1 ACTIVITY PURPOSE The purpose of this activity is to give you practice preparing a four-week work schedule. PROCESS Follow the steps listed below to prepare a schedule. 1. Read the Information Sheet: Scheduling Employees. 2. The pay week for this medical record service runs Sunday – Saturday. The pay period is two pay weeks. Each full-time employee cannot work more than 40 hours per pay week, or 80 hours per pay period. Each part-time employee works 20 hours per pay week – 40 hours per pay period. 3. The first Friday of the four – week period is a holiday. 4. The medical record service has 24 hour coverage, seven days a week. All full-time employees work a five day pay week, eight hours per day, with rotating weekend coverage. Part-time employees work four hours Monday – Friday, except for their rotation weekend. On those days they work an eight hour shift. Remember to adjust their time accordingly. 5. The Assistant Director and all supervisors, except the Tumor Registry Supervisor, should be scheduled for rotating weekend coverage. 2 6. All employees, except the Tumor Registry employees, should be scheduled on a rotating basis for weekend coverage. 7. For weekend and holiday coverage, there needs to be at least two clerks and one transcriptionist on days and evenings, one clerk and one transcriptionist at night. 8. The Department Director has scheduled a two – week vacation for the first two full weeks of the four – week schedule. 9. Employees who work holidays must take the holiday time within the pay period in which the holiday occurs. 10.Use the following marks on the schedule: X – work eight hours V – vacation H – holiday D – day off 4 – hours for part-time employees 3 PERSONNEL OF HUFFMAN MEMORIAL MEDICAL RECORD DEPARTMENT DAYS (7:00 A.M. – 3:30 P.M.) Director Diane Lucas Assistant Director JoAnn DeWitt Coding 1 Supervisor – Nina Long 3 Coding/PAS Clerks – Cheryl Newman Pam Rogers Janet Bennett Transcription 1 Supervisor – 6 Transcribers – Jessica DuBois Eileen Andrews Iris Williams Diane Henderson Vivian Thomas Lois Fisher Emma Daily Filing/Retrieval 1 Supervisor – 4 Clerks – 1 Part-time Clerk – Bill James Darlene Cook Janice Stivers Larry Patterson Don Williamson Susan Evanston Tumor Registry 1 Supervisor – 1 Clerk – 1 Part-time Clerk – Mabel Smith Pauline Erskine Suzanne Chapman EVENING (3:00 P.M. – 11:00 P.M.) Transcription 1 Part-time – Beth Richman Filing/Retrieval 1 Supervisor – 2 Clerks – 1 Part-time Clerk – Daniel Johnson Harry Skinner Matthew Scott Anne Madison NIGHTS (11:00 P.M. – 7:00 A.M.) Transcription 3 Transcribers – Louise Wilson Jane Matters Nancy Lipman Filing/Retrieval 2 Clerks – Lily Jamison Helen Benson 4 INFORMATION SHEET SCHEDULING EMPLOYEES In addition to the planning, organizing and controlling of a medical record service, managers must accurately plan the work pattern for employees. This plan must insure that all duties are adequately covered, all shifts have sufficient numbers of people to perform duties, and employees are given appropriate days off. Scheduling encompasses both short term and long term plans. Short term scheduling involves planning work on a daily and/or weekly basis. Long term scheduling generally covers a four – to six – week time period, as well as yearly planning for holidays. In larger health care facilities with the medical record service providing 24 hour service, seven days a week, advanced planning is a requisite to a smooth operation. In smaller facilities with shorter hours of service, the schedule is less complex. The number of employees needed for weekend work for those facilities open on weekends is totally dependent upon the weekend workload. A volume of seventy (70) to ninety (90) discharges per day generally requires two (2) medical record clerks to process those discharges, as well as to perform the other daily responsibilities of the medical record service. It is also advisable to schedule a supervisor during the weekend in the event that any problems arise which a clerk might not be able to handle (i.e. medico-legal questions, irate patients or physicians). If you work in a department that has an active work 5 measurement program, valuable scheduling information can be obtained from the data reported. In planning for holidays, it is important to remember to: 1. obtain employee preferences for which holidays they might choose to work; 2. keep track of who has worked which holidays; 3. if a holiday occurs on a Friday or a Monday and the employee must work on the holiday, try to give them a Friday or Monday off to compensate. It is important for you to be fair in terms of assigning employees weekend work and scheduling Holidays. Everyone should share the responsibility equally. If you have all supervisors work one weekend per month, then that schedule should be followed. If you have clerks working every other weekend, then that pattern should be followed consistently. When preparing a schedule it is best to put in all the “givens” first. For example, if you have vacations scheduled for the four weeks you’re preparing, then those should be marked in first. Also included in this category would be employees who do not work weekends (i.e. personnel in the Tumor Registry). Once all work times have been scheduled, you must be certain that an employee receives two (2) days off for every seven (7) days. If an employee works more than forty (40) hours in one (1) week, the facility must pat time-an-a-half for all hours over forty. Some facilities are experimenting with a variety of scheduling techniques: flex time and the four-day work week. Both techniques have been 6 heavily debated. The final questions regarding these nontraditional alternatives end up being: 1. Are your employees willing to try it? 2. Are you ready to handle the extra planning these alternatives may warrant? 3. Do you have the necessary resources, including equipment, to accommodate a nontraditional scheduling alternative? 4. Will administrator of the facility support your proposal? Once you have established answers to those questions you are ready to embark on a new technique of scheduling. Scheduling employees can be one of the most challenging tasks that a manager faces. Whether you elect to try one of the nontraditional alternatives or use the five-day work week, the manager must: 1. be fair; 2. apply all guidelines to every employee consistently 3. utilize all available data to arrive at appropriate numbers for weekend and holiday staffing requirements; and 4. maximize the utilization of equipment and resources.

1 ACTIVITY PURPOSE The purpose of this activity is to give you practice preparing a four-week work schedule. PROCESS Follow the steps listed below to prepare a schedule. 1. Read the Information Sheet: Scheduling Employees. 2. The pay week for this medical record service runs Sunday – Saturday. The pay period is two pay weeks. Each full-time employee cannot work more than 40 hours per pay week, or 80 hours per pay period. Each part-time employee works 20 hours per pay week – 40 hours per pay period. 3. The first Friday of the four – week period is a holiday. 4. The medical record service has 24 hour coverage, seven days a week. All full-time employees work a five day pay week, eight hours per day, with rotating weekend coverage. Part-time employees work four hours Monday – Friday, except for their rotation weekend. On those days they work an eight hour shift. Remember to adjust their time accordingly. 5. The Assistant Director and all supervisors, except the Tumor Registry Supervisor, should be scheduled for rotating weekend coverage. 2 6. All employees, except the Tumor Registry employees, should be scheduled on a rotating basis for weekend coverage. 7. For weekend and holiday coverage, there needs to be at least two clerks and one transcriptionist on days and evenings, one clerk and one transcriptionist at night. 8. The Department Director has scheduled a two – week vacation for the first two full weeks of the four – week schedule. 9. Employees who work holidays must take the holiday time within the pay period in which the holiday occurs. 10.Use the following marks on the schedule: X – work eight hours V – vacation H – holiday D – day off 4 – hours for part-time employees 3 PERSONNEL OF HUFFMAN MEMORIAL MEDICAL RECORD DEPARTMENT DAYS (7:00 A.M. – 3:30 P.M.) Director Diane Lucas Assistant Director JoAnn DeWitt Coding 1 Supervisor – Nina Long 3 Coding/PAS Clerks – Cheryl Newman Pam Rogers Janet Bennett Transcription 1 Supervisor – 6 Transcribers – Jessica DuBois Eileen Andrews Iris Williams Diane Henderson Vivian Thomas Lois Fisher Emma Daily Filing/Retrieval 1 Supervisor – 4 Clerks – 1 Part-time Clerk – Bill James Darlene Cook Janice Stivers Larry Patterson Don Williamson Susan Evanston Tumor Registry 1 Supervisor – 1 Clerk – 1 Part-time Clerk – Mabel Smith Pauline Erskine Suzanne Chapman EVENING (3:00 P.M. – 11:00 P.M.) Transcription 1 Part-time – Beth Richman Filing/Retrieval 1 Supervisor – 2 Clerks – 1 Part-time Clerk – Daniel Johnson Harry Skinner Matthew Scott Anne Madison NIGHTS (11:00 P.M. – 7:00 A.M.) Transcription 3 Transcribers – Louise Wilson Jane Matters Nancy Lipman Filing/Retrieval 2 Clerks – Lily Jamison Helen Benson 4 INFORMATION SHEET SCHEDULING EMPLOYEES In addition to the planning, organizing and controlling of a medical record service, managers must accurately plan the work pattern for employees. This plan must insure that all duties are adequately covered, all shifts have sufficient numbers of people to perform duties, and employees are given appropriate days off. Scheduling encompasses both short term and long term plans. Short term scheduling involves planning work on a daily and/or weekly basis. Long term scheduling generally covers a four – to six – week time period, as well as yearly planning for holidays. In larger health care facilities with the medical record service providing 24 hour service, seven days a week, advanced planning is a requisite to a smooth operation. In smaller facilities with shorter hours of service, the schedule is less complex. The number of employees needed for weekend work for those facilities open on weekends is totally dependent upon the weekend workload. A volume of seventy (70) to ninety (90) discharges per day generally requires two (2) medical record clerks to process those discharges, as well as to perform the other daily responsibilities of the medical record service. It is also advisable to schedule a supervisor during the weekend in the event that any problems arise which a clerk might not be able to handle (i.e. medico-legal questions, irate patients or physicians). If you work in a department that has an active work 5 measurement program, valuable scheduling information can be obtained from the data reported. In planning for holidays, it is important to remember to: 1. obtain employee preferences for which holidays they might choose to work; 2. keep track of who has worked which holidays; 3. if a holiday occurs on a Friday or a Monday and the employee must work on the holiday, try to give them a Friday or Monday off to compensate. It is important for you to be fair in terms of assigning employees weekend work and scheduling Holidays. Everyone should share the responsibility equally. If you have all supervisors work one weekend per month, then that schedule should be followed. If you have clerks working every other weekend, then that pattern should be followed consistently. When preparing a schedule it is best to put in all the “givens” first. For example, if you have vacations scheduled for the four weeks you’re preparing, then those should be marked in first. Also included in this category would be employees who do not work weekends (i.e. personnel in the Tumor Registry). Once all work times have been scheduled, you must be certain that an employee receives two (2) days off for every seven (7) days. If an employee works more than forty (40) hours in one (1) week, the facility must pat time-an-a-half for all hours over forty. Some facilities are experimenting with a variety of scheduling techniques: flex time and the four-day work week. Both techniques have been 6 heavily debated. The final questions regarding these nontraditional alternatives end up being: 1. Are your employees willing to try it? 2. Are you ready to handle the extra planning these alternatives may warrant? 3. Do you have the necessary resources, including equipment, to accommodate a nontraditional scheduling alternative? 4. Will administrator of the facility support your proposal? Once you have established answers to those questions you are ready to embark on a new technique of scheduling. Scheduling employees can be one of the most challenging tasks that a manager faces. Whether you elect to try one of the nontraditional alternatives or use the five-day work week, the manager must: 1. be fair; 2. apply all guidelines to every employee consistently 3. utilize all available data to arrive at appropriate numbers for weekend and holiday staffing requirements; and 4. maximize the utilization of equipment and resources.

Chapter 13 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 16, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy A Matter of Some Gravity Learning Goal: To understand Newton’s law of gravitation and the distinction between inertial and gravitational masses. In this problem, you will practice using Newton’s law of gravitation. According to that law, the magnitude of the gravitational force between two small particles of masses and , separated by a distance , is given by , where is the universal gravitational constant, whose numerical value (in SI units) is . This formula applies not only to small particles, but also to spherical objects. In fact, the gravitational force between two uniform spheres is the same as if we concentrated all the mass of each sphere at its center. Thus, by modeling the Earth and the Moon as uniform spheres, you can use the particle approximation when calculating the force of gravity between them. Be careful in using Newton’s law to choose the correct value for . To calculate the force of gravitational attraction between two uniform spheres, the distance in the equation for Newton’s law of gravitation is the distance between the centers of the spheres. For instance, if a small object such as an elephant is located on the surface of the Earth, the radius of the Earth would be used in the equation. Note that the force of gravity acting on an object located near the surface of a planet is often called weight. Also note that in situations involving satellites, you are often given the altitude of the satellite, that is, the distance from the satellite to the surface of the planet; this is not the distance to be used in the formula for the law of gravitation. There is a potentially confusing issue involving mass. Mass is defined as a measure of an object’s inertia, that is, its ability to resist acceleration. Newton’s second law demonstrates the relationship between mass, acceleration, and the net force acting on an object: . We can now refer to this measure of inertia more precisely as the inertial mass. On the other hand, the masses of the particles that appear in the expression for the law of gravity seem to have nothing to do with inertia: Rather, they serve as a measure of the strength of gravitational interactions. It would be reasonable to call such a property gravitational mass. Does this mean that every object has two different masses? Generally speaking, yes. However, the good news is that according to the latest, highly precise, measurements, the inertial and the gravitational mass of an object are, in fact, equal to each other; it is an established consensus among physicists that there is only one mass after all, which is a measure of both the object’s inertia and its ability to engage in gravitational interactions. Note that this consensus, like everything else in science, is open to possible amendments in the future. In this problem, you will answer several questions that require the use of Newton’s law of gravitation. Part A Two particles are separated by a certain distance. The force of gravitational interaction between them is . Now the separation between the particles is tripled. Find the new force of gravitational Fg m1 m2 r Fg = G m1m2 r2 G 6.67 × 10−11 N m2 kg2 r r rEarth F  = m net a F0

Chapter 13 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 16, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy A Matter of Some Gravity Learning Goal: To understand Newton’s law of gravitation and the distinction between inertial and gravitational masses. In this problem, you will practice using Newton’s law of gravitation. According to that law, the magnitude of the gravitational force between two small particles of masses and , separated by a distance , is given by , where is the universal gravitational constant, whose numerical value (in SI units) is . This formula applies not only to small particles, but also to spherical objects. In fact, the gravitational force between two uniform spheres is the same as if we concentrated all the mass of each sphere at its center. Thus, by modeling the Earth and the Moon as uniform spheres, you can use the particle approximation when calculating the force of gravity between them. Be careful in using Newton’s law to choose the correct value for . To calculate the force of gravitational attraction between two uniform spheres, the distance in the equation for Newton’s law of gravitation is the distance between the centers of the spheres. For instance, if a small object such as an elephant is located on the surface of the Earth, the radius of the Earth would be used in the equation. Note that the force of gravity acting on an object located near the surface of a planet is often called weight. Also note that in situations involving satellites, you are often given the altitude of the satellite, that is, the distance from the satellite to the surface of the planet; this is not the distance to be used in the formula for the law of gravitation. There is a potentially confusing issue involving mass. Mass is defined as a measure of an object’s inertia, that is, its ability to resist acceleration. Newton’s second law demonstrates the relationship between mass, acceleration, and the net force acting on an object: . We can now refer to this measure of inertia more precisely as the inertial mass. On the other hand, the masses of the particles that appear in the expression for the law of gravity seem to have nothing to do with inertia: Rather, they serve as a measure of the strength of gravitational interactions. It would be reasonable to call such a property gravitational mass. Does this mean that every object has two different masses? Generally speaking, yes. However, the good news is that according to the latest, highly precise, measurements, the inertial and the gravitational mass of an object are, in fact, equal to each other; it is an established consensus among physicists that there is only one mass after all, which is a measure of both the object’s inertia and its ability to engage in gravitational interactions. Note that this consensus, like everything else in science, is open to possible amendments in the future. In this problem, you will answer several questions that require the use of Newton’s law of gravitation. Part A Two particles are separated by a certain distance. The force of gravitational interaction between them is . Now the separation between the particles is tripled. Find the new force of gravitational Fg m1 m2 r Fg = G m1m2 r2 G 6.67 × 10−11 N m2 kg2 r r rEarth F  = m net a F0

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Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture Spring 2015 Look through popular magazines, and see if you can find advertisements that objectify women in order to sell a product. Alternately, you may use an advertisement on television (but make sure to provide a link to the ad so I can see it!). Study these images then write a paper about objectification that deals with all or some of the following: • What effect(s), if any, do you think the objectification of women’s bodies has on our culture? • Jean Kilbourne states “turning a human being into a thing is almost always the first step toward justifying violence against that person.” What do you think she means by this? Do you agree with her reasoning? Why or why not? • Some people would argue that depicting a woman’s body as an object is a form of art. What is your opinion of this point of view? Explain your reasoning. • Why do you think that women are objectified more often than men are? • How does sexualization and objectification play out differently across racial lines? • Kilbourne explains that the consequences of being objectified are different – and more serious – for women than for men. Do you agree? How is the world different for women than it is for men? How do objectified images of women interact with those in our culture differently from the way images of men do? Why is it important to look at images in the context of the culture? • What is the difference between sexual objectification and sexual subjectification? (Ros Gill ) • How do ads construct violent white masculinity and how does that vision of masculinity hurt both men and women? Throughout your written analysis, be sure to make clear and specific reference to the images you selected, and please submit these images with your paper. Make sure you engage with and reference to at least 4 of the following authors: Kilbourne, Bordo, Hunter & Soto, Rose, Durham, Gill, Katz, Schuchardt, Ono and Buescher. Guidelines:  Keep your content focused on structural, systemic, institutional factors rather than the individual: BE ANALYTICAL NOT ANECDOTAL.  Avoid using the first person or including personal stories/reactions. You must make sure to actively engage with your readings: these essays need to be informed and framed by the theoretical material you have been reading this semester.  Keep within the 4-6 page limit; use 12-point font, double spacing and 1-inch margins.  Use formal writing conventions (introduction/thesis statement, body, conclusion) and correct grammar. Resources may be cited within the text of your paper, i.e. (Walters, 2013).

Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture Spring 2015 Look through popular magazines, and see if you can find advertisements that objectify women in order to sell a product. Alternately, you may use an advertisement on television (but make sure to provide a link to the ad so I can see it!). Study these images then write a paper about objectification that deals with all or some of the following: • What effect(s), if any, do you think the objectification of women’s bodies has on our culture? • Jean Kilbourne states “turning a human being into a thing is almost always the first step toward justifying violence against that person.” What do you think she means by this? Do you agree with her reasoning? Why or why not? • Some people would argue that depicting a woman’s body as an object is a form of art. What is your opinion of this point of view? Explain your reasoning. • Why do you think that women are objectified more often than men are? • How does sexualization and objectification play out differently across racial lines? • Kilbourne explains that the consequences of being objectified are different – and more serious – for women than for men. Do you agree? How is the world different for women than it is for men? How do objectified images of women interact with those in our culture differently from the way images of men do? Why is it important to look at images in the context of the culture? • What is the difference between sexual objectification and sexual subjectification? (Ros Gill ) • How do ads construct violent white masculinity and how does that vision of masculinity hurt both men and women? Throughout your written analysis, be sure to make clear and specific reference to the images you selected, and please submit these images with your paper. Make sure you engage with and reference to at least 4 of the following authors: Kilbourne, Bordo, Hunter & Soto, Rose, Durham, Gill, Katz, Schuchardt, Ono and Buescher. Guidelines:  Keep your content focused on structural, systemic, institutional factors rather than the individual: BE ANALYTICAL NOT ANECDOTAL.  Avoid using the first person or including personal stories/reactions. You must make sure to actively engage with your readings: these essays need to be informed and framed by the theoretical material you have been reading this semester.  Keep within the 4-6 page limit; use 12-point font, double spacing and 1-inch margins.  Use formal writing conventions (introduction/thesis statement, body, conclusion) and correct grammar. Resources may be cited within the text of your paper, i.e. (Walters, 2013).

The objectification of women has been a very controversial topic … Read More...
Watch the video, and then answer the questions below. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XUF-T5JubDg#t=49 According to the video, which of the three scholars accepted the invasion of Iraq? A. Realists and liberals tended to reject it, but the constructivists thought it was a good idea. B. Realists tended to reject it, but the constructivists and liberals thought it was a good idea. C. Liberals tended to reject it, but the realists and constructivists thought it was a good idea. D. All of the scholars rejected it. E. None of the scholars rejected it. Which of the following was NOT given as a reason to be concerned about the war in Iraq? A. First and foremost, peace needed to prevail. B. The invasion was form of moralizing or crusading. C. The invasion undermined respect for International law. D. The invasion didn’t serve clear U.S. interests. E. The situation had the potential to become a quagmire. In the video, one of the topics under discussion concerns democratic governance. How much do their views conflict? A. Caleb Gallemore and J.D. Bowen disagree, because democracy is a social construct. B. Randall Schweller and J.D. Bowen disagree, because one side believes that democracy is impossible to spread while the other thinks it may be possible. C. Randall Schweller and Caleb Gallemore disagree with J.D. Bowen, because the first two view the attempt to spread democracy as a moralizing crusade. D. J.D. Bowen and Randall Schweller disagree with Caleb Gallemore, who doesn’t think that democracy can be spread successfully. E. All of the authors agree on the possibility of establishing democracy in Iraq. What sorts of things were on the minds of constructivists considering the war in Iraq? A. the history of colonialism, tensions between Islam and the West, and the United States’ perceived role as a world leader B. whether the war served U.S. interests C. whether the Coalition of the Willing would have forces sufficient to topple Saddam Hussein D. the likelihood that the war would result in a quagmire E. the importance of promoting human rights Professor Bowen says that liberals disagreed about invading Iraq but agreed on the form of government to be established there. What was that form of government? A. a loose confederacy of tribes B. a constitutional monarchy with negotiated rights for minorities C. a communist dictatorship with religious tolerance D. a democracy with respect for human rights E. a long-term military installation with UN forces overseeing government functions

Watch the video, and then answer the questions below. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XUF-T5JubDg#t=49 According to the video, which of the three scholars accepted the invasion of Iraq? A. Realists and liberals tended to reject it, but the constructivists thought it was a good idea. B. Realists tended to reject it, but the constructivists and liberals thought it was a good idea. C. Liberals tended to reject it, but the realists and constructivists thought it was a good idea. D. All of the scholars rejected it. E. None of the scholars rejected it. Which of the following was NOT given as a reason to be concerned about the war in Iraq? A. First and foremost, peace needed to prevail. B. The invasion was form of moralizing or crusading. C. The invasion undermined respect for International law. D. The invasion didn’t serve clear U.S. interests. E. The situation had the potential to become a quagmire. In the video, one of the topics under discussion concerns democratic governance. How much do their views conflict? A. Caleb Gallemore and J.D. Bowen disagree, because democracy is a social construct. B. Randall Schweller and J.D. Bowen disagree, because one side believes that democracy is impossible to spread while the other thinks it may be possible. C. Randall Schweller and Caleb Gallemore disagree with J.D. Bowen, because the first two view the attempt to spread democracy as a moralizing crusade. D. J.D. Bowen and Randall Schweller disagree with Caleb Gallemore, who doesn’t think that democracy can be spread successfully. E. All of the authors agree on the possibility of establishing democracy in Iraq. What sorts of things were on the minds of constructivists considering the war in Iraq? A. the history of colonialism, tensions between Islam and the West, and the United States’ perceived role as a world leader B. whether the war served U.S. interests C. whether the Coalition of the Willing would have forces sufficient to topple Saddam Hussein D. the likelihood that the war would result in a quagmire E. the importance of promoting human rights Professor Bowen says that liberals disagreed about invading Iraq but agreed on the form of government to be established there. What was that form of government? A. a loose confederacy of tribes B. a constitutional monarchy with negotiated rights for minorities C. a communist dictatorship with religious tolerance D. a democracy with respect for human rights E. a long-term military installation with UN forces overseeing government functions

Watch the video, and then answer the questions below. According … Read More...
Overview The human body can regulate its function responding to the change of its environment. Temperature is one of the factors which can modulate the body function. Refer to the related lectures and other resources; answer the followed questions (question 1-5 need at least 400 words together): Q1 In case of cold weather how does human body detect the coldness? Explain the signal detection, delivery, processing and involved cells, tissues and organs.

Overview The human body can regulate its function responding to the change of its environment. Temperature is one of the factors which can modulate the body function. Refer to the related lectures and other resources; answer the followed questions (question 1-5 need at least 400 words together): Q1 In case of cold weather how does human body detect the coldness? Explain the signal detection, delivery, processing and involved cells, tissues and organs.

  The chief brain mechanisms for heat regulation are established … Read More...
Chapter 13 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 16, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy A Matter of Some Gravity Learning Goal: To understand Newton’s law of gravitation and the distinction between inertial and gravitational masses. In this problem, you will practice using Newton’s law of gravitation. According to that law, the magnitude of the gravitational force between two small particles of masses and , separated by a distance , is given by , where is the universal gravitational constant, whose numerical value (in SI units) is . This formula applies not only to small particles, but also to spherical objects. In fact, the gravitational force between two uniform spheres is the same as if we concentrated all the mass of each sphere at its center. Thus, by modeling the Earth and the Moon as uniform spheres, you can use the particle approximation when calculating the force of gravity between them. Be careful in using Newton’s law to choose the correct value for . To calculate the force of gravitational attraction between two uniform spheres, the distance in the equation for Newton’s law of gravitation is the distance between the centers of the spheres. For instance, if a small object such as an elephant is located on the surface of the Earth, the radius of the Earth would be used in the equation. Note that the force of gravity acting on an object located near the surface of a planet is often called weight. Also note that in situations involving satellites, you are often given the altitude of the satellite, that is, the distance from the satellite to the surface of the planet; this is not the distance to be used in the formula for the law of gravitation. There is a potentially confusing issue involving mass. Mass is defined as a measure of an object’s inertia, that is, its ability to resist acceleration. Newton’s second law demonstrates the relationship between mass, acceleration, and the net force acting on an object: . We can now refer to this measure of inertia more precisely as the inertial mass. On the other hand, the masses of the particles that appear in the expression for the law of gravity seem to have nothing to do with inertia: Rather, they serve as a measure of the strength of gravitational interactions. It would be reasonable to call such a property gravitational mass. Does this mean that every object has two different masses? Generally speaking, yes. However, the good news is that according to the latest, highly precise, measurements, the inertial and the gravitational mass of an object are, in fact, equal to each other; it is an established consensus among physicists that there is only one mass after all, which is a measure of both the object’s inertia and its ability to engage in gravitational interactions. Note that this consensus, like everything else in science, is open to possible amendments in the future. In this problem, you will answer several questions that require the use of Newton’s law of gravitation. Part A Two particles are separated by a certain distance. The force of gravitational interaction between them is . Now the separation between the particles is tripled. Find the new force of gravitational Fg m1 m2 r Fg = G m1m2 r2 G 6.67 × 10−11 N m2 kg2 r r rEarth F  = m net a F0 interaction . Express your answer in terms of . ANSWER: Part B A satellite revolves around a planet at an altitude equal to the radius of the planet. The force of gravitational interaction between the satellite and the planet is . Then the satellite moves to a different orbit, so that its altitude is tripled. Find the new force of gravitational interaction . Express your answer in terms of . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C A satellite revolves around a planet at an altitude equal to the radius of the planet. The force of gravitational interaction between the satellite and the planet is . Then the satellite is brought back to the surface of the planet. Find the new force of gravitational interaction . Express your answer in terms of . ANSWER: F1 F0 F1 = F0 F2 F0 F2 = F0 F4 F0 Typesetting math: 81% Part D Two satellites revolve around the Earth. Satellite A has mass and has an orbit of radius . Satellite B has mass and an orbit of unknown radius . The forces of gravitational attraction between each satellite and the Earth is the same. Find . Express your answer in terms of . ANSWER: Part E An adult elephant has a mass of about 5.0 tons. An adult elephant shrew has a mass of about 50 grams. How far from the center of the Earth should an elephant be placed so that its weight equals that of the elephant shrew on the surface of the Earth? The radius of the Earth is 6400 . ( .) Express your answer in kilometers. ANSWER: The table below gives the masses of the Earth, the Moon, and the Sun. Name Mass (kg) Earth Moon Sun F4 = m r 6m rb rb r rb = r km 1 ton = 103 kg r = km 5.97 × 1024 7.35 × 1022 1.99 × 1030 Typesetting math: 81% The average distance between the Earth and the Moon is . The average distance between the Earth and the Sun is . Use this information to answer the following questions. Part F Find the net gravitational force acting on the Earth in the Sun-Earth-Moon system during the new moon (when the moon is located directly between the Earth and the Sun). Express your answer in newtons to three significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part G Find the net gravitational force acting on the Earth in the Sun-Earth-Moon system during the full moon (when the Earth is located directly between the moon and the sun). Express your answer in newtons to three significant figures. ANSWER: ± Understanding Newton’s Law of Universal Gravitation Learning Goal: To understand Newton’s law of universal gravitation and be able to apply it in two-object situations and (collinear) three-object situations; to distinguish between the use of and . 3.84 × 108 m 1.50 × 1011 m Fnet Fnet = N Fnet Fnet = N Typesetting math: 81% G g In the late 1600s, Isaac Newton proposed a rule to quantify the attractive force known as gravity between objects that have mass, such as those shown in the figure. Newton’s law of universal gravitation describes the magnitude of the attractive gravitational force between two objects with masses and as , where is the distance between the centers of the two objects and is the gravitational constant. The gravitational force is attractive, so in the figure it pulls to the right on (toward ) and toward the left on (toward ). The gravitational force acting on is equal in size to, but exactly opposite in direction from, the gravitational force acting on , as required by Newton’s third law. The magnitude of both forces is calculated with the equation given above. The gravitational constant has the value and should not be confused with the magnitude of the gravitational free-fall acceleration constant, denoted by , which equals 9.80 near the surface of the earth. The size of in SI units is tiny. This means that gravitational forces are sizeable only in the vicinity of very massive objects, such as the earth. You are in fact gravitationally attracted toward all the objects around you, such as the computer you are using, but the size of that force is too small to be noticed without extremely sensitive equipment. Consider the earth following its nearly circular orbit (dashed curve) about the sun. The earth has mass and the sun has mass . They are separated, center to center, by . Part A What is the size of the gravitational force acting on the earth due to the sun? Express your answer in newtons. F  g m1 m2 Fg = G( ) m1m2 r2 r G m1 m2 m2 m1 m1 m2 G G = 6.67 × 10−11 N m2/kg2 g m/s2 G mearth = 5.98 × 1024 kg msun = 1.99 × 1030 kg r = 93 million miles = 150 million km Typesetting math: 81% You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F N Typesetting math: 81% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Understanding Mass and Weight Learning Goal: To understand the distinction between mass and weight and to be able to calculate the weight of an object from its mass and Newton’s law of gravitation. The concepts of mass and weight are often confused. In fact, in everyday conversations, the word “weight” often replaces “mass,” as in “My weight is seventy-five kilograms” or “I need to lose some weight.” Of course, mass and weight are related; however, they are also very different. Mass, as you recall, is a measure of an object’s inertia (ability to resist acceleration). Newton’s 2nd law demonstrates the relationship among an object’s mass, its acceleration, and the net force acting on it: . Mass is an intrinsic property of an object and is independent of the object’s location. Weight, in contrast, is defined as the force due to gravity acting on the object. That force depends on the strength of the gravitational field of the planet: , where is the weight of an object, is the mass of that object, and is the local acceleration due to gravity (in other words, the strength of the gravitational field at the location of the object). Weight, unlike mass, is not an intrinsic property of the object; it is determined by both the object and its location. Part A Which of the following quantities represent mass? Check all that apply. ANSWER: Fnet = ma w = mg w m g 12.0 lbs 0.34 g 120 kg 1600 kN 0.34 m 411 cm 899 MN Typesetting math: 81% Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Using the universal law of gravity, we can find the weight of an object feeling the gravitational pull of a nearby planet. We can write an expression , where is the weight of the object, is the gravitational constant, is the mass of that object, is mass of the planet, and is the distance from the center of the planet to the object. If the object is on the surface of the planet, is simply the radius of the planet. Part C The gravitational field on the surface of the earth is stronger than that on the surface of the moon. If a rock is transported from the moon to the earth, which properties of the rock change? ANSWER: Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E If acceleration due to gravity on the earth is , which formula gives the acceleration due to gravity on Loput? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: w = GmM/r2 w G m M r r mass only weight only both mass and weight neither mass nor weight g Typesetting math: 81% Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). ± Weight on a Neutron Star Neutron stars, such as the one at the center of the Crab Nebula, have about the same mass as our sun but a much smaller diameter. g 1.7 5.6 g 1.72 5.6 g 1.72 5.62 g 5.6 1.7 g 5.62 1.72 g 5.6 1.72 Typesetting math: 81% Part A If you weigh 655 on the earth, what would be your weight on the surface of a neutron star that has the same mass as our sun and a diameter of 19.0 ? Take the mass of the sun to be = 1.99×1030 , the gravitational constant to be = 6.67×10−11 , and the acceleration due to gravity at the earth’s surface to be = 9.810 . Express your weight in newtons. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: ± Escape Velocity Learning Goal: To introduce you to the concept of escape velocity for a rocket. The escape velocity is defined to be the minimum speed with which an object of mass must move to escape from the gravitational attraction of a much larger body, such as a planet of total mass . The escape velocity is a function of the distance of the object from the center of the planet , but unless otherwise specified this distance is taken to be the radius of the planet because it addresses the question “How fast does my rocket have to go to escape from the surface of the planet?” Part A The key to making a concise mathematical definition of escape velocity is to consider the energy. If an object is launched at its escape velocity, what is the total mechanical energy of the object at a very large (i.e., infinite) distance from the planet? Follow the usual convention and take the gravitational potential energy to be zero at very large distances. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: N km ms kg G N m2/kg2 g m/s2 wstar wstar = N m M R Etotal Typesetting math: 81% Consider the motion of an object between a point close to the planet and a point very very far from the planet. Indicate whether the following statements are true or false. Part B Angular momentum about the center of the planet is conserved. ANSWER: Part C Total mechanical energy is conserved. ANSWER: Part D Kinetic energy is conserved. ANSWER: Etotal = true false true false Typesetting math: 81% Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). A Satellite in a Circular Orbit Consider a satellite of mass that orbits a planet of mass in a circle a distance from the center of the planet. The satellite’s mass is negligible compared with that of the planet. Indicate whether each of the statements in this problem is true or false. Part A The information given is sufficient to uniquely specify the speed, potential energy, and angular momentum of the satellite. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: true false m1 m2 r true false Typesetting math: 81% Part B The total mechanical energy of the satellite is conserved. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C The linear momentum vector of the satellite is conserved. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D The angular momentum of the satellite about the center of the planet is conserved. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: true false true false Typesetting math: 81% Part E The equations that express the conservation laws of total mechanical energy and linear momentum are sufficient to solve for the speed necessary to maintain a circular orbit at without using . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: At the Galaxy’s Core Astronomers have observed a small, massive object at the center of our Milky Way galaxy. A ring of material orbits this massive object; the ring has a diameter of about 15 light years and an orbital speed of about 200 . Part A Determine the mass of the massive object at the center of the Milky Way galaxy. Take the distance of one light year to be . Express your answer in kilograms. You did not open hints for this part. true false R F = ma true false km/s M 9.461 × 1015 m Typesetting math: 81% ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Properties of Circular Orbits Learning Goal: To teach you how to find the parameters characterizing an object in a circular orbit around a much heavier body like the earth. M = kg Typesetting math: 81% The motivation for Isaac Newton to discover his laws of motion was to explain the properties of planetary orbits that were observed by Tycho Brahe and analyzed by Johannes Kepler. A good starting point for understanding this (as well as the speed of the space shuttle and the height of geostationary satellites) is the simplest orbit–a circular one. This problem concerns the properties of circular orbits for a satellite orbiting a planet of mass . For all parts of this problem, where appropriate, use for the universal gravitational constant. Part A Find the orbital speed for a satellite in a circular orbit of radius . Express the orbital speed in terms of , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Find the kinetic energy of a satellite with mass in a circular orbit with radius . Express your answer in terms of \texttip{m}{m}, \texttip{M}{M}, \texttip{G}{G}, and \texttip{R}{R}. ANSWER: Part C M G v R G M R v = K m R \texttip{K}{K} = Typesetting math: 81% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D Find the orbital period \texttip{T}{T}. Express your answer in terms of \texttip{G}{G}, \texttip{M}{M}, \texttip{R}{R}, and \texttip{\pi }{pi}. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F Find \texttip{L}{L}, the magnitude of the angular momentum of the satellite with respect to the center of the planet. Express your answer in terms of \texttip{m}{m}, \texttip{M}{M}, \texttip{G}{G}, and \texttip{R}{R}. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: \texttip{T}{T} = Typesetting math: 81% Part G The quantities \texttip{v}{v}, \texttip{K}{K}, \texttip{U}{U}, and \texttip{L}{L} all represent physical quantities characterizing the orbit that depend on radius \texttip{R}{R}. Indicate the exponent (power) of the radial dependence of the absolute value of each. Express your answer as a comma-separated list of exponents corresponding to \texttip{v}{v}, \texttip{K}{K}, \texttip{U}{U}, and \texttip{L}{L}, in that order. For example, -1,-1/2,-0.5,-3/2 would mean v \propto R^{-1}, K \propto R^{-1/2}, and so forth. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. \texttip{L}{L} = Typesetting math: 81%

Chapter 13 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 16, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy A Matter of Some Gravity Learning Goal: To understand Newton’s law of gravitation and the distinction between inertial and gravitational masses. In this problem, you will practice using Newton’s law of gravitation. According to that law, the magnitude of the gravitational force between two small particles of masses and , separated by a distance , is given by , where is the universal gravitational constant, whose numerical value (in SI units) is . This formula applies not only to small particles, but also to spherical objects. In fact, the gravitational force between two uniform spheres is the same as if we concentrated all the mass of each sphere at its center. Thus, by modeling the Earth and the Moon as uniform spheres, you can use the particle approximation when calculating the force of gravity between them. Be careful in using Newton’s law to choose the correct value for . To calculate the force of gravitational attraction between two uniform spheres, the distance in the equation for Newton’s law of gravitation is the distance between the centers of the spheres. For instance, if a small object such as an elephant is located on the surface of the Earth, the radius of the Earth would be used in the equation. Note that the force of gravity acting on an object located near the surface of a planet is often called weight. Also note that in situations involving satellites, you are often given the altitude of the satellite, that is, the distance from the satellite to the surface of the planet; this is not the distance to be used in the formula for the law of gravitation. There is a potentially confusing issue involving mass. Mass is defined as a measure of an object’s inertia, that is, its ability to resist acceleration. Newton’s second law demonstrates the relationship between mass, acceleration, and the net force acting on an object: . We can now refer to this measure of inertia more precisely as the inertial mass. On the other hand, the masses of the particles that appear in the expression for the law of gravity seem to have nothing to do with inertia: Rather, they serve as a measure of the strength of gravitational interactions. It would be reasonable to call such a property gravitational mass. Does this mean that every object has two different masses? Generally speaking, yes. However, the good news is that according to the latest, highly precise, measurements, the inertial and the gravitational mass of an object are, in fact, equal to each other; it is an established consensus among physicists that there is only one mass after all, which is a measure of both the object’s inertia and its ability to engage in gravitational interactions. Note that this consensus, like everything else in science, is open to possible amendments in the future. In this problem, you will answer several questions that require the use of Newton’s law of gravitation. Part A Two particles are separated by a certain distance. The force of gravitational interaction between them is . Now the separation between the particles is tripled. Find the new force of gravitational Fg m1 m2 r Fg = G m1m2 r2 G 6.67 × 10−11 N m2 kg2 r r rEarth F  = m net a F0 interaction . Express your answer in terms of . ANSWER: Part B A satellite revolves around a planet at an altitude equal to the radius of the planet. The force of gravitational interaction between the satellite and the planet is . Then the satellite moves to a different orbit, so that its altitude is tripled. Find the new force of gravitational interaction . Express your answer in terms of . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C A satellite revolves around a planet at an altitude equal to the radius of the planet. The force of gravitational interaction between the satellite and the planet is . Then the satellite is brought back to the surface of the planet. Find the new force of gravitational interaction . Express your answer in terms of . ANSWER: F1 F0 F1 = F0 F2 F0 F2 = F0 F4 F0 Typesetting math: 81% Part D Two satellites revolve around the Earth. Satellite A has mass and has an orbit of radius . Satellite B has mass and an orbit of unknown radius . The forces of gravitational attraction between each satellite and the Earth is the same. Find . Express your answer in terms of . ANSWER: Part E An adult elephant has a mass of about 5.0 tons. An adult elephant shrew has a mass of about 50 grams. How far from the center of the Earth should an elephant be placed so that its weight equals that of the elephant shrew on the surface of the Earth? The radius of the Earth is 6400 . ( .) Express your answer in kilometers. ANSWER: The table below gives the masses of the Earth, the Moon, and the Sun. Name Mass (kg) Earth Moon Sun F4 = m r 6m rb rb r rb = r km 1 ton = 103 kg r = km 5.97 × 1024 7.35 × 1022 1.99 × 1030 Typesetting math: 81% The average distance between the Earth and the Moon is . The average distance between the Earth and the Sun is . Use this information to answer the following questions. Part F Find the net gravitational force acting on the Earth in the Sun-Earth-Moon system during the new moon (when the moon is located directly between the Earth and the Sun). Express your answer in newtons to three significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part G Find the net gravitational force acting on the Earth in the Sun-Earth-Moon system during the full moon (when the Earth is located directly between the moon and the sun). Express your answer in newtons to three significant figures. ANSWER: ± Understanding Newton’s Law of Universal Gravitation Learning Goal: To understand Newton’s law of universal gravitation and be able to apply it in two-object situations and (collinear) three-object situations; to distinguish between the use of and . 3.84 × 108 m 1.50 × 1011 m Fnet Fnet = N Fnet Fnet = N Typesetting math: 81% G g In the late 1600s, Isaac Newton proposed a rule to quantify the attractive force known as gravity between objects that have mass, such as those shown in the figure. Newton’s law of universal gravitation describes the magnitude of the attractive gravitational force between two objects with masses and as , where is the distance between the centers of the two objects and is the gravitational constant. The gravitational force is attractive, so in the figure it pulls to the right on (toward ) and toward the left on (toward ). The gravitational force acting on is equal in size to, but exactly opposite in direction from, the gravitational force acting on , as required by Newton’s third law. The magnitude of both forces is calculated with the equation given above. The gravitational constant has the value and should not be confused with the magnitude of the gravitational free-fall acceleration constant, denoted by , which equals 9.80 near the surface of the earth. The size of in SI units is tiny. This means that gravitational forces are sizeable only in the vicinity of very massive objects, such as the earth. You are in fact gravitationally attracted toward all the objects around you, such as the computer you are using, but the size of that force is too small to be noticed without extremely sensitive equipment. Consider the earth following its nearly circular orbit (dashed curve) about the sun. The earth has mass and the sun has mass . They are separated, center to center, by . Part A What is the size of the gravitational force acting on the earth due to the sun? Express your answer in newtons. F  g m1 m2 Fg = G( ) m1m2 r2 r G m1 m2 m2 m1 m1 m2 G G = 6.67 × 10−11 N m2/kg2 g m/s2 G mearth = 5.98 × 1024 kg msun = 1.99 × 1030 kg r = 93 million miles = 150 million km Typesetting math: 81% You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F N Typesetting math: 81% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Understanding Mass and Weight Learning Goal: To understand the distinction between mass and weight and to be able to calculate the weight of an object from its mass and Newton’s law of gravitation. The concepts of mass and weight are often confused. In fact, in everyday conversations, the word “weight” often replaces “mass,” as in “My weight is seventy-five kilograms” or “I need to lose some weight.” Of course, mass and weight are related; however, they are also very different. Mass, as you recall, is a measure of an object’s inertia (ability to resist acceleration). Newton’s 2nd law demonstrates the relationship among an object’s mass, its acceleration, and the net force acting on it: . Mass is an intrinsic property of an object and is independent of the object’s location. Weight, in contrast, is defined as the force due to gravity acting on the object. That force depends on the strength of the gravitational field of the planet: , where is the weight of an object, is the mass of that object, and is the local acceleration due to gravity (in other words, the strength of the gravitational field at the location of the object). Weight, unlike mass, is not an intrinsic property of the object; it is determined by both the object and its location. Part A Which of the following quantities represent mass? Check all that apply. ANSWER: Fnet = ma w = mg w m g 12.0 lbs 0.34 g 120 kg 1600 kN 0.34 m 411 cm 899 MN Typesetting math: 81% Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Using the universal law of gravity, we can find the weight of an object feeling the gravitational pull of a nearby planet. We can write an expression , where is the weight of the object, is the gravitational constant, is the mass of that object, is mass of the planet, and is the distance from the center of the planet to the object. If the object is on the surface of the planet, is simply the radius of the planet. Part C The gravitational field on the surface of the earth is stronger than that on the surface of the moon. If a rock is transported from the moon to the earth, which properties of the rock change? ANSWER: Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E If acceleration due to gravity on the earth is , which formula gives the acceleration due to gravity on Loput? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: w = GmM/r2 w G m M r r mass only weight only both mass and weight neither mass nor weight g Typesetting math: 81% Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). ± Weight on a Neutron Star Neutron stars, such as the one at the center of the Crab Nebula, have about the same mass as our sun but a much smaller diameter. g 1.7 5.6 g 1.72 5.6 g 1.72 5.62 g 5.6 1.7 g 5.62 1.72 g 5.6 1.72 Typesetting math: 81% Part A If you weigh 655 on the earth, what would be your weight on the surface of a neutron star that has the same mass as our sun and a diameter of 19.0 ? Take the mass of the sun to be = 1.99×1030 , the gravitational constant to be = 6.67×10−11 , and the acceleration due to gravity at the earth’s surface to be = 9.810 . Express your weight in newtons. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: ± Escape Velocity Learning Goal: To introduce you to the concept of escape velocity for a rocket. The escape velocity is defined to be the minimum speed with which an object of mass must move to escape from the gravitational attraction of a much larger body, such as a planet of total mass . The escape velocity is a function of the distance of the object from the center of the planet , but unless otherwise specified this distance is taken to be the radius of the planet because it addresses the question “How fast does my rocket have to go to escape from the surface of the planet?” Part A The key to making a concise mathematical definition of escape velocity is to consider the energy. If an object is launched at its escape velocity, what is the total mechanical energy of the object at a very large (i.e., infinite) distance from the planet? Follow the usual convention and take the gravitational potential energy to be zero at very large distances. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: N km ms kg G N m2/kg2 g m/s2 wstar wstar = N m M R Etotal Typesetting math: 81% Consider the motion of an object between a point close to the planet and a point very very far from the planet. Indicate whether the following statements are true or false. Part B Angular momentum about the center of the planet is conserved. ANSWER: Part C Total mechanical energy is conserved. ANSWER: Part D Kinetic energy is conserved. ANSWER: Etotal = true false true false Typesetting math: 81% Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). A Satellite in a Circular Orbit Consider a satellite of mass that orbits a planet of mass in a circle a distance from the center of the planet. The satellite’s mass is negligible compared with that of the planet. Indicate whether each of the statements in this problem is true or false. Part A The information given is sufficient to uniquely specify the speed, potential energy, and angular momentum of the satellite. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: true false m1 m2 r true false Typesetting math: 81% Part B The total mechanical energy of the satellite is conserved. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C The linear momentum vector of the satellite is conserved. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D The angular momentum of the satellite about the center of the planet is conserved. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: true false true false Typesetting math: 81% Part E The equations that express the conservation laws of total mechanical energy and linear momentum are sufficient to solve for the speed necessary to maintain a circular orbit at without using . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: At the Galaxy’s Core Astronomers have observed a small, massive object at the center of our Milky Way galaxy. A ring of material orbits this massive object; the ring has a diameter of about 15 light years and an orbital speed of about 200 . Part A Determine the mass of the massive object at the center of the Milky Way galaxy. Take the distance of one light year to be . Express your answer in kilograms. You did not open hints for this part. true false R F = ma true false km/s M 9.461 × 1015 m Typesetting math: 81% ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Properties of Circular Orbits Learning Goal: To teach you how to find the parameters characterizing an object in a circular orbit around a much heavier body like the earth. M = kg Typesetting math: 81% The motivation for Isaac Newton to discover his laws of motion was to explain the properties of planetary orbits that were observed by Tycho Brahe and analyzed by Johannes Kepler. A good starting point for understanding this (as well as the speed of the space shuttle and the height of geostationary satellites) is the simplest orbit–a circular one. This problem concerns the properties of circular orbits for a satellite orbiting a planet of mass . For all parts of this problem, where appropriate, use for the universal gravitational constant. Part A Find the orbital speed for a satellite in a circular orbit of radius . Express the orbital speed in terms of , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Find the kinetic energy of a satellite with mass in a circular orbit with radius . Express your answer in terms of \texttip{m}{m}, \texttip{M}{M}, \texttip{G}{G}, and \texttip{R}{R}. ANSWER: Part C M G v R G M R v = K m R \texttip{K}{K} = Typesetting math: 81% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D Find the orbital period \texttip{T}{T}. Express your answer in terms of \texttip{G}{G}, \texttip{M}{M}, \texttip{R}{R}, and \texttip{\pi }{pi}. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F Find \texttip{L}{L}, the magnitude of the angular momentum of the satellite with respect to the center of the planet. Express your answer in terms of \texttip{m}{m}, \texttip{M}{M}, \texttip{G}{G}, and \texttip{R}{R}. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: \texttip{T}{T} = Typesetting math: 81% Part G The quantities \texttip{v}{v}, \texttip{K}{K}, \texttip{U}{U}, and \texttip{L}{L} all represent physical quantities characterizing the orbit that depend on radius \texttip{R}{R}. Indicate the exponent (power) of the radial dependence of the absolute value of each. Express your answer as a comma-separated list of exponents corresponding to \texttip{v}{v}, \texttip{K}{K}, \texttip{U}{U}, and \texttip{L}{L}, in that order. For example, -1,-1/2,-0.5,-3/2 would mean v \propto R^{-1}, K \propto R^{-1/2}, and so forth. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. \texttip{L}{L} = Typesetting math: 81%

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AUCS 340: Ethics in the Professions Individual Written Assignment #1 Medical Ethics: Historical names, dates and ethical theories assignment As you read chapters 1 and 2 in the “Ethics and Basic Law for Medical Imaging Professionals” textbook you will be responsible for identifying and explaining each of the following items from the list below. You will respond in paragraph format with correct spelling and grammar expected for each paragraph. Feel free to have more than one paragraph for each item, although in most instances a single paragraph response is sufficient. If you reference material in addition to what is available in the textbook it must be appropriately cited in your work using either APA or MLA including a references cited page. The use of Wikipedia.com is not a recognized peer reviewed source so please do not use that as a reference. When responding about individuals it is necessary to indicate a year or time period that the person discussed/developed their particular ethical theory so that you can look at and appreciate the historical background to the development of ethical theories and decision making. Respond to the following sixteen items. (They are in random order from your reading) 1. Francis Bacon 2. Isaac Newton 3. Prima Facie Duties – Why do they exist? LIST AND DEFINE ALL TERMS 4. Hippocrates 5. W.D. Ross – what do the initials stand for in his name and what was his contribution to the study of ethics? 6. Microallocation – define the term and provide an example separate from the book example (You should develop your own example rather than looking for an online example; this will use your critical thinking skills. Consider an application to your own profession as microallocation is NOT limited to the medical field.) 7. Deontology – Discuss at length the basic types/concepts of this theory 8. Thomas Aquinas – 1) Discuss the ethical theory developed by Aquinas, 2) his religious affiliation, 3) why that was so important to his ethical premise and 4) discuss the type of ethical issues resolved to this day using this theory. 9. Macroallocation – define and provide an example separate from the book example (You should develop your own example rather than looking for an online example; this will use your critical thinking skills. Consider an application to your own profession as macroallocation is NOT limited to the medical field.) 10. David Hume 11. Rodericus Castro 12. Plato and “The Republic” 13. Pythagoras 14. Teleology – Discuss at length the basic types/concepts of this theory 15. Core Values – Why do they exist? LIST AND DEFINE ALL TERMS 16. Develop a timeline that reflects the ethical theories as developed by the INDIVIDUALS presented in this assignment. This assignment is due Saturday March 14th at NOON and is graded as a homework assignment. Grading: Paragraph Formation = 20% of grade (bulleted lists are acceptable for some answers) Answers inclusive of major material for answer = 40% of grade Creation of Timeline = 10% of grade Sentence structure, application of correct spelling and grammar = 20% of grade References (if utilized) = 10% of grade; references should be submitted on a separate references cited page. Otherwise this 10% of the assignment grade will be considered under the sentence structure component for 30% of the grade. It is expected that the finished assignment will be two – three pages of text, double spaced, using 12 font and standard page margins.

AUCS 340: Ethics in the Professions Individual Written Assignment #1 Medical Ethics: Historical names, dates and ethical theories assignment As you read chapters 1 and 2 in the “Ethics and Basic Law for Medical Imaging Professionals” textbook you will be responsible for identifying and explaining each of the following items from the list below. You will respond in paragraph format with correct spelling and grammar expected for each paragraph. Feel free to have more than one paragraph for each item, although in most instances a single paragraph response is sufficient. If you reference material in addition to what is available in the textbook it must be appropriately cited in your work using either APA or MLA including a references cited page. The use of Wikipedia.com is not a recognized peer reviewed source so please do not use that as a reference. When responding about individuals it is necessary to indicate a year or time period that the person discussed/developed their particular ethical theory so that you can look at and appreciate the historical background to the development of ethical theories and decision making. Respond to the following sixteen items. (They are in random order from your reading) 1. Francis Bacon 2. Isaac Newton 3. Prima Facie Duties – Why do they exist? LIST AND DEFINE ALL TERMS 4. Hippocrates 5. W.D. Ross – what do the initials stand for in his name and what was his contribution to the study of ethics? 6. Microallocation – define the term and provide an example separate from the book example (You should develop your own example rather than looking for an online example; this will use your critical thinking skills. Consider an application to your own profession as microallocation is NOT limited to the medical field.) 7. Deontology – Discuss at length the basic types/concepts of this theory 8. Thomas Aquinas – 1) Discuss the ethical theory developed by Aquinas, 2) his religious affiliation, 3) why that was so important to his ethical premise and 4) discuss the type of ethical issues resolved to this day using this theory. 9. Macroallocation – define and provide an example separate from the book example (You should develop your own example rather than looking for an online example; this will use your critical thinking skills. Consider an application to your own profession as macroallocation is NOT limited to the medical field.) 10. David Hume 11. Rodericus Castro 12. Plato and “The Republic” 13. Pythagoras 14. Teleology – Discuss at length the basic types/concepts of this theory 15. Core Values – Why do they exist? LIST AND DEFINE ALL TERMS 16. Develop a timeline that reflects the ethical theories as developed by the INDIVIDUALS presented in this assignment. This assignment is due Saturday March 14th at NOON and is graded as a homework assignment. Grading: Paragraph Formation = 20% of grade (bulleted lists are acceptable for some answers) Answers inclusive of major material for answer = 40% of grade Creation of Timeline = 10% of grade Sentence structure, application of correct spelling and grammar = 20% of grade References (if utilized) = 10% of grade; references should be submitted on a separate references cited page. Otherwise this 10% of the assignment grade will be considered under the sentence structure component for 30% of the grade. It is expected that the finished assignment will be two – three pages of text, double spaced, using 12 font and standard page margins.

Francis Bacon was a 16th century ethical theorist who was … Read More...
Chapter 06 Homework Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 23, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Concept Review: Species Interactions Can you identify the type of species interaction that each label describes? Part A Drag each description to the appropriate bin. ANSWER: Activity: Food Webs Click here to complete this activity. Then answer the questions. Part A In an ecosystem, phytoplankton are _____. ANSWER: Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 1 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Correct Autotrophs, such as phytoplankton, are producers. Part B An earthworm that feeds on the remains of plants and animals is acting as a _____. ANSWER: Correct The earthworm is feeding on the remains of dead organisms. Part C When a human eats a steak, the human is acting as a _____. ANSWER: Correct By feeding on a primary consumer, the human is acting as a secondary consumer. Part D A cow eating grass is an example of a _____. ANSWER: Correct By feeding on a producer, the cow is acting as a primary consumer. Part E primary consumers tertiary consumers detritivores producers secondary consumers tertiary consumer secondary consumer producer detritivore primary consumer primary consumer detritivore secondary consumer producer tertiary consumer detritivore producer tertiary consumer secondary consumer primary consumer Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 2 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM A seal that just ate a clam is eaten by a shark. The shark is acting as a _____. ANSWER: Correct The shark that ate the seal that ate the clam that ate the algae is the tertiary consumer. Activity: Pyramids of Production Click here to complete this activity. Then answer the questions. Part A _____ are secondary consumers. ANSWER: Correct Secondary consumers are animals that eat other animals; thus, they are carnivores. Part B Approximately _____% of the energy at one trophic level is passed on to the next highest trophic level. ANSWER: Correct Approximately 5–10% of the energy at one trophic level is passed on to the next highest trophic level. producer primary consumer tertiary consumer secondary consumer detritivore Producers Herbivores Plants Cows Carnivores 0–5 5–10 10–15 15–20 90–100 Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 3 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Part C 10,000 kcal of producer could support approximately _____ kcal of tertiary consumer. ANSWER: Correct This is the number of kcal of tertiary consumer that could be supported. Activity: Primary Succession Click here to complete this activity. Then answer the question. Part A Which of these is a starting point for primary succession? ANSWER: Correct Such a surface lacks any life and is thus a starting point for primary succession. Part B The first colonizing organisms during primary succession tend to be: ANSWER: 1,000 100 10 1 0 a surface exposed by a retreating glacier abandoned farmland an abandoned city a neglected yard none of these is a starting point for primary succession small shrubs trees lichens and mosses herbs Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 4 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Correct After the glacier retreats, bare ground is eventually colonized by lichens and mosses. Part C Which one of the following is a general characteristic of plants that are early colonizers during primary succession? ANSWER: Correct After the glacier retreats, bare ground is eventually colonized by lichens and mosses, then by deciduous trees with wind-borne seeds. Concept Review: Secondary Succession Can you order the steps of secondary succession? Part A Order the labels in the flowchart to complete the model of secondary succession as observed in a deciduous forest of eastern North America. ANSWER: Current Events: In Yellowstone, Killing One Kind of Trout to Save Another (New York Times, 8/23/2011) Read this New York Times article and then answer the questions. In Yellowstone, Killing One Kind of Trout to Save Another (8/23/2011) Registration with The New York Times provides instant access to breaking news on NYTimes.com. To register, go to http://www.nytimes.com/register. Visit http://www.nytimes.com/content/help/rights/terms/terms-of-service.html to review the current NYT Terms of Service. Part A Which of the following would be the best discovery regarding the Judas fish? ANSWER: plants are able to fix their own nitrogen plants can outcompete other plants that invade the area plants have wind-dispersed seeds plants are shade-tolerant Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 5 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Part B Which of the following is true? ANSWER: Part C Why is protecting cutthroat trout in Yellowstone so important? ANSWER: Part D Which of the following is true? ANSWER: Part E Why don’t bears in Yellowstone eat lake trout? ANSWER: Part F How did rainbow trout become established worldwide? ANSWER: Learning where lake trout feed. Learning where lake trout hibernate. Learning where lake trout spawn. Learning where lake trout migrate to during fall. Officials are working only in certain areas to eliminate lake trout. Officials are working to eliminate lake trout throughout Wyoming. Officials are working to eliminate lake trout throughout the Great Lakes. All states in the U.S. are working to eliminate lake trout. Because many other species depend on cutthroat trout. Because local people depend on cutthroat trout for food. Because Yellowstone is the only place cutthroat trout are found. Because cutthroat trout are listed as a threatened species. Cutthroat trout are to Yellowstone Lake as rainbow trout are to Yellowstone Lake. Cutthroat trout are to Yellowstone Lake as Asian carp are to the Great Lakes. Lake trout are to Yellowstone Lake as see lamprey are to the Great Lakes. Lake trout are to the Great Lakes as Asian carp are to the Yellowstone Lake. They don’t like the taste. They cannot find them. Lake trout skin is too tough. Lake trout are too small for bears to be interested. Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 6 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Current Events: In Thailand, Love of Food Carries Deadly Risks (New York Times, 4/25/2011) Read this New York Times article and then answer the questions. In Thailand, Love of Food Carries Deadly Risks (4/25/2011) Registration with The New York Times provides instant access to breaking news on NYTimes.com. To register, go to http://www.nytimes.com/register. Visit http://www.nytimes.com/content/help/rights/terms/terms-of-service.html to review the current NYT Terms of Service. Part A Rather than stop eating fish, what should Thai people do to eliminate the risk of liver fluke infection? ANSWER: Part B Liver flukes are transmitted through which of the following? ANSWER: Part C Getting rid of which of the following would help decrease the population of liver flukes? ANSWER: Part D Pla som is a unique dish because it is what? ANSWER: Part E Due to warming oceans caused by climate change. Natural process of migration. Accidental introduction via ships. Purposeful stocking. Consume ethyl alcohol while eating fish. Add more garlic. Cook it thoroughly. Pick the flukes out by hand. urine saliva feces blood rats mosquitoes frogs snails pickled frozen fermented blanched Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 7 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM You have liver flukes. What are your chances of getting liver cancer? ANSWER: Part F You are a scientist studying liver flukes in Thailand. Where should you look for them? ANSWER: ABC News Video: The Cuttlefish Watch the ABC News video (2:20 minutes). Then answer the questions below. Part A The changes to the cuttlefish’s skin are related to _______. ANSWER: Correct Part B Camouflage contributes to the cuttlefish’s survival by enabling it to _______. 1-5% 5-10% 10-15% 15-20% The northwestern part of the country. The southeastern part of the country. The southwestern part of the country. The northeastern part of the country. camouflage elimination of waste reproductive strategies feeding behavior Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 8 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM ANSWER: Correct Part C Cuttlefish placed in a sandy environment with white rocks will camouflage their skin in a pattern called _______. ANSWER: Correct Part D In the presence of a black-and-white striped background, a cuttlefish was observed to _______. ANSWER: Correct Part E Which question was raised but not answered in the video? ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 48.5%. You received 16 out of a possible total of 33 points. sneak up on prey mimic poisonous species hide from predators warn potential predators that it is poisonous universal camouflage disruptive camouflage warning coloration camouflage tide-pool camouflage move its arm to match the orientation of the stripes turn completely white and hide in the white stripe turn completely black and hide in the black stripe exhibit the exact striping pattern of its surroundings Why does the cuttlefish change its skin pattern? What happens when a cuttlefish is placed in an unnatural environment? Is the cuttlefish able to grow a protective shell? How do cuttlefish camouflage themselves even though they are colorblind? Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 9 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM

Chapter 06 Homework Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 23, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Concept Review: Species Interactions Can you identify the type of species interaction that each label describes? Part A Drag each description to the appropriate bin. ANSWER: Activity: Food Webs Click here to complete this activity. Then answer the questions. Part A In an ecosystem, phytoplankton are _____. ANSWER: Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 1 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Correct Autotrophs, such as phytoplankton, are producers. Part B An earthworm that feeds on the remains of plants and animals is acting as a _____. ANSWER: Correct The earthworm is feeding on the remains of dead organisms. Part C When a human eats a steak, the human is acting as a _____. ANSWER: Correct By feeding on a primary consumer, the human is acting as a secondary consumer. Part D A cow eating grass is an example of a _____. ANSWER: Correct By feeding on a producer, the cow is acting as a primary consumer. Part E primary consumers tertiary consumers detritivores producers secondary consumers tertiary consumer secondary consumer producer detritivore primary consumer primary consumer detritivore secondary consumer producer tertiary consumer detritivore producer tertiary consumer secondary consumer primary consumer Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 2 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM A seal that just ate a clam is eaten by a shark. The shark is acting as a _____. ANSWER: Correct The shark that ate the seal that ate the clam that ate the algae is the tertiary consumer. Activity: Pyramids of Production Click here to complete this activity. Then answer the questions. Part A _____ are secondary consumers. ANSWER: Correct Secondary consumers are animals that eat other animals; thus, they are carnivores. Part B Approximately _____% of the energy at one trophic level is passed on to the next highest trophic level. ANSWER: Correct Approximately 5–10% of the energy at one trophic level is passed on to the next highest trophic level. producer primary consumer tertiary consumer secondary consumer detritivore Producers Herbivores Plants Cows Carnivores 0–5 5–10 10–15 15–20 90–100 Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 3 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Part C 10,000 kcal of producer could support approximately _____ kcal of tertiary consumer. ANSWER: Correct This is the number of kcal of tertiary consumer that could be supported. Activity: Primary Succession Click here to complete this activity. Then answer the question. Part A Which of these is a starting point for primary succession? ANSWER: Correct Such a surface lacks any life and is thus a starting point for primary succession. Part B The first colonizing organisms during primary succession tend to be: ANSWER: 1,000 100 10 1 0 a surface exposed by a retreating glacier abandoned farmland an abandoned city a neglected yard none of these is a starting point for primary succession small shrubs trees lichens and mosses herbs Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 4 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Correct After the glacier retreats, bare ground is eventually colonized by lichens and mosses. Part C Which one of the following is a general characteristic of plants that are early colonizers during primary succession? ANSWER: Correct After the glacier retreats, bare ground is eventually colonized by lichens and mosses, then by deciduous trees with wind-borne seeds. Concept Review: Secondary Succession Can you order the steps of secondary succession? Part A Order the labels in the flowchart to complete the model of secondary succession as observed in a deciduous forest of eastern North America. ANSWER: Current Events: In Yellowstone, Killing One Kind of Trout to Save Another (New York Times, 8/23/2011) Read this New York Times article and then answer the questions. In Yellowstone, Killing One Kind of Trout to Save Another (8/23/2011) Registration with The New York Times provides instant access to breaking news on NYTimes.com. To register, go to http://www.nytimes.com/register. Visit http://www.nytimes.com/content/help/rights/terms/terms-of-service.html to review the current NYT Terms of Service. Part A Which of the following would be the best discovery regarding the Judas fish? ANSWER: plants are able to fix their own nitrogen plants can outcompete other plants that invade the area plants have wind-dispersed seeds plants are shade-tolerant Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 5 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Part B Which of the following is true? ANSWER: Part C Why is protecting cutthroat trout in Yellowstone so important? ANSWER: Part D Which of the following is true? ANSWER: Part E Why don’t bears in Yellowstone eat lake trout? ANSWER: Part F How did rainbow trout become established worldwide? ANSWER: Learning where lake trout feed. Learning where lake trout hibernate. Learning where lake trout spawn. Learning where lake trout migrate to during fall. Officials are working only in certain areas to eliminate lake trout. Officials are working to eliminate lake trout throughout Wyoming. Officials are working to eliminate lake trout throughout the Great Lakes. All states in the U.S. are working to eliminate lake trout. Because many other species depend on cutthroat trout. Because local people depend on cutthroat trout for food. Because Yellowstone is the only place cutthroat trout are found. Because cutthroat trout are listed as a threatened species. Cutthroat trout are to Yellowstone Lake as rainbow trout are to Yellowstone Lake. Cutthroat trout are to Yellowstone Lake as Asian carp are to the Great Lakes. Lake trout are to Yellowstone Lake as see lamprey are to the Great Lakes. Lake trout are to the Great Lakes as Asian carp are to the Yellowstone Lake. They don’t like the taste. They cannot find them. Lake trout skin is too tough. Lake trout are too small for bears to be interested. Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 6 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Current Events: In Thailand, Love of Food Carries Deadly Risks (New York Times, 4/25/2011) Read this New York Times article and then answer the questions. In Thailand, Love of Food Carries Deadly Risks (4/25/2011) Registration with The New York Times provides instant access to breaking news on NYTimes.com. To register, go to http://www.nytimes.com/register. Visit http://www.nytimes.com/content/help/rights/terms/terms-of-service.html to review the current NYT Terms of Service. Part A Rather than stop eating fish, what should Thai people do to eliminate the risk of liver fluke infection? ANSWER: Part B Liver flukes are transmitted through which of the following? ANSWER: Part C Getting rid of which of the following would help decrease the population of liver flukes? ANSWER: Part D Pla som is a unique dish because it is what? ANSWER: Part E Due to warming oceans caused by climate change. Natural process of migration. Accidental introduction via ships. Purposeful stocking. Consume ethyl alcohol while eating fish. Add more garlic. Cook it thoroughly. Pick the flukes out by hand. urine saliva feces blood rats mosquitoes frogs snails pickled frozen fermented blanched Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 7 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM You have liver flukes. What are your chances of getting liver cancer? ANSWER: Part F You are a scientist studying liver flukes in Thailand. Where should you look for them? ANSWER: ABC News Video: The Cuttlefish Watch the ABC News video (2:20 minutes). Then answer the questions below. Part A The changes to the cuttlefish’s skin are related to _______. ANSWER: Correct Part B Camouflage contributes to the cuttlefish’s survival by enabling it to _______. 1-5% 5-10% 10-15% 15-20% The northwestern part of the country. The southeastern part of the country. The southwestern part of the country. The northeastern part of the country. camouflage elimination of waste reproductive strategies feeding behavior Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 8 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM ANSWER: Correct Part C Cuttlefish placed in a sandy environment with white rocks will camouflage their skin in a pattern called _______. ANSWER: Correct Part D In the presence of a black-and-white striped background, a cuttlefish was observed to _______. ANSWER: Correct Part E Which question was raised but not answered in the video? ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 48.5%. You received 16 out of a possible total of 33 points. sneak up on prey mimic poisonous species hide from predators warn potential predators that it is poisonous universal camouflage disruptive camouflage warning coloration camouflage tide-pool camouflage move its arm to match the orientation of the stripes turn completely white and hide in the white stripe turn completely black and hide in the black stripe exhibit the exact striping pattern of its surroundings Why does the cuttlefish change its skin pattern? What happens when a cuttlefish is placed in an unnatural environment? Is the cuttlefish able to grow a protective shell? How do cuttlefish camouflage themselves even though they are colorblind? Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 9 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM

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Computer/information Security Q1. Identify legislative and regulative requirements relative to information security for a bank

Computer/information Security Q1. Identify legislative and regulative requirements relative to information security for a bank

Computer/information Security     Q1. Identify legislative and regulative requirements relative to … Read More...
Please read Martha Menchaca, Recovering History, Constructing Race, Chapter 2 Racial Formation, pp. 49-66. This is an electronic book in Oviatt Library. Go to the library homepage and click on “library catalog” (right under “One Search”) and do a title search for the book, then open the electronic version. Intro: This chapter has a lot of details. Menchaca explains how the Spanish established their power and organized social hierarchies (relationships of power) after they had defeated the Aztecs and were beginning the colonization process in Mexico. As always, begin with your gut reaction to this reading. What was interesting to you, surprising, fascinating, exciting, disturbing, maddening, etc. or gave you insight into something you’d wondered about. 1.) How did Spain use land and Indian leaders to exert their power? Explain what an encomienda was. 2.) Explain the debate on Indian slavery and who its advocates were. 3.) Explain Spain’s policies of intermarriage and what their purpose was. 4.) Answer the following questions about African slavery under Spanish colonization: -What were the time periods of the slave trade in Mexico? -What was the total number of people of African descent and what were the areas in Mexico where they were concentrated? -What rights did African slaves have (different than what would later develop in the U.S.) and who advocated for them? 5.) Name each level of the racial hierarchy Spain established and the rights each group enjoyed or was denied.

Please read Martha Menchaca, Recovering History, Constructing Race, Chapter 2 Racial Formation, pp. 49-66. This is an electronic book in Oviatt Library. Go to the library homepage and click on “library catalog” (right under “One Search”) and do a title search for the book, then open the electronic version. Intro: This chapter has a lot of details. Menchaca explains how the Spanish established their power and organized social hierarchies (relationships of power) after they had defeated the Aztecs and were beginning the colonization process in Mexico. As always, begin with your gut reaction to this reading. What was interesting to you, surprising, fascinating, exciting, disturbing, maddening, etc. or gave you insight into something you’d wondered about. 1.) How did Spain use land and Indian leaders to exert their power? Explain what an encomienda was. 2.) Explain the debate on Indian slavery and who its advocates were. 3.) Explain Spain’s policies of intermarriage and what their purpose was. 4.) Answer the following questions about African slavery under Spanish colonization: -What were the time periods of the slave trade in Mexico? -What was the total number of people of African descent and what were the areas in Mexico where they were concentrated? -What rights did African slaves have (different than what would later develop in the U.S.) and who advocated for them? 5.) Name each level of the racial hierarchy Spain established and the rights each group enjoyed or was denied.

Gut Reaction This is a history consisting of racism- white, … Read More...