here is the video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=760lwYmpXbc In his Prison Experiment, Professor Philip Zimbardo wanted to test the behavior of good people when they are put into evil places. In the short amount of time that his experiment ran, hid findings were shocking. The students who played the role of the guards became sadistic, and the students that who played the role of the prisoners became extremely stressed. McLaren explained to us that since the beginning of time, all humans have had an appetite for violence. McLaren also explains that in a world where violence is also a means of entertainment, it only adds to our appetite for violence. Think about how the information that McLaren shares and how it relates to the Stanford Prison Experiment. McLaren shares with us that name calling is the beginning stage of dehumanizing, and when one succeeds in name calling, we decide to extend our powers and become violent and uncaring. McLaren also uses many examples of the world’s history, specifically regarding religion and war. McLaren explains that the mentality of everyone that goes into war believes that their enemy deserves everything that they get. Compare McLaren’s findings with The Stanford Prison Experiment. Zimbardo concluded that his students (the good people) were defeated by the prison (the evil place). Can you think of a story or a situation where the good person overcame the evil place? Can one’s attitude and/or morality be so strong that it can allow you to overcome anything? The manner in which, the guard “John Wayne”, treated the prisoners was very controversial. Years later he admitted himself that he does regret his behavior, but could it be possible that he wasn’t acting? Is it true what prisoner 416 said? Can someone contribute to a role so much that it starts to show who you really are as a person? If we were put in the shoes of “John Wayne” would we have behaved the same? Are ethics totally thrown out the window when given that position of power?

here is the video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=760lwYmpXbc In his Prison Experiment, Professor Philip Zimbardo wanted to test the behavior of good people when they are put into evil places. In the short amount of time that his experiment ran, hid findings were shocking. The students who played the role of the guards became sadistic, and the students that who played the role of the prisoners became extremely stressed. McLaren explained to us that since the beginning of time, all humans have had an appetite for violence. McLaren also explains that in a world where violence is also a means of entertainment, it only adds to our appetite for violence. Think about how the information that McLaren shares and how it relates to the Stanford Prison Experiment. McLaren shares with us that name calling is the beginning stage of dehumanizing, and when one succeeds in name calling, we decide to extend our powers and become violent and uncaring. McLaren also uses many examples of the world’s history, specifically regarding religion and war. McLaren explains that the mentality of everyone that goes into war believes that their enemy deserves everything that they get. Compare McLaren’s findings with The Stanford Prison Experiment. Zimbardo concluded that his students (the good people) were defeated by the prison (the evil place). Can you think of a story or a situation where the good person overcame the evil place? Can one’s attitude and/or morality be so strong that it can allow you to overcome anything? The manner in which, the guard “John Wayne”, treated the prisoners was very controversial. Years later he admitted himself that he does regret his behavior, but could it be possible that he wasn’t acting? Is it true what prisoner 416 said? Can someone contribute to a role so much that it starts to show who you really are as a person? If we were put in the shoes of “John Wayne” would we have behaved the same? Are ethics totally thrown out the window when given that position of power?

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Name: Lab Time: BIO 218 Experiment Paper Rubric (20 points) General Formatting: (2 pts.) • Margins should be 1 inch top, bottom, left, and right. • Font should be 12 point Times New Roman or similar font. • Double-spaced. • Pages numbered. Title page is unnumbered. Next page is numbered at the bottom right corner with a 2 followed by pages 3, 4, and 5. • All sections must be included: Abstract, Introduction, Methods, Results, Discussion, and Literature Cited. • At least 3 pages (double spaced) but no more than five pages long. • All scientific names should be formatted correctly by italicizing and capitalizing the genus name and having the species name in lowercase (Bufo americanus). • Title page should have a specific title, student name, course, lab section time, and date. Project elements (18 pts. Total) • Abstract (2 points) o Summarize most important points using past tense. Use present tense to suggest a general conclusion which supports or refutes the hypothesis. • Introduction (3 points) o General background on topic and species (state scientific name!) o Discuss the possible tests of the hypothesis. o Reads from general to specific. o States hypothesis/hypotheses to be addressed. May discuss null and all alternative hypotheses. • Methods (2 points) o Reports how experiment was conducted and all materials used. Use enough detail so others could repeat the study. o Discuss the type(s) of data collected. o Discuss how data was to be analyzed/compared/used to test hypothesis. • Results (3 points) o Reports what happened in the experiment. o If comparisons made, discuss how they were made. o Report statistical and other data. Use “significant” only for statistical significance. o NO interpretation of data (no data analysis). o At least one original figure present and formatted correctly. Figures such as pictures and graphs are numbered and have captions underneath. o At least one table present and formatted correctly. Tables such as charts are numbered and have captions above them. • Discussion: (3 points) o Discusses the results of the experiment and ties in how the results fit with the literature. o Use past tense to discuss your results and shift to present tense to discuss previously published information. o States how results supported or refuted the original hypothesis. Hypotheses are never proven! o Ties in results with big picture within topic of biology. • Literature Cited: (2 points: .5 per citation) o At least 2 peer-reviewed journal articles (provided) + 2 peer-reviewed journal articles (found on your own). o References used in text properly. o References all listed in this section are alphabetized by author’s last name and formatted correctly. o All references listed in the Literature Cited section are cited in text. Writing Elements (3 pts.) • Grammar or spelling is error-free and excellent print quality. (1 pt) • Writing is clear and flows logically throughout paper. (1 pt) • Appropriate content in each section? (1 pt) Additional Comments:

Name: Lab Time: BIO 218 Experiment Paper Rubric (20 points) General Formatting: (2 pts.) • Margins should be 1 inch top, bottom, left, and right. • Font should be 12 point Times New Roman or similar font. • Double-spaced. • Pages numbered. Title page is unnumbered. Next page is numbered at the bottom right corner with a 2 followed by pages 3, 4, and 5. • All sections must be included: Abstract, Introduction, Methods, Results, Discussion, and Literature Cited. • At least 3 pages (double spaced) but no more than five pages long. • All scientific names should be formatted correctly by italicizing and capitalizing the genus name and having the species name in lowercase (Bufo americanus). • Title page should have a specific title, student name, course, lab section time, and date. Project elements (18 pts. Total) • Abstract (2 points) o Summarize most important points using past tense. Use present tense to suggest a general conclusion which supports or refutes the hypothesis. • Introduction (3 points) o General background on topic and species (state scientific name!) o Discuss the possible tests of the hypothesis. o Reads from general to specific. o States hypothesis/hypotheses to be addressed. May discuss null and all alternative hypotheses. • Methods (2 points) o Reports how experiment was conducted and all materials used. Use enough detail so others could repeat the study. o Discuss the type(s) of data collected. o Discuss how data was to be analyzed/compared/used to test hypothesis. • Results (3 points) o Reports what happened in the experiment. o If comparisons made, discuss how they were made. o Report statistical and other data. Use “significant” only for statistical significance. o NO interpretation of data (no data analysis). o At least one original figure present and formatted correctly. Figures such as pictures and graphs are numbered and have captions underneath. o At least one table present and formatted correctly. Tables such as charts are numbered and have captions above them. • Discussion: (3 points) o Discusses the results of the experiment and ties in how the results fit with the literature. o Use past tense to discuss your results and shift to present tense to discuss previously published information. o States how results supported or refuted the original hypothesis. Hypotheses are never proven! o Ties in results with big picture within topic of biology. • Literature Cited: (2 points: .5 per citation) o At least 2 peer-reviewed journal articles (provided) + 2 peer-reviewed journal articles (found on your own). o References used in text properly. o References all listed in this section are alphabetized by author’s last name and formatted correctly. o All references listed in the Literature Cited section are cited in text. Writing Elements (3 pts.) • Grammar or spelling is error-free and excellent print quality. (1 pt) • Writing is clear and flows logically throughout paper. (1 pt) • Appropriate content in each section? (1 pt) Additional Comments:

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Physics 220 – HW #1 (Homework) halsalem::app-6@purdue Summer-2013-PHYS-22000-01-XLST, Summer 1 2013 Instructor: Shawn Slavin Current Score : 2 / 20 Due : Wednesday, May 22 2013 11:59 PM EDT 1. –/2 points SerCP9 1.P.006. Kinetic energy KE has dimensions kg · m 2 /s 2 . It can be written in terms of the momentum p and mass m as (a) Determine the proper units for momentum using dimensional analysis. (b) Force has the SI units kg · m/s2. Given the units of force, write a simple equation relating a constant force F exerted on an object, an interval of time t during which the force is applied, and the resulting momentum of the object, p. (Do this on paper. Your instructor may ask you to turn in this work.) Show My Work (Optional) 2. 2/2 points | Previous Answers SerCP9 1.P.502.XP. You can obtain a rough estimate of the size of a molecule by the following simple experiment. Let a droplet of oil spread out on a smooth surface of water. The resulting oil slick will be approximately one molecule thick. Given an oil droplet of mass 8.0 10 -7 kg and density 914 kg/m 3 that spreads out into a circle of radius 41.8 cm on the water surface, what is the order of magnitude of the diameter of an oil molecule? Show My Work (Optional) 3. –/2 points SerCP9 1.P.016. A small turtle moves at a speed of 163 furlongs per fortnight. Find the speed of the turtle in centimeters per second. Note that 1 furlong = 220 yards and 1 fortnight = 14 days. cm/s Show My Work (Optional) 4. –/2 points SerCP9 1.P.035.MI.FB. A point is located in a polar coordinate system by the coordinates r = 4.6 m and θ = 24°. Find the x- and y-coordinates of this point, assuming that the two coordinate systems have the same origin. x = m y = m Show My Work (Optional) WebAssign KE = P . 2 2m kg · m/s2 kg · m/s kg · m2/s kg2 · m/s 10−5 10−7 10−9 10−11 10−14 Physics 220 – HW #1 http://www.webassign.net/web/Student/Assignment-Responses/last?d… 1 of 3 19-05-2013 13:35 5. –/2 points SerCP9 1.P.045. In the figure below, find each of the following. (a) the side opposite θ (b) the side adjacent to (c) cos θ (d) sin (e) tan Show My Work (Optional) 6. –/2 points SerCP9 2.P.028.WI. In 1865, Jules Verne proposed sending men to the Moon by firing a space capsule from a 220-m-long cannon with final speed of 10.97 km/s. What would have been the unrealistically large acceleration experienced by the space travelers during their launch? (A human can stand an acceleration of 15g for a short time.) m/s2 Compare your answer with the free-fall acceleration, 9.80 m/s 2 (i.e. how many times stronger than gravity is this force?). g Show My Work (Optional) 7. –/2 points SerCP9 2.P.045. A ball is thrown vertically upward with a speed of 10.0 m/s. (a) How high does it rise? m (b) How long does it take to reach its highest point? s (c) How long does the ball take to hit the ground after it reaches its highest point? s (d) What is its velocity when it returns to the level from which it started? m/s Show My Work (Optional) Physics 220 – HW #1 http://www.webassign.net/web/Student/Assignment-Responses/last?d… 2 of 3 19-05-2013 13:35 8. –/2 points SerCP9 3.P.001. Vector has a magnitude of 28 units and points in the positive y-direction. When vector is added to the resultant vector points in the negative y-direction with a magnitude of 13 units. Find the magnitude and direction of magnitude unit(s) direction Show My Work (Optional) 9. –/2 points SerCP9 3.P.010. A person walks 24.0° north of east for 2.30 km. How far due north and how far due east would she have to walk to arrive at the same location? north km east km Show My Work (Optional) 10.–/2 points SerCP9 3.P.025.WI. The best leaper in the animal kingdom is the puma, which can jump to a height of 3.7 m when leaving the ground at an angle of 45°. With what speed must the animal leave the ground to reach that height? m/s Show My Work (Optional) A B A, A + B B? Physics 220 – HW #1 http://www.webassign.net/web/Student/Assignment-Responses/last?d… 3 of 3 19-05-2013 13:35

Physics 220 – HW #1 (Homework) halsalem::app-6@purdue Summer-2013-PHYS-22000-01-XLST, Summer 1 2013 Instructor: Shawn Slavin Current Score : 2 / 20 Due : Wednesday, May 22 2013 11:59 PM EDT 1. –/2 points SerCP9 1.P.006. Kinetic energy KE has dimensions kg · m 2 /s 2 . It can be written in terms of the momentum p and mass m as (a) Determine the proper units for momentum using dimensional analysis. (b) Force has the SI units kg · m/s2. Given the units of force, write a simple equation relating a constant force F exerted on an object, an interval of time t during which the force is applied, and the resulting momentum of the object, p. (Do this on paper. Your instructor may ask you to turn in this work.) Show My Work (Optional) 2. 2/2 points | Previous Answers SerCP9 1.P.502.XP. You can obtain a rough estimate of the size of a molecule by the following simple experiment. Let a droplet of oil spread out on a smooth surface of water. The resulting oil slick will be approximately one molecule thick. Given an oil droplet of mass 8.0 10 -7 kg and density 914 kg/m 3 that spreads out into a circle of radius 41.8 cm on the water surface, what is the order of magnitude of the diameter of an oil molecule? Show My Work (Optional) 3. –/2 points SerCP9 1.P.016. A small turtle moves at a speed of 163 furlongs per fortnight. Find the speed of the turtle in centimeters per second. Note that 1 furlong = 220 yards and 1 fortnight = 14 days. cm/s Show My Work (Optional) 4. –/2 points SerCP9 1.P.035.MI.FB. A point is located in a polar coordinate system by the coordinates r = 4.6 m and θ = 24°. Find the x- and y-coordinates of this point, assuming that the two coordinate systems have the same origin. x = m y = m Show My Work (Optional) WebAssign KE = P . 2 2m kg · m/s2 kg · m/s kg · m2/s kg2 · m/s 10−5 10−7 10−9 10−11 10−14 Physics 220 – HW #1 http://www.webassign.net/web/Student/Assignment-Responses/last?d… 1 of 3 19-05-2013 13:35 5. –/2 points SerCP9 1.P.045. In the figure below, find each of the following. (a) the side opposite θ (b) the side adjacent to (c) cos θ (d) sin (e) tan Show My Work (Optional) 6. –/2 points SerCP9 2.P.028.WI. In 1865, Jules Verne proposed sending men to the Moon by firing a space capsule from a 220-m-long cannon with final speed of 10.97 km/s. What would have been the unrealistically large acceleration experienced by the space travelers during their launch? (A human can stand an acceleration of 15g for a short time.) m/s2 Compare your answer with the free-fall acceleration, 9.80 m/s 2 (i.e. how many times stronger than gravity is this force?). g Show My Work (Optional) 7. –/2 points SerCP9 2.P.045. A ball is thrown vertically upward with a speed of 10.0 m/s. (a) How high does it rise? m (b) How long does it take to reach its highest point? s (c) How long does the ball take to hit the ground after it reaches its highest point? s (d) What is its velocity when it returns to the level from which it started? m/s Show My Work (Optional) Physics 220 – HW #1 http://www.webassign.net/web/Student/Assignment-Responses/last?d… 2 of 3 19-05-2013 13:35 8. –/2 points SerCP9 3.P.001. Vector has a magnitude of 28 units and points in the positive y-direction. When vector is added to the resultant vector points in the negative y-direction with a magnitude of 13 units. Find the magnitude and direction of magnitude unit(s) direction Show My Work (Optional) 9. –/2 points SerCP9 3.P.010. A person walks 24.0° north of east for 2.30 km. How far due north and how far due east would she have to walk to arrive at the same location? north km east km Show My Work (Optional) 10.–/2 points SerCP9 3.P.025.WI. The best leaper in the animal kingdom is the puma, which can jump to a height of 3.7 m when leaving the ground at an angle of 45°. With what speed must the animal leave the ground to reach that height? m/s Show My Work (Optional) A B A, A + B B? Physics 220 – HW #1 http://www.webassign.net/web/Student/Assignment-Responses/last?d… 3 of 3 19-05-2013 13:35

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. An experiment is performed by passing light through one or two slits and the light pattern to the right is produced. Determine the best answer and explain how you can tell: the pattern produced was a result of a double slit interference experiment the pattern produced was a result of a single slit diffraction experiment More information is needed, i.e. the wavelength of the source, the distance it is from the slit(s) and how far the slit is to the viewing screen, before it can be determined which type of experiment produced the pattern

. An experiment is performed by passing light through one or two slits and the light pattern to the right is produced. Determine the best answer and explain how you can tell: the pattern produced was a result of a double slit interference experiment the pattern produced was a result of a single slit diffraction experiment More information is needed, i.e. the wavelength of the source, the distance it is from the slit(s) and how far the slit is to the viewing screen, before it can be determined which type of experiment produced the pattern

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Learning Goals: Students will be able to determine the gravitational acceleration of “Planet X” 1. Research to find equations that would help you find g using a pendulum. Design an experiment and test your design using Moon and Jupiter. Write your procedure in a paragraph that another student could use to verify your results. Show your data, graphs, and calculations that support your strategy. 2. Use your procedure to find g on Planet X. Show your data, graphs, and calculations that support your conclusion. 3. Give your conclusion and write an error analysis.

Learning Goals: Students will be able to determine the gravitational acceleration of “Planet X” 1. Research to find equations that would help you find g using a pendulum. Design an experiment and test your design using Moon and Jupiter. Write your procedure in a paragraph that another student could use to verify your results. Show your data, graphs, and calculations that support your strategy. 2. Use your procedure to find g on Planet X. Show your data, graphs, and calculations that support your conclusion. 3. Give your conclusion and write an error analysis.

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BLY 101L – Take Home Assignment (20 pts. TOTAL) Due: Start of class time – Monday, June 30, 2014 OR Tuesday, July 1, 2014 1. Calculate the % of disks floating (%DF) for each time point and both Control and Treatment groups. (5 pts.) • refer to the class notes re: how to do this… 2. Neatly graph experimental results. (5 pts.) • graph paper • Microsoft Excel • refer to the class notes re: how to do this… 3. What was the overarching QUESTION addressed by the lab exercise? (1 pt.) 4. State “null” (H0) and “alternative” (HA) HYPOTHESES. (2 pts.) 5. State your PREDICTION in “If…., then…” format, based upon your knowledge of PS and as written in your lab guide. (1 pt.) 6. Applying what you’ve learned about photosynthesis… • Undoubtedly, you have heard mention of the effect of increasing concentrations of certain gasses (one of which is CO2) in Earth’s atmosphere, and its relevance to Climate Change. Sometime around two decades ago or so, plant scientists began to earnestly think about CO2 level and its effects on plant physiology and growth. Based upon your knowledge of photosynthesis and what you’ve learned from this week’s lab experiment… Formulate testable hypotheses (H0, HA) AND a prediction for this scenario. (3 pts.) • As a follow-on to the previous question and in the context of the experiment you performed in class…Aside from affecting “aesthetics” and habitat for fuzzy wuzzy animals, why are plant and conservation scientists worried about the effects of “clear cutting” (i.e., cutting down forests for development or other agricultural and industrial uses) in combination with rising CO2 levels? (NOTE: O2 HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH THE ANSWER TO THIS QUESTION…; 3 pts.) You MUST hand in the following: o Data table o Line graph of experimental results (plot both data sets on the SAME set of axes; see lecture notes) o Neatly typed answers to questions 3-6 REMEMBER: Images, written text AND/OR ideas are intellectual property and/or copyrighted! If you consult/borrow any published material (e.g., internet webpage text, published paper or report, your textbook, etc.) to construct answers to the questions above, you MUST CITE THE SOURCE FROM WHICH YOU COPIED THE IMAGES, TEXT or IDEAS. See below… Scientific Paper Chase, J. 2010. Stochastic community assembly causes higher biodiversity in more productive environments. Science 328: 1388-1391. Book Stein, B.A., Kutner, L.S., and Adams, J.S. 2000. Precious Heritage, The Status of Biodiversity in the United States. Oxford University Press, Oxford, England. Webpage NOAA, National Atmospheric and Oceanographic Administration. Accessed 01/05/12. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pastall.shtml#tracks_us.

BLY 101L – Take Home Assignment (20 pts. TOTAL) Due: Start of class time – Monday, June 30, 2014 OR Tuesday, July 1, 2014 1. Calculate the % of disks floating (%DF) for each time point and both Control and Treatment groups. (5 pts.) • refer to the class notes re: how to do this… 2. Neatly graph experimental results. (5 pts.) • graph paper • Microsoft Excel • refer to the class notes re: how to do this… 3. What was the overarching QUESTION addressed by the lab exercise? (1 pt.) 4. State “null” (H0) and “alternative” (HA) HYPOTHESES. (2 pts.) 5. State your PREDICTION in “If…., then…” format, based upon your knowledge of PS and as written in your lab guide. (1 pt.) 6. Applying what you’ve learned about photosynthesis… • Undoubtedly, you have heard mention of the effect of increasing concentrations of certain gasses (one of which is CO2) in Earth’s atmosphere, and its relevance to Climate Change. Sometime around two decades ago or so, plant scientists began to earnestly think about CO2 level and its effects on plant physiology and growth. Based upon your knowledge of photosynthesis and what you’ve learned from this week’s lab experiment… Formulate testable hypotheses (H0, HA) AND a prediction for this scenario. (3 pts.) • As a follow-on to the previous question and in the context of the experiment you performed in class…Aside from affecting “aesthetics” and habitat for fuzzy wuzzy animals, why are plant and conservation scientists worried about the effects of “clear cutting” (i.e., cutting down forests for development or other agricultural and industrial uses) in combination with rising CO2 levels? (NOTE: O2 HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH THE ANSWER TO THIS QUESTION…; 3 pts.) You MUST hand in the following: o Data table o Line graph of experimental results (plot both data sets on the SAME set of axes; see lecture notes) o Neatly typed answers to questions 3-6 REMEMBER: Images, written text AND/OR ideas are intellectual property and/or copyrighted! If you consult/borrow any published material (e.g., internet webpage text, published paper or report, your textbook, etc.) to construct answers to the questions above, you MUST CITE THE SOURCE FROM WHICH YOU COPIED THE IMAGES, TEXT or IDEAS. See below… Scientific Paper Chase, J. 2010. Stochastic community assembly causes higher biodiversity in more productive environments. Science 328: 1388-1391. Book Stein, B.A., Kutner, L.S., and Adams, J.S. 2000. Precious Heritage, The Status of Biodiversity in the United States. Oxford University Press, Oxford, England. Webpage NOAA, National Atmospheric and Oceanographic Administration. Accessed 01/05/12. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pastall.shtml#tracks_us.

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ELEC153 Circuit Theory II M2A4 Lab: AC Parallel Circuits Introduction In this experiment we work with AC parallel circuits. As we did in the AC series circuits lab, the results obtained through Transient Analysis in MultiSim will be verified by manual calculations. Procedure 1. Figure 1 is the circuit we want to analyze.The voltage source is 24 volts peak at 1000 Hz. Figure 1: AC parallel circuit used for analysis using MultiSim Unlike the series circuit, there is no resistor in series with the voltage source that allows us to plot the current by taking advantage of its in-phase relationship. So, in order to measure the current produced by the source (total current) add a 1 Ohm resistor in series with the source. This small resistor will not affect the calculations. Figure 2: Arrangement for analyzing the current waveforms 2. Run the simulations and with the oscilloscope measure both the source voltage and the voltage across the resistor. You should get a plot similar to the following graph: Figure 3: Source voltage (red) and source current (blue) waveforms 3. From the resulting analysis plot, determine the peak current. Record it here. Measured Peak Current 4. Determine the peak current by calculation. Record it here. Does it match the measured peak current? Explain. Calculated Peak Current 5. Calculate the phase-shift. Using the method presented in the last lab, measure the time difference at the zero-crossing of the two signals. Record it here. Time difference 6. From the resulting calculation, determine the phase shift by using the following formula Record it here. Measured Phase Shift 7. Determine the phase shift by calculation. Record it here. Does it match the measured phase shift? Explain. Calculated Phase Shift 8. Change the frequency of the voltage source to 5000 Hz. Re-simulate and perform a Transient Analysis to find the new circuit current and phase angle. Measure them and record them here: Measured Current Measured Phase Shift 9. Perform the manual calculations needed to find the circuit current and phase shift. Record the calculated values here. Do they match the measured values within reason? What has happened to the circuit with an increase in frequency? Calculated Current Calculated Phase Shift 10. Replace the capacitor with a 0.8 H inductor. Set the source frequency back to 1000 Hz. Perform Transient Analysis and measure the current amplitude and phase shift. Record them here: Measured Current Measured Phase Shift 11. Perform the manual calculations needed to find the circuit current and phase shift. Record the calculated values here. Do they match the measured values within reason? Calculated Current Calculated Phase Shift 12. Change the frequency of the voltage source to 5000 Hz. Re-simulate and perform a Transient Analysis to find the new circuit current and phase angle. Measure them and record them here: Measured Current Measured Phase Shift 13. Perform the manual calculations needed to find the circuit current and phase shift. Record the calculated values here. Do they match the measured values within reason? What has happened to the circuit with an increase in frequency? Calculated Current Calculated Phase Shift Write-up and Submission In general, for each lab you do, you will be asked to setup certain circuits, simulate them, record the results, verify the results are correct by hand, and then discuss the solution. Your lab write-up should contain a one page, single spaced discussion of the lab experiment, what went right for you, what you had difficulty with, what you learned from the experiment, how it applies to our coursework, and any other comment you can think of. In addition, you should include screen shots from the MultiSim software and any other figure, table, or diagram as necessary.

ELEC153 Circuit Theory II M2A4 Lab: AC Parallel Circuits Introduction In this experiment we work with AC parallel circuits. As we did in the AC series circuits lab, the results obtained through Transient Analysis in MultiSim will be verified by manual calculations. Procedure 1. Figure 1 is the circuit we want to analyze.The voltage source is 24 volts peak at 1000 Hz. Figure 1: AC parallel circuit used for analysis using MultiSim Unlike the series circuit, there is no resistor in series with the voltage source that allows us to plot the current by taking advantage of its in-phase relationship. So, in order to measure the current produced by the source (total current) add a 1 Ohm resistor in series with the source. This small resistor will not affect the calculations. Figure 2: Arrangement for analyzing the current waveforms 2. Run the simulations and with the oscilloscope measure both the source voltage and the voltage across the resistor. You should get a plot similar to the following graph: Figure 3: Source voltage (red) and source current (blue) waveforms 3. From the resulting analysis plot, determine the peak current. Record it here. Measured Peak Current 4. Determine the peak current by calculation. Record it here. Does it match the measured peak current? Explain. Calculated Peak Current 5. Calculate the phase-shift. Using the method presented in the last lab, measure the time difference at the zero-crossing of the two signals. Record it here. Time difference 6. From the resulting calculation, determine the phase shift by using the following formula Record it here. Measured Phase Shift 7. Determine the phase shift by calculation. Record it here. Does it match the measured phase shift? Explain. Calculated Phase Shift 8. Change the frequency of the voltage source to 5000 Hz. Re-simulate and perform a Transient Analysis to find the new circuit current and phase angle. Measure them and record them here: Measured Current Measured Phase Shift 9. Perform the manual calculations needed to find the circuit current and phase shift. Record the calculated values here. Do they match the measured values within reason? What has happened to the circuit with an increase in frequency? Calculated Current Calculated Phase Shift 10. Replace the capacitor with a 0.8 H inductor. Set the source frequency back to 1000 Hz. Perform Transient Analysis and measure the current amplitude and phase shift. Record them here: Measured Current Measured Phase Shift 11. Perform the manual calculations needed to find the circuit current and phase shift. Record the calculated values here. Do they match the measured values within reason? Calculated Current Calculated Phase Shift 12. Change the frequency of the voltage source to 5000 Hz. Re-simulate and perform a Transient Analysis to find the new circuit current and phase angle. Measure them and record them here: Measured Current Measured Phase Shift 13. Perform the manual calculations needed to find the circuit current and phase shift. Record the calculated values here. Do they match the measured values within reason? What has happened to the circuit with an increase in frequency? Calculated Current Calculated Phase Shift Write-up and Submission In general, for each lab you do, you will be asked to setup certain circuits, simulate them, record the results, verify the results are correct by hand, and then discuss the solution. Your lab write-up should contain a one page, single spaced discussion of the lab experiment, what went right for you, what you had difficulty with, what you learned from the experiment, how it applies to our coursework, and any other comment you can think of. In addition, you should include screen shots from the MultiSim software and any other figure, table, or diagram as necessary.

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– 1 – Laboratory 1 Introduction: In this lab you will look at two problems that are at the heart of calculus. Each of these experiments illustrates a core calculus concept. You should perform each experiment taking notes and pictures. You will use these to write up your results. You are expected to use a word processor to produce the laboratory. Graphing software should be used to draw your graphs and illustrations. You can also include pictures you have taken. Equations should be written using “equation editor” software. In short, the laboratory should have a professional look and feel to it. It should be of publishable quality. You report should be printed on 8.5 x 11 inch paper and include a title page (format will be discussed in class). Each page should be numbered. You can work in groups of 3 on this laboratory. If you do this, you must include a page right after the title page and before the report that includes a list of the contributions of each member of the group has made. Question 1 Suppose you start 10 feet away from a wall and walk 5 feet toward the wall and stop. Now walk 2.5 feet toward the wall and stop. Keep going each time walking half the distance of your previous walk toward the wall. 1. Where are you after three walks? 2. Where are you after 2, 3, 4, 5, 10 walks? 3. Create a function where n is the number of the walk and f(n) is the distance from the wall. 4. Graph this function. 5. Using your modeling skills find a model for this function. 6. If you walk forever, were will you end up? For this one write a paragraph defending your location. 7. If instead of walking one half as far as the previous walk, walk one third. That is start 9 feet away from the wall and walk 3 feet, then 1 foot, then 1/3 of a foot, etc. Where do you end up this time? Again write a paragraph. 8. Discuss you experiment in relation Zeno’s Paradox called Achilles and Tortoise. – 2 – Question 2 Here you are going to find the circumference and area of a circle by approximating it with polygons. 1. Start by drawing a circle with radius 3” on a sheet of paper. (You should include your drawings in laboratory report. You should be able to get two per page.) 2. Divide the circle into 3 equal parts. 3. Now connect adjacent points on the circumference to form 3 triangles as shown below. You need to find the area of these isosceles triangles and the length of the bases (red lines). 4. In a table keep track of the following: a. The number of triangles. b. The sum of the lengths of the bases. This is your approximation for the circumference. Label this column, C. c. The sum of the areas of the triangles. This is your approximation for the area of the circle. Label this column , A. d. In a column divide your approximation for the circumference by 2*r. This value should be 6 since r is the radius of your circle is 3. Label this column P1 e. In a column divide your approximation for the area by r2 or 9. Label this column P2. – 3 – 5. Repeat this process for n = 4 … 15 recording your results in the correct columns. 6. Create the two functions described below. You should the graph for each of these functions separately. a. C(n) which associates n to the corresponding approximation of the circumference. b. A(n) which associates n to the corresponding approximation of the area. 7. For the two functions created in step 6 find a model for each function. 8. If we were to continue this experiment — let n grow larger without bound then what values do C and A will approach. Write a paragraph for each variable explaining your reasoning. 9. Then examine the P1 and P2 columns of your table. Write a paragraph on what you if n is allowed to grow larger without bound.

– 1 – Laboratory 1 Introduction: In this lab you will look at two problems that are at the heart of calculus. Each of these experiments illustrates a core calculus concept. You should perform each experiment taking notes and pictures. You will use these to write up your results. You are expected to use a word processor to produce the laboratory. Graphing software should be used to draw your graphs and illustrations. You can also include pictures you have taken. Equations should be written using “equation editor” software. In short, the laboratory should have a professional look and feel to it. It should be of publishable quality. You report should be printed on 8.5 x 11 inch paper and include a title page (format will be discussed in class). Each page should be numbered. You can work in groups of 3 on this laboratory. If you do this, you must include a page right after the title page and before the report that includes a list of the contributions of each member of the group has made. Question 1 Suppose you start 10 feet away from a wall and walk 5 feet toward the wall and stop. Now walk 2.5 feet toward the wall and stop. Keep going each time walking half the distance of your previous walk toward the wall. 1. Where are you after three walks? 2. Where are you after 2, 3, 4, 5, 10 walks? 3. Create a function where n is the number of the walk and f(n) is the distance from the wall. 4. Graph this function. 5. Using your modeling skills find a model for this function. 6. If you walk forever, were will you end up? For this one write a paragraph defending your location. 7. If instead of walking one half as far as the previous walk, walk one third. That is start 9 feet away from the wall and walk 3 feet, then 1 foot, then 1/3 of a foot, etc. Where do you end up this time? Again write a paragraph. 8. Discuss you experiment in relation Zeno’s Paradox called Achilles and Tortoise. – 2 – Question 2 Here you are going to find the circumference and area of a circle by approximating it with polygons. 1. Start by drawing a circle with radius 3” on a sheet of paper. (You should include your drawings in laboratory report. You should be able to get two per page.) 2. Divide the circle into 3 equal parts. 3. Now connect adjacent points on the circumference to form 3 triangles as shown below. You need to find the area of these isosceles triangles and the length of the bases (red lines). 4. In a table keep track of the following: a. The number of triangles. b. The sum of the lengths of the bases. This is your approximation for the circumference. Label this column, C. c. The sum of the areas of the triangles. This is your approximation for the area of the circle. Label this column , A. d. In a column divide your approximation for the circumference by 2*r. This value should be 6 since r is the radius of your circle is 3. Label this column P1 e. In a column divide your approximation for the area by r2 or 9. Label this column P2. – 3 – 5. Repeat this process for n = 4 … 15 recording your results in the correct columns. 6. Create the two functions described below. You should the graph for each of these functions separately. a. C(n) which associates n to the corresponding approximation of the circumference. b. A(n) which associates n to the corresponding approximation of the area. 7. For the two functions created in step 6 find a model for each function. 8. If we were to continue this experiment — let n grow larger without bound then what values do C and A will approach. Write a paragraph for each variable explaining your reasoning. 9. Then examine the P1 and P2 columns of your table. Write a paragraph on what you if n is allowed to grow larger without bound.

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Louis Pasteur conducted an experiment to answer the question of whether or not living things can arise spontaneously from nonliving materials. In this experiment he used two flasks of sterile broth. How could this demonstrate the invalidity of spontaneous generation? Select one: In the flask in which no outside materials could enter, no growth occurred while growth did occur in the flask that allowed outside air to enter demonstrating that the living things came from outside the sterile broth. No growth occurred in either flask demonstrating that sterile broth could not promote growth. Both flasks showed growth demonstrating that spontaneous generation does occur. While both flasks showed growth, the flask that did not allow air to enter showed a higher growth demonstrating that while spontaneous generation does not occur that it does not take air to permit growth. No growth occurred in either flask demonstrating that sterilizing the broth removed its nutrients so growth could not occur regardless of whether or not life was present.

Louis Pasteur conducted an experiment to answer the question of whether or not living things can arise spontaneously from nonliving materials. In this experiment he used two flasks of sterile broth. How could this demonstrate the invalidity of spontaneous generation? Select one: In the flask in which no outside materials could enter, no growth occurred while growth did occur in the flask that allowed outside air to enter demonstrating that the living things came from outside the sterile broth. No growth occurred in either flask demonstrating that sterile broth could not promote growth. Both flasks showed growth demonstrating that spontaneous generation does occur. While both flasks showed growth, the flask that did not allow air to enter showed a higher growth demonstrating that while spontaneous generation does not occur that it does not take air to permit growth. No growth occurred in either flask demonstrating that sterilizing the broth removed its nutrients so growth could not occur regardless of whether or not life was present.

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