managers of established, stable companies sometimes attempt to get their state legislatures to remove rules that make it more difficult for raiders to succeed with hostile takeovers.

15. Which of the following statements is CORRECT? a. One disadvantage of organizing a business as a corporation rather than a partnership is that the equity investors in a corporation are exposed to unlimited liability. b. Using restrictive covenants in debt agreements is an effective way to reduce conflicts between stockholders and managers. c. Managers generally welcome hostile takeovers since the “raider” generally offers a price for the stock that is higher than the price before the takeover action started. d. The managers of established, stable companies sometimes attempt to get their state legislatures to impose rules that make it more difficult for raiders to succeed with hostile takeovers. e. The managers of established, stable companies sometimes attempt to get their state legislatures to remove rules that make it more difficult for raiders to succeed with hostile takeovers.

Answer: d 15.    Which of the following statements is CORRECT?  … Read More...
Our petty cash fund was established for $500. The amount of cash on hand in petty cash totals $110 and includes the following receipts: Office Supplies $220 Repairs Expense $100 Miscellaneous Expense $60 Which of the following would be included in your journal entry to replenish the petty cash fund? Select one: a. Credit Petty Cash $500. b. Credit Cash $390. c. Credit Petty Cash $390. d. Credit Cash Short and Over $10.

Our petty cash fund was established for $500. The amount of cash on hand in petty cash totals $110 and includes the following receipts: Office Supplies $220 Repairs Expense $100 Miscellaneous Expense $60 Which of the following would be included in your journal entry to replenish the petty cash fund? Select one: a. Credit Petty Cash $500. b. Credit Cash $390. c. Credit Petty Cash $390. d. Credit Cash Short and Over $10.

Our petty cash fund was established for $500. The amount … Read More...
1A. You administer an IV with 3 liters of 50 mM NaCl to a person whose osmolarity is 300 mOsM and whose total body water is 30 L. Fill in the table below: 3 L of 50 mM NaCl Total body ECF ICF Solute (osmoles) Volume (L) Concentration (OsM) 1B. The same person from the previous problem instead is given 1 liter of an IV contained 250 mOsM NaCl and 50 mOsM urea. Com Total body ECF ICF Solute Volume Concentration 2. You isolate intact mitochondria as described in class and equilibrate them in a buffered solution at pH 9, containing 0.1 M KCl and ADP plus Pi but without succinate. You then collect them by centrifugation, and quickly resuspend them in a new buffer at pH 7, without KCl , but with valinomycin (a K+ ionophore). Note: the K+ rushing out will create a huge positive charge differential. a. Describe what happens to proton concentrations in the intermembrane space and the matrix at each step of the study. b. What do you predict will be the result on oxygen consumption and the production of ATP?   3. A negatively charged nutrient (equivalent charge of one electron) is actively transported from the outside to the inside of a cell membrane; i.e. a cell captures energy from the hydrolysis of ATP in order to bring a molecule from the outside of the cell, where it is present at a low concentration, to the inside of the cell, where it is present at higher concentration. If the molecular species to be transported is present at a concentration of 34.5 nM on the outside of the cell, the potential on the outside of the cell is +75 mV, the potential on the inside of the cell is -35 mV, and the efficiency at which energy from the hydrolysis of ATP is captured for this active transport process is 59%, what is the maximum concentration of the transported species that may be achieved inside the cell?   4. . ATP + H2O -> ADP + Pi G0 = -7.3 kcal/mol In a chemical system that has two different solute concentrations, the Gibbs free energy that is available to do work is: ΔG = RT ln [C1/C2], where R and T are the gas constant (2 cal/mol K) and temperature (Kelvin). C1 and C2 refer to the concentrations (e.g. molarities, M) of a solute on different sides of a membrane. (a) For a one unit difference in pH across a cellular membrane, what is the energy (in kcal/mol) that is available to do chemical work? (b) This gradient is to be used to drive the reaction synthesis of ATP from ADP and Pi. A concentration gradient of any solute has potential energy. When the solute is charged, a voltage is also established across the membrane, which also adds to the total potential energy. What fraction of the energy needed to drive the reaction is provided by the voltage across the membrane?

1A. You administer an IV with 3 liters of 50 mM NaCl to a person whose osmolarity is 300 mOsM and whose total body water is 30 L. Fill in the table below: 3 L of 50 mM NaCl Total body ECF ICF Solute (osmoles) Volume (L) Concentration (OsM) 1B. The same person from the previous problem instead is given 1 liter of an IV contained 250 mOsM NaCl and 50 mOsM urea. Com Total body ECF ICF Solute Volume Concentration 2. You isolate intact mitochondria as described in class and equilibrate them in a buffered solution at pH 9, containing 0.1 M KCl and ADP plus Pi but without succinate. You then collect them by centrifugation, and quickly resuspend them in a new buffer at pH 7, without KCl , but with valinomycin (a K+ ionophore). Note: the K+ rushing out will create a huge positive charge differential. a. Describe what happens to proton concentrations in the intermembrane space and the matrix at each step of the study. b. What do you predict will be the result on oxygen consumption and the production of ATP?   3. A negatively charged nutrient (equivalent charge of one electron) is actively transported from the outside to the inside of a cell membrane; i.e. a cell captures energy from the hydrolysis of ATP in order to bring a molecule from the outside of the cell, where it is present at a low concentration, to the inside of the cell, where it is present at higher concentration. If the molecular species to be transported is present at a concentration of 34.5 nM on the outside of the cell, the potential on the outside of the cell is +75 mV, the potential on the inside of the cell is -35 mV, and the efficiency at which energy from the hydrolysis of ATP is captured for this active transport process is 59%, what is the maximum concentration of the transported species that may be achieved inside the cell?   4. . ATP + H2O -> ADP + Pi G0 = -7.3 kcal/mol In a chemical system that has two different solute concentrations, the Gibbs free energy that is available to do work is: ΔG = RT ln [C1/C2], where R and T are the gas constant (2 cal/mol K) and temperature (Kelvin). C1 and C2 refer to the concentrations (e.g. molarities, M) of a solute on different sides of a membrane. (a) For a one unit difference in pH across a cellular membrane, what is the energy (in kcal/mol) that is available to do chemical work? (b) This gradient is to be used to drive the reaction synthesis of ATP from ADP and Pi. A concentration gradient of any solute has potential energy. When the solute is charged, a voltage is also established across the membrane, which also adds to the total potential energy. What fraction of the energy needed to drive the reaction is provided by the voltage across the membrane?

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