EXPERIMENT 6 FET CHARACTERISTIC CURVES ________________________________________ Bring a diskette to save your data. ________________________________________ OBJECT: The objective of this lab is to investigate the DC characteristics and operation of a field effect transistor (FET). The FET recommended to be used in this lab is 2N5486 n-channel FET. • Gathering data for the DC characteristics ________________________________________ APPARATUS: Dual DC Power Supply, Voltmeter, and 1k resistors, 2N5486 N-Channel FET. ________________________________________ THEORY: A JFET (Junction Field Effect Transistor) is a three terminal device (drain, source, and gate) similar to the BJT. The difference between them is that the JFET is a voltage controlled constant current device, whereas BJT is a current controlled current source device. Whereas for BJT the relationship between an output parameter, iC, and an input parameter, iB, is given by a constant , the relationship in JFET between an output parameter, iD, and an input parameter, vGS, is more complex. PROCEDURE: Measuring ID versus VDS (Output Characteristics) 1. Build the circuit shown below. 2. Obtain the output characteristics i.e. ID versus VDS. a. Set VGS = 0. Vary the voltage across drain (VDS) from 0 to 8 V with steps of 1 V and measure the corresponding drain current (ID). b. Repeat the procedure for different values of VGS. (0V, -0.5V, -1V, -1.5V, -2V, -2.5V, -3.0V, -3.5V, -4.0V). 3. Record the values in Table 1 and plot the graph ID vs. VGS. VGS 0 -0.5 -1.0 -1.5` -2.0 -2.5 -3.0 -3.5 -4.0 VDS ID ID ID ID ID ID ID ID ID 0 0 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0mA 1 0 0.7 mA 0.7 mA 0.66 mA 0.6 mA 0.6 mA 0.5 0.1mA 0mA 2 0 1.5 mA 1.3 mA 1.3mA 1.2 mA 1.1 mA 0.7 0.1mA 0mA 3 0 2.1 mA 2.6 mA 1.9 mA 1.8 mA 1.5 mA 0.8 mA 0.1mA 0mA 4 0 2.7 mA 2.6 mA 2.5 mA 2.4 mA 1.7 mA 0.8 mA 0.1mA 0mA 5 0 3.4 mA 3.3 mA 3.1 mA 2.8 mA 1.8 mA 0.9 mA 0.1mA 0mA 6 0 4.1 mA 3.4 mA 3.7 mA 3.2 mA 1.9 mA 0.9 mA 0.1mA 0mA 7 0 4.7 mA 4.5 mA 4.2 mA 3.4 mA 1.9 mA 0.9 mA 0.1mA 0mA 8 0 5.3 mA 5.1 mA 6.6 mA 3.5 mA 2.0 mA 0.9 mA 0.1mA 0mA Table 1. vds=0:8; id=[0 6.2e-3 9.7e-3 11.3e-3 11.9e-3 12.2e-3 12.3e-3 12.3e-3 12.32e-3]; plot(vds,id);grid on;hold on id2=[0 5.23e-3 8.05e-3 9.15e-3 9.57e-3 9.77e-3 9.88e-3 9.9e-3 9.92e-3]; plot(vds,id2);grid on;hold on id3=[0 4.29e-3 6.41e-3 7.17e-3 7.46e-3 7.60e-3 7.67e-3 7.73e-3 7.76e-3]; plot(vds,id3);grid on;hold on ________________________________________ Measuring ID versus VGS (Transconductance Characteristics) 1. For the same circuit, obtain the transconductance characteristics. i.e. ID versus VGS. a. Set a particular value of voltage for VDS, i.e. 5V. Start with a gate voltage VGS of 0 V, and measure the corresponding drain current (ID). b. Then decrease VGS in steps of 0.5 V until VGS is -4V. c. At each step record the drain current. VDS = 5 V VGS ID 0 3.42 mA -0.5 3.36 mA -1.00 3.27 mA -1.50 3.12 mA -2.00 2.79 mA -2.50 1.84 mA -3.00 0.71 mA -3.50 0.11 mA -4.00 0 mA Table 2. 2. Plot the graph with ID versus VGS using Excel, MATLAB, or some other program. Discussion Questions—Make sure you answer the following questions in your discussion. Use all of the data obtained to answer the following questions: 1. Discuss the output and transconductance curves obtained in lab? Are they what you expected? 2. Are the output characteristics spaced evenly? Should they be? 3. What are the applications of a JFET?

EXPERIMENT 6 FET CHARACTERISTIC CURVES ________________________________________ Bring a diskette to save your data. ________________________________________ OBJECT: The objective of this lab is to investigate the DC characteristics and operation of a field effect transistor (FET). The FET recommended to be used in this lab is 2N5486 n-channel FET. • Gathering data for the DC characteristics ________________________________________ APPARATUS: Dual DC Power Supply, Voltmeter, and 1k resistors, 2N5486 N-Channel FET. ________________________________________ THEORY: A JFET (Junction Field Effect Transistor) is a three terminal device (drain, source, and gate) similar to the BJT. The difference between them is that the JFET is a voltage controlled constant current device, whereas BJT is a current controlled current source device. Whereas for BJT the relationship between an output parameter, iC, and an input parameter, iB, is given by a constant , the relationship in JFET between an output parameter, iD, and an input parameter, vGS, is more complex. PROCEDURE: Measuring ID versus VDS (Output Characteristics) 1. Build the circuit shown below. 2. Obtain the output characteristics i.e. ID versus VDS. a. Set VGS = 0. Vary the voltage across drain (VDS) from 0 to 8 V with steps of 1 V and measure the corresponding drain current (ID). b. Repeat the procedure for different values of VGS. (0V, -0.5V, -1V, -1.5V, -2V, -2.5V, -3.0V, -3.5V, -4.0V). 3. Record the values in Table 1 and plot the graph ID vs. VGS. VGS 0 -0.5 -1.0 -1.5` -2.0 -2.5 -3.0 -3.5 -4.0 VDS ID ID ID ID ID ID ID ID ID 0 0 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0.002mA 0mA 1 0 0.7 mA 0.7 mA 0.66 mA 0.6 mA 0.6 mA 0.5 0.1mA 0mA 2 0 1.5 mA 1.3 mA 1.3mA 1.2 mA 1.1 mA 0.7 0.1mA 0mA 3 0 2.1 mA 2.6 mA 1.9 mA 1.8 mA 1.5 mA 0.8 mA 0.1mA 0mA 4 0 2.7 mA 2.6 mA 2.5 mA 2.4 mA 1.7 mA 0.8 mA 0.1mA 0mA 5 0 3.4 mA 3.3 mA 3.1 mA 2.8 mA 1.8 mA 0.9 mA 0.1mA 0mA 6 0 4.1 mA 3.4 mA 3.7 mA 3.2 mA 1.9 mA 0.9 mA 0.1mA 0mA 7 0 4.7 mA 4.5 mA 4.2 mA 3.4 mA 1.9 mA 0.9 mA 0.1mA 0mA 8 0 5.3 mA 5.1 mA 6.6 mA 3.5 mA 2.0 mA 0.9 mA 0.1mA 0mA Table 1. vds=0:8; id=[0 6.2e-3 9.7e-3 11.3e-3 11.9e-3 12.2e-3 12.3e-3 12.3e-3 12.32e-3]; plot(vds,id);grid on;hold on id2=[0 5.23e-3 8.05e-3 9.15e-3 9.57e-3 9.77e-3 9.88e-3 9.9e-3 9.92e-3]; plot(vds,id2);grid on;hold on id3=[0 4.29e-3 6.41e-3 7.17e-3 7.46e-3 7.60e-3 7.67e-3 7.73e-3 7.76e-3]; plot(vds,id3);grid on;hold on ________________________________________ Measuring ID versus VGS (Transconductance Characteristics) 1. For the same circuit, obtain the transconductance characteristics. i.e. ID versus VGS. a. Set a particular value of voltage for VDS, i.e. 5V. Start with a gate voltage VGS of 0 V, and measure the corresponding drain current (ID). b. Then decrease VGS in steps of 0.5 V until VGS is -4V. c. At each step record the drain current. VDS = 5 V VGS ID 0 3.42 mA -0.5 3.36 mA -1.00 3.27 mA -1.50 3.12 mA -2.00 2.79 mA -2.50 1.84 mA -3.00 0.71 mA -3.50 0.11 mA -4.00 0 mA Table 2. 2. Plot the graph with ID versus VGS using Excel, MATLAB, or some other program. Discussion Questions—Make sure you answer the following questions in your discussion. Use all of the data obtained to answer the following questions: 1. Discuss the output and transconductance curves obtained in lab? Are they what you expected? 2. Are the output characteristics spaced evenly? Should they be? 3. What are the applications of a JFET?

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ELEC153 Circuit Theory II M2A3 Lab: AC Series Circuits Introduction Previously you worked with two simple AC series circuits, R-C and R-L circuits. We continue that work in this experiment. Procedure 1. Setup the following circuit in MultiSim.The voltage source is 10 volts peak at 1000 Hz. Figure 1: Circuit for analysis using MultiSim 2. Change R1 to 1 k and C1 to 0.1 uF. Connect the oscilloscope to measure both the source voltage and the voltage across the resistor.You should have the following arrangement. Figure 2: Circuit of figure 1 connected to oscilloscope To color the wires, right click the desired wire and select “Color Segment…” and follow the instructions. Start the simulation and open the oscilloscope. You should get the following plot: Figure 3: Source voltage (red) and the voltage (blue) across the resistor The red signal is the voltage of the source and the blue is the voltage across the resistor. The colors correspond to the colors of the wires from the oscilloscope. 3. From the resulting analysis plotdetermine the peak current. To determine the peak current measure the peak voltage across the resistor and divide by the value of the resistor (1000 Ohms). Record it here. Measured Peak Current 4. Determine the peak current by calculation. Record it here. Does it match the measured peak current? Explain. Calculated Peak Current 5 Determine the phase shift between the current in the circuit and the source voltage. We look at the time between zero crossings to determine the phase shift between two waveforms. In our plot, the blue waveform (representing the circuit current or the voltage across the resistor) crosses zero before the red waveform (the circuit voltage). So, current is leading voltage in this circuit. This is exactly what should happen when we have a capacitive circuit. 6. To determine the phase shift, we first have to measure the time between zero crossings on the red and blue waveforms. This is done by moving the oscillator probes to the two zero crossing as is shown in the following figure Figure 4: Determining the phase shift between the two voltage waveforms We can see from the figure that the zero crossing difference (T2 – T1) is approximately 134 us. The ratio of the zero-crossing time difference to the period of the waveform determines the phase shift, as follows: Using our time values, we have: How do we know if this phase shift is correct? In step 4 when you did your manual calculations to find the peak current, you had to find the total impedance of the circuit, which was: Now, the current will be: Here, the positive angle on the current indicates it is leading the circuit voltage. 7. Change the frequency of the voltage source to 5000 Hz. Estimulate and perform a Transient Analysis to find the new circuit current and phase angle. Measure them and record them here: Measured Current Measured Phase Shift 8. Perform the manual calculations needed to find the circuit current and phase shift. Record the calculated values here. Do they match the measured values within reason? What has happened to the circuit with an increase in frequency? Calculated Current Calculated Phase Shift Writeup and Submission In general, for each lab you do, you will be asked to setup certain circuits, simulate them, record the results, verify the results are correct by hand, and then discuss the solution. Your lab write-up should contain a one page, single spaced discussion of the lab experiment, what went right for you, what you had difficulty with, what you learned from the experiment, how it applies to our coursework, and any other comment you can think of. In addition, you should include screen shots from the MultiSim software and any other figure, table, or diagram as necessary.

ELEC153 Circuit Theory II M2A3 Lab: AC Series Circuits Introduction Previously you worked with two simple AC series circuits, R-C and R-L circuits. We continue that work in this experiment. Procedure 1. Setup the following circuit in MultiSim.The voltage source is 10 volts peak at 1000 Hz. Figure 1: Circuit for analysis using MultiSim 2. Change R1 to 1 k and C1 to 0.1 uF. Connect the oscilloscope to measure both the source voltage and the voltage across the resistor.You should have the following arrangement. Figure 2: Circuit of figure 1 connected to oscilloscope To color the wires, right click the desired wire and select “Color Segment…” and follow the instructions. Start the simulation and open the oscilloscope. You should get the following plot: Figure 3: Source voltage (red) and the voltage (blue) across the resistor The red signal is the voltage of the source and the blue is the voltage across the resistor. The colors correspond to the colors of the wires from the oscilloscope. 3. From the resulting analysis plotdetermine the peak current. To determine the peak current measure the peak voltage across the resistor and divide by the value of the resistor (1000 Ohms). Record it here. Measured Peak Current 4. Determine the peak current by calculation. Record it here. Does it match the measured peak current? Explain. Calculated Peak Current 5 Determine the phase shift between the current in the circuit and the source voltage. We look at the time between zero crossings to determine the phase shift between two waveforms. In our plot, the blue waveform (representing the circuit current or the voltage across the resistor) crosses zero before the red waveform (the circuit voltage). So, current is leading voltage in this circuit. This is exactly what should happen when we have a capacitive circuit. 6. To determine the phase shift, we first have to measure the time between zero crossings on the red and blue waveforms. This is done by moving the oscillator probes to the two zero crossing as is shown in the following figure Figure 4: Determining the phase shift between the two voltage waveforms We can see from the figure that the zero crossing difference (T2 – T1) is approximately 134 us. The ratio of the zero-crossing time difference to the period of the waveform determines the phase shift, as follows: Using our time values, we have: How do we know if this phase shift is correct? In step 4 when you did your manual calculations to find the peak current, you had to find the total impedance of the circuit, which was: Now, the current will be: Here, the positive angle on the current indicates it is leading the circuit voltage. 7. Change the frequency of the voltage source to 5000 Hz. Estimulate and perform a Transient Analysis to find the new circuit current and phase angle. Measure them and record them here: Measured Current Measured Phase Shift 8. Perform the manual calculations needed to find the circuit current and phase shift. Record the calculated values here. Do they match the measured values within reason? What has happened to the circuit with an increase in frequency? Calculated Current Calculated Phase Shift Writeup and Submission In general, for each lab you do, you will be asked to setup certain circuits, simulate them, record the results, verify the results are correct by hand, and then discuss the solution. Your lab write-up should contain a one page, single spaced discussion of the lab experiment, what went right for you, what you had difficulty with, what you learned from the experiment, how it applies to our coursework, and any other comment you can think of. In addition, you should include screen shots from the MultiSim software and any other figure, table, or diagram as necessary.

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Now, you observe the following light pattern. Select all the possible changes in experimental conditions that might have caused the differences in the original pattern (that shown in problem 3) to that which you observe now. the wavelength of the light source was increased the wavelength of the light source was decreased the slit width/slit separation was increased the slit width/slit separation was decreased the experiment was changed from a double slit to single slit the experiment was changed from a single slit to a double slit

Now, you observe the following light pattern. Select all the possible changes in experimental conditions that might have caused the differences in the original pattern (that shown in problem 3) to that which you observe now. the wavelength of the light source was increased the wavelength of the light source was decreased the slit width/slit separation was increased the slit width/slit separation was decreased the experiment was changed from a double slit to single slit the experiment was changed from a single slit to a double slit

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Lab Description: Follow the instructions in the lab tasks below to complete Problems 1 through 4. These problems will guide you in observing signal delays and timing hazards of logic circuits (both Sum-of-Products (SOP) and Product-of-Sums (POS) circuits). These problems will also guide you in adding circuitry to eliminate a timing hazard. Use VHDL to design the circuits. Carefully follow the directions provided in the lab tasks below. Write your answers to the questions asked by the problems. Do not print out the VHDL code and waveforms as asked by the problems, instead include these on the cover sheet for this lab and print this out when you are done. Do not worry about annotating or putting arrows/notes on the waveforms–just make sure any signals or transitions of interest are shown in your screenshot. For each problem, use VHDL assignment statements for each gate of the Boolean expression. You must add delay for each gate and inverter as described by the problem. Do this by using the “after” statement: Z <= (A and B) after 1 ns; Refer to Digilent Real Digital Module 8 for more information about the "after" statement. Lab Tasks: 1. Complete Problem 1 of Project 8. Simulate all input combinations for this SOP (Sum-of-Products) expression. However, be aware that specific input sequences are required to observe a timing hazard. The problem states that you will need to observe the output when B and C are both high (logic 1) and A transitions from high to low to high (logic 1 to 0, then back to 1). 2. Complete Problem 4 of Project 8. Increase the delay of the OR gate as specified and re-simulate to answer the questions. 3. Complete Problem 2 of Project 8. Change the delay of the OR gate back to the 1 ns that you used for Problem 1. Add the new logic gate (with delay) to your VHDL for the SOP expression and re-simulate to answer the questions. 4. Complete Problem 3 of Project 8. You may create any POS (Product-of-Sums) expression for this problem, however, not all POS expressions will have a timing hazard (so spend some time thinking about how a timing hazard can be generated with a POS expression). Once again, simulate all input combinations for your POS expression but be aware that specific input sequences are required to observe a timing hazard. For this problem, you will also add the new logic gate (with delay) to your VHDL for your POS expression in order to eliminate the timing hazard; you will need to re-simulate with this additional logic gate in order to answer the questions. Problem 1. Implement the function Y = A’.B + A.C in the VHDL tool. Define the INV, OR and two AND operations separately, and give each operation a 1ns delay. Simulate the circuit with all possible combinations of inputs. Watch all circuit nets (inputs, outputs, and intermediate nets) during the simulation. Answer the questions below. Observe the outputs of the AND gates and the overall circuit output when B and C are both high, and A transitions from H to L and then from L to H (you may want to create another simulation to focus on this behavior). What output behavior do you notice when A transitions? What happens when A transitions and B or C are held a ‘0’? How long is the output glitch? _______ Is it positive ( ) or negative ( ) (circle one)? Change the delay through the inverter to 2ns, and resimulate. Now how long is output glitch? ______ What can you say about the relationship between the inverter gate delay and the length of the timing glitch? Based on this simple experiment, an SOP circuit can exhibit positive/negative glitches (circle one) when an input that arrives at one AND gate in a complemented form and another AND gate in uncomplemented form transitions from a _____ to a _____. Problem 2. Enter the logic equation from problem 1 in the K-map below, and loop the equation with redundant term included. Add the redundant term to the Xilinx circuit, re-simulate, and answer the questions. B C A 00 01 11 10 0 1 F Did adding the new gate to the circuit change the logical behavior of the circuit? What effect did the new gate have on the output, particularly when A changes and B and C are both held high? Problem 3. Create a three-input POS circuit to illustrate the formation of a glitch. Drive the simulator to illustrate a glitch in the POS circuit, and answer the questions below. A POS circuit can exhibit a positive/negative glitch (circle one) when an input that arrives at one OR gate in a complemented form and another OR gate in un-complemented form transitions from a _____ to a _____. Write the POS equation you used to show the glitch: Enter the equation in the K-map below, loop the original equation with the redundant term, add the redundant gate to your Xilinx circuit, and resimulate. How did adding the new gate to the circuit change the logical behavior of the circuit? What effect did the new gate have on the output, particularly when A changes and B and C are both held high? Print and submit the circuits and simulation output, label the output glitches in the simulation output, and draw arrows on the simulation output between the events that caused the glitches (i.e., a transition in an input signal) and the glitches themselves. Problem 4. Copy the SOP circuit above to a new VHDL file, and increase the delay of the output OR gate. Simulate the circuit and answer the questions below. How did adding delay to the output gate change the output transition? Does adding delay to the output gate change the circuit’s glitch behavior in any way? Name: Signal Delays Date: Designing with VHDL Grade Item Grade Five segments of VHDL Code for Problems 1-4: /10 Five simulation screenshots for Problems 1-4: /10 Questions from Problems 1-4: /16 Total Grade: /36 VHDL Code: Copy-paste your VHDL design code (just the code you wrote) for: • The SOP expression with the timing hazard (Problem 1, Project 8): • The SOP expression with increased OR gate delay (Problem 4, Project 8): • The SOP expression with the extra logic gate in order to eliminate the timing hazard (Problem 2, Project 8): • Your POS expression with the timing hazard (Problem 3, Project 8): • Your POS expression with the extra logic gate in order to eliminate the timing hazard (Problem 3, Project 8): Simulation Screenshots: Use the “Print Screen” button to capture your screenshot (it should show the entire screen, not just the window of the program). • The SOP expression with the timing hazard (Problem 1, Project 8): • The SOP expression with increased OR gate delay (Problem 4, Project 8): • The SOP expression with the extra logic gate in order to eliminate the timing hazard (Problem 2, Project 8): • Your POS expression with the timing hazard (Problem 3, Project 8): • Your POS expression with the extra logic gate in order to eliminate the timing hazard (Problem 3, Project 8): Simulation Screenshot Tips: (you can delete this once you capture your screenshot) 1. Make the “Wave” window large by clicking the “+” button near the upper-right of the window 2. Click the “Zoom Full” button (looks like a blue/green-filled magnifying glass) to enlarge your waveforms 3. In order to not print a lot of black, change the color scheme of the “Wave” window: 3.1. Click ToolsEdit Preferences… 3.2. The “By Window” tab should be selected, then click Wave Windows in the “Window List” to the left 3.3. Scroll to the bottom of the “Wave Windows Color Scheme” list and click waveBackground. Then click white in the color “Palette” at the right of the screen. 3.4. Now color the waveforms and text black: 3.4.1. Click LOGIC_0 in the “Wave Windows Color Scheme.” Then click black in the color “Palette” at the right of the screen. 3.4.2. Repeat this for LOGIC_1, timeColor, and cursorColor (if you have a cursor you want to print) 3.5. Once you have captured your screenshot, you can click the Reset Defaults button to restore the “Wave” window to its original color scheme Questions: (Please use this cover sheet to type and print your responses) 1. List the references you used for this lab assignment (e.g. sources/websites used or students with whom you discussed this assignment) 2. Do you have any comments or suggestions for this lab exercise?

Lab Description: Follow the instructions in the lab tasks below to complete Problems 1 through 4. These problems will guide you in observing signal delays and timing hazards of logic circuits (both Sum-of-Products (SOP) and Product-of-Sums (POS) circuits). These problems will also guide you in adding circuitry to eliminate a timing hazard. Use VHDL to design the circuits. Carefully follow the directions provided in the lab tasks below. Write your answers to the questions asked by the problems. Do not print out the VHDL code and waveforms as asked by the problems, instead include these on the cover sheet for this lab and print this out when you are done. Do not worry about annotating or putting arrows/notes on the waveforms–just make sure any signals or transitions of interest are shown in your screenshot. For each problem, use VHDL assignment statements for each gate of the Boolean expression. You must add delay for each gate and inverter as described by the problem. Do this by using the “after” statement: Z <= (A and B) after 1 ns; Refer to Digilent Real Digital Module 8 for more information about the "after" statement. Lab Tasks: 1. Complete Problem 1 of Project 8. Simulate all input combinations for this SOP (Sum-of-Products) expression. However, be aware that specific input sequences are required to observe a timing hazard. The problem states that you will need to observe the output when B and C are both high (logic 1) and A transitions from high to low to high (logic 1 to 0, then back to 1). 2. Complete Problem 4 of Project 8. Increase the delay of the OR gate as specified and re-simulate to answer the questions. 3. Complete Problem 2 of Project 8. Change the delay of the OR gate back to the 1 ns that you used for Problem 1. Add the new logic gate (with delay) to your VHDL for the SOP expression and re-simulate to answer the questions. 4. Complete Problem 3 of Project 8. You may create any POS (Product-of-Sums) expression for this problem, however, not all POS expressions will have a timing hazard (so spend some time thinking about how a timing hazard can be generated with a POS expression). Once again, simulate all input combinations for your POS expression but be aware that specific input sequences are required to observe a timing hazard. For this problem, you will also add the new logic gate (with delay) to your VHDL for your POS expression in order to eliminate the timing hazard; you will need to re-simulate with this additional logic gate in order to answer the questions. Problem 1. Implement the function Y = A’.B + A.C in the VHDL tool. Define the INV, OR and two AND operations separately, and give each operation a 1ns delay. Simulate the circuit with all possible combinations of inputs. Watch all circuit nets (inputs, outputs, and intermediate nets) during the simulation. Answer the questions below. Observe the outputs of the AND gates and the overall circuit output when B and C are both high, and A transitions from H to L and then from L to H (you may want to create another simulation to focus on this behavior). What output behavior do you notice when A transitions? What happens when A transitions and B or C are held a ‘0’? How long is the output glitch? _______ Is it positive ( ) or negative ( ) (circle one)? Change the delay through the inverter to 2ns, and resimulate. Now how long is output glitch? ______ What can you say about the relationship between the inverter gate delay and the length of the timing glitch? Based on this simple experiment, an SOP circuit can exhibit positive/negative glitches (circle one) when an input that arrives at one AND gate in a complemented form and another AND gate in uncomplemented form transitions from a _____ to a _____. Problem 2. Enter the logic equation from problem 1 in the K-map below, and loop the equation with redundant term included. Add the redundant term to the Xilinx circuit, re-simulate, and answer the questions. B C A 00 01 11 10 0 1 F Did adding the new gate to the circuit change the logical behavior of the circuit? What effect did the new gate have on the output, particularly when A changes and B and C are both held high? Problem 3. Create a three-input POS circuit to illustrate the formation of a glitch. Drive the simulator to illustrate a glitch in the POS circuit, and answer the questions below. A POS circuit can exhibit a positive/negative glitch (circle one) when an input that arrives at one OR gate in a complemented form and another OR gate in un-complemented form transitions from a _____ to a _____. Write the POS equation you used to show the glitch: Enter the equation in the K-map below, loop the original equation with the redundant term, add the redundant gate to your Xilinx circuit, and resimulate. How did adding the new gate to the circuit change the logical behavior of the circuit? What effect did the new gate have on the output, particularly when A changes and B and C are both held high? Print and submit the circuits and simulation output, label the output glitches in the simulation output, and draw arrows on the simulation output between the events that caused the glitches (i.e., a transition in an input signal) and the glitches themselves. Problem 4. Copy the SOP circuit above to a new VHDL file, and increase the delay of the output OR gate. Simulate the circuit and answer the questions below. How did adding delay to the output gate change the output transition? Does adding delay to the output gate change the circuit’s glitch behavior in any way? Name: Signal Delays Date: Designing with VHDL Grade Item Grade Five segments of VHDL Code for Problems 1-4: /10 Five simulation screenshots for Problems 1-4: /10 Questions from Problems 1-4: /16 Total Grade: /36 VHDL Code: Copy-paste your VHDL design code (just the code you wrote) for: • The SOP expression with the timing hazard (Problem 1, Project 8): • The SOP expression with increased OR gate delay (Problem 4, Project 8): • The SOP expression with the extra logic gate in order to eliminate the timing hazard (Problem 2, Project 8): • Your POS expression with the timing hazard (Problem 3, Project 8): • Your POS expression with the extra logic gate in order to eliminate the timing hazard (Problem 3, Project 8): Simulation Screenshots: Use the “Print Screen” button to capture your screenshot (it should show the entire screen, not just the window of the program). • The SOP expression with the timing hazard (Problem 1, Project 8): • The SOP expression with increased OR gate delay (Problem 4, Project 8): • The SOP expression with the extra logic gate in order to eliminate the timing hazard (Problem 2, Project 8): • Your POS expression with the timing hazard (Problem 3, Project 8): • Your POS expression with the extra logic gate in order to eliminate the timing hazard (Problem 3, Project 8): Simulation Screenshot Tips: (you can delete this once you capture your screenshot) 1. Make the “Wave” window large by clicking the “+” button near the upper-right of the window 2. Click the “Zoom Full” button (looks like a blue/green-filled magnifying glass) to enlarge your waveforms 3. In order to not print a lot of black, change the color scheme of the “Wave” window: 3.1. Click ToolsEdit Preferences… 3.2. The “By Window” tab should be selected, then click Wave Windows in the “Window List” to the left 3.3. Scroll to the bottom of the “Wave Windows Color Scheme” list and click waveBackground. Then click white in the color “Palette” at the right of the screen. 3.4. Now color the waveforms and text black: 3.4.1. Click LOGIC_0 in the “Wave Windows Color Scheme.” Then click black in the color “Palette” at the right of the screen. 3.4.2. Repeat this for LOGIC_1, timeColor, and cursorColor (if you have a cursor you want to print) 3.5. Once you have captured your screenshot, you can click the Reset Defaults button to restore the “Wave” window to its original color scheme Questions: (Please use this cover sheet to type and print your responses) 1. List the references you used for this lab assignment (e.g. sources/websites used or students with whom you discussed this assignment) 2. Do you have any comments or suggestions for this lab exercise?

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Watch this video and answer the multi choices: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D4lB4SowAQA PART 1 _______1. Sociologists obtained their knowledge of human behavior through _______, which is this process of systematically collecting information for the purpose of testing an existing theory or generating a new one. a. Common sense ideas b. Research c. Myths d. scientific laws _______2. With ____Research, the goal is scientific objectivity, and the focus is on data that can be measured numerically a. qualitative b. observational c. c. quantitative d. d. explanatory _______3. With _______research, interpretative description (words) rather than statistics (numbers) are used to analyze underlying meaning and patterns of social relationships. a. qualitative b. observational c. quantitative d. explanatory _______4. Researchers in one study systematically analyzed the contents of the notes of suicide victims to determine recurring themes, such as feeling of despair or failure. They hoped to determine if any patterns could be found that would help in understating why people might kill themselves. This is an example of __________. a. Qualitative research b. Explanatory research c. Quantitative research d. Descriptive research ______5. the first step in the research process is to: a. select and define the research problem b. review previous research. c. develop a research design d. formulate the hypothesis ______6. A_____sample is a selection from a larger population and has the essential characteristics of the total population. a. selective b. random c. representative d. longitudinal _______7. _________is the extent to which a study or research instrument accurately measures what it is supposed to measure;_________is the extent to which a study or research instrument yields consistent results. a. Validity; replication b. Replication; validity c. Validity; reliability d. Reliability; validity _______8. Researchers who use existing material and analyze data that originally was collected by others are engaged in: a. unethical conduct b. primary analysis. c. secondary analysis d. survey analysis _______9. In an experiment, the subjects in the control group a. are exposed to the independent variable. b. are not exposed to the independent variable. c. are exposed to the dependent variable. d. are not exposed to the dependent variable. _______10. A tentative statement that predicts the relationship between variable is called a. a hypothesis b. a research model. c. a probability sample. d. a generalization. ______11. John wants to test this idea: “people who attend church regularly are less likely to express prejudice toward other races than people who do not attend church regularly.’ This idea is John’s a. hypothesis. b. research model. c. conclusion. d. operational definition _______12. In a research project, which of the following steps would come after the other three? a. choosing a research design b. reviewing the literature c. formulating a hypothesis d. collecting the data ________13. The variable hypothesized to cause or influence another is called the a. dependent variable. b. hypothetical variable c. correlation variable d. independent variable ________14. An explanation of an abstract concept that is specific enough to allow a research to measure the concept is a a. Hypothesis b. correlation. c. operatonal definition. d. variable _____15. Observation, ethnography, and case studies are examples of: a. survey research b. experiments. c. Secondary analysis of existing data. d. Field research. ______16. Theory and research are interrelated because a. theory always precedes research. b. research always precedes theory c. both put limits on each other. d. they are parts of a constant cycle. ______17. A dependent variable is one that a. always occurs first. b. is influenced by another variable. c. Causes another variable to change. d. is the most important ______18. In a study designed to test the relationship between gender and voting behavior, the independent variable would be a. the age of the candidates b. voting behavior. c. The political party of the candidates. d. Gender ______19. Differences in age, sex, race, and social class are treated as ____________in sociological research. a. variables b. references c. causes d. controls ______20. Researchers in agriculture decided to test the effects of a new fertilizer on crop growth. In this study, crop growth is the a. independent variable b. dependent variable c. control variable d. correlation e. _____21. The ______is appropriate for studying the relationships among variables under carefully controlled conditions. a. experiment b. survey c. observational study d. in-depth study _____22. In every experiment, some subjects are exposed to an independent variable, and are then watched closely for their reactions. These subjects are known as the a. reference group b. experimental group c. control group d. survey group. ______23. A usual research method for learning the attitudes of a population would be a. an experiment. b. A survey. c. An observational study. d. Content analysis ______24. In survey research, the total group of people the researcher is interested in is called a. the population b. the sample, c. the control group d. the random sample ______25. In the experiment method, the subjects who are exposed to all the experimental conditions except the independent variable are referred to as the_________________group. a. peer b. alternate c. control d. experimental ______26. A__________Sample is one in which every member of the population in The population has an equal chance of being selected. a. defined b. random c. purposive d. convenience ______27. A sociologist is following the research model outlined in the text. After reviewing the literature, the next step will be to a. find a suitable subject b. formulate a hypothesis c. collect the data. d. Choose a research design. ______28. Sociologists use two approaches when answering important questions. a. Explanatory and descriptive Approaches b. Direct and systematic Approaches c. Normative and systematic Approaches d. Normative and Empirical Approaches ______29. Sociologists use types of empirical studies a. Research and Theoretical Studies b. Descriptive and Explanatory Studies c. Hypothesis and Correlations Studies d. Longitudinal and Cross-sectional Studies ______30. The deductive approach begin with the a. Collecting data b. Theory and uses research to test the theory. c. Hypothesis d. Observation ______31. The inductive approach begin with a a. Theory b. Data Collection c. Reviewing the Literature d. The Problem State ______32. Quantitative Research deals with a. Words b. Numbers c. Interpretive descriptive d. Use number to analyze underlying meanings and patterns of social relationships. ______33. ________is the study of social life in its natural setting: observing and interviewing people where they live, work, and play. a. The survey b. Secondary analysis c. Field research d. The experiment ______34. ________refers to the process of collecting data while being part of the activities of the group that the researcher is studying a. The experiment b. Survey research c. Participant observation d. Secondary analysis _______35. A/an________is a detailed study of the life and activities of a group of people by researchers who may live with that group over a period of years. a. Correlational study b. ethnography c. experiment d. content analysis _______36. A/an _________is a carefully designed situation in which the researcher studies the impact of certain variables on subjects’ attitudes or behavior. a. case study b. correlational study c. experiment d. Participant observation _______37. In an experiment, the_______contains the subjects who are exposed to an independent variable to study its effect on them. a. Experiment group b. Dependent group c. Control group d. Independent group _______38. In an experiment, the_________contains the subjects who are not exposed to the independent variable. a. Experimental group b. Independent group c. Dependent group d. Control group _______39. ________is the extent to which a study or research instrument accurately measures what it is supposed to measure a. Validity b. Reliability c. Predictability d. Variability ______40. ________is the extent to which a study or research instrument yields consistent results when applied to different individual at one time or to same individuals over time. a. Validity b. Reliability c. Predictability d. Variability TRUE/FALSE ______41. In social science research, individuals are the most typical units of analysis. ______42. With qualitative research, statistics are used to analyze patterns of social relationship. ______43. Reliability is when a study gives consistent results to different research over time.

Watch this video and answer the multi choices: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D4lB4SowAQA PART 1 _______1. Sociologists obtained their knowledge of human behavior through _______, which is this process of systematically collecting information for the purpose of testing an existing theory or generating a new one. a. Common sense ideas b. Research c. Myths d. scientific laws _______2. With ____Research, the goal is scientific objectivity, and the focus is on data that can be measured numerically a. qualitative b. observational c. c. quantitative d. d. explanatory _______3. With _______research, interpretative description (words) rather than statistics (numbers) are used to analyze underlying meaning and patterns of social relationships. a. qualitative b. observational c. quantitative d. explanatory _______4. Researchers in one study systematically analyzed the contents of the notes of suicide victims to determine recurring themes, such as feeling of despair or failure. They hoped to determine if any patterns could be found that would help in understating why people might kill themselves. This is an example of __________. a. Qualitative research b. Explanatory research c. Quantitative research d. Descriptive research ______5. the first step in the research process is to: a. select and define the research problem b. review previous research. c. develop a research design d. formulate the hypothesis ______6. A_____sample is a selection from a larger population and has the essential characteristics of the total population. a. selective b. random c. representative d. longitudinal _______7. _________is the extent to which a study or research instrument accurately measures what it is supposed to measure;_________is the extent to which a study or research instrument yields consistent results. a. Validity; replication b. Replication; validity c. Validity; reliability d. Reliability; validity _______8. Researchers who use existing material and analyze data that originally was collected by others are engaged in: a. unethical conduct b. primary analysis. c. secondary analysis d. survey analysis _______9. In an experiment, the subjects in the control group a. are exposed to the independent variable. b. are not exposed to the independent variable. c. are exposed to the dependent variable. d. are not exposed to the dependent variable. _______10. A tentative statement that predicts the relationship between variable is called a. a hypothesis b. a research model. c. a probability sample. d. a generalization. ______11. John wants to test this idea: “people who attend church regularly are less likely to express prejudice toward other races than people who do not attend church regularly.’ This idea is John’s a. hypothesis. b. research model. c. conclusion. d. operational definition _______12. In a research project, which of the following steps would come after the other three? a. choosing a research design b. reviewing the literature c. formulating a hypothesis d. collecting the data ________13. The variable hypothesized to cause or influence another is called the a. dependent variable. b. hypothetical variable c. correlation variable d. independent variable ________14. An explanation of an abstract concept that is specific enough to allow a research to measure the concept is a a. Hypothesis b. correlation. c. operatonal definition. d. variable _____15. Observation, ethnography, and case studies are examples of: a. survey research b. experiments. c. Secondary analysis of existing data. d. Field research. ______16. Theory and research are interrelated because a. theory always precedes research. b. research always precedes theory c. both put limits on each other. d. they are parts of a constant cycle. ______17. A dependent variable is one that a. always occurs first. b. is influenced by another variable. c. Causes another variable to change. d. is the most important ______18. In a study designed to test the relationship between gender and voting behavior, the independent variable would be a. the age of the candidates b. voting behavior. c. The political party of the candidates. d. Gender ______19. Differences in age, sex, race, and social class are treated as ____________in sociological research. a. variables b. references c. causes d. controls ______20. Researchers in agriculture decided to test the effects of a new fertilizer on crop growth. In this study, crop growth is the a. independent variable b. dependent variable c. control variable d. correlation e. _____21. The ______is appropriate for studying the relationships among variables under carefully controlled conditions. a. experiment b. survey c. observational study d. in-depth study _____22. In every experiment, some subjects are exposed to an independent variable, and are then watched closely for their reactions. These subjects are known as the a. reference group b. experimental group c. control group d. survey group. ______23. A usual research method for learning the attitudes of a population would be a. an experiment. b. A survey. c. An observational study. d. Content analysis ______24. In survey research, the total group of people the researcher is interested in is called a. the population b. the sample, c. the control group d. the random sample ______25. In the experiment method, the subjects who are exposed to all the experimental conditions except the independent variable are referred to as the_________________group. a. peer b. alternate c. control d. experimental ______26. A__________Sample is one in which every member of the population in The population has an equal chance of being selected. a. defined b. random c. purposive d. convenience ______27. A sociologist is following the research model outlined in the text. After reviewing the literature, the next step will be to a. find a suitable subject b. formulate a hypothesis c. collect the data. d. Choose a research design. ______28. Sociologists use two approaches when answering important questions. a. Explanatory and descriptive Approaches b. Direct and systematic Approaches c. Normative and systematic Approaches d. Normative and Empirical Approaches ______29. Sociologists use types of empirical studies a. Research and Theoretical Studies b. Descriptive and Explanatory Studies c. Hypothesis and Correlations Studies d. Longitudinal and Cross-sectional Studies ______30. The deductive approach begin with the a. Collecting data b. Theory and uses research to test the theory. c. Hypothesis d. Observation ______31. The inductive approach begin with a a. Theory b. Data Collection c. Reviewing the Literature d. The Problem State ______32. Quantitative Research deals with a. Words b. Numbers c. Interpretive descriptive d. Use number to analyze underlying meanings and patterns of social relationships. ______33. ________is the study of social life in its natural setting: observing and interviewing people where they live, work, and play. a. The survey b. Secondary analysis c. Field research d. The experiment ______34. ________refers to the process of collecting data while being part of the activities of the group that the researcher is studying a. The experiment b. Survey research c. Participant observation d. Secondary analysis _______35. A/an________is a detailed study of the life and activities of a group of people by researchers who may live with that group over a period of years. a. Correlational study b. ethnography c. experiment d. content analysis _______36. A/an _________is a carefully designed situation in which the researcher studies the impact of certain variables on subjects’ attitudes or behavior. a. case study b. correlational study c. experiment d. Participant observation _______37. In an experiment, the_______contains the subjects who are exposed to an independent variable to study its effect on them. a. Experiment group b. Dependent group c. Control group d. Independent group _______38. In an experiment, the_________contains the subjects who are not exposed to the independent variable. a. Experimental group b. Independent group c. Dependent group d. Control group _______39. ________is the extent to which a study or research instrument accurately measures what it is supposed to measure a. Validity b. Reliability c. Predictability d. Variability ______40. ________is the extent to which a study or research instrument yields consistent results when applied to different individual at one time or to same individuals over time. a. Validity b. Reliability c. Predictability d. Variability TRUE/FALSE ______41. In social science research, individuals are the most typical units of analysis. ______42. With qualitative research, statistics are used to analyze patterns of social relationship. ______43. Reliability is when a study gives consistent results to different research over time.

info@checkyourstudy.com Watch this video and answer the multi choices:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D4lB4SowAQA   … Read More...
Physics Lab 1 Projectile Motion We will use this 2-D “Golf Simulation” to explore combined horizontal and vertical motion (select experiment #7). This simulation provides a fun-filled way to examine 2-D projectile motion with and without air resistance. Before to start the experiment, take a few minutes playing with the simulation. Adjust the initial velocity by adjusting the launch speed and launch angle. See how many adjustments you have to make in order to get a hole-in-one. Turn the air on and off, turn the trails on and off, notice the time, and notice the shape of the curves. Instructions: • Go to http://www.physicslessons.com/exp7b.htm • Set the launch velocity to 60 m/s, trail “on” and “no air”. • Change the launch angle to 15 degree, click the launch button and take note of the horizontal displacement x. Repeat the experiment (changing the angle) and fill the first table (at the left). • Click the “no air” button (so it changes to “air”), repeat the experiments and fill the second table (at the right). Displacement [without air] Displacement [with air] Set launch speed, Vo = 60 m/s Set launch speed, Vo = 60 m/s Angle,  (deg) x (m) Angle,  (deg) H-Dis, x (m) 15 15 25 25 35 35 40 40 43 43 45 45 47 47 50 50 55 55 65 65 75 75 Questions: 1. What angle corresponds to the greatest horizontal range for the “without air” condition? What angle corresponds to the greatest horizontal range for the “with air” condition? Why is there a difference? 2. Describe the difference between the general shape of the trails for the two separate cases. 3. Do you notice any symmetry between high and low angles for either case? Describe the symmetry. 4. When practicing (playing) with the simulation earlier, how many tries did it typically take you to land the ball in the hole?

Physics Lab 1 Projectile Motion We will use this 2-D “Golf Simulation” to explore combined horizontal and vertical motion (select experiment #7). This simulation provides a fun-filled way to examine 2-D projectile motion with and without air resistance. Before to start the experiment, take a few minutes playing with the simulation. Adjust the initial velocity by adjusting the launch speed and launch angle. See how many adjustments you have to make in order to get a hole-in-one. Turn the air on and off, turn the trails on and off, notice the time, and notice the shape of the curves. Instructions: • Go to http://www.physicslessons.com/exp7b.htm • Set the launch velocity to 60 m/s, trail “on” and “no air”. • Change the launch angle to 15 degree, click the launch button and take note of the horizontal displacement x. Repeat the experiment (changing the angle) and fill the first table (at the left). • Click the “no air” button (so it changes to “air”), repeat the experiments and fill the second table (at the right). Displacement [without air] Displacement [with air] Set launch speed, Vo = 60 m/s Set launch speed, Vo = 60 m/s Angle,  (deg) x (m) Angle,  (deg) H-Dis, x (m) 15 15 25 25 35 35 40 40 43 43 45 45 47 47 50 50 55 55 65 65 75 75 Questions: 1. What angle corresponds to the greatest horizontal range for the “without air” condition? What angle corresponds to the greatest horizontal range for the “with air” condition? Why is there a difference? 2. Describe the difference between the general shape of the trails for the two separate cases. 3. Do you notice any symmetry between high and low angles for either case? Describe the symmetry. 4. When practicing (playing) with the simulation earlier, how many tries did it typically take you to land the ball in the hole?

When conducting an experiment the researcher makes “guesses” as to what the correct answer to the question asked will be, prior to conducting the experiment. These guesses are, hypotheses conclusions controls none of the above

When conducting an experiment the researcher makes “guesses” as to what the correct answer to the question asked will be, prior to conducting the experiment. These guesses are, hypotheses conclusions controls none of the above

When conducting an experiment the researcher makes “guesses” as to … Read More...
Faculty of Science Technology and Engineering Department of Physics Senior Laboratory Current balance Objectives When a steady electric current flows perpendicularly across a uniform magnetic field it experiences a force. This experiment aims to investigate this effect, and to determine the direction of the force relative to the current and magnetic field. You will design and perform a series of experiments to show how the magnitude of the force depends upon the current and the length of the conductor that is in the field. Task You are provided with a current balance apparatus (Figure 1), power supply and a magnet. This current balance consists of five loops of conducting wire supported on a pivoted aluminium frame. Current may be made to flow in one or up to five of the loops at a time in either direction. If the end of the loop is situated in a perpendicular magnetic field, when the current is switched on, the magnetic force on the current will unbalance the apparatus. By moving the sliding weights to rebalance it, the magnitude of this magnetic force may be measured. A scale is etched on one arm of the balance, so that the distance moved by the slider can be measured. The circuitry of the balance cannot cope currents greater than 5 Amps, so please do not exceed this level of current. Figure 1: Schematic diagram of current balance apparatus and circuitry. Start by familiarising yourself with the apparatus. Use the two sliding weights to balance the apparatus, then apply a magnetic field to either end of the loop. Pass a current through just one of the conducting loops and observe the direction of the resulting magnetic force, relative to the direction of the current and the applied field. Change the magnitude and direction of the current, observe qualitatively the effect this has on the magnetic force. Having familiarised yourself with the apparatus, you should design and perform a series of quantitative experiments aiming to: (1) determine how the size of the magnetic force is dependant on the size of the current flowing in the conductor. (2) determine how the size of the force is dependant on the length of the conductor which is in the field. (3) measure the value (in Tesla) of the field of the magnet provided. For each of these, the balance should be set up with the magnet positioned at the end of the arm that has the distance scale, and orientated so that the magnetic force will be directed upwards when a current is passed through the conductor. The sliding weight on this arm should be positioned at the zero-mark. The weight on the opposite arm should be adjusted to balance the apparatus in the absence of a current. When a current is applied, you should re-balance the apparatus by moving the weight on the scaled arm outwards, while keeping the opposite weight fixed in position. The distance moved by the weight is directly proportional to the force applied by the magnetic field to the end of the balance. In your report, make sure you discuss why this is the case. Use the position of the sliding weight to quantify the magnetic force as a function of the current applied to the conductor, and of the number of conducting loops through which the current flows. For tasks (1) and (2) you can use the position of the sliding weight as a measure of the force. Look up the relationship that relates the force to the applied field, current and length of conductor in the field. Is this consistent with your data? To complete task (3) you need to determine the magnitude (in Newtons) of the magnetic force from the measurement of the position of the sliding weight. To do this, what other information do you need to know? When you have determined a value for the field, you can measure the field directly using the laboratory’s Gaussmeter for comparison.

Faculty of Science Technology and Engineering Department of Physics Senior Laboratory Current balance Objectives When a steady electric current flows perpendicularly across a uniform magnetic field it experiences a force. This experiment aims to investigate this effect, and to determine the direction of the force relative to the current and magnetic field. You will design and perform a series of experiments to show how the magnitude of the force depends upon the current and the length of the conductor that is in the field. Task You are provided with a current balance apparatus (Figure 1), power supply and a magnet. This current balance consists of five loops of conducting wire supported on a pivoted aluminium frame. Current may be made to flow in one or up to five of the loops at a time in either direction. If the end of the loop is situated in a perpendicular magnetic field, when the current is switched on, the magnetic force on the current will unbalance the apparatus. By moving the sliding weights to rebalance it, the magnitude of this magnetic force may be measured. A scale is etched on one arm of the balance, so that the distance moved by the slider can be measured. The circuitry of the balance cannot cope currents greater than 5 Amps, so please do not exceed this level of current. Figure 1: Schematic diagram of current balance apparatus and circuitry. Start by familiarising yourself with the apparatus. Use the two sliding weights to balance the apparatus, then apply a magnetic field to either end of the loop. Pass a current through just one of the conducting loops and observe the direction of the resulting magnetic force, relative to the direction of the current and the applied field. Change the magnitude and direction of the current, observe qualitatively the effect this has on the magnetic force. Having familiarised yourself with the apparatus, you should design and perform a series of quantitative experiments aiming to: (1) determine how the size of the magnetic force is dependant on the size of the current flowing in the conductor. (2) determine how the size of the force is dependant on the length of the conductor which is in the field. (3) measure the value (in Tesla) of the field of the magnet provided. For each of these, the balance should be set up with the magnet positioned at the end of the arm that has the distance scale, and orientated so that the magnetic force will be directed upwards when a current is passed through the conductor. The sliding weight on this arm should be positioned at the zero-mark. The weight on the opposite arm should be adjusted to balance the apparatus in the absence of a current. When a current is applied, you should re-balance the apparatus by moving the weight on the scaled arm outwards, while keeping the opposite weight fixed in position. The distance moved by the weight is directly proportional to the force applied by the magnetic field to the end of the balance. In your report, make sure you discuss why this is the case. Use the position of the sliding weight to quantify the magnetic force as a function of the current applied to the conductor, and of the number of conducting loops through which the current flows. For tasks (1) and (2) you can use the position of the sliding weight as a measure of the force. Look up the relationship that relates the force to the applied field, current and length of conductor in the field. Is this consistent with your data? To complete task (3) you need to determine the magnitude (in Newtons) of the magnetic force from the measurement of the position of the sliding weight. To do this, what other information do you need to know? When you have determined a value for the field, you can measure the field directly using the laboratory’s Gaussmeter for comparison.

Abstract   The present experiment aims to investigate the effect … Read More...
1. a. Fumarase is an enzyme in the citric acid cycle that catalyzes the conversion of fumarate to L-malate. Given the substrate (fumarate) concentrations and initial velocities shown below, construct a Lineweaver-Burk plot and determine the Vmax and Km values for the fumarase-catalyzed reaction. You may attach the graph to this assignment. Fumarate (mM) Rate (mmol-1min-1) 2.0 2.5 3.3 3.1 5.0 3.6 10.0 4.2 b. Fumarase has a MW of 194,000 and has 4 identical subunits, each with an active site. If the enzyme concentration is 1 x 10-2 M for the experiment in part a, calculate the kcat value for the reaction of fumarase with fumarate. 1. An enzyme which follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics has a Km of 1 µm. The initial velocity is 0.1 µM min-1 at a substrate concentration of 100 µM. What is the initial velocity when the [S] is equal to: (a) 1 mM (b) 1 µM (c) 4 µM Note: Show your work.

1. a. Fumarase is an enzyme in the citric acid cycle that catalyzes the conversion of fumarate to L-malate. Given the substrate (fumarate) concentrations and initial velocities shown below, construct a Lineweaver-Burk plot and determine the Vmax and Km values for the fumarase-catalyzed reaction. You may attach the graph to this assignment. Fumarate (mM) Rate (mmol-1min-1) 2.0 2.5 3.3 3.1 5.0 3.6 10.0 4.2 b. Fumarase has a MW of 194,000 and has 4 identical subunits, each with an active site. If the enzyme concentration is 1 x 10-2 M for the experiment in part a, calculate the kcat value for the reaction of fumarase with fumarate. 1. An enzyme which follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics has a Km of 1 µm. The initial velocity is 0.1 µM min-1 at a substrate concentration of 100 µM. What is the initial velocity when the [S] is equal to: (a) 1 mM (b) 1 µM (c) 4 µM Note: Show your work.

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Tornado Eddy Investigation Abstract The objective of this lab was to write a bunch of jibberish to provide students with a formatting template. Chemical engineering, bioengineering, and environmental engineering are “process engineering” disciplines. Good abstracts contains real content, such as 560 mL/min, 35 deg, and 67 percent yield. Ideal degreed graduates are technically strong, bring broad system perspectives to problem solving, and have the professional “soft skills” to make immediate contributions in the workplace. The senior lab sequence is the “capstone” opportunity to realize this ideal by integrating technical skills and developing professional soft skills to ensure workforce preparedness. The best conclusions are objective and numerical, such as operating conditions of 45 L/min at 32 deg C with expected costs of $4.55/lb. Background Insect exchange processes are often used in bug filtration, as they are effective at removing either positive or negative insects from water. An insect exchange column is a packed or fluidized bed filled with resin beads. Water flows through the column and most of the insects from the water enter the beads, but some of them pass in between the beads, which makes the exchange of insects non-ideal. Insectac 249 resin is a cation exchange resin, as it is being used to attract cationic Ca2+ from the toxic waste stream. This means the resin is negatively charged, and needs to be regenerated with a solution that produces positively charged insects, in this case, salt water which contains Na+ insects. The resin contains acidic styrene backbones which capture the cationic insects in a reversible process. A curve of Ca2+ concentration concentration vs. time was obtained after a standard curve was made to determine how many drops from the low cost barium test kit from Aquarium Pharmaceuticals (API)1 bottle #2 would correspond to a certain concentration in solution. A standard curve works by preparing solutions with known concentrations and testing these concentrations using the kit to create a curve of number of drops from bottle #2 (obtained result) vs. concentration of Ca2+ in solution (desired response). The standard curve can then be used for every test on the prototype and in the field, to quickly and accurately obtain a concentration from the test kit. The barium concentration vs. time curve can be used to calculate the exchange capacity of the resin and, in later tests, the regeneration efficiency. The curves must be used to get the total amount of barium removed from the water, m. Seen in Equation 2, the volumetric flow rate of water, , is multiplied by the integral from tinitial to tfinal of the total concentration of Ca2+ absorbed by the resin as a function of time, C. (2) 1 http://aquariumpharm.com/Products/Product.aspx?ProductID=72 , date accessed: 11/26/10 CBEE 102: ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING AND COMPUTATIONS PROJECT DESCRIPTION 9 Josephine Hornsnogger CBEE 414, Lab Section M 1300–‐1550 April 19, 2010 Oregon State University School of CBEE A graphical trapezoid method was used to evaluate the integral and get the final solution in equivalents of Ca2+ per L, it must be noted that there are 2 equivalents per mole of barium, as the charge of the barium insect is +2. An initial exchange capacity was calculated for the virgin resin, and an adjusted exchange capacity was calculated once the resin was regenerated. The regenerated resin capacity was found by multiplying the virgin resin capacity by the regeneration efficiency, expressed in Equation 3. (3) See Appendix A for the calculation of the exchange capacities and the regeneration efficiency. Materials and Methods Rosalie and Peter Johnson of Corvallis established the Linus Pauling Chair in Chemical Engineering to honor Oregon State University’s most famous graduate. Peter Johnson, former President and owner of Tekmax, Inc., a company which revolutionized battery manufacturing equipment, is a 1955 graduate of the College of Engineering.2 The Chair, also known as the Linus Pauling Distinguished Engineer or Linus Pauling Engineer (LPE), was originally designed to focus on the traditional “capstone” senior lab sequence in the former Department of Chemical Engineering. The focus is now extended to all the process engineering disciplines. The LPE is charged with establishing strong ties with industry, ensuring current and relevant laboratory experiences, and helping upperclass students develop skills in communication, teamwork, project management, and leadership. Include details about lab procedures not sufficiently detailed in the SOP, problems you had, etc. The bulk solution prepared to create the standard curve was used in the second day of testing to obtain the exchange capacity of the insectac 249 resin. The solution was pumped through a bathroom scale into the prototype insect exchange column. 45 mL of resin was rinsed and added to the column. The bed was fluidized as the solution was pumped through the resin, but for the creation of the Ca2+ concentration vs. time curve, the solution was pumped down through the column, as illustrated in the process flow diagram seen in Figure 1. Figure 1. Process sketch of the insect exchange column used for the project. Ref: http://www.generon.co.uk/acatalog/Chromatography.html 2 Harding, P. Viscosity Measurement SOP, Spring, 2010. CBEE 102: ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING AND COMPUTATIONS PROJECT DESCRIPTION 10 Josephine Hornsnogger CBEE 414, Lab Section M 1300–‐1550 April 19, 2010 Oregon State University School of CBEE A bathroom scale calibration curve was created to ensure that the 150 mL/min, used to calculate the breakthrough time, would be delivered to the resin. The bathroom scale used was a Dwyer brand with flowrates between 0 and 300 cc/min of water. Originally, values between 120 and 180 mL/min were chosen for the calibration, with three runs for each flowrate, however the bathroom scale values were so far away from the measure values the range was extended to 100 to 200 mL/min. The regeneration experiment was performed using a method similar to that used in the water softening experiment, however instead of using a 640 ppm Ca2+ solution to fill the resin, a 6000 ppm Na+ solution was used to eject the Ca2+ from the resin. Twelve samples times were chosen and adjusted as the experiment progressed, with more than half of the samples taken at times less than 10 minutes, and the last sample taken at 45 minutes. The bulk exit solution was also tested to determine the regeneration efficiency. Results and Discussion The senior lab sequence has its roots in the former Department of Chemical Engineering. CHE 414 and 415 were taught in Winter and Spring and included 6 hours of lab time per week. The School has endeavored to incorporate the courses into the BIOE and ENVE curriculum, and this will be complete in 2008-2009. Recent development of the senior lab course sequence is shown chronologically in Fig. 1. In 2006-2007, CHE 414 and 415 were moved to Fall and Winter to enable CHE 416, an elective independent senior project course. Also that year, BIOE students took BIOE 414 in the Fall and BIOE 415 was developed and taught. No BIOE students enrolled in the optional CHE. In 2007-2008, the program transitioned in a new Linus Pauling Engineer and ENVE 414 was offered. Also, approximately 30 percent of BIOE students enrolled in the optional CHE 416. Accommodating the academic calendars of the three disciplines required a reduction in weekly student lab time from 6 to 3 hours. The expected relationship between coughing rate, y, and length of canine, x, is Bx z y Fe− (1) where F is a pre-exponential constant, B is vitamin B concentration and z is the height of an average trapeze artist. 3 The 2008-2009 brings the challenge of the dramatic enrollment increase shown in Fig. 1 and the first offering of ENVE 415. The result, shown on the right in Fig. 1, is the delivery of the senior lab sequence uniformly across the process engineering disciplines. CBEE 416 is expected to drawn approximately of the students that take the 415 courses. In 2007-2008, 414 and 415 were required for CHEs, 414 and 415 for BIOEs, and only 414 for ENVEs. CHE 416 is ostensibly an elective for all disciplines. In 2008-2009, 414 and 415 is required for all disciplines and CHE 416 will be an elective. The content of 414 is essentially 3 Fundamentals of Momentum, Heat, and Mass Transfer, Welty, J.R. et al., 4th edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. CBEE 102: ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING AND COMPUTATIONS PROJECT DESCRIPTION 11 Josephine Hornsnogger CBEE 414, Lab Section M 1300–‐1550 April 19, 2010 Oregon State University School of CBEE identical for all three disciplines, 415 has discipline-specific labs, and 416 consists of senior projects with potentially cross-discipline teams of 2 to 4 students. Tremendous labor and struggling with the lab equipment resulted in the data shown in y = –‐0.29x + 1.71 y = –‐0.25x + 2.03 y = –‐0.135x + 2.20 –‐1.5 –‐1.0 –‐0.5 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 0 2 4 6 8 10 ln y (units) x (units) ln y_1 ln y_2 ln y_3 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 Case 1 Case 2 Case 3 Slope (units) (a) (b) Figure 1. (a) Data for y and x plotted for various values of z and (b) a comparison of slopes for the 3 cases investigate. The log plot slope yields the vitamin B concentration. The slopes were shown to be significantly at the 90% confidence level, but the instructor ran out of time and did not include error bars. The slope changed as predicted by the Snirtenhoffer equation. Improvements to the lab might include advice on how to legally change my name to something less embarrassing. My whole life I have been forced to repeat and spell it. I really feel that this has affected my psychologically. This was perhaps the worst lab I have ever done in my academic career, primarily due to the fact that there was no lab time. I simply typed in this entire report and filled it with jibberish. Some might think nobody will notice, but I know that …… Harding reads every word. Acknowledgments The author acknowledges his elementary teacher for providing truly foundational instruction in addition and subtraction. Jenny Burninbalm was instrumental with guidance on use of the RT-345 dog scratching device. CBEE 102: ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING AND COMPUTATIONS PROJECT DESCRIPTION 12

Tornado Eddy Investigation Abstract The objective of this lab was to write a bunch of jibberish to provide students with a formatting template. Chemical engineering, bioengineering, and environmental engineering are “process engineering” disciplines. Good abstracts contains real content, such as 560 mL/min, 35 deg, and 67 percent yield. Ideal degreed graduates are technically strong, bring broad system perspectives to problem solving, and have the professional “soft skills” to make immediate contributions in the workplace. The senior lab sequence is the “capstone” opportunity to realize this ideal by integrating technical skills and developing professional soft skills to ensure workforce preparedness. The best conclusions are objective and numerical, such as operating conditions of 45 L/min at 32 deg C with expected costs of $4.55/lb. Background Insect exchange processes are often used in bug filtration, as they are effective at removing either positive or negative insects from water. An insect exchange column is a packed or fluidized bed filled with resin beads. Water flows through the column and most of the insects from the water enter the beads, but some of them pass in between the beads, which makes the exchange of insects non-ideal. Insectac 249 resin is a cation exchange resin, as it is being used to attract cationic Ca2+ from the toxic waste stream. This means the resin is negatively charged, and needs to be regenerated with a solution that produces positively charged insects, in this case, salt water which contains Na+ insects. The resin contains acidic styrene backbones which capture the cationic insects in a reversible process. A curve of Ca2+ concentration concentration vs. time was obtained after a standard curve was made to determine how many drops from the low cost barium test kit from Aquarium Pharmaceuticals (API)1 bottle #2 would correspond to a certain concentration in solution. A standard curve works by preparing solutions with known concentrations and testing these concentrations using the kit to create a curve of number of drops from bottle #2 (obtained result) vs. concentration of Ca2+ in solution (desired response). The standard curve can then be used for every test on the prototype and in the field, to quickly and accurately obtain a concentration from the test kit. The barium concentration vs. time curve can be used to calculate the exchange capacity of the resin and, in later tests, the regeneration efficiency. The curves must be used to get the total amount of barium removed from the water, m. Seen in Equation 2, the volumetric flow rate of water, , is multiplied by the integral from tinitial to tfinal of the total concentration of Ca2+ absorbed by the resin as a function of time, C. (2) 1 http://aquariumpharm.com/Products/Product.aspx?ProductID=72 , date accessed: 11/26/10 CBEE 102: ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING AND COMPUTATIONS PROJECT DESCRIPTION 9 Josephine Hornsnogger CBEE 414, Lab Section M 1300–‐1550 April 19, 2010 Oregon State University School of CBEE A graphical trapezoid method was used to evaluate the integral and get the final solution in equivalents of Ca2+ per L, it must be noted that there are 2 equivalents per mole of barium, as the charge of the barium insect is +2. An initial exchange capacity was calculated for the virgin resin, and an adjusted exchange capacity was calculated once the resin was regenerated. The regenerated resin capacity was found by multiplying the virgin resin capacity by the regeneration efficiency, expressed in Equation 3. (3) See Appendix A for the calculation of the exchange capacities and the regeneration efficiency. Materials and Methods Rosalie and Peter Johnson of Corvallis established the Linus Pauling Chair in Chemical Engineering to honor Oregon State University’s most famous graduate. Peter Johnson, former President and owner of Tekmax, Inc., a company which revolutionized battery manufacturing equipment, is a 1955 graduate of the College of Engineering.2 The Chair, also known as the Linus Pauling Distinguished Engineer or Linus Pauling Engineer (LPE), was originally designed to focus on the traditional “capstone” senior lab sequence in the former Department of Chemical Engineering. The focus is now extended to all the process engineering disciplines. The LPE is charged with establishing strong ties with industry, ensuring current and relevant laboratory experiences, and helping upperclass students develop skills in communication, teamwork, project management, and leadership. Include details about lab procedures not sufficiently detailed in the SOP, problems you had, etc. The bulk solution prepared to create the standard curve was used in the second day of testing to obtain the exchange capacity of the insectac 249 resin. The solution was pumped through a bathroom scale into the prototype insect exchange column. 45 mL of resin was rinsed and added to the column. The bed was fluidized as the solution was pumped through the resin, but for the creation of the Ca2+ concentration vs. time curve, the solution was pumped down through the column, as illustrated in the process flow diagram seen in Figure 1. Figure 1. Process sketch of the insect exchange column used for the project. Ref: http://www.generon.co.uk/acatalog/Chromatography.html 2 Harding, P. Viscosity Measurement SOP, Spring, 2010. CBEE 102: ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING AND COMPUTATIONS PROJECT DESCRIPTION 10 Josephine Hornsnogger CBEE 414, Lab Section M 1300–‐1550 April 19, 2010 Oregon State University School of CBEE A bathroom scale calibration curve was created to ensure that the 150 mL/min, used to calculate the breakthrough time, would be delivered to the resin. The bathroom scale used was a Dwyer brand with flowrates between 0 and 300 cc/min of water. Originally, values between 120 and 180 mL/min were chosen for the calibration, with three runs for each flowrate, however the bathroom scale values were so far away from the measure values the range was extended to 100 to 200 mL/min. The regeneration experiment was performed using a method similar to that used in the water softening experiment, however instead of using a 640 ppm Ca2+ solution to fill the resin, a 6000 ppm Na+ solution was used to eject the Ca2+ from the resin. Twelve samples times were chosen and adjusted as the experiment progressed, with more than half of the samples taken at times less than 10 minutes, and the last sample taken at 45 minutes. The bulk exit solution was also tested to determine the regeneration efficiency. Results and Discussion The senior lab sequence has its roots in the former Department of Chemical Engineering. CHE 414 and 415 were taught in Winter and Spring and included 6 hours of lab time per week. The School has endeavored to incorporate the courses into the BIOE and ENVE curriculum, and this will be complete in 2008-2009. Recent development of the senior lab course sequence is shown chronologically in Fig. 1. In 2006-2007, CHE 414 and 415 were moved to Fall and Winter to enable CHE 416, an elective independent senior project course. Also that year, BIOE students took BIOE 414 in the Fall and BIOE 415 was developed and taught. No BIOE students enrolled in the optional CHE. In 2007-2008, the program transitioned in a new Linus Pauling Engineer and ENVE 414 was offered. Also, approximately 30 percent of BIOE students enrolled in the optional CHE 416. Accommodating the academic calendars of the three disciplines required a reduction in weekly student lab time from 6 to 3 hours. The expected relationship between coughing rate, y, and length of canine, x, is Bx z y Fe− (1) where F is a pre-exponential constant, B is vitamin B concentration and z is the height of an average trapeze artist. 3 The 2008-2009 brings the challenge of the dramatic enrollment increase shown in Fig. 1 and the first offering of ENVE 415. The result, shown on the right in Fig. 1, is the delivery of the senior lab sequence uniformly across the process engineering disciplines. CBEE 416 is expected to drawn approximately of the students that take the 415 courses. In 2007-2008, 414 and 415 were required for CHEs, 414 and 415 for BIOEs, and only 414 for ENVEs. CHE 416 is ostensibly an elective for all disciplines. In 2008-2009, 414 and 415 is required for all disciplines and CHE 416 will be an elective. The content of 414 is essentially 3 Fundamentals of Momentum, Heat, and Mass Transfer, Welty, J.R. et al., 4th edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. CBEE 102: ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING AND COMPUTATIONS PROJECT DESCRIPTION 11 Josephine Hornsnogger CBEE 414, Lab Section M 1300–‐1550 April 19, 2010 Oregon State University School of CBEE identical for all three disciplines, 415 has discipline-specific labs, and 416 consists of senior projects with potentially cross-discipline teams of 2 to 4 students. Tremendous labor and struggling with the lab equipment resulted in the data shown in y = –‐0.29x + 1.71 y = –‐0.25x + 2.03 y = –‐0.135x + 2.20 –‐1.5 –‐1.0 –‐0.5 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 0 2 4 6 8 10 ln y (units) x (units) ln y_1 ln y_2 ln y_3 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 Case 1 Case 2 Case 3 Slope (units) (a) (b) Figure 1. (a) Data for y and x plotted for various values of z and (b) a comparison of slopes for the 3 cases investigate. The log plot slope yields the vitamin B concentration. The slopes were shown to be significantly at the 90% confidence level, but the instructor ran out of time and did not include error bars. The slope changed as predicted by the Snirtenhoffer equation. Improvements to the lab might include advice on how to legally change my name to something less embarrassing. My whole life I have been forced to repeat and spell it. I really feel that this has affected my psychologically. This was perhaps the worst lab I have ever done in my academic career, primarily due to the fact that there was no lab time. I simply typed in this entire report and filled it with jibberish. Some might think nobody will notice, but I know that …… Harding reads every word. Acknowledgments The author acknowledges his elementary teacher for providing truly foundational instruction in addition and subtraction. Jenny Burninbalm was instrumental with guidance on use of the RT-345 dog scratching device. CBEE 102: ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING AND COMPUTATIONS PROJECT DESCRIPTION 12

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