Question 1 1. When males reach puberty, _________ increases their muscle mass and skeletal development. A. prolactin B. protein C. androgen D. adipose tissue E. estrogen 3 points Question 2 1. Which of the following is the only 100percent effective method of fertility control and STI protection? A. Abstinence B. Condoms and spermicide together C. Condoms and a hormonal contraceptive together D. Oral contraceptives E. Condoms 3 points Question 3 1. The efficacy rate for implants is less than ________ pregnancy per 100 users per year. A. 1 B. 10 C. 11 D. 17 E. 4 3 points Question 4 1. Over-the-counter medications are ________ A. sold legally without a prescription. B. safe for pregnant women to use. C. sold illegally without a prescription. D. the safest drugs for self-medication purposes. E. harmful even when approved by the pregnant women’s physician. 3 points Question 5 1. The ________ activates the autonomic nervous system and the endocrine system through messages sent via nerves or substances released into the bloodstream. A. cerebral cortex B. pons C. thalamus D. subcortex E. hypothalamus 3 points Question 6 1. Ovulation methods center around ______ A. a female’s basal body temperature. B. a female’s cervical secretions. C. a female tracking her menstrual cycle by using a calendar. D. A and B. E. A and C. 3 points Question 7 1. Emergency contraception ______ A. can be used as a regular contraception method. B. provides protection against STDs. C. is the only method available if unprotected intercourse has occurred when fertility is likely. D. is significantly more effective than other contraceptive methods. E. All of the above 3 points Question 8 1. Although a simultaneous orgasm between sexual partners is an exciting event, it _______ A. is a relatively uncommon event and can actually detract from the coital experience if one is preoccupied by sharing this experience. B. is common and should be a priority as far as coitus is concerned. C. is of no particular importance. D. is immensely overrated. E. None of the above 3 points Question 9 1. Cervical caps are similar to ________, but the cervical cap is smaller. A. IUDs B. diaphragms C. Norplant D. oral contraceptives E. Depo-Provera 3 points Question 10 1. Which of the following increases the risk of having a low-birth-weight baby? A. The mother does not eat well during pregnancy. B. The mother does not take care of herself. C. The mother does not receive comprehensive prenatal care. D. The mother smokes. E. All of the above 3 points Question 11 1. An advantage to using IUDs and IUSs is that they ______ A. remain in place, so planning before sexual intercourse is unnecessary. B. have a high level of effectiveness. C. allow fertility to return immediately after they are removed. D. can remain in place during a woman’s period. E. all of the above 3 points Question 12 1. Contraception is the means of preventing _______ from occurring during sexual intercourse. A. conception B. pain C. infertility D. STDs E. pleasure 3 points Question 13 1. ________ is the contraceptive method of removing the penis from the vagina before ejaculation. A. Abstinence B. Sterilization C. Avoidance D. Withdrawal E. Monogamy 3 points Question 14 1. Compared to men, women employed full time __________ A. spend fewer hours on household tasks. B. work more hours in the workplace. C. work a proportionate number of hours on household tasks. D. spend more hours on household tasks. E. work fewer hours in the workplace. 3 points Question 15 1. At ________, the female central nervous system (CNS) is typically more advanced than the male CNS. A. birth B. conception C. adolescence D. adulthood E. puberty 3 points Question 16 1. Females sometimes experience a sexual response cycle similar to that of males, EXCEPT A. when they are menstruating. B. they can have multiple orgasms without a refractory period. C. they can have multiple orgasms with a refractory period. D. the resolution phase is shorter in duration than in males. E. they generally move from excitement to plateau and then to orgasm. 3 points Question 17 1. Fertilization normally takes place in the ________ A. ovary. B. cervix. C. vagina. D. uterus. E. fallopian tubes. 3 points Question 18 1. ________ come in the form of foam, gels, films, suppositories, creams, sponges, and tablets. A. Condoms B. Diaphragms C. Spermicides D. IUDs E. Sterilization agents 3 points Question 19 1. The three major settings in the United States where labor and delivery occur are ________ A. the hospital, health-care clinics, and the home. B. the home, the hospital, and the birthing room. C. free-standing birth centers, the home, and health-care clinics. D. the hospital, the home, and free-standing birth centers. E. the birthing room, the hospital, and free-standing birth centers. 3 points Question 20 1. Mode, a fashion magazine, _______ A. was developed for women who wear normal and large sizes. B. was developed for women who wear over a size 16. C. shows only pictures of clothing, with no models. D. was sued by a group of women who claimed the magazine contributed to their bouts with eating disorders. E. none of the above 3 points Question 21 1. All of the following are advantages to breastfeeding EXCEPT that: A. over-the-counter medications do not affect breast milk. B. babies are less likely to contract respiratory infection. C. mothers’ milk provides antibodies against disease. D. encourages bonding of infant and mother. E. breast milk is cheaper than formula. 3 points Question 22 1. Kaplan’s Triphasic Model consists of the A. excitement, plateau, and resolution phases. B. desire, plateau, and orgasm phases. C. plateau, orgasm, and resolution phases. D. desire, excitement, and resolution phases. E. desire, excitement, and orgasm phases. 3 points Question 23 1. The unique component of Kaplan’s triphasic model is the ______phase—a psychological, prephysical sexual response stage. A. excitement B. desire C. resolution D. plateau E. None of the above 3 points Question 24 1. Together, the ________ and the ______ form the lifeline between the mother and the fetus. A. placenta, cervix B. cervix, uterus C. umbilical cord, vagina D. fallopiantubes, vagina E. placenta, umbilical cord 3 points Question 25 1. When an employee switches genders, which of the following is a difficult issue that employers may face? A. How clients might react B. How others will handle a transitioning employee using the restroom C. How an employee informs coworkers about switching genders D. All of the above E. None of the above 3 points Question 26 1. In men, sex flush occurs during the ________ phase, whereas in women it occurs during the ________ phase. A. refractory, excitement B. excitement, resolution C. excitement, plateau D. plateau, excitement E. plateau, resolution 3 points Question 27 1. The process that results in vaginal lubrication during the excitement phase is: A. myotonia. B. uterine orgasm. C. orgasmic platform. D. transudation. E. tachycardia. 3 points Question 28 1. The ________ is the waxy protective substance that coats the fetus. A. amniotic sac B. amniocentesis C. amniotic fluid D. vernixcaseosa. E. chorionic fluid 3 points Question 29 1. ________ adolescent females seem to be happier with their bodies and less likely to diet than ________ adolescent females. A. Hispanic, European Americans B. Asian American; African American C. African American, European American D. European American, Hispanic 3 points Question 30 1. Intrauterine devices (IUDs) and intrauterine systems (IUSs) are ______ methods of contraception. A. not B. permanent C. effective D. reversible E. both c and d 3 points Question 31 1. In early adolescence, girls outperform boys at which of the following types of tasks? A. Visual-spatial B. Math C. Physical D. Language and verbal E. None of the above 3 points Question 32 1. Which of the following are common signs that a person may have an eating disorder? A. The person wears tight clothes to show off his or her “new” body. B. A female may quit menstruating C. Excessive exercise D. B and C E. A and C 3 points Question 33 1. The ________ is the valve that prevents urine from entering the urethra and sperm from entering the bladder during ejaculation. A. orgasmic platform B. vasocongestive valve C. sex flush D. internal urethral sphincter E. None of the above 3 points Question 34 1. Which of the following statements reflect gender bias? A. Boys in school will “act out.” B. Girls in school will be docile. C. Girls are neat. D. All of the above. E. None of the above 3 points Question 35 1. The calendar method and ovulation methods are examples of ______ A. natural planning. B. fertility awareness methods. C. natural family planning. D. fertility planning. E. both B and C 3 points Question 36 1. Dieting during pregnancy can be harmful because the breakdown of fat produces toxic substances called ______ A. fibers. B. pheromones. C. ketones. D. monosaccharides. E. hormones. 3 points Question 37 1. Oral contraceptives _____ A. suppress ovulation. B. mimic the changes that occur in pregnancy. C. can be taken by both males and females. D. A and B E. A and C 3 points Question 38 1. According to Fisher (2001), men usually _______, whereas women ________. A. cut straight to the point, see issues as a part of a larger whole B. discuss their feelings, are more stoic C. mull things over, tend to speak their mind D. waiver while making decisions, mull things over E. None of the above 3 points Question 39 1. The increase in heart rate that occurs during sexual activity is known as _______ A. hyperventilation. B. vasocongestion. C. myotonia. D. tachycardia. E. sex flush. 3 points Question 40 1. Women earned about _________ of all college degrees in 2008. A. 10% B. 35% C. 57% D. 85% E. None of the above

Question 1 1. When males reach puberty, _________ increases their muscle mass and skeletal development. A. prolactin B. protein C. androgen D. adipose tissue E. estrogen 3 points Question 2 1. Which of the following is the only 100percent effective method of fertility control and STI protection? A. Abstinence B. Condoms and spermicide together C. Condoms and a hormonal contraceptive together D. Oral contraceptives E. Condoms 3 points Question 3 1. The efficacy rate for implants is less than ________ pregnancy per 100 users per year. A. 1 B. 10 C. 11 D. 17 E. 4 3 points Question 4 1. Over-the-counter medications are ________ A. sold legally without a prescription. B. safe for pregnant women to use. C. sold illegally without a prescription. D. the safest drugs for self-medication purposes. E. harmful even when approved by the pregnant women’s physician. 3 points Question 5 1. The ________ activates the autonomic nervous system and the endocrine system through messages sent via nerves or substances released into the bloodstream. A. cerebral cortex B. pons C. thalamus D. subcortex E. hypothalamus 3 points Question 6 1. Ovulation methods center around ______ A. a female’s basal body temperature. B. a female’s cervical secretions. C. a female tracking her menstrual cycle by using a calendar. D. A and B. E. A and C. 3 points Question 7 1. Emergency contraception ______ A. can be used as a regular contraception method. B. provides protection against STDs. C. is the only method available if unprotected intercourse has occurred when fertility is likely. D. is significantly more effective than other contraceptive methods. E. All of the above 3 points Question 8 1. Although a simultaneous orgasm between sexual partners is an exciting event, it _______ A. is a relatively uncommon event and can actually detract from the coital experience if one is preoccupied by sharing this experience. B. is common and should be a priority as far as coitus is concerned. C. is of no particular importance. D. is immensely overrated. E. None of the above 3 points Question 9 1. Cervical caps are similar to ________, but the cervical cap is smaller. A. IUDs B. diaphragms C. Norplant D. oral contraceptives E. Depo-Provera 3 points Question 10 1. Which of the following increases the risk of having a low-birth-weight baby? A. The mother does not eat well during pregnancy. B. The mother does not take care of herself. C. The mother does not receive comprehensive prenatal care. D. The mother smokes. E. All of the above 3 points Question 11 1. An advantage to using IUDs and IUSs is that they ______ A. remain in place, so planning before sexual intercourse is unnecessary. B. have a high level of effectiveness. C. allow fertility to return immediately after they are removed. D. can remain in place during a woman’s period. E. all of the above 3 points Question 12 1. Contraception is the means of preventing _______ from occurring during sexual intercourse. A. conception B. pain C. infertility D. STDs E. pleasure 3 points Question 13 1. ________ is the contraceptive method of removing the penis from the vagina before ejaculation. A. Abstinence B. Sterilization C. Avoidance D. Withdrawal E. Monogamy 3 points Question 14 1. Compared to men, women employed full time __________ A. spend fewer hours on household tasks. B. work more hours in the workplace. C. work a proportionate number of hours on household tasks. D. spend more hours on household tasks. E. work fewer hours in the workplace. 3 points Question 15 1. At ________, the female central nervous system (CNS) is typically more advanced than the male CNS. A. birth B. conception C. adolescence D. adulthood E. puberty 3 points Question 16 1. Females sometimes experience a sexual response cycle similar to that of males, EXCEPT A. when they are menstruating. B. they can have multiple orgasms without a refractory period. C. they can have multiple orgasms with a refractory period. D. the resolution phase is shorter in duration than in males. E. they generally move from excitement to plateau and then to orgasm. 3 points Question 17 1. Fertilization normally takes place in the ________ A. ovary. B. cervix. C. vagina. D. uterus. E. fallopian tubes. 3 points Question 18 1. ________ come in the form of foam, gels, films, suppositories, creams, sponges, and tablets. A. Condoms B. Diaphragms C. Spermicides D. IUDs E. Sterilization agents 3 points Question 19 1. The three major settings in the United States where labor and delivery occur are ________ A. the hospital, health-care clinics, and the home. B. the home, the hospital, and the birthing room. C. free-standing birth centers, the home, and health-care clinics. D. the hospital, the home, and free-standing birth centers. E. the birthing room, the hospital, and free-standing birth centers. 3 points Question 20 1. Mode, a fashion magazine, _______ A. was developed for women who wear normal and large sizes. B. was developed for women who wear over a size 16. C. shows only pictures of clothing, with no models. D. was sued by a group of women who claimed the magazine contributed to their bouts with eating disorders. E. none of the above 3 points Question 21 1. All of the following are advantages to breastfeeding EXCEPT that: A. over-the-counter medications do not affect breast milk. B. babies are less likely to contract respiratory infection. C. mothers’ milk provides antibodies against disease. D. encourages bonding of infant and mother. E. breast milk is cheaper than formula. 3 points Question 22 1. Kaplan’s Triphasic Model consists of the A. excitement, plateau, and resolution phases. B. desire, plateau, and orgasm phases. C. plateau, orgasm, and resolution phases. D. desire, excitement, and resolution phases. E. desire, excitement, and orgasm phases. 3 points Question 23 1. The unique component of Kaplan’s triphasic model is the ______phase—a psychological, prephysical sexual response stage. A. excitement B. desire C. resolution D. plateau E. None of the above 3 points Question 24 1. Together, the ________ and the ______ form the lifeline between the mother and the fetus. A. placenta, cervix B. cervix, uterus C. umbilical cord, vagina D. fallopiantubes, vagina E. placenta, umbilical cord 3 points Question 25 1. When an employee switches genders, which of the following is a difficult issue that employers may face? A. How clients might react B. How others will handle a transitioning employee using the restroom C. How an employee informs coworkers about switching genders D. All of the above E. None of the above 3 points Question 26 1. In men, sex flush occurs during the ________ phase, whereas in women it occurs during the ________ phase. A. refractory, excitement B. excitement, resolution C. excitement, plateau D. plateau, excitement E. plateau, resolution 3 points Question 27 1. The process that results in vaginal lubrication during the excitement phase is: A. myotonia. B. uterine orgasm. C. orgasmic platform. D. transudation. E. tachycardia. 3 points Question 28 1. The ________ is the waxy protective substance that coats the fetus. A. amniotic sac B. amniocentesis C. amniotic fluid D. vernixcaseosa. E. chorionic fluid 3 points Question 29 1. ________ adolescent females seem to be happier with their bodies and less likely to diet than ________ adolescent females. A. Hispanic, European Americans B. Asian American; African American C. African American, European American D. European American, Hispanic 3 points Question 30 1. Intrauterine devices (IUDs) and intrauterine systems (IUSs) are ______ methods of contraception. A. not B. permanent C. effective D. reversible E. both c and d 3 points Question 31 1. In early adolescence, girls outperform boys at which of the following types of tasks? A. Visual-spatial B. Math C. Physical D. Language and verbal E. None of the above 3 points Question 32 1. Which of the following are common signs that a person may have an eating disorder? A. The person wears tight clothes to show off his or her “new” body. B. A female may quit menstruating C. Excessive exercise D. B and C E. A and C 3 points Question 33 1. The ________ is the valve that prevents urine from entering the urethra and sperm from entering the bladder during ejaculation. A. orgasmic platform B. vasocongestive valve C. sex flush D. internal urethral sphincter E. None of the above 3 points Question 34 1. Which of the following statements reflect gender bias? A. Boys in school will “act out.” B. Girls in school will be docile. C. Girls are neat. D. All of the above. E. None of the above 3 points Question 35 1. The calendar method and ovulation methods are examples of ______ A. natural planning. B. fertility awareness methods. C. natural family planning. D. fertility planning. E. both B and C 3 points Question 36 1. Dieting during pregnancy can be harmful because the breakdown of fat produces toxic substances called ______ A. fibers. B. pheromones. C. ketones. D. monosaccharides. E. hormones. 3 points Question 37 1. Oral contraceptives _____ A. suppress ovulation. B. mimic the changes that occur in pregnancy. C. can be taken by both males and females. D. A and B E. A and C 3 points Question 38 1. According to Fisher (2001), men usually _______, whereas women ________. A. cut straight to the point, see issues as a part of a larger whole B. discuss their feelings, are more stoic C. mull things over, tend to speak their mind D. waiver while making decisions, mull things over E. None of the above 3 points Question 39 1. The increase in heart rate that occurs during sexual activity is known as _______ A. hyperventilation. B. vasocongestion. C. myotonia. D. tachycardia. E. sex flush. 3 points Question 40 1. Women earned about _________ of all college degrees in 2008. A. 10% B. 35% C. 57% D. 85% E. None of the above

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Lab Description: Follow the instructions in the lab tasks below to complete Problems 1 through 4. These problems will guide you in observing signal delays and timing hazards of logic circuits (both Sum-of-Products (SOP) and Product-of-Sums (POS) circuits). These problems will also guide you in adding circuitry to eliminate a timing hazard. Use VHDL to design the circuits. Carefully follow the directions provided in the lab tasks below. Write your answers to the questions asked by the problems. Do not print out the VHDL code and waveforms as asked by the problems, instead include these on the cover sheet for this lab and print this out when you are done. Do not worry about annotating or putting arrows/notes on the waveforms–just make sure any signals or transitions of interest are shown in your screenshot. For each problem, use VHDL assignment statements for each gate of the Boolean expression. You must add delay for each gate and inverter as described by the problem. Do this by using the “after” statement: Z <= (A and B) after 1 ns; Refer to Digilent Real Digital Module 8 for more information about the "after" statement. Lab Tasks: 1. Complete Problem 1 of Project 8. Simulate all input combinations for this SOP (Sum-of-Products) expression. However, be aware that specific input sequences are required to observe a timing hazard. The problem states that you will need to observe the output when B and C are both high (logic 1) and A transitions from high to low to high (logic 1 to 0, then back to 1). 2. Complete Problem 4 of Project 8. Increase the delay of the OR gate as specified and re-simulate to answer the questions. 3. Complete Problem 2 of Project 8. Change the delay of the OR gate back to the 1 ns that you used for Problem 1. Add the new logic gate (with delay) to your VHDL for the SOP expression and re-simulate to answer the questions. 4. Complete Problem 3 of Project 8. You may create any POS (Product-of-Sums) expression for this problem, however, not all POS expressions will have a timing hazard (so spend some time thinking about how a timing hazard can be generated with a POS expression). Once again, simulate all input combinations for your POS expression but be aware that specific input sequences are required to observe a timing hazard. For this problem, you will also add the new logic gate (with delay) to your VHDL for your POS expression in order to eliminate the timing hazard; you will need to re-simulate with this additional logic gate in order to answer the questions. Problem 1. Implement the function Y = A’.B + A.C in the VHDL tool. Define the INV, OR and two AND operations separately, and give each operation a 1ns delay. Simulate the circuit with all possible combinations of inputs. Watch all circuit nets (inputs, outputs, and intermediate nets) during the simulation. Answer the questions below. Observe the outputs of the AND gates and the overall circuit output when B and C are both high, and A transitions from H to L and then from L to H (you may want to create another simulation to focus on this behavior). What output behavior do you notice when A transitions? What happens when A transitions and B or C are held a ‘0’? How long is the output glitch? _______ Is it positive ( ) or negative ( ) (circle one)? Change the delay through the inverter to 2ns, and resimulate. Now how long is output glitch? ______ What can you say about the relationship between the inverter gate delay and the length of the timing glitch? Based on this simple experiment, an SOP circuit can exhibit positive/negative glitches (circle one) when an input that arrives at one AND gate in a complemented form and another AND gate in uncomplemented form transitions from a _____ to a _____. Problem 2. Enter the logic equation from problem 1 in the K-map below, and loop the equation with redundant term included. Add the redundant term to the Xilinx circuit, re-simulate, and answer the questions. B C A 00 01 11 10 0 1 F Did adding the new gate to the circuit change the logical behavior of the circuit? What effect did the new gate have on the output, particularly when A changes and B and C are both held high? Problem 3. Create a three-input POS circuit to illustrate the formation of a glitch. Drive the simulator to illustrate a glitch in the POS circuit, and answer the questions below. A POS circuit can exhibit a positive/negative glitch (circle one) when an input that arrives at one OR gate in a complemented form and another OR gate in un-complemented form transitions from a _____ to a _____. Write the POS equation you used to show the glitch: Enter the equation in the K-map below, loop the original equation with the redundant term, add the redundant gate to your Xilinx circuit, and resimulate. How did adding the new gate to the circuit change the logical behavior of the circuit? What effect did the new gate have on the output, particularly when A changes and B and C are both held high? Print and submit the circuits and simulation output, label the output glitches in the simulation output, and draw arrows on the simulation output between the events that caused the glitches (i.e., a transition in an input signal) and the glitches themselves. Problem 4. Copy the SOP circuit above to a new VHDL file, and increase the delay of the output OR gate. Simulate the circuit and answer the questions below. How did adding delay to the output gate change the output transition? Does adding delay to the output gate change the circuit’s glitch behavior in any way? Name: Signal Delays Date: Designing with VHDL Grade Item Grade Five segments of VHDL Code for Problems 1-4: /10 Five simulation screenshots for Problems 1-4: /10 Questions from Problems 1-4: /16 Total Grade: /36 VHDL Code: Copy-paste your VHDL design code (just the code you wrote) for: • The SOP expression with the timing hazard (Problem 1, Project 8): • The SOP expression with increased OR gate delay (Problem 4, Project 8): • The SOP expression with the extra logic gate in order to eliminate the timing hazard (Problem 2, Project 8): • Your POS expression with the timing hazard (Problem 3, Project 8): • Your POS expression with the extra logic gate in order to eliminate the timing hazard (Problem 3, Project 8): Simulation Screenshots: Use the “Print Screen” button to capture your screenshot (it should show the entire screen, not just the window of the program). • The SOP expression with the timing hazard (Problem 1, Project 8): • The SOP expression with increased OR gate delay (Problem 4, Project 8): • The SOP expression with the extra logic gate in order to eliminate the timing hazard (Problem 2, Project 8): • Your POS expression with the timing hazard (Problem 3, Project 8): • Your POS expression with the extra logic gate in order to eliminate the timing hazard (Problem 3, Project 8): Simulation Screenshot Tips: (you can delete this once you capture your screenshot) 1. Make the “Wave” window large by clicking the “+” button near the upper-right of the window 2. Click the “Zoom Full” button (looks like a blue/green-filled magnifying glass) to enlarge your waveforms 3. In order to not print a lot of black, change the color scheme of the “Wave” window: 3.1. Click ToolsEdit Preferences… 3.2. The “By Window” tab should be selected, then click Wave Windows in the “Window List” to the left 3.3. Scroll to the bottom of the “Wave Windows Color Scheme” list and click waveBackground. Then click white in the color “Palette” at the right of the screen. 3.4. Now color the waveforms and text black: 3.4.1. Click LOGIC_0 in the “Wave Windows Color Scheme.” Then click black in the color “Palette” at the right of the screen. 3.4.2. Repeat this for LOGIC_1, timeColor, and cursorColor (if you have a cursor you want to print) 3.5. Once you have captured your screenshot, you can click the Reset Defaults button to restore the “Wave” window to its original color scheme Questions: (Please use this cover sheet to type and print your responses) 1. List the references you used for this lab assignment (e.g. sources/websites used or students with whom you discussed this assignment) 2. Do you have any comments or suggestions for this lab exercise?

Lab Description: Follow the instructions in the lab tasks below to complete Problems 1 through 4. These problems will guide you in observing signal delays and timing hazards of logic circuits (both Sum-of-Products (SOP) and Product-of-Sums (POS) circuits). These problems will also guide you in adding circuitry to eliminate a timing hazard. Use VHDL to design the circuits. Carefully follow the directions provided in the lab tasks below. Write your answers to the questions asked by the problems. Do not print out the VHDL code and waveforms as asked by the problems, instead include these on the cover sheet for this lab and print this out when you are done. Do not worry about annotating or putting arrows/notes on the waveforms–just make sure any signals or transitions of interest are shown in your screenshot. For each problem, use VHDL assignment statements for each gate of the Boolean expression. You must add delay for each gate and inverter as described by the problem. Do this by using the “after” statement: Z <= (A and B) after 1 ns; Refer to Digilent Real Digital Module 8 for more information about the "after" statement. Lab Tasks: 1. Complete Problem 1 of Project 8. Simulate all input combinations for this SOP (Sum-of-Products) expression. However, be aware that specific input sequences are required to observe a timing hazard. The problem states that you will need to observe the output when B and C are both high (logic 1) and A transitions from high to low to high (logic 1 to 0, then back to 1). 2. Complete Problem 4 of Project 8. Increase the delay of the OR gate as specified and re-simulate to answer the questions. 3. Complete Problem 2 of Project 8. Change the delay of the OR gate back to the 1 ns that you used for Problem 1. Add the new logic gate (with delay) to your VHDL for the SOP expression and re-simulate to answer the questions. 4. Complete Problem 3 of Project 8. You may create any POS (Product-of-Sums) expression for this problem, however, not all POS expressions will have a timing hazard (so spend some time thinking about how a timing hazard can be generated with a POS expression). Once again, simulate all input combinations for your POS expression but be aware that specific input sequences are required to observe a timing hazard. For this problem, you will also add the new logic gate (with delay) to your VHDL for your POS expression in order to eliminate the timing hazard; you will need to re-simulate with this additional logic gate in order to answer the questions. Problem 1. Implement the function Y = A’.B + A.C in the VHDL tool. Define the INV, OR and two AND operations separately, and give each operation a 1ns delay. Simulate the circuit with all possible combinations of inputs. Watch all circuit nets (inputs, outputs, and intermediate nets) during the simulation. Answer the questions below. Observe the outputs of the AND gates and the overall circuit output when B and C are both high, and A transitions from H to L and then from L to H (you may want to create another simulation to focus on this behavior). What output behavior do you notice when A transitions? What happens when A transitions and B or C are held a ‘0’? How long is the output glitch? _______ Is it positive ( ) or negative ( ) (circle one)? Change the delay through the inverter to 2ns, and resimulate. Now how long is output glitch? ______ What can you say about the relationship between the inverter gate delay and the length of the timing glitch? Based on this simple experiment, an SOP circuit can exhibit positive/negative glitches (circle one) when an input that arrives at one AND gate in a complemented form and another AND gate in uncomplemented form transitions from a _____ to a _____. Problem 2. Enter the logic equation from problem 1 in the K-map below, and loop the equation with redundant term included. Add the redundant term to the Xilinx circuit, re-simulate, and answer the questions. B C A 00 01 11 10 0 1 F Did adding the new gate to the circuit change the logical behavior of the circuit? What effect did the new gate have on the output, particularly when A changes and B and C are both held high? Problem 3. Create a three-input POS circuit to illustrate the formation of a glitch. Drive the simulator to illustrate a glitch in the POS circuit, and answer the questions below. A POS circuit can exhibit a positive/negative glitch (circle one) when an input that arrives at one OR gate in a complemented form and another OR gate in un-complemented form transitions from a _____ to a _____. Write the POS equation you used to show the glitch: Enter the equation in the K-map below, loop the original equation with the redundant term, add the redundant gate to your Xilinx circuit, and resimulate. How did adding the new gate to the circuit change the logical behavior of the circuit? What effect did the new gate have on the output, particularly when A changes and B and C are both held high? Print and submit the circuits and simulation output, label the output glitches in the simulation output, and draw arrows on the simulation output between the events that caused the glitches (i.e., a transition in an input signal) and the glitches themselves. Problem 4. Copy the SOP circuit above to a new VHDL file, and increase the delay of the output OR gate. Simulate the circuit and answer the questions below. How did adding delay to the output gate change the output transition? Does adding delay to the output gate change the circuit’s glitch behavior in any way? Name: Signal Delays Date: Designing with VHDL Grade Item Grade Five segments of VHDL Code for Problems 1-4: /10 Five simulation screenshots for Problems 1-4: /10 Questions from Problems 1-4: /16 Total Grade: /36 VHDL Code: Copy-paste your VHDL design code (just the code you wrote) for: • The SOP expression with the timing hazard (Problem 1, Project 8): • The SOP expression with increased OR gate delay (Problem 4, Project 8): • The SOP expression with the extra logic gate in order to eliminate the timing hazard (Problem 2, Project 8): • Your POS expression with the timing hazard (Problem 3, Project 8): • Your POS expression with the extra logic gate in order to eliminate the timing hazard (Problem 3, Project 8): Simulation Screenshots: Use the “Print Screen” button to capture your screenshot (it should show the entire screen, not just the window of the program). • The SOP expression with the timing hazard (Problem 1, Project 8): • The SOP expression with increased OR gate delay (Problem 4, Project 8): • The SOP expression with the extra logic gate in order to eliminate the timing hazard (Problem 2, Project 8): • Your POS expression with the timing hazard (Problem 3, Project 8): • Your POS expression with the extra logic gate in order to eliminate the timing hazard (Problem 3, Project 8): Simulation Screenshot Tips: (you can delete this once you capture your screenshot) 1. Make the “Wave” window large by clicking the “+” button near the upper-right of the window 2. Click the “Zoom Full” button (looks like a blue/green-filled magnifying glass) to enlarge your waveforms 3. In order to not print a lot of black, change the color scheme of the “Wave” window: 3.1. Click ToolsEdit Preferences… 3.2. The “By Window” tab should be selected, then click Wave Windows in the “Window List” to the left 3.3. Scroll to the bottom of the “Wave Windows Color Scheme” list and click waveBackground. Then click white in the color “Palette” at the right of the screen. 3.4. Now color the waveforms and text black: 3.4.1. Click LOGIC_0 in the “Wave Windows Color Scheme.” Then click black in the color “Palette” at the right of the screen. 3.4.2. Repeat this for LOGIC_1, timeColor, and cursorColor (if you have a cursor you want to print) 3.5. Once you have captured your screenshot, you can click the Reset Defaults button to restore the “Wave” window to its original color scheme Questions: (Please use this cover sheet to type and print your responses) 1. List the references you used for this lab assignment (e.g. sources/websites used or students with whom you discussed this assignment) 2. Do you have any comments or suggestions for this lab exercise?

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You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Exercise 2.5 Starting from the front door of your ranch house, you walk 60.0 due east to your windmill, and then you turn around and slowly walk 35.0 west to a bench where you sit and watch the sunrise. It takes you 27.0 to walk from your house to the windmill and then 49.0 to walk from the windmill to the bench. Part A For the entire trip from your front door to the bench, what is your average velocity? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B For the entire trip from your front door to the bench, what is your average speed? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Exercise 2.7 A car is stopped at a traffic light. It then travels along a straight road so that its distance from the light is given by , where = 2.40 and = 0.110 . = -0.329 average speed = 1.25 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 1 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Part A Calculate the average velocity of the car for the time interval = 0 to = 10.0 . ANSWER: Correct Part B Calculate the instantaneous velocity of the car at =0. ANSWER: Correct Part C Calculate the instantaneous velocity of the car at =5.00 . ANSWER: Correct Part D Calculate the instantaneous velocity of the car at =10.0 . ANSWER: Correct Part E How long after starting from rest is the car again at rest? ANSWER: = 13.0 = 0 = 15.8 = 15.0 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 2 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Correct Exercise 2.9 A ball moves in a straight line (the x-axis). The graph in the figure shows this ball’s velocity as a function of time. Part A What are the ball’s average velocity during the first 2.8 ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Answer Requested Part B What are the ball’s average speed during the first 2.8 ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct = 14.5 = 2.3 = 2.3 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 3 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Part C Suppose that the ball moved in such a way that the graph segment after 2.0 was -3.0 instead of +3.0 . Find the ball’s and average velocity during the first 2.8 in this case. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: All attempts used; correct answer displayed Part D Suppose that the ball moved in such a way that the graph segment after 2.0 was -3.0 instead of +3.0 . Find the ball’s average speed during the first 2.8 in this case. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Exercise 2.13 Part A The table shows test data for the Bugatti Veyron, the fastest car made. The car is moving in a straight line (the x-axis). Time 0 2.10 20.0 53.0 Speed 0 60.0 205 259 Calculate the car’s average acceleration (in ) between 0 and 2.1 . ANSWER: Correct Part B Calculate the car’s average acceleration (in ) between 2.1 and 20.0 . = 0.57 = 2.3 = 12.8 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 4 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM ANSWER: Correct Part C Calculate the car’s average acceleration (in ) between 20.0 and 53 . ANSWER: Correct Exercise 2.19 An antelope moving with constant acceleration covers the distance 79.0 between two points in time 7.00 . Its speed as it passes the second point is 14.5 . Part A What is its speed at the first point? ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the acceleration? ANSWER: Correct Exercise 2.22 In the fastest measured tennis serve, the ball left the racquet at 73.14 . A served tennis ball is typically in contact with = 3.62 = 0.731 = 8.07 = 0.918 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 5 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM the racquet for 27.0 and starts from rest. Assume constant acceleration. Part A What was the ball’s acceleration during this serve? ANSWER: Correct Part B How far did the ball travel during the serve? ANSWER: Correct Exercise 2.30 A cat walks in a straight line, which we shall call the x-axis with the positive direction to the right. As an observant physicist, you make measurements of this cat’s motion and construct a graph of the feline’s velocity as a function of time (the figure ). Part A Find the cat’s velocity at = 5.0 . Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: = 2710 = 0.987 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 6 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Correct Part B Find the cat’s velocity at = 8.0 . Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the cat’s acceleration at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the cat’s acceleration at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part E What is the cat’s acceleration at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: = 1.3 = -2.7 = -1.3 = -1.3 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 7 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Correct Part F What distance does the cat move during the first 4.5 ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part G What distance does the cat move from to ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part H Sketch clear graph of the cat’s acceleration as function of time, assuming that the cat started at the origin. ANSWER: = -1.3 = 23 = 26 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 8 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Correct Part I Sketch clear graph of the cat’s position as function of time, assuming that the cat started at the origin. ANSWER: Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 9 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM All attempts used; correct answer displayed Exercise 2.35 Part A If a flea can jump straight up to a height of 0.510 , what is its initial speed as it leaves the ground? ANSWER: Correct Part B How long is it in the air? ANSWER: Correct = 3.16 = 0.645 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 10 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Exercise 2.36 A small rock is thrown vertically upward with a speed of 18.0 from the edge of the roof of a 39.0 tall building. The rock doesn’t hit the building on its way back down and lands in the street below. Air resistance can be neglected. Part A What is the speed of the rock just before it hits the street? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How much time elapses from when the rock is thrown until it hits the street? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Exercise 2.38 You throw a glob of putty straight up toward the ceiling, which is 3.00 above the point where the putty leaves your hand. The initial speed of the putty as it leaves your hand is 9.70 . Part A What is the speed of the putty just before it strikes the ceiling? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B = 33.0 = 5.20 = 5.94 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 11 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM How much time from when it leaves your hand does it take the putty to reach the ceiling? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Exercise 3.1 A squirrel has x- and y-coordinates ( 1.2 , 3.3 ) at time and coordinates ( 5.3 , -0.80 ) at time = 2.6 . Part A For this time interval, find the x-component of the average velocity. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part B For this time interval, find the y-component of the average velocity. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part C Find the magnitude of the average velocity. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: = 0.384 = 1.6 = -1.6 = 2.2 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 12 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Correct Part D Find the direction of the average velocity. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Exercise 3.3 A web page designer creates an animation in which a dot on a computer screen has a position of 4.1 2.1 4.7 . Part A Find the average velocity of the dot between and . Give your answer as a pair of components separated by a comma. For example, if you think the x component is 3 and the y component is 4, then you should enter 3,4. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part B Find the instantaneous velocity at . Give your answer as a pair of components separated by a comma. For example, if you think the x component is 3 and the y component is 4, then you should enter 3,4. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part C = 45 below the x-axis = 4.2,4.7 = 0,4.7 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 13 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Find the instantaneous velocity at . Give your answer as a pair of components separated by a comma. For example, if you think the x component is 3 and the y component is 4, then you should enter 3,4. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part D Find the instantaneous velocity at . Give your answer as a pair of components separated by a comma. For example, if you think the x component is 3 and the y component is 4, then you should enter 3,4. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Exercise 3.5 A jet plane is flying at a constant altitude. At time it has components of velocity 89 , 108 . At time 32.5 the components are 165 , 37 . Part A For this time interval calculate the average acceleration. Give your answer as a pair of components separated by a comma. For example, if you think the x component is 3 and the y component is 4, then you should enter 3,4. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part B Find the magnitude of the average acceleration. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: = 4.2,4.7 = 8.4,4.7 = 2.3,-2.2 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 14 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Correct Part C Find the direction of the average acceleration (let the direction be the angle that the vector makes with the +x-axis, measured counterclockwise). ANSWER: Correct Exercise 3.4 The position of a squirrel running in a park is given by . Part A What is , the -component of the velocity of the squirrel, as function of time? ANSWER: Correct Part B What is , the y-component of the velocity of the squirrel, as function of time? ANSWER: = 3.2 = -43.1 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 15 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Correct Part C At 4.51 , how far is the squirrel from its initial position? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: All attempts used; correct answer displayed Part D At 4.51 , what is the magnitude of the squirrel’s velocity? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part E At 4.51 , what is the direction (in degrees counterclockwise from +x-axis) of the squirrel’s velocity? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 90.1%. You received 14.42 out of a possible total of 16 points. = 2.65 = 1.31 = 62.5 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 16 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM

You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Exercise 2.5 Starting from the front door of your ranch house, you walk 60.0 due east to your windmill, and then you turn around and slowly walk 35.0 west to a bench where you sit and watch the sunrise. It takes you 27.0 to walk from your house to the windmill and then 49.0 to walk from the windmill to the bench. Part A For the entire trip from your front door to the bench, what is your average velocity? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B For the entire trip from your front door to the bench, what is your average speed? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Exercise 2.7 A car is stopped at a traffic light. It then travels along a straight road so that its distance from the light is given by , where = 2.40 and = 0.110 . = -0.329 average speed = 1.25 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 1 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Part A Calculate the average velocity of the car for the time interval = 0 to = 10.0 . ANSWER: Correct Part B Calculate the instantaneous velocity of the car at =0. ANSWER: Correct Part C Calculate the instantaneous velocity of the car at =5.00 . ANSWER: Correct Part D Calculate the instantaneous velocity of the car at =10.0 . ANSWER: Correct Part E How long after starting from rest is the car again at rest? ANSWER: = 13.0 = 0 = 15.8 = 15.0 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 2 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Correct Exercise 2.9 A ball moves in a straight line (the x-axis). The graph in the figure shows this ball’s velocity as a function of time. Part A What are the ball’s average velocity during the first 2.8 ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Answer Requested Part B What are the ball’s average speed during the first 2.8 ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct = 14.5 = 2.3 = 2.3 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 3 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Part C Suppose that the ball moved in such a way that the graph segment after 2.0 was -3.0 instead of +3.0 . Find the ball’s and average velocity during the first 2.8 in this case. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: All attempts used; correct answer displayed Part D Suppose that the ball moved in such a way that the graph segment after 2.0 was -3.0 instead of +3.0 . Find the ball’s average speed during the first 2.8 in this case. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Exercise 2.13 Part A The table shows test data for the Bugatti Veyron, the fastest car made. The car is moving in a straight line (the x-axis). Time 0 2.10 20.0 53.0 Speed 0 60.0 205 259 Calculate the car’s average acceleration (in ) between 0 and 2.1 . ANSWER: Correct Part B Calculate the car’s average acceleration (in ) between 2.1 and 20.0 . = 0.57 = 2.3 = 12.8 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 4 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM ANSWER: Correct Part C Calculate the car’s average acceleration (in ) between 20.0 and 53 . ANSWER: Correct Exercise 2.19 An antelope moving with constant acceleration covers the distance 79.0 between two points in time 7.00 . Its speed as it passes the second point is 14.5 . Part A What is its speed at the first point? ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the acceleration? ANSWER: Correct Exercise 2.22 In the fastest measured tennis serve, the ball left the racquet at 73.14 . A served tennis ball is typically in contact with = 3.62 = 0.731 = 8.07 = 0.918 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 5 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM the racquet for 27.0 and starts from rest. Assume constant acceleration. Part A What was the ball’s acceleration during this serve? ANSWER: Correct Part B How far did the ball travel during the serve? ANSWER: Correct Exercise 2.30 A cat walks in a straight line, which we shall call the x-axis with the positive direction to the right. As an observant physicist, you make measurements of this cat’s motion and construct a graph of the feline’s velocity as a function of time (the figure ). Part A Find the cat’s velocity at = 5.0 . Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: = 2710 = 0.987 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 6 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Correct Part B Find the cat’s velocity at = 8.0 . Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the cat’s acceleration at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the cat’s acceleration at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part E What is the cat’s acceleration at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: = 1.3 = -2.7 = -1.3 = -1.3 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 7 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Correct Part F What distance does the cat move during the first 4.5 ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part G What distance does the cat move from to ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part H Sketch clear graph of the cat’s acceleration as function of time, assuming that the cat started at the origin. ANSWER: = -1.3 = 23 = 26 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 8 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Correct Part I Sketch clear graph of the cat’s position as function of time, assuming that the cat started at the origin. ANSWER: Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 9 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM All attempts used; correct answer displayed Exercise 2.35 Part A If a flea can jump straight up to a height of 0.510 , what is its initial speed as it leaves the ground? ANSWER: Correct Part B How long is it in the air? ANSWER: Correct = 3.16 = 0.645 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 10 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Exercise 2.36 A small rock is thrown vertically upward with a speed of 18.0 from the edge of the roof of a 39.0 tall building. The rock doesn’t hit the building on its way back down and lands in the street below. Air resistance can be neglected. Part A What is the speed of the rock just before it hits the street? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How much time elapses from when the rock is thrown until it hits the street? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Exercise 2.38 You throw a glob of putty straight up toward the ceiling, which is 3.00 above the point where the putty leaves your hand. The initial speed of the putty as it leaves your hand is 9.70 . Part A What is the speed of the putty just before it strikes the ceiling? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B = 33.0 = 5.20 = 5.94 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 11 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM How much time from when it leaves your hand does it take the putty to reach the ceiling? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Exercise 3.1 A squirrel has x- and y-coordinates ( 1.2 , 3.3 ) at time and coordinates ( 5.3 , -0.80 ) at time = 2.6 . Part A For this time interval, find the x-component of the average velocity. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part B For this time interval, find the y-component of the average velocity. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part C Find the magnitude of the average velocity. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: = 0.384 = 1.6 = -1.6 = 2.2 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 12 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Correct Part D Find the direction of the average velocity. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Exercise 3.3 A web page designer creates an animation in which a dot on a computer screen has a position of 4.1 2.1 4.7 . Part A Find the average velocity of the dot between and . Give your answer as a pair of components separated by a comma. For example, if you think the x component is 3 and the y component is 4, then you should enter 3,4. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part B Find the instantaneous velocity at . Give your answer as a pair of components separated by a comma. For example, if you think the x component is 3 and the y component is 4, then you should enter 3,4. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part C = 45 below the x-axis = 4.2,4.7 = 0,4.7 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 13 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Find the instantaneous velocity at . Give your answer as a pair of components separated by a comma. For example, if you think the x component is 3 and the y component is 4, then you should enter 3,4. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part D Find the instantaneous velocity at . Give your answer as a pair of components separated by a comma. For example, if you think the x component is 3 and the y component is 4, then you should enter 3,4. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Exercise 3.5 A jet plane is flying at a constant altitude. At time it has components of velocity 89 , 108 . At time 32.5 the components are 165 , 37 . Part A For this time interval calculate the average acceleration. Give your answer as a pair of components separated by a comma. For example, if you think the x component is 3 and the y component is 4, then you should enter 3,4. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part B Find the magnitude of the average acceleration. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: = 4.2,4.7 = 8.4,4.7 = 2.3,-2.2 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 14 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Correct Part C Find the direction of the average acceleration (let the direction be the angle that the vector makes with the +x-axis, measured counterclockwise). ANSWER: Correct Exercise 3.4 The position of a squirrel running in a park is given by . Part A What is , the -component of the velocity of the squirrel, as function of time? ANSWER: Correct Part B What is , the y-component of the velocity of the squirrel, as function of time? ANSWER: = 3.2 = -43.1 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 15 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM Correct Part C At 4.51 , how far is the squirrel from its initial position? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: All attempts used; correct answer displayed Part D At 4.51 , what is the magnitude of the squirrel’s velocity? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part E At 4.51 , what is the direction (in degrees counterclockwise from +x-axis) of the squirrel’s velocity? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 90.1%. You received 14.42 out of a possible total of 16 points. = 2.65 = 1.31 = 62.5 Week 2 https://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?assignme… 16 of 16 3/23/2015 11:12 AM

IT 7358 – Human interface Technology Assignment 3 – Observation Exercise The purpose of this exercise is for you to begin learning how to make and record observations of people involved in an activity of some kind. To do this project you will need a pad of paper, a notebook or something else to write on, and a pen or pencil. To begin this exercise, you will be making an observation in a public space. Specifically, you will be observing a cafeteria setting, such as found in the basement of the IU main library, dorm cafeteria, Union cafeteria etc. Choose a time during which there is a good amount of activity. Be aware that too little activity will not give you enough data to work with, and might make people feel like they’re being watched. Once you have chosen the position from which you will make your observations, go through the following steps: • Record the date, day of week, time of day, weather, and other factors you think may have some bearing on what you are observing. • Describe the setting. Note features of the physical environment that seem to be significant. Write a brief and general description of what’s going on. This is mainly for background and context. • Also record your reactions and thoughts about what is going on, but you should keep these reactions distinct from description – perhaps in the margins, or on the back of the page. • Describe in detail the activity you are observing. At this point, you should strive for your description to be concrete, specific, and chronological. For example, it is better to record, “Six people standing single file in line, holding trays horizontal at waist height, advancing several steps in cascading fashion when the cashier says ‘next.’ On each tray is…” instead of “people waiting in line to pay for their food.” Your guiding question right now is ‘What’s going on here?’ Your notes for this part of the exercise should be event-by-event narrative, not generalizations. • Separately (again, in the margins or somewhere else) record the perceptions, motives, and values of the people you are watching. As you observe, begin to focus on something that seems interesting to you, such as a pattern that emerges or a particular aspect of what you are observing. Stop when you’ve done roughly 20 minutes of detailed go back over your notes and fill in any important but missing details from memory, adding questions that came up for you as you were observing, and ideas you could investigate in the future if you were going to do further study. You can also begin adding any of your own interpretations of what you observed.

IT 7358 – Human interface Technology Assignment 3 – Observation Exercise The purpose of this exercise is for you to begin learning how to make and record observations of people involved in an activity of some kind. To do this project you will need a pad of paper, a notebook or something else to write on, and a pen or pencil. To begin this exercise, you will be making an observation in a public space. Specifically, you will be observing a cafeteria setting, such as found in the basement of the IU main library, dorm cafeteria, Union cafeteria etc. Choose a time during which there is a good amount of activity. Be aware that too little activity will not give you enough data to work with, and might make people feel like they’re being watched. Once you have chosen the position from which you will make your observations, go through the following steps: • Record the date, day of week, time of day, weather, and other factors you think may have some bearing on what you are observing. • Describe the setting. Note features of the physical environment that seem to be significant. Write a brief and general description of what’s going on. This is mainly for background and context. • Also record your reactions and thoughts about what is going on, but you should keep these reactions distinct from description – perhaps in the margins, or on the back of the page. • Describe in detail the activity you are observing. At this point, you should strive for your description to be concrete, specific, and chronological. For example, it is better to record, “Six people standing single file in line, holding trays horizontal at waist height, advancing several steps in cascading fashion when the cashier says ‘next.’ On each tray is…” instead of “people waiting in line to pay for their food.” Your guiding question right now is ‘What’s going on here?’ Your notes for this part of the exercise should be event-by-event narrative, not generalizations. • Separately (again, in the margins or somewhere else) record the perceptions, motives, and values of the people you are watching. As you observe, begin to focus on something that seems interesting to you, such as a pattern that emerges or a particular aspect of what you are observing. Stop when you’ve done roughly 20 minutes of detailed go back over your notes and fill in any important but missing details from memory, adding questions that came up for you as you were observing, and ideas you could investigate in the future if you were going to do further study. You can also begin adding any of your own interpretations of what you observed.

Place: Cafeteria Date: 27/05/2013 Day of week: Monday Time of … Read More...
Morgan Extra Pages Graphing with Excel to be carried out in a computer lab, 3rd floor Calloway Hall or elsewhere The Excel spreadsheet consists of vertical columns and horizontal rows; a column and row intersect at a cell. A cell can contain data for use in calculations of all sorts. The Name Box shows the currently selected cell (Fig. 1). In the Excel 2007 and 2010 versions the drop-down menus familiar in most software screens have been replaced by tabs with horizontally-arranged command buttons of various categories (Fig. 2) ___________________________________________________________________ Open Excel, click on the Microsoft circle, upper left, and Save As your surname. xlsx on the desktop. Before leaving the lab e-mail the file to yourself and/or save to a flash drive. Also e-mail it to your instructor. Figure 1. Parts of an Excel spreadsheet. Name Box Figure 2. Tabs. Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com EXERCISE 1: BASIC OPERATIONS Click Save often as you work. 1. Type the heading “Edge Length” in Cell A1 and double click the crack between the A and B column heading for automatic widening of column A. Similarly, write headings for columns B and C and enter numbers in Cells A2 and A3 as in Fig. 3. Highlight Cells A2 and A3 by dragging the cursor (chunky plus-shape) over the two of them and letting go. 2. Note that there are three types of cursor crosses: chunky for selecting, barbed for moving entries or blocks of entries from cell to cell, and tiny (appearing only at the little square in the lower-right corner of a cell). Obtain a tiny arrow for Cell A3 and perform a plus-drag down Column A until the cells are filled up to 40 (in Cell A8). Note that the two highlighted cells set both the starting value of the fill and the intervals. 3. Click on Cell B2 and enter a formula for face area of a cube as follows: type =, click on Cell A2, type ^2, and press Enter (note the formula bar in Fig. 4). 4. Enter the formula for cube volume in Cell C2 (same procedure, but “=, click on A2, ^3, Enter”). 5. Highlight Cells B2 and C2; plus-drag down to Row 8 (Fig. 5). Do the numbers look correct? Click on some cells in the newly filled area and notice how Excel steps the row designations as it moves down the column (it can do it for horizontal plusdrags along rows also). This is the major programming development that has led to the popularity of spreadsheets. Figure 3. Entries. Figure 4. A formula. Figure 5. Plus-dragging formulas. Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com 6. Now let’s graph the Face Area versus Edge Length: select Cells A1 through B8, choose the Insert tab, and click the Scatter drop-down menu and select “Scatter with only Markers” (Fig. 6). 7. Move the graph (Excel calls it a “chart”) that appears up alongside your number table and dress it up as follows: a. Note that some Chart Layouts have appeared above. Click Layout 1 and alter each title to read Face Area for the vertical axis, Edge Length for the horizontal and Face Area vs. Edge Length for the Graph Title. b. Activate the Excel Least squares routine, called “fitting a trendline” in the program: right click any of the data markers and click Add Trendline. Choose Power and also check “Display equation on chart” and “Display R-squared value on chart.” Fig. 7 shows what the graph will look like at this point. c. The titles are explicit, so the legend is unnecessary. Click on it and press the delete button to remove it. Figure 6. Creating a scatter graph. Figure 7. A graph with a fitted curve. Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com 8. Now let’s overlay the Volume vs. Edge Length curve onto the same graph (optional for 203L/205L): Make a copy of your graph by clicking on the outer white area, clicking ctrl-c (or right click, copy), and pasting the copy somewhere else (ctrl-v). If you wish, delete the trendline as in Fig. 8. a. Right click on the outer white space, choose Select Data and click the Add button. b. You can type in the cell ranges by hand in the dialog box that comes up, but it is easier to click the red, white, and blue button on the right of each space and highlight what you want to go in. Click the red, white, and blue of the bar that has appeared, and you will bounce back to the Add dialog box. Use the Edge Length column for the x’s and Volume for the y’s. c. Right-click on any volume data point and choose Format Data Series. Clicking Secondary Axis will place its scale on the right of the graph as in Fig. 8. d. Dress up your graph with two axis titles (Layout-Labels-Axis Titles), etc. Figure 8. Adding a second curve and y-axis to the graph Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com EXERCISE 2: INTERPRETING A LINEAR GRAPH Introduction: Many experiments are repeated a number of times with one of the parameters involved varied from run to run. Often the goal is to measure the rate of change of a dependent variable, rather than a particular value. If the dependent variable can be expressed as a linear function of the independent parameter, then the slope and yintercept of an appropriate graph will give the rate of change and a particular value, respectively. An example of such an experiment in PHYS.203L/205L is the first part of Lab 20, in which weights are added to the bottom of a suspended spring (Figure 9). This experiment shows that a spring exerts a force Fs proportional to the distance stretched y = (y-yo), a relationship known as Hooke’s Law: Fs = – k(y – yo) (Eq. 1) where k is called the Hooke’s Law constant. The minus sign shows that the spring opposes any push or pull on it. In Lab 20 Fs is equal to (- Mg) and y is given by the reading on a meter stick. Masses were added to the bottom of the spring in 50-g increments giving weights in newtons of 0.49, 0.98, etc. The weight pan was used as the pointer for reading y and had a mass of 50 g, so yo could not be directly measured. For convenient graphing Equation 1 can be rewritten: -(Mg) = – ky + kyo Or (Mg) = ky – kyo (Eq. 1′) Procedure 1. On your spreadsheet note the tabs at the bottom left and double-click Sheet1. Type in “Basics,” and then click the Sheet2 tab to bring up a fresh worksheet. Change the sheet name to “Linear Fit” and fill in data as in this table. Hooke’s Law Experiment y (m) -Fs = Mg (N) 0.337 0.49 0.388 0.98 0.446 1.47 0.498 1.96 0.550 2.45 2. Highlight the cells with the numbers, and graph (Mg) versus y as in Steps 6 and 7 of the Basics section. Your Trendline this time will be Linear of course. If you are having trouble remembering what’s versus what, “y” looks like “v”, so what comes before the “v” of “versus” goes on the y (vertical) axis. Yes, this graph is confusing: the horizontal (“x”) axis is distance y, and the “y” axis is something else. 3. Click on the Equation/R2 box on the graph and highlight just the slope, that is, only the number that comes before the “x.” Copy it (control-c is a fast way to Figure 9. A spring with a weight stretching it Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com do it) and paste it (control-v) into an empty cell. Do likewise for the intercept (including the minus sign). SAVE YOUR FILE! 5. The next steps use the standard procedure for obtaining information from linear data. Write the general equation for a straight line immediately below a hand-written copy of Equation 1′ then circle matching items: (Mg) = k y + (- k yo) (Eq. 1′) y = m x + b Note the parentheses around the intercept term of Equation 1′ to emphasize that the minus sign is part of it. Equating above and below, you can create two useful new equations: slope m = k (Eq. 2) y-intercept b = -kyo (Eq. 3) 6. Solve Equation 2 for k, that is, rewrite left to right. Then substitute the value for slope m from your graph, and you have an experimental value for the Hooke’s Law constant k. Next solve Equation 3 for yo, substitute the value for intercept b from your graph and the value of k that you just found, and calculate yo. 7. Examine your linear graph for clues to finding the units of the slope and the yintercept. Use these units to find the units of k and yo. 8. Present your values of k and yo with their units neatly at the bottom of your spreadsheet. 9. R2 in Excel, like r in our lab manual and Corr. in the LoggerPro software, is a measure of how well the calculated line matches the data points. 1.00 would indicate a perfect match. State how good a match you think was made in this case? 10. Do the Homework, Further Exercises on Interpreting Linear Graphs, on the following pages. Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Eq.1 M m f M a g               , (Eq.2) M slope m g       (Eq.3) M b f        Morgan Extra Pages Homework: Graph Interpretation Exercises EXAMPLE WITH COMPLETE SOLUTION In PHYS.203L and 205L we do Lab 9 Newton’s Second Law on Atwood’s Machine using a photogate sensor (Fig. 1). The Atwood’s apparatus can slow the rate of fall enough to be measured even with primitive timing devices. In our experiment LoggerPro software automatically collects and analyzes the data giving reliable measurements of g, the acceleration of gravity. The equation governing motion for Atwood’s Machine can be written: where a is the acceleration of the masses and string, g is the acceleration of gravity, M is the total mass at both ends of the string, m is the difference between the masses, and f is the frictional force at the hub of the pulley wheel. In this exercise you are given a graph of a vs. m obtained in this experiment with the values of M and the slope and intercept (Fig. 2). The goal is to extract values for acceleration of gravity g and frictional force f from this information. To analyze the graph we write y = mx + b, the general equation for a straight line, directly under Equation 1 and match up the various parameters: Equating above and below, you can create two new equations: and y m x b M m f M a g                Figure 1. The Atwood’s Machine setup (from the LoggerPro handout). Figure 2. Graph of acceleration versus mass difference; data from a Physics I experiment. Atwood’s Machine M = 0.400 kg a = 24.4 m – 0.018 R2 = 0.998 0.00 0.20 0.40 0.60 0.80 1.00 1.20 1.40 0.000 0.010 0.020 0.030 0.040 0.050 0.060  m (kg) a (m/s2) Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com 2 2 9.76 / 0.400 24.4 /( ) m s kg m kg s g Mm      To handle Equation 2 it pays to consider what the units of the slope are. A slope is “the rise over the run,“ so its units must be the units of the vertical axis divided by those of the horizontal axis. In this case: Now let’s solve Equation 2 for g and substitute the values of total mass M and of the slope m from the graph: Using 9.80 m/s2 as the Baltimore accepted value for g, we can calculate the percent error: A similar process with Equation 3 leads to a value for f, the frictional force at the hub of the pulley wheel. Note that the units of intercept b are simply whatever the vertical axis units are, m/s2 in this case. Solving Equation 3 for f: EXERCISE 1 The Picket Fence experiment makes use of LoggerPro software to calculate velocities at regular time intervals as the striped plate passes through the photogate (Fig. 3). The theoretical equation is v = vi + at (Eq. 4) where vi = 0 (the fence is dropped from rest) and a = g. a. Write Equation 4 with y = mx + b under it and circle matching factors as in the Example. b. What is the experimental value of the acceleration of gravity? What is its percent error from the accepted value for Baltimore, 9.80 m/s2? c. Does the value of the y-intercept make sense? d. How well did the straight Trendline match the data? 2 / 2 kg s m kg m s   0.4% 100 9.80 9.76 9.80 100 . . . %        Acc Exp Acc Error kg m s mN kg m s f Mb 7.2 10 / 7.2 0.400 ( 0.018 / ) 3 2 2           Figure 3. Graph of speed versus time as calculated by LoggerPro as a picket fence falls freely through a photogate. Picket Fence Drop y = 9.8224x + 0.0007 R2 = 0.9997 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 t (s) v (m/s) Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com EXERCISE 2 This is an electrical example from PHYS.204L/206L, potential difference, V, versus current, I (Fig. 4). The theoretical equation is V = IR (Eq. 5) and is known as “Ohm’s Law.” The unit symbols stand for volts, V, and Amperes, A. The factor R stands for resistance and is measured in units of ohms, symbol  (capital omega). The definition of the ohm is: V (Eq. 6) By coincidence the letter symbols for potential (a quantity ) and volts (its unit) are identical. Thus “voltage” has become the laboratory slang name for potential. a. Rearrange the Ohm’s Law equation to match y = mx + b.. b. What is the experimental resistance? c. Comment on the experimental intercept: is its value reasonable? EXERCISE 3 This graph (Fig. 5) also follows Ohm’s Law, but solved for current I. For this graph the experimenter held potential difference V constant at 15.0V and measured the current for resistances of 100, 50, 40, and 30  Solve Ohm’s Law for I and you will see that 1/R is the logical variable to use on the x axis. For units, someone once jokingly referred to a “reciprocal ohm” as a “mho,” and the name stuck. a. Rearrange Equation 5 solved for I to match y = mx + b. b. What is the experimental potential difference? c. Calculate the percent difference from the 15.0 V that the experimenter set on the power supply (the instrument used for such experiments). d. Comment on the experimental intercept: is its value reasonable? Figure 4. Graph of potential difference versus current; data from a Physics II experiment. The theoretical equation, V = IR, is known as “Ohm’s Law.” Ohm’s Law y = 0.628x – 0.0275 R2 = 0.9933 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 Current, I (A) Potential difference, V (V) Figure 5. Another application of Ohm’s Law: a graph of current versus the inverse of resistance, from a different electric circuit experiment. Current versus (1/Resistance) y = 14.727x – 0.2214 R2 = 0.9938 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 R-1 (millimhos) I (milliamperes) Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com EXERCISE 4 The Atwood’s Machine experiment (see the solved example above) can be done in another way: keep mass difference m the same and vary the total mass M (Fig. 6). a. Rewrite Equation 1 and factor out (1/M). b. Equate the coefficient of (1/M) with the experimental slope and solve for acceleration of gravity g. c. Substitute the values for slope, mass difference, and frictional force and calculate the experimental of g. d. Derive the units of the slope and show that the units of g come out as they should. e. Is the value of the experimental intercept reasonable? EXERCISE 5 In the previous two exercises the reciprocal of a variable was used to make the graph come out linear. In this one the trick will be to use the square root of a variable (Fig. 7). In PHYS.203L and 205L Lab 19 The Pendulum the theoretical equation is where the period T is the time per cycle, L is the length of the string, and g is the acceleration of gravity. a. Rewrite Equation 7 with the square root of L factored out and placed at the end. b. Equate the coefficient of √L with the experimental slope and solve for acceleration of gravity g. c. Substitute the value for slope and calculate the experimental of g. d. Derive the units of the slope and show that the units of g come out as they should. e. Is the value of the experimental intercept reasonable? 2 (Eq . 7) g T   L Figure 6. Graph of acceleration versus the reciprocal of total mass; data from a another Physics I experiment. Atwood’s Machine m = 0.020 kg f = 7.2 mN y = 0.1964x – 0.0735 R2 = 0.995 0.400 0.600 0.800 1.000 2.000 2.500 3.000 3.500 4.000 4.500 5.000 1/M (1/kg) a (m/s2) Effect of Pendulum Length on Period y = 2.0523x – 0.0331 R2 = 0.999 0.400 0.800 1.200 1.600 2.000 2.400 0.00 0.10 0.20 0.30 0.40 0.50 0.60 0.70 0.80 0.90 1.00 1.10 L1/2 (m1/2) T (s) Figure 7. Graph of period T versus the square root of pendulum length; data from a Physics I experiment. Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com EXERCISE 6 In Exercise 5 another approach would have been to square both sides of Equation 7 and plot T2 versus L. Lab 20 directs us to use that alternative. It involves another case of periodic or harmonic motion with a similar, but more complicated, equation for the period: where T is the period of the bobbing (Fig. 8), M is the suspended mass, ms is the mass of the spring, k is a measure of stiffness called the spring constant, and C is a dimensionless factor showing how much of the spring mass is effectively bobbing. a. Square both sides of Equation 8 and rearrange it to match y = mx + b. b. Write y = mx + b under your rearranged equation and circle matching factors as in the Example. c. Write two new equations analogous to Equations 2 and 3 in the Example. Use the first of the two for calculating k and the second for finding C from the data of Fig. 9. d. A theoretical analysis has shown that for most springs C = 1/3. Find the percent error from that value. e. Derive the units of the slope and intercept; show that the units of k come out as N/m and that C is dimensionless. 2 (Eq . 8) k T M Cm s    Figure 8. In Lab 20 mass M is suspended from a spring which is set to bobbing up and down, a good approximation to simple harmonic motion (SHM), described by Equation 8. Lab 20: SHM of a Spring Mass of the spring, ms = 25.1 g y = 3.0185x + 0.0197 R2 = 0.9965 0.0000 0.2000 0.4000 0.6000 0.8000 1.0000 0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 0.3 M (kg) T 2 2 Figure 9. Graph of the square of the period T2 versus suspended mass M data from a Physics I experiment. Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com EXERCISE 7 This last exercise deals with an exponential equation, and the trick is to take the logarithm of both sides. In PHYS.204L/206L we do Lab 33 The RC Time Constant with theoretical equation: where V is the potential difference at time t across a circuit element called a capacitor (the  is dropped for simplicity), Vo is V at t = 0 (try it), and  (tau) is a characteristic of the circuit called the time constant. a. Take the natural log of both sides and apply the addition rule for logarithms of a product on the right-hand side. b. Noting that the graph (Fig. 10) plots lnV versus t, arrange your equation in y = mx + b order, write y = mx + b under it, and circle the parts as in the Example. c. Write two new equations analogous to Equations 2 and 3 in the Example. Use the first of the two for calculating  and the second for finding lnVo and then Vo. d. Note that the units of lnV are the natural log of volts, lnV. As usual derive the units of the slope and interecept and use them to obtain the units of your experimental V and t. V V e (Eq. 9) t o    Figure 10. Graph of a logarithm versus time; data from Lab 33, a Physics II experiment. Discharge of a Capacitor y = -9.17E-03x + 2.00E+00 R2 = 9.98E-01 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50

Morgan Extra Pages Graphing with Excel to be carried out in a computer lab, 3rd floor Calloway Hall or elsewhere The Excel spreadsheet consists of vertical columns and horizontal rows; a column and row intersect at a cell. A cell can contain data for use in calculations of all sorts. The Name Box shows the currently selected cell (Fig. 1). In the Excel 2007 and 2010 versions the drop-down menus familiar in most software screens have been replaced by tabs with horizontally-arranged command buttons of various categories (Fig. 2) ___________________________________________________________________ Open Excel, click on the Microsoft circle, upper left, and Save As your surname. xlsx on the desktop. Before leaving the lab e-mail the file to yourself and/or save to a flash drive. Also e-mail it to your instructor. Figure 1. Parts of an Excel spreadsheet. Name Box Figure 2. Tabs. Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com EXERCISE 1: BASIC OPERATIONS Click Save often as you work. 1. Type the heading “Edge Length” in Cell A1 and double click the crack between the A and B column heading for automatic widening of column A. Similarly, write headings for columns B and C and enter numbers in Cells A2 and A3 as in Fig. 3. Highlight Cells A2 and A3 by dragging the cursor (chunky plus-shape) over the two of them and letting go. 2. Note that there are three types of cursor crosses: chunky for selecting, barbed for moving entries or blocks of entries from cell to cell, and tiny (appearing only at the little square in the lower-right corner of a cell). Obtain a tiny arrow for Cell A3 and perform a plus-drag down Column A until the cells are filled up to 40 (in Cell A8). Note that the two highlighted cells set both the starting value of the fill and the intervals. 3. Click on Cell B2 and enter a formula for face area of a cube as follows: type =, click on Cell A2, type ^2, and press Enter (note the formula bar in Fig. 4). 4. Enter the formula for cube volume in Cell C2 (same procedure, but “=, click on A2, ^3, Enter”). 5. Highlight Cells B2 and C2; plus-drag down to Row 8 (Fig. 5). Do the numbers look correct? Click on some cells in the newly filled area and notice how Excel steps the row designations as it moves down the column (it can do it for horizontal plusdrags along rows also). This is the major programming development that has led to the popularity of spreadsheets. Figure 3. Entries. Figure 4. A formula. Figure 5. Plus-dragging formulas. Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com 6. Now let’s graph the Face Area versus Edge Length: select Cells A1 through B8, choose the Insert tab, and click the Scatter drop-down menu and select “Scatter with only Markers” (Fig. 6). 7. Move the graph (Excel calls it a “chart”) that appears up alongside your number table and dress it up as follows: a. Note that some Chart Layouts have appeared above. Click Layout 1 and alter each title to read Face Area for the vertical axis, Edge Length for the horizontal and Face Area vs. Edge Length for the Graph Title. b. Activate the Excel Least squares routine, called “fitting a trendline” in the program: right click any of the data markers and click Add Trendline. Choose Power and also check “Display equation on chart” and “Display R-squared value on chart.” Fig. 7 shows what the graph will look like at this point. c. The titles are explicit, so the legend is unnecessary. Click on it and press the delete button to remove it. Figure 6. Creating a scatter graph. Figure 7. A graph with a fitted curve. Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com 8. Now let’s overlay the Volume vs. Edge Length curve onto the same graph (optional for 203L/205L): Make a copy of your graph by clicking on the outer white area, clicking ctrl-c (or right click, copy), and pasting the copy somewhere else (ctrl-v). If you wish, delete the trendline as in Fig. 8. a. Right click on the outer white space, choose Select Data and click the Add button. b. You can type in the cell ranges by hand in the dialog box that comes up, but it is easier to click the red, white, and blue button on the right of each space and highlight what you want to go in. Click the red, white, and blue of the bar that has appeared, and you will bounce back to the Add dialog box. Use the Edge Length column for the x’s and Volume for the y’s. c. Right-click on any volume data point and choose Format Data Series. Clicking Secondary Axis will place its scale on the right of the graph as in Fig. 8. d. Dress up your graph with two axis titles (Layout-Labels-Axis Titles), etc. Figure 8. Adding a second curve and y-axis to the graph Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com EXERCISE 2: INTERPRETING A LINEAR GRAPH Introduction: Many experiments are repeated a number of times with one of the parameters involved varied from run to run. Often the goal is to measure the rate of change of a dependent variable, rather than a particular value. If the dependent variable can be expressed as a linear function of the independent parameter, then the slope and yintercept of an appropriate graph will give the rate of change and a particular value, respectively. An example of such an experiment in PHYS.203L/205L is the first part of Lab 20, in which weights are added to the bottom of a suspended spring (Figure 9). This experiment shows that a spring exerts a force Fs proportional to the distance stretched y = (y-yo), a relationship known as Hooke’s Law: Fs = – k(y – yo) (Eq. 1) where k is called the Hooke’s Law constant. The minus sign shows that the spring opposes any push or pull on it. In Lab 20 Fs is equal to (- Mg) and y is given by the reading on a meter stick. Masses were added to the bottom of the spring in 50-g increments giving weights in newtons of 0.49, 0.98, etc. The weight pan was used as the pointer for reading y and had a mass of 50 g, so yo could not be directly measured. For convenient graphing Equation 1 can be rewritten: -(Mg) = – ky + kyo Or (Mg) = ky – kyo (Eq. 1′) Procedure 1. On your spreadsheet note the tabs at the bottom left and double-click Sheet1. Type in “Basics,” and then click the Sheet2 tab to bring up a fresh worksheet. Change the sheet name to “Linear Fit” and fill in data as in this table. Hooke’s Law Experiment y (m) -Fs = Mg (N) 0.337 0.49 0.388 0.98 0.446 1.47 0.498 1.96 0.550 2.45 2. Highlight the cells with the numbers, and graph (Mg) versus y as in Steps 6 and 7 of the Basics section. Your Trendline this time will be Linear of course. If you are having trouble remembering what’s versus what, “y” looks like “v”, so what comes before the “v” of “versus” goes on the y (vertical) axis. Yes, this graph is confusing: the horizontal (“x”) axis is distance y, and the “y” axis is something else. 3. Click on the Equation/R2 box on the graph and highlight just the slope, that is, only the number that comes before the “x.” Copy it (control-c is a fast way to Figure 9. A spring with a weight stretching it Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com do it) and paste it (control-v) into an empty cell. Do likewise for the intercept (including the minus sign). SAVE YOUR FILE! 5. The next steps use the standard procedure for obtaining information from linear data. Write the general equation for a straight line immediately below a hand-written copy of Equation 1′ then circle matching items: (Mg) = k y + (- k yo) (Eq. 1′) y = m x + b Note the parentheses around the intercept term of Equation 1′ to emphasize that the minus sign is part of it. Equating above and below, you can create two useful new equations: slope m = k (Eq. 2) y-intercept b = -kyo (Eq. 3) 6. Solve Equation 2 for k, that is, rewrite left to right. Then substitute the value for slope m from your graph, and you have an experimental value for the Hooke’s Law constant k. Next solve Equation 3 for yo, substitute the value for intercept b from your graph and the value of k that you just found, and calculate yo. 7. Examine your linear graph for clues to finding the units of the slope and the yintercept. Use these units to find the units of k and yo. 8. Present your values of k and yo with their units neatly at the bottom of your spreadsheet. 9. R2 in Excel, like r in our lab manual and Corr. in the LoggerPro software, is a measure of how well the calculated line matches the data points. 1.00 would indicate a perfect match. State how good a match you think was made in this case? 10. Do the Homework, Further Exercises on Interpreting Linear Graphs, on the following pages. Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Eq.1 M m f M a g               , (Eq.2) M slope m g       (Eq.3) M b f        Morgan Extra Pages Homework: Graph Interpretation Exercises EXAMPLE WITH COMPLETE SOLUTION In PHYS.203L and 205L we do Lab 9 Newton’s Second Law on Atwood’s Machine using a photogate sensor (Fig. 1). The Atwood’s apparatus can slow the rate of fall enough to be measured even with primitive timing devices. In our experiment LoggerPro software automatically collects and analyzes the data giving reliable measurements of g, the acceleration of gravity. The equation governing motion for Atwood’s Machine can be written: where a is the acceleration of the masses and string, g is the acceleration of gravity, M is the total mass at both ends of the string, m is the difference between the masses, and f is the frictional force at the hub of the pulley wheel. In this exercise you are given a graph of a vs. m obtained in this experiment with the values of M and the slope and intercept (Fig. 2). The goal is to extract values for acceleration of gravity g and frictional force f from this information. To analyze the graph we write y = mx + b, the general equation for a straight line, directly under Equation 1 and match up the various parameters: Equating above and below, you can create two new equations: and y m x b M m f M a g                Figure 1. The Atwood’s Machine setup (from the LoggerPro handout). Figure 2. Graph of acceleration versus mass difference; data from a Physics I experiment. Atwood’s Machine M = 0.400 kg a = 24.4 m – 0.018 R2 = 0.998 0.00 0.20 0.40 0.60 0.80 1.00 1.20 1.40 0.000 0.010 0.020 0.030 0.040 0.050 0.060  m (kg) a (m/s2) Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com 2 2 9.76 / 0.400 24.4 /( ) m s kg m kg s g Mm      To handle Equation 2 it pays to consider what the units of the slope are. A slope is “the rise over the run,“ so its units must be the units of the vertical axis divided by those of the horizontal axis. In this case: Now let’s solve Equation 2 for g and substitute the values of total mass M and of the slope m from the graph: Using 9.80 m/s2 as the Baltimore accepted value for g, we can calculate the percent error: A similar process with Equation 3 leads to a value for f, the frictional force at the hub of the pulley wheel. Note that the units of intercept b are simply whatever the vertical axis units are, m/s2 in this case. Solving Equation 3 for f: EXERCISE 1 The Picket Fence experiment makes use of LoggerPro software to calculate velocities at regular time intervals as the striped plate passes through the photogate (Fig. 3). The theoretical equation is v = vi + at (Eq. 4) where vi = 0 (the fence is dropped from rest) and a = g. a. Write Equation 4 with y = mx + b under it and circle matching factors as in the Example. b. What is the experimental value of the acceleration of gravity? What is its percent error from the accepted value for Baltimore, 9.80 m/s2? c. Does the value of the y-intercept make sense? d. How well did the straight Trendline match the data? 2 / 2 kg s m kg m s   0.4% 100 9.80 9.76 9.80 100 . . . %        Acc Exp Acc Error kg m s mN kg m s f Mb 7.2 10 / 7.2 0.400 ( 0.018 / ) 3 2 2           Figure 3. Graph of speed versus time as calculated by LoggerPro as a picket fence falls freely through a photogate. Picket Fence Drop y = 9.8224x + 0.0007 R2 = 0.9997 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 t (s) v (m/s) Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com EXERCISE 2 This is an electrical example from PHYS.204L/206L, potential difference, V, versus current, I (Fig. 4). The theoretical equation is V = IR (Eq. 5) and is known as “Ohm’s Law.” The unit symbols stand for volts, V, and Amperes, A. The factor R stands for resistance and is measured in units of ohms, symbol  (capital omega). The definition of the ohm is: V (Eq. 6) By coincidence the letter symbols for potential (a quantity ) and volts (its unit) are identical. Thus “voltage” has become the laboratory slang name for potential. a. Rearrange the Ohm’s Law equation to match y = mx + b.. b. What is the experimental resistance? c. Comment on the experimental intercept: is its value reasonable? EXERCISE 3 This graph (Fig. 5) also follows Ohm’s Law, but solved for current I. For this graph the experimenter held potential difference V constant at 15.0V and measured the current for resistances of 100, 50, 40, and 30  Solve Ohm’s Law for I and you will see that 1/R is the logical variable to use on the x axis. For units, someone once jokingly referred to a “reciprocal ohm” as a “mho,” and the name stuck. a. Rearrange Equation 5 solved for I to match y = mx + b. b. What is the experimental potential difference? c. Calculate the percent difference from the 15.0 V that the experimenter set on the power supply (the instrument used for such experiments). d. Comment on the experimental intercept: is its value reasonable? Figure 4. Graph of potential difference versus current; data from a Physics II experiment. The theoretical equation, V = IR, is known as “Ohm’s Law.” Ohm’s Law y = 0.628x – 0.0275 R2 = 0.9933 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 Current, I (A) Potential difference, V (V) Figure 5. Another application of Ohm’s Law: a graph of current versus the inverse of resistance, from a different electric circuit experiment. Current versus (1/Resistance) y = 14.727x – 0.2214 R2 = 0.9938 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 R-1 (millimhos) I (milliamperes) Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com EXERCISE 4 The Atwood’s Machine experiment (see the solved example above) can be done in another way: keep mass difference m the same and vary the total mass M (Fig. 6). a. Rewrite Equation 1 and factor out (1/M). b. Equate the coefficient of (1/M) with the experimental slope and solve for acceleration of gravity g. c. Substitute the values for slope, mass difference, and frictional force and calculate the experimental of g. d. Derive the units of the slope and show that the units of g come out as they should. e. Is the value of the experimental intercept reasonable? EXERCISE 5 In the previous two exercises the reciprocal of a variable was used to make the graph come out linear. In this one the trick will be to use the square root of a variable (Fig. 7). In PHYS.203L and 205L Lab 19 The Pendulum the theoretical equation is where the period T is the time per cycle, L is the length of the string, and g is the acceleration of gravity. a. Rewrite Equation 7 with the square root of L factored out and placed at the end. b. Equate the coefficient of √L with the experimental slope and solve for acceleration of gravity g. c. Substitute the value for slope and calculate the experimental of g. d. Derive the units of the slope and show that the units of g come out as they should. e. Is the value of the experimental intercept reasonable? 2 (Eq . 7) g T   L Figure 6. Graph of acceleration versus the reciprocal of total mass; data from a another Physics I experiment. Atwood’s Machine m = 0.020 kg f = 7.2 mN y = 0.1964x – 0.0735 R2 = 0.995 0.400 0.600 0.800 1.000 2.000 2.500 3.000 3.500 4.000 4.500 5.000 1/M (1/kg) a (m/s2) Effect of Pendulum Length on Period y = 2.0523x – 0.0331 R2 = 0.999 0.400 0.800 1.200 1.600 2.000 2.400 0.00 0.10 0.20 0.30 0.40 0.50 0.60 0.70 0.80 0.90 1.00 1.10 L1/2 (m1/2) T (s) Figure 7. Graph of period T versus the square root of pendulum length; data from a Physics I experiment. Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com EXERCISE 6 In Exercise 5 another approach would have been to square both sides of Equation 7 and plot T2 versus L. Lab 20 directs us to use that alternative. It involves another case of periodic or harmonic motion with a similar, but more complicated, equation for the period: where T is the period of the bobbing (Fig. 8), M is the suspended mass, ms is the mass of the spring, k is a measure of stiffness called the spring constant, and C is a dimensionless factor showing how much of the spring mass is effectively bobbing. a. Square both sides of Equation 8 and rearrange it to match y = mx + b. b. Write y = mx + b under your rearranged equation and circle matching factors as in the Example. c. Write two new equations analogous to Equations 2 and 3 in the Example. Use the first of the two for calculating k and the second for finding C from the data of Fig. 9. d. A theoretical analysis has shown that for most springs C = 1/3. Find the percent error from that value. e. Derive the units of the slope and intercept; show that the units of k come out as N/m and that C is dimensionless. 2 (Eq . 8) k T M Cm s    Figure 8. In Lab 20 mass M is suspended from a spring which is set to bobbing up and down, a good approximation to simple harmonic motion (SHM), described by Equation 8. Lab 20: SHM of a Spring Mass of the spring, ms = 25.1 g y = 3.0185x + 0.0197 R2 = 0.9965 0.0000 0.2000 0.4000 0.6000 0.8000 1.0000 0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 0.3 M (kg) T 2 2 Figure 9. Graph of the square of the period T2 versus suspended mass M data from a Physics I experiment. Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com Click to buy NOW! PDF-XChange Viewer www.docu-track.com EXERCISE 7 This last exercise deals with an exponential equation, and the trick is to take the logarithm of both sides. In PHYS.204L/206L we do Lab 33 The RC Time Constant with theoretical equation: where V is the potential difference at time t across a circuit element called a capacitor (the  is dropped for simplicity), Vo is V at t = 0 (try it), and  (tau) is a characteristic of the circuit called the time constant. a. Take the natural log of both sides and apply the addition rule for logarithms of a product on the right-hand side. b. Noting that the graph (Fig. 10) plots lnV versus t, arrange your equation in y = mx + b order, write y = mx + b under it, and circle the parts as in the Example. c. Write two new equations analogous to Equations 2 and 3 in the Example. Use the first of the two for calculating  and the second for finding lnVo and then Vo. d. Note that the units of lnV are the natural log of volts, lnV. As usual derive the units of the slope and interecept and use them to obtain the units of your experimental V and t. V V e (Eq. 9) t o    Figure 10. Graph of a logarithm versus time; data from Lab 33, a Physics II experiment. Discharge of a Capacitor y = -9.17E-03x + 2.00E+00 R2 = 9.98E-01 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50

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After reading the supplement article on Business Analytics linked to the week 1 schedule, write an essay on how business analytics impacts you today, or its potential role in your chosen career path. Do research for your paper, or interview someone who works in your area. The goals of this paper are two-fold: (1) focus on high quality writing, using the COBE Writing Styles Guide for writing help and citations. (2) consider the importance of BI from a personal/work/career perspective.

After reading the supplement article on Business Analytics linked to the week 1 schedule, write an essay on how business analytics impacts you today, or its potential role in your chosen career path. Do research for your paper, or interview someone who works in your area. The goals of this paper are two-fold: (1) focus on high quality writing, using the COBE Writing Styles Guide for writing help and citations. (2) consider the importance of BI from a personal/work/career perspective.

  Business analytics importance and its potential     Introduction … Read More...
Distribution of the Sample Mean and Linear Combinations – Examples Example 1 Let X1;X2; : : : ;X100 denote the actual net weights of 100 randomly selected 50-pound bags of fertilizer. a. If the expected weight of each bag is 50 pounds and the standard deviation is 1 pound, approximate P(49:75 • ¹X • 50:25) using the CLT. b. If the expected weight is 49.8 pounds rather than 50 pounds, so that on average bags are under…lled, approximate P(49:75 • ¹X • 50:25). Example 2 The breaking strength of a rivet has a mean value of 10,000 psi and a standard deviation of 500 psi. a. What is the approximate probability that the sample mean breaking strength for a random sample of 40 rivets is between 9,900 psi and 10,200 psi? b. If the sample size had been 15 rivets rather than 40 rivets, could the probability requested in part a be approximated from the given information? Why or why not? Example 3 The lifetime of a certain type of battery is normally distributed with mean 8 hours and standard deviation 1 hour. There are four batteries in a package. What lifetime value is such that the total lifetime of all batteries in a package exceeds that value for only 5% of all packages? Example 4 Suppose your waiting time for a bus in the morning is uniformly distributed on [0; 5], while waiting time in the evening is uniformly distributed on [0; 10]. Assume that evening waiting time is independent of morning waiting time. a. If you take the bus each morning and evening for a week, what is your total expected waiting time. b. What is the variance of your total waiting time? expected value and variance of the di¤erence between morning and evening waiting time on a given day? d. What are the expected value and variance of the di¤erence between total morning waiting time and total evening waiting time for a particular week? 2 Example 5 Three di¤erent roads feed into a particular freeway entrance. Suppose that during a …xed time period, the number of cars coming from each road onto the freeway is a random variable, with expected value and standard deviation as given in the following table: Road 1 Road 2 Road 3 Expected Value 800 1000 600 Standard Deviation 16 25 18 : a. What is the expected total number of cars entering the freeway at this point during the period? b. What is the variance of the total number of entering cars? Have you made any assumptions about the relationship between the number of cars on the di¤erent roads? c. With Xi denoting the number of cars entering from road i during the period, suppose that Cov(X1;X2) = 80, Cov(X1;X3) = 90, and Cov(X2;X3) = 100 (so that the three streams of tra¢c are not independent). Compute the expected total number of entering cars and the standard deviation of the total. Example 6 In an area having sandy soil, 50 small trees of a certain type were planted, and another 50 trees were planted in an area having clay soil. Let X be the number of trees planted in sandy soil that survive one year and Y be the number of trees planted in clay soil that survive one year. If the probability that a tree planted in sandy soil will survive one year is 0.7 and the probability of one-year survival in clay soil is 0.6, compute an approximation to P(¡5 • X ¡ Y • 5). For the purposes of this exercise, ignore the continuity correction.

Distribution of the Sample Mean and Linear Combinations – Examples Example 1 Let X1;X2; : : : ;X100 denote the actual net weights of 100 randomly selected 50-pound bags of fertilizer. a. If the expected weight of each bag is 50 pounds and the standard deviation is 1 pound, approximate P(49:75 • ¹X • 50:25) using the CLT. b. If the expected weight is 49.8 pounds rather than 50 pounds, so that on average bags are under…lled, approximate P(49:75 • ¹X • 50:25). Example 2 The breaking strength of a rivet has a mean value of 10,000 psi and a standard deviation of 500 psi. a. What is the approximate probability that the sample mean breaking strength for a random sample of 40 rivets is between 9,900 psi and 10,200 psi? b. If the sample size had been 15 rivets rather than 40 rivets, could the probability requested in part a be approximated from the given information? Why or why not? Example 3 The lifetime of a certain type of battery is normally distributed with mean 8 hours and standard deviation 1 hour. There are four batteries in a package. What lifetime value is such that the total lifetime of all batteries in a package exceeds that value for only 5% of all packages? Example 4 Suppose your waiting time for a bus in the morning is uniformly distributed on [0; 5], while waiting time in the evening is uniformly distributed on [0; 10]. Assume that evening waiting time is independent of morning waiting time. a. If you take the bus each morning and evening for a week, what is your total expected waiting time. b. What is the variance of your total waiting time? expected value and variance of the di¤erence between morning and evening waiting time on a given day? d. What are the expected value and variance of the di¤erence between total morning waiting time and total evening waiting time for a particular week? 2 Example 5 Three di¤erent roads feed into a particular freeway entrance. Suppose that during a …xed time period, the number of cars coming from each road onto the freeway is a random variable, with expected value and standard deviation as given in the following table: Road 1 Road 2 Road 3 Expected Value 800 1000 600 Standard Deviation 16 25 18 : a. What is the expected total number of cars entering the freeway at this point during the period? b. What is the variance of the total number of entering cars? Have you made any assumptions about the relationship between the number of cars on the di¤erent roads? c. With Xi denoting the number of cars entering from road i during the period, suppose that Cov(X1;X2) = 80, Cov(X1;X3) = 90, and Cov(X2;X3) = 100 (so that the three streams of tra¢c are not independent). Compute the expected total number of entering cars and the standard deviation of the total. Example 6 In an area having sandy soil, 50 small trees of a certain type were planted, and another 50 trees were planted in an area having clay soil. Let X be the number of trees planted in sandy soil that survive one year and Y be the number of trees planted in clay soil that survive one year. If the probability that a tree planted in sandy soil will survive one year is 0.7 and the probability of one-year survival in clay soil is 0.6, compute an approximation to P(¡5 • X ¡ Y • 5). For the purposes of this exercise, ignore the continuity correction.

University of California, Los Angeles Department of Statistics Statistics 100C Instructor: Nicolas Christou Homework 4 Exercise 1 Consider the following simple regression model yi = 0 + 1xi + i, for which E(i) = 0, E(ij) = 0 for i 6= j, and var(i) = 2. The normal equations discussed earlier in class are: n^ 0 + ^ 1 Xn i=1 xi = Xn i=1 yi ^ 0 Xn i=1 xi + ^ 1 Xn i=1 x2i = Xn i=1 xiyi In matrix form this system of two equations with two unknowns can be expressed as follows:  n Pn i=1 P xi n i=1 xi Pn i=1 x2i  ^ 0 ^ 1  =  Pn i=1 P yi n i=1 xiyi  a. Use matrix algebra to nd the solution for the vector ^ = ( ^ 0; ^ 1)0. b. Use matrix algebra to nd the variance covariance matrix of the vector ^ , i.e.  var( ^ 0) cov( ^ 0; 1) cov( ^ 1; 1) var( ^ 1)  : Exercise 2 Consider the following simple regression model for which i  N(0; ). y1 = 0 + 0:5 1 + 1 y2 = 0 ? 1 + 2 y3 = 0 + 0:5 1 + 3 a. Write the above model in matrix form. b. Find the least squares estimates using vectors and matrices. c. Find the variance-covariance matrix of ^ . d. Find the hat matrix. Verify that the sum of the diagonal elements of the hat matrix is equal to 2 ( Pn i=1 hii = k + 1). e. Generate your own data with n = 3 based on this model and verify that the estimates of 0 and 1 are those given by part (b). Exercise 3 Suppose that you need to t the multiple regression model yi = 0 + 1x1i + 2x2i + i, where E(i) = 0, E(ij) = 0 for i 6= j, and var(i) = 2, to the following data: y x1 x2 -43.6 27 34 3.3 33 30 -12.4 27 33 7.6 24 11 11.4 31 16 5.9 40 30 -4.5 15 17 22.7 26 12 -14.4 22 21 -28.3 23 27 It turns out that (X0X)?1 = 0 @ 1:97015 ?0:05623 ?0:01572 ?0:05623 0:00289 ?0:00091 ?0:01572 ?0:00091 0:00174 1 A and X0Y = 0 @ ?52:3 ?1076:3 ?2220:2 1 A a. Find the least squares estimator of = ( 0; 1; 2)0. b. Find the variance-covariance matrix of the previous estimator. c. Compute the estimate s2e of 2. d. Using your answers to parts (b) and (c) nd the variances of ^ 0; ^ 1, and ^ 2. e. Find the tted value ^y1 a nd its variance. f. What is the variance of the rst residual (var(ei))? Exercise 4 Show that the residuals are orthogonal to the matrix X as well as to the tted values ^Y . This is true for simple or multiple regression models. a. e0X = 0. b. e0^Y = 0. c. Use part (a) to show the already known result that Pn i=1 ei = 0.

University of California, Los Angeles Department of Statistics Statistics 100C Instructor: Nicolas Christou Homework 4 Exercise 1 Consider the following simple regression model yi = 0 + 1xi + i, for which E(i) = 0, E(ij) = 0 for i 6= j, and var(i) = 2. The normal equations discussed earlier in class are: n^ 0 + ^ 1 Xn i=1 xi = Xn i=1 yi ^ 0 Xn i=1 xi + ^ 1 Xn i=1 x2i = Xn i=1 xiyi In matrix form this system of two equations with two unknowns can be expressed as follows:  n Pn i=1 P xi n i=1 xi Pn i=1 x2i  ^ 0 ^ 1  =  Pn i=1 P yi n i=1 xiyi  a. Use matrix algebra to nd the solution for the vector ^ = ( ^ 0; ^ 1)0. b. Use matrix algebra to nd the variance covariance matrix of the vector ^ , i.e.  var( ^ 0) cov( ^ 0; 1) cov( ^ 1; 1) var( ^ 1)  : Exercise 2 Consider the following simple regression model for which i  N(0; ). y1 = 0 + 0:5 1 + 1 y2 = 0 ? 1 + 2 y3 = 0 + 0:5 1 + 3 a. Write the above model in matrix form. b. Find the least squares estimates using vectors and matrices. c. Find the variance-covariance matrix of ^ . d. Find the hat matrix. Verify that the sum of the diagonal elements of the hat matrix is equal to 2 ( Pn i=1 hii = k + 1). e. Generate your own data with n = 3 based on this model and verify that the estimates of 0 and 1 are those given by part (b). Exercise 3 Suppose that you need to t the multiple regression model yi = 0 + 1x1i + 2x2i + i, where E(i) = 0, E(ij) = 0 for i 6= j, and var(i) = 2, to the following data: y x1 x2 -43.6 27 34 3.3 33 30 -12.4 27 33 7.6 24 11 11.4 31 16 5.9 40 30 -4.5 15 17 22.7 26 12 -14.4 22 21 -28.3 23 27 It turns out that (X0X)?1 = 0 @ 1:97015 ?0:05623 ?0:01572 ?0:05623 0:00289 ?0:00091 ?0:01572 ?0:00091 0:00174 1 A and X0Y = 0 @ ?52:3 ?1076:3 ?2220:2 1 A a. Find the least squares estimator of = ( 0; 1; 2)0. b. Find the variance-covariance matrix of the previous estimator. c. Compute the estimate s2e of 2. d. Using your answers to parts (b) and (c) nd the variances of ^ 0; ^ 1, and ^ 2. e. Find the tted value ^y1 a nd its variance. f. What is the variance of the rst residual (var(ei))? Exercise 4 Show that the residuals are orthogonal to the matrix X as well as to the tted values ^Y . This is true for simple or multiple regression models. a. e0X = 0. b. e0^Y = 0. c. Use part (a) to show the already known result that Pn i=1 ei = 0.

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Explain the significant impact this career development experience has had and will continue to have on your life.

Explain the significant impact this career development experience has had and will continue to have on your life.

Most corporate individuals instinctively comprehend the connection between well-designed creativities … Read More...