ECON 101 FALL 2015 EXAM 1 NAME:______________________________ 1. Suppose the price elasticity of demand for cheeseburgers equals 1.37. This means the overall demand for cheeseburgers is: A) price elastic. B) price inelastic. C) price unit-elastic. D) perfectly price inelastic. 2. The price elasticity of demand for skiing lessons in New Hampshire is less than 1.00. This means that the demand is ______ in New Hampshire. A) price elastic B) price inelastic C) price unit-elastic D) perfectly price elastic 3. If the demand for textbooks is price inelastic, which of the following would explain this? A) Many alternative textbooks can be used as substitutes. B) Students have a lot of time to adjust to price changes. C) Textbook purchases consume a large portion of most students’ income. D) The good is a necessity. 4. A major state university in the South recently raised tuition by 12%. An economics professor at this university asked his students, “Due to the increase in tuition, how many of you will transfer to another university?” One student out of about 300 said that he or she would transfer. Based on this information, the price elasticity of demand for education at this university is: (Hint: one out of 300 is how much of a percentage change? Which percentage change is greater – tuition or transfer? Apply the basic formula for elasticity that I put on the board a few times.) A) one. B) highly elastic. C) highly inelastic. D) zero. 5. Suppose the price elasticity of demand for fishing lures equals 1 in South Carolina and 0.63 in Alabama. To increase revenue, fishing lure manufacturers should: (Hint: If the demand for a product is inelastic, the price can go up and you’ll still buy it, since there are no or few substitutes. If the demand for a product is elastic, the price can go up and you’ll probably walk away from it, since substitutes are available. How might this info impact the pricing strategies of firms?) A) lower prices in each state. B) raise prices in each state. C) lower prices in South Carolina and raise prices in Alabama. D) leave prices unchanged in South Carolina and raise prices in Alabama. Read your syllabus and answer questions 6 through 10: 6. T or F: Disruptive classroom behavior includes the following: chatting with fellow students, use of electronic devices such as laptops, tablets, notebooks, and cell phones, reading or studying during class, sleeping, arriving late, departing early, studying for another class, or in any other way disturbing the class. 7. T or F: It’s OK to use my computer in class or play with my phone. There is no penalty attached to these activities and Keiser doesn’t really mind. 8. T or F: It’s OK to show up late for class and disrupt one of Keiser’s swashbuckling lectures. 9. T or F: Attendance is highly optional since it doesn’t impact my final course grade. 10. T or F: I should blow off the career plan/business plan assignment in this course because it’s unimportant to my future and not worth many points. 11. Jacquelyn is a student at a major state university. Which of the following is not an example of an explicit, or direct, cost of her attending college? A) Tuition B) Textbooks C) the salary that she could have earned working full time D) computer lab fees 12. The two principles of tax fairness are: A) the minimize distortions principle and the maximize revenue principle. B) the benefits principle and the ability-to-pay principle. C) the proportional tax principle and the ability-to-pay principle. D) the equity principle and the efficiency principle. 13. The benefits principles says: A) the amount of tax paid depends on the measure of value. B) those who benefit from public spending should bear the burden of the tax that pays for that spending. C) those with greater ability to pay should pay more tax. D) those who benefit from the tax should pay the same percentage of the tax base as those who do not benefit. 14. A tax that rises less than in proportion to income is described as: (Hint: This would have more of a negative impact on lower income earners vs. higher income earners.) A) progressive. B) proportional. C) regressive. D) structural. 15. The U.S. income tax is _______, while the payroll tax is _______. (Hint: Think income tax vs. Social Security tax.) A) progressive; progressive C) regressive; progressive B) progressive; regressive D) regressive; regressive 16. Who is currently leading in the polls to receive the Republican nomination as that party’s presidential candidate? A) Qasem Soleimani B) Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi C) Osama bin Laden D) Donald J. Trump 17. The single most important thing I’ve learned in class this term is: A) stay in frickin’ school B) stay in school and make a plan for life and my career C) the use of cheese for skyscraper construction D) both A and B above 18. Market equilibrium occurs when: A) there is no incentive for prices to change in the market. B) quantity demanded equals quantity supplied. C) the market clears. D) all of the above occur. 19. Excess supply occurs when: (Hint: Draw a supply and demand graph! Think about price ceilings and floors and the graphs of these we discussed in class.) A) the price is above the equilibrium price. B) the quantity demanded exceeds the quantity supplied. C) the price is below the equilibrium price. D) both b and c occur. 20. The single most important thing I’ve learned in class this term is: a. stay in school and look into either a study abroad or internship experience b. stay in school and make a plan for life and my career c. the untimely demise of Cecil the lion in Zimbabwe d. both a. and b. above 21. According to the textbook definition, mainstream microeconomics generally focuses on a. how individual decision-making units, like households and firms, make economic decisions. b. the performance of the national economy and policies to improve this performance. c. the relationship between economic and political institutions. d. the general level of prices in the national economy. 22. Which of the following is the best summary of the three basic economic questions? a. Who? Why? and When? b. What? How? and Who? c. When? Where? and Why? d. What? Where? and Who? 23. Which of the following is not one of the basic economic resources? a. land b. labor c. capital d. cheese e. entrepreneurship 24. The largest country in the Arabian Peninsula and home to the cities of Riyadh, Jeddah, Mecca, and Medina is: a. The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia b. California c. Spain d. Kentucky 25. T or F: The law of demand explains the upward slope of the supply curve. 26. In economics, a “marginal” value refers to: a. the value associated with an important or marginal activity. b. a value entered as an explanatory item in the margin of a balance sheet or other accounts. c. the value associated with one more unit of an activity. d. a value that is most appropriately identified in a footnote. 27. A government mandated price that is below the market equilibrium price is sometimes called. . . (Hint: Draw a graph again and think about what the government is trying to accomplish.) a. a price ceiling. b. a price floor. c. a market clearing price. d. a reservation price. 28. T or F: Entering the US job market without any education or training is crazy and should be avoided. Stay in frickin’ school, baby! 29. The law of demand states that, other things equal: a. as the price increases, the quantity demanded will increase. b. as the price decreases, the demand curve will shift to the right. c. as the price increases, the quantity demanded will decrease. d. none of the above. 30. The law of supply says: a. other things equal, the quantity supplied of a good is inversely related to the price of the good. b. other things equal, the supply of a good creates its own demand. c. other things equal, the quantity supplied of a good is positively related to the price of the good. d. none of the above. 31. A perfectly inelastic demand curve is: a. horizontal. b. downward sloping. c. upward sloping. d. vertical. 32. A trade-off involves weighing costs and benefits. a. true b. false 33. A perfectly elastic demand curve is: a. horizontal. b. downward sloping. c. upward sloping. d. vertical. 34. The second most important thing I’ve learned in class this term is: a. despair is not an option b. Donald J. Trump’s hair is real c. the use of cheese for skyscraper construction d. none of the above 35. T or F: Virtually any news item has important economic dimensions and consequences. 36. T or F: When studying economics, always think in terms of historical context. 37. This popular Asian country is populated by 1.3 billion people, has the world’s second largest economy, and uses a language that’s been in continuous use for nearly 5,000 years: a. Kentucky b. California c. Spain d. China 38. T or F: The top priority in my life right now should be my education and an internship experience. Without these, the job market is going to kick my butt! 39. Which of the following is a key side effect generated by the use of price ceilings? a. black markets b. products with too high of quality c. an excess supply of a good d. too many resources artificially channeled into the production of a good 40. Which of the following is NOT one of the four basic principles for understanding individual choice? a. Resources are scarce. b. The real cost of something is the money that you must pay to get it. c. “How much?” is a decision at the margin. d. People usually take advantage of opportunities to make themselves better off. 41. A hot mixture of pan drippings, flour, and water is commonly known as: a. interest rates and expected future real GDP. b. interest rates and current real GDP. c. inflation and expected future real GDP. d. gravy. 42. The example we used in class when discussing the inefficiency of quantity quotas was: a. Uber b. General Electric c. AT&T d. the KSU marching band 43. The term we learned in class signifying a key method of non-price competition is: a. excess supply chain management b. arbitrage c. swashbuckling d. product differentiation 44. When discussing market failure and the role of regulation in class, which company/product did we use as an example? a. Pabst Blue Ribbon b. JetBlue c. Blue Bell d. Blue Apron 45. Governments may place relatively high sales taxes on goods such as alcohol and tobacco because: a. such taxes are a significant source of revenue b. such goods exhibit inelastic demand c. such taxes may discourage use of these products d. all of the above 46. When discussing the cost of higher education in class, which country did we cite as an example of one that offers free college for qualifying students? a. USSR b. Rhodesia c. Czechoslovakia d. Germany 47. Which of the following is not an example of market failure we discussed in class? a. externalities b. public goods c. fungible goods d. common pool resources e. equity 48. T or F: As we discussed in class, the real reason why the US has lost jobs to China is the “most favored nation” (MFN) trading status granted to China by the US back in the 1980s. 49. The dude we talked about in class who coined the expression “invisible hand” and promoted self-interest and competition in his famous book “The Wealth of Nations” is: a. Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi b. Ali Khamenei c. Donald J. Trump d. Adam Smith 50. When studying for your final exams and attempting to allocate your limited time among several subjects in order to maximize your course grades (recall, we talked about this example during the first week of class), you’re almost unconsciously engaging in a form of: a. fraud b. miscellaneous serendipity b. mitosis d. marginal analysis

ECON 101 FALL 2015 EXAM 1 NAME:______________________________ 1. Suppose the price elasticity of demand for cheeseburgers equals 1.37. This means the overall demand for cheeseburgers is: A) price elastic. B) price inelastic. C) price unit-elastic. D) perfectly price inelastic. 2. The price elasticity of demand for skiing lessons in New Hampshire is less than 1.00. This means that the demand is ______ in New Hampshire. A) price elastic B) price inelastic C) price unit-elastic D) perfectly price elastic 3. If the demand for textbooks is price inelastic, which of the following would explain this? A) Many alternative textbooks can be used as substitutes. B) Students have a lot of time to adjust to price changes. C) Textbook purchases consume a large portion of most students’ income. D) The good is a necessity. 4. A major state university in the South recently raised tuition by 12%. An economics professor at this university asked his students, “Due to the increase in tuition, how many of you will transfer to another university?” One student out of about 300 said that he or she would transfer. Based on this information, the price elasticity of demand for education at this university is: (Hint: one out of 300 is how much of a percentage change? Which percentage change is greater – tuition or transfer? Apply the basic formula for elasticity that I put on the board a few times.) A) one. B) highly elastic. C) highly inelastic. D) zero. 5. Suppose the price elasticity of demand for fishing lures equals 1 in South Carolina and 0.63 in Alabama. To increase revenue, fishing lure manufacturers should: (Hint: If the demand for a product is inelastic, the price can go up and you’ll still buy it, since there are no or few substitutes. If the demand for a product is elastic, the price can go up and you’ll probably walk away from it, since substitutes are available. How might this info impact the pricing strategies of firms?) A) lower prices in each state. B) raise prices in each state. C) lower prices in South Carolina and raise prices in Alabama. D) leave prices unchanged in South Carolina and raise prices in Alabama. Read your syllabus and answer questions 6 through 10: 6. T or F: Disruptive classroom behavior includes the following: chatting with fellow students, use of electronic devices such as laptops, tablets, notebooks, and cell phones, reading or studying during class, sleeping, arriving late, departing early, studying for another class, or in any other way disturbing the class. 7. T or F: It’s OK to use my computer in class or play with my phone. There is no penalty attached to these activities and Keiser doesn’t really mind. 8. T or F: It’s OK to show up late for class and disrupt one of Keiser’s swashbuckling lectures. 9. T or F: Attendance is highly optional since it doesn’t impact my final course grade. 10. T or F: I should blow off the career plan/business plan assignment in this course because it’s unimportant to my future and not worth many points. 11. Jacquelyn is a student at a major state university. Which of the following is not an example of an explicit, or direct, cost of her attending college? A) Tuition B) Textbooks C) the salary that she could have earned working full time D) computer lab fees 12. The two principles of tax fairness are: A) the minimize distortions principle and the maximize revenue principle. B) the benefits principle and the ability-to-pay principle. C) the proportional tax principle and the ability-to-pay principle. D) the equity principle and the efficiency principle. 13. The benefits principles says: A) the amount of tax paid depends on the measure of value. B) those who benefit from public spending should bear the burden of the tax that pays for that spending. C) those with greater ability to pay should pay more tax. D) those who benefit from the tax should pay the same percentage of the tax base as those who do not benefit. 14. A tax that rises less than in proportion to income is described as: (Hint: This would have more of a negative impact on lower income earners vs. higher income earners.) A) progressive. B) proportional. C) regressive. D) structural. 15. The U.S. income tax is _______, while the payroll tax is _______. (Hint: Think income tax vs. Social Security tax.) A) progressive; progressive C) regressive; progressive B) progressive; regressive D) regressive; regressive 16. Who is currently leading in the polls to receive the Republican nomination as that party’s presidential candidate? A) Qasem Soleimani B) Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi C) Osama bin Laden D) Donald J. Trump 17. The single most important thing I’ve learned in class this term is: A) stay in frickin’ school B) stay in school and make a plan for life and my career C) the use of cheese for skyscraper construction D) both A and B above 18. Market equilibrium occurs when: A) there is no incentive for prices to change in the market. B) quantity demanded equals quantity supplied. C) the market clears. D) all of the above occur. 19. Excess supply occurs when: (Hint: Draw a supply and demand graph! Think about price ceilings and floors and the graphs of these we discussed in class.) A) the price is above the equilibrium price. B) the quantity demanded exceeds the quantity supplied. C) the price is below the equilibrium price. D) both b and c occur. 20. The single most important thing I’ve learned in class this term is: a. stay in school and look into either a study abroad or internship experience b. stay in school and make a plan for life and my career c. the untimely demise of Cecil the lion in Zimbabwe d. both a. and b. above 21. According to the textbook definition, mainstream microeconomics generally focuses on a. how individual decision-making units, like households and firms, make economic decisions. b. the performance of the national economy and policies to improve this performance. c. the relationship between economic and political institutions. d. the general level of prices in the national economy. 22. Which of the following is the best summary of the three basic economic questions? a. Who? Why? and When? b. What? How? and Who? c. When? Where? and Why? d. What? Where? and Who? 23. Which of the following is not one of the basic economic resources? a. land b. labor c. capital d. cheese e. entrepreneurship 24. The largest country in the Arabian Peninsula and home to the cities of Riyadh, Jeddah, Mecca, and Medina is: a. The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia b. California c. Spain d. Kentucky 25. T or F: The law of demand explains the upward slope of the supply curve. 26. In economics, a “marginal” value refers to: a. the value associated with an important or marginal activity. b. a value entered as an explanatory item in the margin of a balance sheet or other accounts. c. the value associated with one more unit of an activity. d. a value that is most appropriately identified in a footnote. 27. A government mandated price that is below the market equilibrium price is sometimes called. . . (Hint: Draw a graph again and think about what the government is trying to accomplish.) a. a price ceiling. b. a price floor. c. a market clearing price. d. a reservation price. 28. T or F: Entering the US job market without any education or training is crazy and should be avoided. Stay in frickin’ school, baby! 29. The law of demand states that, other things equal: a. as the price increases, the quantity demanded will increase. b. as the price decreases, the demand curve will shift to the right. c. as the price increases, the quantity demanded will decrease. d. none of the above. 30. The law of supply says: a. other things equal, the quantity supplied of a good is inversely related to the price of the good. b. other things equal, the supply of a good creates its own demand. c. other things equal, the quantity supplied of a good is positively related to the price of the good. d. none of the above. 31. A perfectly inelastic demand curve is: a. horizontal. b. downward sloping. c. upward sloping. d. vertical. 32. A trade-off involves weighing costs and benefits. a. true b. false 33. A perfectly elastic demand curve is: a. horizontal. b. downward sloping. c. upward sloping. d. vertical. 34. The second most important thing I’ve learned in class this term is: a. despair is not an option b. Donald J. Trump’s hair is real c. the use of cheese for skyscraper construction d. none of the above 35. T or F: Virtually any news item has important economic dimensions and consequences. 36. T or F: When studying economics, always think in terms of historical context. 37. This popular Asian country is populated by 1.3 billion people, has the world’s second largest economy, and uses a language that’s been in continuous use for nearly 5,000 years: a. Kentucky b. California c. Spain d. China 38. T or F: The top priority in my life right now should be my education and an internship experience. Without these, the job market is going to kick my butt! 39. Which of the following is a key side effect generated by the use of price ceilings? a. black markets b. products with too high of quality c. an excess supply of a good d. too many resources artificially channeled into the production of a good 40. Which of the following is NOT one of the four basic principles for understanding individual choice? a. Resources are scarce. b. The real cost of something is the money that you must pay to get it. c. “How much?” is a decision at the margin. d. People usually take advantage of opportunities to make themselves better off. 41. A hot mixture of pan drippings, flour, and water is commonly known as: a. interest rates and expected future real GDP. b. interest rates and current real GDP. c. inflation and expected future real GDP. d. gravy. 42. The example we used in class when discussing the inefficiency of quantity quotas was: a. Uber b. General Electric c. AT&T d. the KSU marching band 43. The term we learned in class signifying a key method of non-price competition is: a. excess supply chain management b. arbitrage c. swashbuckling d. product differentiation 44. When discussing market failure and the role of regulation in class, which company/product did we use as an example? a. Pabst Blue Ribbon b. JetBlue c. Blue Bell d. Blue Apron 45. Governments may place relatively high sales taxes on goods such as alcohol and tobacco because: a. such taxes are a significant source of revenue b. such goods exhibit inelastic demand c. such taxes may discourage use of these products d. all of the above 46. When discussing the cost of higher education in class, which country did we cite as an example of one that offers free college for qualifying students? a. USSR b. Rhodesia c. Czechoslovakia d. Germany 47. Which of the following is not an example of market failure we discussed in class? a. externalities b. public goods c. fungible goods d. common pool resources e. equity 48. T or F: As we discussed in class, the real reason why the US has lost jobs to China is the “most favored nation” (MFN) trading status granted to China by the US back in the 1980s. 49. The dude we talked about in class who coined the expression “invisible hand” and promoted self-interest and competition in his famous book “The Wealth of Nations” is: a. Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi b. Ali Khamenei c. Donald J. Trump d. Adam Smith 50. When studying for your final exams and attempting to allocate your limited time among several subjects in order to maximize your course grades (recall, we talked about this example during the first week of class), you’re almost unconsciously engaging in a form of: a. fraud b. miscellaneous serendipity b. mitosis d. marginal analysis

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Learning Objectives This part begins with what are probably the basic questions for a designer of a computing sytem’s human interface: • How should the functionality of the system be described and presented to the user? • How can the design of the interface help the user to understand and successfully use the system? Learning Goals At the conclusion of this module you will be able to: • define the user’s movement among the displays that make up the system; • the addition of visual and spatial cues to the information organization; and • methods of structuring and presenting the interface. Introduction This module deals with the development and utilization of a system. We all have systems for doing things. For instance, we may have a system for handling routine situations around the house that makes sense only to us. Or, we may be oriented toward systems that have a more widespread understanding such as personal finance or how to fill out our IRS forms. When humans use a system, whether natural or man-made, they do so based on their understanding of that system. A totally accurate understanding of a system is not a necessary condition for effective use of that system. Key Terms Systems, User Model, Model, Metaphor, Concept Modeling The Development of Human Systems I. The organization of knowledge about a phenomenon or system constitutes the human’s conceptual model of that system. Information gained from experience with a system contributes to the model, and the model in turn provides a reference or guide for future experience with the system. A. (Reinstein and Hersh, 1984) – a set of concepts a person gradually acquires to explain the behavior of a system. …. That enables that person to understand and interact with the system. 1. For the user, the important thing about a model is its ability to predict: when confronted with unfamiliar or incompletely understood situations, the user relies on their model, their conceptual understanding of the system, to make educated guesses about how to proceed. If the user’s model accurately reflects the effects of the system, then he will be more successful in learning and using the system, and likely will perceive the system as easy to use. 2. Because the model can server this important role in design of helping to create an understandable and predictable system, the creation of the user’s conceptual model should be the first task of system development. One of the more important examples of the use of conceptual model, the XEROX Star office automation system (whose design greatly influenced Apple’s Lisa and Macintosh systems), started with thirty man-years of design work on the user interface before either the hardware or the system software was designed (Smith, Irby, Kimball, Verplank and Harselm, 1982). 3. The conceptual model does not have to be an accurate representation of how the system actually functions. Indeed, it can be quite different from reality, and in most if not all circumstances for systems as complex as computers, should be. 4. The model may be a myth or metaphor, that explains the system: it “suggests that the computer is like something with which the user is already familiar” (Rubinstein and Hersh, 1984, p. 43), or provides a simple explanation of the system which can be used to predict the system’s behavior. 5. ….the conceptual models people form are based on their interactions with an environment … “people who have different roles within an environment … will form different conceptual systems of those environments. 6. People whose essential interaction with an environment is to create it will almost inevitably have an understanding and conceptualization of it which is different from those whose major interaction with it is to use it” Action Assignment Based on the readings for this module, please identify a personal “system” with which you act and perform within. This should be from personal experience and one that assists in providing a model for organization, understanding and problem solving.

Learning Objectives This part begins with what are probably the basic questions for a designer of a computing sytem’s human interface: • How should the functionality of the system be described and presented to the user? • How can the design of the interface help the user to understand and successfully use the system? Learning Goals At the conclusion of this module you will be able to: • define the user’s movement among the displays that make up the system; • the addition of visual and spatial cues to the information organization; and • methods of structuring and presenting the interface. Introduction This module deals with the development and utilization of a system. We all have systems for doing things. For instance, we may have a system for handling routine situations around the house that makes sense only to us. Or, we may be oriented toward systems that have a more widespread understanding such as personal finance or how to fill out our IRS forms. When humans use a system, whether natural or man-made, they do so based on their understanding of that system. A totally accurate understanding of a system is not a necessary condition for effective use of that system. Key Terms Systems, User Model, Model, Metaphor, Concept Modeling The Development of Human Systems I. The organization of knowledge about a phenomenon or system constitutes the human’s conceptual model of that system. Information gained from experience with a system contributes to the model, and the model in turn provides a reference or guide for future experience with the system. A. (Reinstein and Hersh, 1984) – a set of concepts a person gradually acquires to explain the behavior of a system. …. That enables that person to understand and interact with the system. 1. For the user, the important thing about a model is its ability to predict: when confronted with unfamiliar or incompletely understood situations, the user relies on their model, their conceptual understanding of the system, to make educated guesses about how to proceed. If the user’s model accurately reflects the effects of the system, then he will be more successful in learning and using the system, and likely will perceive the system as easy to use. 2. Because the model can server this important role in design of helping to create an understandable and predictable system, the creation of the user’s conceptual model should be the first task of system development. One of the more important examples of the use of conceptual model, the XEROX Star office automation system (whose design greatly influenced Apple’s Lisa and Macintosh systems), started with thirty man-years of design work on the user interface before either the hardware or the system software was designed (Smith, Irby, Kimball, Verplank and Harselm, 1982). 3. The conceptual model does not have to be an accurate representation of how the system actually functions. Indeed, it can be quite different from reality, and in most if not all circumstances for systems as complex as computers, should be. 4. The model may be a myth or metaphor, that explains the system: it “suggests that the computer is like something with which the user is already familiar” (Rubinstein and Hersh, 1984, p. 43), or provides a simple explanation of the system which can be used to predict the system’s behavior. 5. ….the conceptual models people form are based on their interactions with an environment … “people who have different roles within an environment … will form different conceptual systems of those environments. 6. People whose essential interaction with an environment is to create it will almost inevitably have an understanding and conceptualization of it which is different from those whose major interaction with it is to use it” Action Assignment Based on the readings for this module, please identify a personal “system” with which you act and perform within. This should be from personal experience and one that assists in providing a model for organization, understanding and problem solving.

Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture Spring 2015 Look through popular magazines, and see if you can find advertisements that objectify women in order to sell a product. Alternately, you may use an advertisement on television (but make sure to provide a link to the ad so I can see it!). Study these images then write a paper about objectification that deals with all or some of the following: • What effect(s), if any, do you think the objectification of women’s bodies has on our culture? • Jean Kilbourne states “turning a human being into a thing is almost always the first step toward justifying violence against that person.” What do you think she means by this? Do you agree with her reasoning? Why or why not? • Some people would argue that depicting a woman’s body as an object is a form of art. What is your opinion of this point of view? Explain your reasoning. • Why do you think that women are objectified more often than men are? • How does sexualization and objectification play out differently across racial lines? • Kilbourne explains that the consequences of being objectified are different – and more serious – for women than for men. Do you agree? How is the world different for women than it is for men? How do objectified images of women interact with those in our culture differently from the way images of men do? Why is it important to look at images in the context of the culture? • What is the difference between sexual objectification and sexual subjectification? (Ros Gill ) • How do ads construct violent white masculinity and how does that vision of masculinity hurt both men and women? Throughout your written analysis, be sure to make clear and specific reference to the images you selected, and please submit these images with your paper. Make sure you engage with and reference to at least 4 of the following authors: Kilbourne, Bordo, Hunter & Soto, Rose, Durham, Gill, Katz, Schuchardt, Ono and Buescher. Guidelines:  Keep your content focused on structural, systemic, institutional factors rather than the individual: BE ANALYTICAL NOT ANECDOTAL.  Avoid using the first person or including personal stories/reactions. You must make sure to actively engage with your readings: these essays need to be informed and framed by the theoretical material you have been reading this semester.  Keep within the 4-6 page limit; use 12-point font, double spacing and 1-inch margins.  Use formal writing conventions (introduction/thesis statement, body, conclusion) and correct grammar. Resources may be cited within the text of your paper, i.e. (Walters, 2013).

Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture Spring 2015 Look through popular magazines, and see if you can find advertisements that objectify women in order to sell a product. Alternately, you may use an advertisement on television (but make sure to provide a link to the ad so I can see it!). Study these images then write a paper about objectification that deals with all or some of the following: • What effect(s), if any, do you think the objectification of women’s bodies has on our culture? • Jean Kilbourne states “turning a human being into a thing is almost always the first step toward justifying violence against that person.” What do you think she means by this? Do you agree with her reasoning? Why or why not? • Some people would argue that depicting a woman’s body as an object is a form of art. What is your opinion of this point of view? Explain your reasoning. • Why do you think that women are objectified more often than men are? • How does sexualization and objectification play out differently across racial lines? • Kilbourne explains that the consequences of being objectified are different – and more serious – for women than for men. Do you agree? How is the world different for women than it is for men? How do objectified images of women interact with those in our culture differently from the way images of men do? Why is it important to look at images in the context of the culture? • What is the difference between sexual objectification and sexual subjectification? (Ros Gill ) • How do ads construct violent white masculinity and how does that vision of masculinity hurt both men and women? Throughout your written analysis, be sure to make clear and specific reference to the images you selected, and please submit these images with your paper. Make sure you engage with and reference to at least 4 of the following authors: Kilbourne, Bordo, Hunter & Soto, Rose, Durham, Gill, Katz, Schuchardt, Ono and Buescher. Guidelines:  Keep your content focused on structural, systemic, institutional factors rather than the individual: BE ANALYTICAL NOT ANECDOTAL.  Avoid using the first person or including personal stories/reactions. You must make sure to actively engage with your readings: these essays need to be informed and framed by the theoretical material you have been reading this semester.  Keep within the 4-6 page limit; use 12-point font, double spacing and 1-inch margins.  Use formal writing conventions (introduction/thesis statement, body, conclusion) and correct grammar. Resources may be cited within the text of your paper, i.e. (Walters, 2013).

The objectification of women has been a very controversial topic … Read More...
Engineering Risk Management Special topic: Beer Game Copyright Old Dominion University, 2017 All rights reserved Revised Class Schedule Lac-Megantic Case Study Part 1: Timeline of events Part 2: Timeline + causal chain of events Part 3: Instructions Evaluate your causal-chain (network) Which are the root causes? Which events have the most causes? What are the relationship of the causes? Which causes have the most influence? Part 4: Instructions Consider these recommendations from TSB Which nodes in your causal chain will be addressed by which of these recommendations? Recap How would you summarize the steps in conducting post-event analysis of an accident? Beer Game Case Study The beer game was developed at MIT in the 1960s. It is an experiential learning business simulation game created by a group of professors at MIT Sloan School of Management in early 1960s to demonstrate a number of key principles of supply chain management. The game is played by teams of four players, often in heated competition, and takes at least one hour to complete.  Beer Game Case Study Beer Game Case Study A truck driver delivers beer once each week to the retailer. Then the retailer places an order with the trucker who returns the order to the wholesaler. There’s a four week lag between ordering and receiving the beer. The retailer and wholesaler do not communicate directly. The retailer sells hundreds of products and the wholesaler distributes many products to a large number of customers. Beer Game Case Study The Retailer Week 1: Lover’s Beer is not very popular but the retailer sells four cases per week on average. Because the lead time is four weeks, the retailer attempts to keep twelve cases in the store by ordering four cases each Monday when the trucker makes a delivery. Week 2: The retailer’s sales of Lover’s beer doubles to eight cases, so on Monday, he orders 8 cases. Week 3: The retailer sells 8 cases. The trucker delivers four cases. To be safe, the retailer decides to order 12 cases of Lover’s beer. Week 4: The retailer learns from some of his younger customers that a music video appearing on TV shows a group singing “I’ll take on last sip of Lover’s beer and run into the sun.” The retailer assumes that this explains the increased demand for the product. The trucker delivers 5 cases. The retailer is nearly sold out, so he orders 16 cases. Beer Game Case Study The Retailer Week 5: The retailer sells the last case, but receives 7 cases. All 7 cases are sold by the end of the week. So again on Monday the retailer orders 16 cases. Week 6: Customers are looking for Lover’s beer. Some put their names on a list to be called when the beer comes in. The trucker delivers only 6 cases and all are sold by the weekend. The retailer orders another 16 cases. Week 7: The trucker delivers 7 cases. The retailer is frustrated, but orders another 16 cases. Week 8: The trucker delivers 5 cases and tells the retailer the beer is backlogged. The retailer is really getting irritated with the wholesaler, but orders 24 cases. Beer Game Case Study The Wholesaler The wholesaler distributes many brands of beer to a large number of retailers, but he is the only distributor of Lover’s beer. The wholesaler orders 4 truckloads from the brewery truck driver each week and receives the beer after a 4 week lag. The wholesaler’s policy is to keep 12 truckloads in inventory on a continuous basis. Week 6: By week 6 the wholesaler is out of Lover’s beer and responds by ordering 30 truckloads from the brewery. Week 8: By the 8th week most stores are ordering 3 or 4 times more Lovers’ beer than their regular amounts. Week 9: The wholesaler orders more Lover’s beer, but gets only 6 truckloads. Week 10: Only 8 truckloads are delivered, so the wholesaler orders 40. Week 11: Only 12 truckloads are received, and there are 77 truckloads in backlog, so the wholesaler orders 40 more truckloads. Beer Game Case Study The Wholesaler Week 12: The wholesaler orders 60 more truckloads of Lover’s beer. It appears that the beer is becoming more popular from week to week. Week 13: There is still a huge backlog. Weeks 14-15: The wholesaler receives larger shipments from the brewery, but orders from retailers begin to drop off. Week 16: The trucker delivers 55 truckloads from the brewery, but the wholesaler gets zero orders from retailers. So he stops ordering from the brewery. Week 17: The wholesaler receives another 60 truckloads. Retailers order zero. The wholesaler orders zero. The brewery keeps sending beer. Beer Game Case Study The Brewery The brewery is small but has a reputation for producing high quality beer. Lover’s beer is only one of several products produced at the brewery. Week 6: New orders come in for 40 gross. It takes two weeks to brew the beer. Week 14: Orders continue to come in and the brewery has not been able to catch up on the backlogged orders. The marketing manager begins to wonder how much bonus he will get for increasing sales so dramatically. Week 16: The brewery catches up on the backlog, but orders begin to drop off. Week 18: By week 18 there are no new orders for Lover’s beer. Week 19: The brewery has 100 gross of Lover’s beer in stock, but no orders. So the brewery stops producing Lover’s beer. Weeks 20-23. No orders. Beer Game Case Study At this point all the players blame each other for the excess inventory. Conversations with wholesale and retailer reveal an inventory of 93 cases at the retailer and 220 truckloads at the wholesaler. The marketing manager figures it will take the wholesaler a year to sell the Lover’s beer he has in stock. The retailers must be the problem. The retailer explains that demand increased from 4 cases per week to 8 cases. The wholesaler and marketing manager think demand mushroomed after that, and then fell off, but the retailer explains that didn’t happen. Demand stayed at 8 cases per week. Since he didn’t get the beer he ordered, he kept ordering more in an attempt to keep up with the demand. The marketing manager plans his resignation. Homework 4 Read the case and answer 1+6 questions. 0th What should go right? 1st What can go wrong? 2nd What are the causes and consequences? 3rd What is the likelihood of occurrence? 4rd What can be done to detect, control, and manage them? 5th What are the alternatives? 6th What are the effects beyond this particular time? Homework 4 In 500 words or less, summarize lessons learned in this beer game as it relates to supply chain risk management. Apply one of the tools (CCA, HAZOP, FMEA, etc.) to the case. Work individually and submit before Monday midnight (Feb. 20th). No class on Monday (Feb. 20th).

Engineering Risk Management Special topic: Beer Game Copyright Old Dominion University, 2017 All rights reserved Revised Class Schedule Lac-Megantic Case Study Part 1: Timeline of events Part 2: Timeline + causal chain of events Part 3: Instructions Evaluate your causal-chain (network) Which are the root causes? Which events have the most causes? What are the relationship of the causes? Which causes have the most influence? Part 4: Instructions Consider these recommendations from TSB Which nodes in your causal chain will be addressed by which of these recommendations? Recap How would you summarize the steps in conducting post-event analysis of an accident? Beer Game Case Study The beer game was developed at MIT in the 1960s. It is an experiential learning business simulation game created by a group of professors at MIT Sloan School of Management in early 1960s to demonstrate a number of key principles of supply chain management. The game is played by teams of four players, often in heated competition, and takes at least one hour to complete.  Beer Game Case Study Beer Game Case Study A truck driver delivers beer once each week to the retailer. Then the retailer places an order with the trucker who returns the order to the wholesaler. There’s a four week lag between ordering and receiving the beer. The retailer and wholesaler do not communicate directly. The retailer sells hundreds of products and the wholesaler distributes many products to a large number of customers. Beer Game Case Study The Retailer Week 1: Lover’s Beer is not very popular but the retailer sells four cases per week on average. Because the lead time is four weeks, the retailer attempts to keep twelve cases in the store by ordering four cases each Monday when the trucker makes a delivery. Week 2: The retailer’s sales of Lover’s beer doubles to eight cases, so on Monday, he orders 8 cases. Week 3: The retailer sells 8 cases. The trucker delivers four cases. To be safe, the retailer decides to order 12 cases of Lover’s beer. Week 4: The retailer learns from some of his younger customers that a music video appearing on TV shows a group singing “I’ll take on last sip of Lover’s beer and run into the sun.” The retailer assumes that this explains the increased demand for the product. The trucker delivers 5 cases. The retailer is nearly sold out, so he orders 16 cases. Beer Game Case Study The Retailer Week 5: The retailer sells the last case, but receives 7 cases. All 7 cases are sold by the end of the week. So again on Monday the retailer orders 16 cases. Week 6: Customers are looking for Lover’s beer. Some put their names on a list to be called when the beer comes in. The trucker delivers only 6 cases and all are sold by the weekend. The retailer orders another 16 cases. Week 7: The trucker delivers 7 cases. The retailer is frustrated, but orders another 16 cases. Week 8: The trucker delivers 5 cases and tells the retailer the beer is backlogged. The retailer is really getting irritated with the wholesaler, but orders 24 cases. Beer Game Case Study The Wholesaler The wholesaler distributes many brands of beer to a large number of retailers, but he is the only distributor of Lover’s beer. The wholesaler orders 4 truckloads from the brewery truck driver each week and receives the beer after a 4 week lag. The wholesaler’s policy is to keep 12 truckloads in inventory on a continuous basis. Week 6: By week 6 the wholesaler is out of Lover’s beer and responds by ordering 30 truckloads from the brewery. Week 8: By the 8th week most stores are ordering 3 or 4 times more Lovers’ beer than their regular amounts. Week 9: The wholesaler orders more Lover’s beer, but gets only 6 truckloads. Week 10: Only 8 truckloads are delivered, so the wholesaler orders 40. Week 11: Only 12 truckloads are received, and there are 77 truckloads in backlog, so the wholesaler orders 40 more truckloads. Beer Game Case Study The Wholesaler Week 12: The wholesaler orders 60 more truckloads of Lover’s beer. It appears that the beer is becoming more popular from week to week. Week 13: There is still a huge backlog. Weeks 14-15: The wholesaler receives larger shipments from the brewery, but orders from retailers begin to drop off. Week 16: The trucker delivers 55 truckloads from the brewery, but the wholesaler gets zero orders from retailers. So he stops ordering from the brewery. Week 17: The wholesaler receives another 60 truckloads. Retailers order zero. The wholesaler orders zero. The brewery keeps sending beer. Beer Game Case Study The Brewery The brewery is small but has a reputation for producing high quality beer. Lover’s beer is only one of several products produced at the brewery. Week 6: New orders come in for 40 gross. It takes two weeks to brew the beer. Week 14: Orders continue to come in and the brewery has not been able to catch up on the backlogged orders. The marketing manager begins to wonder how much bonus he will get for increasing sales so dramatically. Week 16: The brewery catches up on the backlog, but orders begin to drop off. Week 18: By week 18 there are no new orders for Lover’s beer. Week 19: The brewery has 100 gross of Lover’s beer in stock, but no orders. So the brewery stops producing Lover’s beer. Weeks 20-23. No orders. Beer Game Case Study At this point all the players blame each other for the excess inventory. Conversations with wholesale and retailer reveal an inventory of 93 cases at the retailer and 220 truckloads at the wholesaler. The marketing manager figures it will take the wholesaler a year to sell the Lover’s beer he has in stock. The retailers must be the problem. The retailer explains that demand increased from 4 cases per week to 8 cases. The wholesaler and marketing manager think demand mushroomed after that, and then fell off, but the retailer explains that didn’t happen. Demand stayed at 8 cases per week. Since he didn’t get the beer he ordered, he kept ordering more in an attempt to keep up with the demand. The marketing manager plans his resignation. Homework 4 Read the case and answer 1+6 questions. 0th What should go right? 1st What can go wrong? 2nd What are the causes and consequences? 3rd What is the likelihood of occurrence? 4rd What can be done to detect, control, and manage them? 5th What are the alternatives? 6th What are the effects beyond this particular time? Homework 4 In 500 words or less, summarize lessons learned in this beer game as it relates to supply chain risk management. Apply one of the tools (CCA, HAZOP, FMEA, etc.) to the case. Work individually and submit before Monday midnight (Feb. 20th). No class on Monday (Feb. 20th).

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here is the video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=760lwYmpXbc In his Prison Experiment, Professor Philip Zimbardo wanted to test the behavior of good people when they are put into evil places. In the short amount of time that his experiment ran, hid findings were shocking. The students who played the role of the guards became sadistic, and the students that who played the role of the prisoners became extremely stressed. McLaren explained to us that since the beginning of time, all humans have had an appetite for violence. McLaren also explains that in a world where violence is also a means of entertainment, it only adds to our appetite for violence. Think about how the information that McLaren shares and how it relates to the Stanford Prison Experiment. McLaren shares with us that name calling is the beginning stage of dehumanizing, and when one succeeds in name calling, we decide to extend our powers and become violent and uncaring. McLaren also uses many examples of the world’s history, specifically regarding religion and war. McLaren explains that the mentality of everyone that goes into war believes that their enemy deserves everything that they get. Compare McLaren’s findings with The Stanford Prison Experiment. Zimbardo concluded that his students (the good people) were defeated by the prison (the evil place). Can you think of a story or a situation where the good person overcame the evil place? Can one’s attitude and/or morality be so strong that it can allow you to overcome anything? The manner in which, the guard “John Wayne”, treated the prisoners was very controversial. Years later he admitted himself that he does regret his behavior, but could it be possible that he wasn’t acting? Is it true what prisoner 416 said? Can someone contribute to a role so much that it starts to show who you really are as a person? If we were put in the shoes of “John Wayne” would we have behaved the same? Are ethics totally thrown out the window when given that position of power?

here is the video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=760lwYmpXbc In his Prison Experiment, Professor Philip Zimbardo wanted to test the behavior of good people when they are put into evil places. In the short amount of time that his experiment ran, hid findings were shocking. The students who played the role of the guards became sadistic, and the students that who played the role of the prisoners became extremely stressed. McLaren explained to us that since the beginning of time, all humans have had an appetite for violence. McLaren also explains that in a world where violence is also a means of entertainment, it only adds to our appetite for violence. Think about how the information that McLaren shares and how it relates to the Stanford Prison Experiment. McLaren shares with us that name calling is the beginning stage of dehumanizing, and when one succeeds in name calling, we decide to extend our powers and become violent and uncaring. McLaren also uses many examples of the world’s history, specifically regarding religion and war. McLaren explains that the mentality of everyone that goes into war believes that their enemy deserves everything that they get. Compare McLaren’s findings with The Stanford Prison Experiment. Zimbardo concluded that his students (the good people) were defeated by the prison (the evil place). Can you think of a story or a situation where the good person overcame the evil place? Can one’s attitude and/or morality be so strong that it can allow you to overcome anything? The manner in which, the guard “John Wayne”, treated the prisoners was very controversial. Years later he admitted himself that he does regret his behavior, but could it be possible that he wasn’t acting? Is it true what prisoner 416 said? Can someone contribute to a role so much that it starts to show who you really are as a person? If we were put in the shoes of “John Wayne” would we have behaved the same? Are ethics totally thrown out the window when given that position of power?

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Chapter 5 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, March 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Tactics Box 5.1 Drawing Force Vectors Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 5.1 Drawing Force Vectors. To visualize how forces are exerted on objects, we can use simple diagrams such as vectors. This Tactics Box illustrates the process of drawing a force vector by using the particle model, in which objects are treated as points. TACTICS BOX 5.1 Drawing force vectors Represent the object 1. as a particle. 2. Place the tail of the force vector on the particle. 3. Draw the force vector as an arrow pointing in the proper direction and with a length proportional to the size of the force. 4. Give the vector an appropriate label. The resulting diagram for a force exerted on an object is shown in the drawing. Note that the object is represented as a black dot. Part A A book lies on a table. A pushing force parallel to the table top and directed to the right is exerted on the book. Follow the steps above to draw the force vector . Use the black dot as the particle representing the book. F  F push F push Draw the vector starting at the black dot. The location and orientation of the vector will be graded. The length of the vector will not be graded. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Tactics Box 5.2 Identifying Forces Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 5.2 Identifying Forces. The first basic step in solving force and motion problems generally involves identifying all of the forces acting on an object. This tactics box provides a step-by-step method for identifying each force in a problem. TACTICS BOX 5.2 Identifying forces Identify the object of interest. This is the object whose motion 1. you wish to study. 2. Draw a picture of the situation. Show the object of interest and all other objects—such as ropes, springs, or surfaces—that touch it. 3. Draw a closed curve around the object. Only the object of interest is inside the curve; everything else is outside. 4. Locate every point on the boundary of this curve where other objects touch the object of interest. These are the points where contact forces are exerted on the object. Name and label each contact force acting on the object. There is at least one force at each point of contact; there may be more than one. When necessary, use subscripts to distinguish forces of the same type. 5. 6. Name and label each long-range force acting on the object. For now, the only long-range force is the gravitational force. Apply these steps to the following problem: A crate is pulled up a rough inclined wood board by a tow rope. Identify the forces on the crate. Part A Which of the following objects are of interest? Check all that apply. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Conceptual Questions on Newton’s 1st and 2nd Laws Learning Goal: To understand the meaning and the basic applications of Newton’s 1st and 2nd laws. In this problem, you are given a diagram representing the motion of an object–a motion diagram. The dots represent the object’s position at moments separated by equal intervals of time. The dots are connected by arrows representing the object’s average velocity during the corresponding time interval. Your goal is to use this motion diagram to determine the direction of the net force acting on the object. You will then determine which force diagrams and which situations may correspond to such a motion. crate earth rope wood board Part A What is the direction of the net force acting on the object at position A? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D upward downward to the left to the right The net force is zero. This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part I This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part J This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Understanding Newton’s Laws Part A An object cannot remain at rest unless which of the following holds? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B If a block is moving to the left at a constant velocity, what can one conclude? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: The net force acting on it is zero. The net force acting on it is constant and nonzero. There are no forces at all acting on it. There is only one force acting on it. Part C A block of mass is acted upon by two forces: (directed to the left) and (directed to the right). What can you say about the block’s motion? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D A massive block is being pulled along a horizontal frictionless surface by a constant horizontal force. The block must be __________. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: There is exactly one force applied to the block. The net force applied to the block is directed to the left. The net force applied to the block is zero. There must be no forces at all applied to the block. 2 kg 3 N 4 N It must be moving to the left. It must be moving to the right. It must be at rest. It could be moving to the left, moving to the right, or be instantaneously at rest. Part E Two forces, of magnitude and , are applied to an object. The relative direction of the forces is unknown. The net force acting on the object __________. Check all that apply. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Tactics Box 5.3 Drawing a Free-Body Diagram Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 5.3 Drawing a Free-Body Diagram. A free-body diagram is a diagram that represents the object as a particle and shows all of the forces acting on the object. Learning how to draw such a diagram is a very important skill in solving physics problems. This tactics box explains the essential steps to construct a correct free-body diagram. TACTICS BOX 5.3 Drawing a free-body diagram Identify all forces acting on the object. This step was described 1. in Tactics Box 5.2. continuously changing direction moving at constant velocity moving with a constant nonzero acceleration moving with continuously increasing acceleration 4 N 10 N cannot have a magnitude equal to cannot have a magnitude equal to cannot have the same direction as the force with magnitude must have a magnitude greater than 5 N 10 N 10 N 10 N Draw a coordinate system. Use the axes defined in your pictorial representation. If those axes are tilted, for motion along an incline, then the axes of the free-body diagram should be similarly tilted. 2. Represent the object as a dot at the origin of the coordinate axes. This is 3. the particle model. 4. Draw vectors representing each of the identified forces. This was described in Tactics Box 5.1. Be sure to label each force vector. Draw and label the net force vector . Draw this vector beside the diagram, not on the particle. Or, if appropriate, write . Then, check that points in the same direction as the acceleration vector on your motion diagram. 5. Apply these steps to the following problem: Your physics book is sliding on the carpet. Draw a free-body diagram. Part A Which forces are acting on the book? Check all that apply. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: F  net F =  net 0 F  net a Part B Draw the most appropriate set of coordinate axes for this problem. The orientation of your vectors will be graded. ANSWER: gravity normal force drag static friction tension kinetic friction spring force Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points.

Chapter 5 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, March 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Tactics Box 5.1 Drawing Force Vectors Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 5.1 Drawing Force Vectors. To visualize how forces are exerted on objects, we can use simple diagrams such as vectors. This Tactics Box illustrates the process of drawing a force vector by using the particle model, in which objects are treated as points. TACTICS BOX 5.1 Drawing force vectors Represent the object 1. as a particle. 2. Place the tail of the force vector on the particle. 3. Draw the force vector as an arrow pointing in the proper direction and with a length proportional to the size of the force. 4. Give the vector an appropriate label. The resulting diagram for a force exerted on an object is shown in the drawing. Note that the object is represented as a black dot. Part A A book lies on a table. A pushing force parallel to the table top and directed to the right is exerted on the book. Follow the steps above to draw the force vector . Use the black dot as the particle representing the book. F  F push F push Draw the vector starting at the black dot. The location and orientation of the vector will be graded. The length of the vector will not be graded. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Tactics Box 5.2 Identifying Forces Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 5.2 Identifying Forces. The first basic step in solving force and motion problems generally involves identifying all of the forces acting on an object. This tactics box provides a step-by-step method for identifying each force in a problem. TACTICS BOX 5.2 Identifying forces Identify the object of interest. This is the object whose motion 1. you wish to study. 2. Draw a picture of the situation. Show the object of interest and all other objects—such as ropes, springs, or surfaces—that touch it. 3. Draw a closed curve around the object. Only the object of interest is inside the curve; everything else is outside. 4. Locate every point on the boundary of this curve where other objects touch the object of interest. These are the points where contact forces are exerted on the object. Name and label each contact force acting on the object. There is at least one force at each point of contact; there may be more than one. When necessary, use subscripts to distinguish forces of the same type. 5. 6. Name and label each long-range force acting on the object. For now, the only long-range force is the gravitational force. Apply these steps to the following problem: A crate is pulled up a rough inclined wood board by a tow rope. Identify the forces on the crate. Part A Which of the following objects are of interest? Check all that apply. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Conceptual Questions on Newton’s 1st and 2nd Laws Learning Goal: To understand the meaning and the basic applications of Newton’s 1st and 2nd laws. In this problem, you are given a diagram representing the motion of an object–a motion diagram. The dots represent the object’s position at moments separated by equal intervals of time. The dots are connected by arrows representing the object’s average velocity during the corresponding time interval. Your goal is to use this motion diagram to determine the direction of the net force acting on the object. You will then determine which force diagrams and which situations may correspond to such a motion. crate earth rope wood board Part A What is the direction of the net force acting on the object at position A? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D upward downward to the left to the right The net force is zero. This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part I This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part J This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Understanding Newton’s Laws Part A An object cannot remain at rest unless which of the following holds? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B If a block is moving to the left at a constant velocity, what can one conclude? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: The net force acting on it is zero. The net force acting on it is constant and nonzero. There are no forces at all acting on it. There is only one force acting on it. Part C A block of mass is acted upon by two forces: (directed to the left) and (directed to the right). What can you say about the block’s motion? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D A massive block is being pulled along a horizontal frictionless surface by a constant horizontal force. The block must be __________. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: There is exactly one force applied to the block. The net force applied to the block is directed to the left. The net force applied to the block is zero. There must be no forces at all applied to the block. 2 kg 3 N 4 N It must be moving to the left. It must be moving to the right. It must be at rest. It could be moving to the left, moving to the right, or be instantaneously at rest. Part E Two forces, of magnitude and , are applied to an object. The relative direction of the forces is unknown. The net force acting on the object __________. Check all that apply. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Tactics Box 5.3 Drawing a Free-Body Diagram Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 5.3 Drawing a Free-Body Diagram. A free-body diagram is a diagram that represents the object as a particle and shows all of the forces acting on the object. Learning how to draw such a diagram is a very important skill in solving physics problems. This tactics box explains the essential steps to construct a correct free-body diagram. TACTICS BOX 5.3 Drawing a free-body diagram Identify all forces acting on the object. This step was described 1. in Tactics Box 5.2. continuously changing direction moving at constant velocity moving with a constant nonzero acceleration moving with continuously increasing acceleration 4 N 10 N cannot have a magnitude equal to cannot have a magnitude equal to cannot have the same direction as the force with magnitude must have a magnitude greater than 5 N 10 N 10 N 10 N Draw a coordinate system. Use the axes defined in your pictorial representation. If those axes are tilted, for motion along an incline, then the axes of the free-body diagram should be similarly tilted. 2. Represent the object as a dot at the origin of the coordinate axes. This is 3. the particle model. 4. Draw vectors representing each of the identified forces. This was described in Tactics Box 5.1. Be sure to label each force vector. Draw and label the net force vector . Draw this vector beside the diagram, not on the particle. Or, if appropriate, write . Then, check that points in the same direction as the acceleration vector on your motion diagram. 5. Apply these steps to the following problem: Your physics book is sliding on the carpet. Draw a free-body diagram. Part A Which forces are acting on the book? Check all that apply. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: F  net F =  net 0 F  net a Part B Draw the most appropriate set of coordinate axes for this problem. The orientation of your vectors will be graded. ANSWER: gravity normal force drag static friction tension kinetic friction spring force Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points.

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. Pt 1. Making Observations (Introduction) Write a brief, introductory paragraph that includes general observations related to the topic. You may consider information from the news, media (tv, movies), social media, popular views, ideas from the general public, or your personal experiences. Your paragraph should specifically mention three (3) observations related to this topic and be sure to cite your sources. You should also include your thoughts on why this topic is of interest to you or relevant to society (i.e. what is the significance?). Pt 2. Apply The Content Choose five (5) terms or concepts that we have covered in this unit that are related to the chosen topic. Define each term in your own words and then write one (1) sentence that explains how it is related to the topic. The concept are: Define evolution. What was Darwin’s role in establishing the theory of evolution? What does the phrase “descent with modification” mean? How are fossils, anatomical studies, and molecular biology used to provide evidence for the theory of evolution? What is “fitness” in a biological organism? What role do mutations have in natural selection? What are the types of natural selection? How do they effect the genetic variation in a population? What is genetic drift? gene flow? How do they effect the genetic variation in a population? What forces can lead to adaptive evolution? What is the biological definition of a species? What are the three domains of living organisms? What are the six kingdoms? For each kingdom you should be able to describe the cellular structure, means of reproduction, ways of getting nutrients/food, general/adaptive features, and an example organism. How does Helicobacter pylori avoid competition? What extreme environment does a hermoacidophile occupy? What is unique about the Volvox compared to other protists? How do pitcher plants thrive in low nutrient environments? How does the puffball mushroom achieve reproductive success? What adaptations allowed plants to live on the land? What major adaptations occurred in the animal kingdom? In vertebrates? What domain, kingdom, phylum, sub phylum, and class do humans belong to? What do we share with organisms in these groups? What are the ecological levels of the biological hierarchy? What are the elements of a habitat? What are the criteria used by ecologists to measure and observe populations? What common patterns of population distribution are seen in nature? Compare the three kinds of survivorship curves? What do they show? What kind of reproductive behaviors lead to type I, II, and III survivorship curves? How does idealized population growth differ from how actual populations grow? What are factors that affect the growth of a population? How do density-dependent factors affect population growth? What are examples of density-independent factors that can affect population growth? What is a population boom? What is a population bust? Describe the boom and bust cycles often observed in nature. What kinds of competition occur in a habitat? What kinds of symbiotic relationships occur in a habitat? How do organisms avoid predation? What are the levels in a trophic structure? How can plants and animals avoid being eaten? Why is a food web a more accurate representation of the organisms in a community compared to a food chain? Why are most food chains limited to only three or four trophic levels.What are some common threats to biodiversity? What are common types of pollution? Explain why we must be concerned about even small levels of polluting chemicals in the environment. What is sustainability? How can we contribute to the sustainability of life on our planet? Pt 3. Form A Claim Write a claim statement related to the chosen topic. Consider the major question that you are addressing and then develop a statement that will guide your research and writing as you develop your scientific explanation (in Pt 4). Pt 4. Construct a Scientific Explanation Write a scientific explanation that includes evidence and reasoning to support your claim. Your explanation should demonstrate your understanding of the chosen topic using discussion and content from this course as a starting point. Your explanation should include information from a minimum of three (3) sources and one (1) of these sources must be a peer-reviewed scientific article or a review of a scientific study or studies (i.e. a primary or secondary source). You should cite your sources within the body of your explanation and include a list of references at the end (any standard formatting method is acceptable).

. Pt 1. Making Observations (Introduction) Write a brief, introductory paragraph that includes general observations related to the topic. You may consider information from the news, media (tv, movies), social media, popular views, ideas from the general public, or your personal experiences. Your paragraph should specifically mention three (3) observations related to this topic and be sure to cite your sources. You should also include your thoughts on why this topic is of interest to you or relevant to society (i.e. what is the significance?). Pt 2. Apply The Content Choose five (5) terms or concepts that we have covered in this unit that are related to the chosen topic. Define each term in your own words and then write one (1) sentence that explains how it is related to the topic. The concept are: Define evolution. What was Darwin’s role in establishing the theory of evolution? What does the phrase “descent with modification” mean? How are fossils, anatomical studies, and molecular biology used to provide evidence for the theory of evolution? What is “fitness” in a biological organism? What role do mutations have in natural selection? What are the types of natural selection? How do they effect the genetic variation in a population? What is genetic drift? gene flow? How do they effect the genetic variation in a population? What forces can lead to adaptive evolution? What is the biological definition of a species? What are the three domains of living organisms? What are the six kingdoms? For each kingdom you should be able to describe the cellular structure, means of reproduction, ways of getting nutrients/food, general/adaptive features, and an example organism. How does Helicobacter pylori avoid competition? What extreme environment does a hermoacidophile occupy? What is unique about the Volvox compared to other protists? How do pitcher plants thrive in low nutrient environments? How does the puffball mushroom achieve reproductive success? What adaptations allowed plants to live on the land? What major adaptations occurred in the animal kingdom? In vertebrates? What domain, kingdom, phylum, sub phylum, and class do humans belong to? What do we share with organisms in these groups? What are the ecological levels of the biological hierarchy? What are the elements of a habitat? What are the criteria used by ecologists to measure and observe populations? What common patterns of population distribution are seen in nature? Compare the three kinds of survivorship curves? What do they show? What kind of reproductive behaviors lead to type I, II, and III survivorship curves? How does idealized population growth differ from how actual populations grow? What are factors that affect the growth of a population? How do density-dependent factors affect population growth? What are examples of density-independent factors that can affect population growth? What is a population boom? What is a population bust? Describe the boom and bust cycles often observed in nature. What kinds of competition occur in a habitat? What kinds of symbiotic relationships occur in a habitat? How do organisms avoid predation? What are the levels in a trophic structure? How can plants and animals avoid being eaten? Why is a food web a more accurate representation of the organisms in a community compared to a food chain? Why are most food chains limited to only three or four trophic levels.What are some common threats to biodiversity? What are common types of pollution? Explain why we must be concerned about even small levels of polluting chemicals in the environment. What is sustainability? How can we contribute to the sustainability of life on our planet? Pt 3. Form A Claim Write a claim statement related to the chosen topic. Consider the major question that you are addressing and then develop a statement that will guide your research and writing as you develop your scientific explanation (in Pt 4). Pt 4. Construct a Scientific Explanation Write a scientific explanation that includes evidence and reasoning to support your claim. Your explanation should demonstrate your understanding of the chosen topic using discussion and content from this course as a starting point. Your explanation should include information from a minimum of three (3) sources and one (1) of these sources must be a peer-reviewed scientific article or a review of a scientific study or studies (i.e. a primary or secondary source). You should cite your sources within the body of your explanation and include a list of references at the end (any standard formatting method is acceptable).

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Question 14 1 / 1 point Isostasy is the tendency toward gravitational and pressure balance between segments of Earth’s crust. explains most of the topography on Earth (why mountains are high and oceans are deep). explains why continental crust is usually thickest under high mountains. All of the above.

Question 14 1 / 1 point Isostasy is the tendency toward gravitational and pressure balance between segments of Earth’s crust. explains most of the topography on Earth (why mountains are high and oceans are deep). explains why continental crust is usually thickest under high mountains. All of the above.

In the article, “The Moral Person” it talks about Lawrence Kohlberg’s stages of moral development. Briefly explain the 3 Conventional levels (pre-conventional, conventional, and post-conventional). How may these stages impact one’s ethics? Think about how culture or the social environment affects our framework for coming up with any moral or ethical answer. (Hei Lam Kwan) In the article, they talked about a push for a “global ethic” or “one world”. Do you think this is possible? Besides the Golden Rule are there any other examples of shared ethics around the world? (Nicole Thompson) The article explained that often people know the distinction between right and wrong, but still do the wrong thing. If people know what is morally right, why do they act in ways that are morally wrong? (Nicole Thompson) In McLaren’s reading, he gives us a description on an idea of personhood to help us understand a moral person. He mentions a quote from the philosopher, Sarvepalli Rhadakrishnan that caught my interest. He says, “The self is not an object which we can find in knowledge, for it is the very condition of knowledge. It is different from all objects, the body, the senses, the empirical self itself (36)”. In your opinion, what exactly does he mean by stating that? Does thinking of yourself this way help you morally? (Maggy Ergun) Video: In the video, Damon Horowitz talks about the different approaches to figuring out what is right and what is wrong. Some of them included Plato, who believed that he could uncover the “truths about Justice”, Aristotle, who thought that people should use their current knowledge to make the right decision of here and now to their best ability, and Utilitarianism, who thought it was about measuring out the options to see which one had the most benefit for the greatest amount of people. Which approach do you think is best? Would you suggest another approach? (Nicole Thompson) Damon Horowitz explains the huge power we have and that is knowledge and data we receive from technology. With all this power in our hands, you can have any information you would like to obtain whether it’s on an object or human being. And as technology keeps rising, the more advanced it keeps getting. When it comes to privacy and dignity, do you think it is fair for one another to have this huge power on us? Will this be better for our future or worse? (Maggy Ergun) Horowitz describes how we rely more on our smart devices then actual moral thinking. (Mobile operating system then moral operating system) If we were to create a moral operating system, do you think that will help provoke people from making bad/evil decisions and guide us to better? Or do those bad decisions just come instantly without much thought? (Maggy Ergun) In the video it states, “what we need is a moral operating system.” What are the possible flaws in relying on a machine/software for answering ethical problems? Discuss and list at least one problem we may encounter from relying on such a system for an ethical solution. (Hei Lam Kwan) Reviewing the answers to the previous questions given, do you think there is only one right answer to any ethical question and why? (Hei Lam Kwan) http://www.ted.com/talks/damon_horowitz?language=en this is the video

In the article, “The Moral Person” it talks about Lawrence Kohlberg’s stages of moral development. Briefly explain the 3 Conventional levels (pre-conventional, conventional, and post-conventional). How may these stages impact one’s ethics? Think about how culture or the social environment affects our framework for coming up with any moral or ethical answer. (Hei Lam Kwan) In the article, they talked about a push for a “global ethic” or “one world”. Do you think this is possible? Besides the Golden Rule are there any other examples of shared ethics around the world? (Nicole Thompson) The article explained that often people know the distinction between right and wrong, but still do the wrong thing. If people know what is morally right, why do they act in ways that are morally wrong? (Nicole Thompson) In McLaren’s reading, he gives us a description on an idea of personhood to help us understand a moral person. He mentions a quote from the philosopher, Sarvepalli Rhadakrishnan that caught my interest. He says, “The self is not an object which we can find in knowledge, for it is the very condition of knowledge. It is different from all objects, the body, the senses, the empirical self itself (36)”. In your opinion, what exactly does he mean by stating that? Does thinking of yourself this way help you morally? (Maggy Ergun) Video: In the video, Damon Horowitz talks about the different approaches to figuring out what is right and what is wrong. Some of them included Plato, who believed that he could uncover the “truths about Justice”, Aristotle, who thought that people should use their current knowledge to make the right decision of here and now to their best ability, and Utilitarianism, who thought it was about measuring out the options to see which one had the most benefit for the greatest amount of people. Which approach do you think is best? Would you suggest another approach? (Nicole Thompson) Damon Horowitz explains the huge power we have and that is knowledge and data we receive from technology. With all this power in our hands, you can have any information you would like to obtain whether it’s on an object or human being. And as technology keeps rising, the more advanced it keeps getting. When it comes to privacy and dignity, do you think it is fair for one another to have this huge power on us? Will this be better for our future or worse? (Maggy Ergun) Horowitz describes how we rely more on our smart devices then actual moral thinking. (Mobile operating system then moral operating system) If we were to create a moral operating system, do you think that will help provoke people from making bad/evil decisions and guide us to better? Or do those bad decisions just come instantly without much thought? (Maggy Ergun) In the video it states, “what we need is a moral operating system.” What are the possible flaws in relying on a machine/software for answering ethical problems? Discuss and list at least one problem we may encounter from relying on such a system for an ethical solution. (Hei Lam Kwan) Reviewing the answers to the previous questions given, do you think there is only one right answer to any ethical question and why? (Hei Lam Kwan) http://www.ted.com/talks/damon_horowitz?language=en this is the video

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