1) During the late 19th century, the nature of work changed for Americans and has never been the same since. Facets of work which we take for granted today such as working long hours and working by the clock, working with machines, and feeling like a very small part of a very large company or corporation, were alien to workers of the late 19th century. Scholars have long debated this transition in the workplace, and have attempted to assess whether the change was beneficial or not for the worker. Using your own personal experience if you wish, but also using specific historical examples discussed in the text and lesson, do you feel the changes the American worker experienced in the 19th century were beneficial or not? Would you rather work in a pre-industrial workplace, not governed by the clock, or has the advent of machines and machinery allowed American workers more freedom? Or has it made them robots? Also, why do you think we don’t have violent labor conflicts in this country like there were in the 19th century? Are workers happier? Or just used to a system now that they have no choice but to accept?

1) During the late 19th century, the nature of work changed for Americans and has never been the same since. Facets of work which we take for granted today such as working long hours and working by the clock, working with machines, and feeling like a very small part of a very large company or corporation, were alien to workers of the late 19th century. Scholars have long debated this transition in the workplace, and have attempted to assess whether the change was beneficial or not for the worker. Using your own personal experience if you wish, but also using specific historical examples discussed in the text and lesson, do you feel the changes the American worker experienced in the 19th century were beneficial or not? Would you rather work in a pre-industrial workplace, not governed by the clock, or has the advent of machines and machinery allowed American workers more freedom? Or has it made them robots? Also, why do you think we don’t have violent labor conflicts in this country like there were in the 19th century? Are workers happier? Or just used to a system now that they have no choice but to accept?

Planned labor has always been of paramount importance as supporting … Read More...
Module Overview Summary of Module Description For full details, go to Module Descriptor. Aims The aim of this module is to: • Develop individuals for a career in business and management • Enhance and develop employability , professional and lifelong learning skills and personal development Learning Outcomes Learners will be able to critically evaluate the acquisition of a range of academic and professional skills using a number of theoretical frameworks. Assessment – Summary Category Assessment Description Duration Word Count Weight (%) Written Assignment Essay 1 Reflective Essay N/A 3000 45 For full details, go to Assessment. Additional Information Remember that a variety of Resources is available to support your learning materials.Skills and character audit This document provides an initial picture of your skills and character. It will also provide the basis of further documents that make up the first assignment on the module. It is based on the skills statements that form a fundamental part of your Masters programme which were approved by a validation panel that consisted of members of staff in the Business School, academic staff from other higher education institutions and employers. The statements in the form are there for you and you will not be judged on whether your responses are positive or negative. The responses should enable you to identify what you are good or bad at from which you can create a personal SLOT analysis (Strengths, Limitations, Opportunities, Threats). From this SLOT analysis you can then concentrate on developing certain areas that will enhance your academic and professional development. We would very much like to” get to know” you through this document and would encourage you to also complete the notes section. In this you could give us a rationale for your responses to the questions. As a guide to how you should gauge your response consider the following: Strongly agree – I have a wide range of experience in this area and have been commended by a tutor or employer for my efforts in this area Agree – I am comfortable with this aspect and have been able to demonstrate my ability Disagree – I am Ok with this but realise that I do need to improve Strongly disagree – I know I am weak in this area and need to focus on this as I could fine this weakness to be detrimental to my progression Explain why – please take the room to consider the reasons for your answer as this is the reflection that is of most value. Do not worry if your section spills onto the next page.   Intellectual (thinking) skills Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree I am a creative person who can adapt my thinking to circumstances I am able to organise my thoughts, analyse, synthesise and critically appraise situations I can identify assumptions, evaluate statements in terms of evidence, detect false logic or reasoning, identify implicit values, define terms adequately and generalise appropriately Explain why: Professional/Vocational skills Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree I use a wide range of techniques in approaching and solving problems. I am comfortable with a range of research techniques I am able to analyse and interpret quantitative data I am able to analyse and interpret qualitative data My leadership skills are well developed and I can adapt them to different situations I am able to manage people effectively Motivating myself and others comes easy to me I am aware of my responsibilities to myself, the organisation and other people I treat people with respect and consideration Explain why:   Key/Common skills Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree I am able to use mathematical techniques to analyse data I can effectively interpret numerical data including tables and charts I am able to use a wide range of software on a PC I use a range Information Technology devices to communicate and access information I am a good listener I am able to communicate my ideas well in a face-to-face situation I can adapt my written style to suit an audiences needs I am comfortable presenting my ideas to an audience Whenever I have completed a task I always reflect on the experience with a view to seeking continuous improvement I manage my time effectively I am always prompt when asked to complete a task I am aware of the need to be sensitive to the cultural differences to which I have been exposed I am keen to learn about other people and their country and culture I enjoy working with others to complete a task I know my own character and am sensitive of this in a group situation I understand that a group is made of individuals and I am sensitive to the needs and preferences of others I will always ensure that I get my views across in a meeting I am willing to accept the viewpoint of others I always give 100% in a group task Explain why: SLOT Analysis Having responded to the statements above you should now be in a position to look forward and recognise those areas on which your development will be based. The SLOT analysis can help you to arrange this. Strengths – can be those skills and characteristics to which you have responded positively to in the previous section. It is worth noting that whilst you may be strong in these areas that does not mean you ignore their development. Indeed you may be able to utilise these strengths in the development of areas identified as weaknesses or to overcome strengths, this will enhance those skills and characteristics. Limitations – All of us can identify some sort of limitation to our skills. None of us should be afraid of doing this as this is the first stage on the improvement and development of these weaknesses. Opportunities – These arise or can be created. When thinking of this look ahead at opportunities that will arise in a professional, academic or social context within which your development can take place. Threats – Many threats from your development can come from within – your own characteristics e.g. poor time management can lead to missing deadlines. However we could equally identify a busy lifestyle as a threat to our development. Once again think widely in terms of where the threat will come from. Do not worry if you find that a strength can also be a limitation. This is often true as a characteristic you have may be strength in one situation but a limitation in another. E.g. you may be an assertive person, which is positive, but this could be negative in a group situation. Please try and elaborate this in the notes section at the foot of the table. SLOT Analysis (you may need to use two pages to set out this analysis) Strengths Limitations Opportunities Threats Analysis of the Bullet points in the SLOT table Objectives Having undertaken some analysis of your skills and characteristics the aim of this next section is to identify various aspects of your development during the course of this module, other modules on your course, and extra-curricular activities. Make sure the objectives are SMART:- S – Specific. Clearly identified from the exercises undertaken M – Measurable. The outcomes can be easily demonstrated (to yourself, and where possible others) A – Achievable. They can be done given the opportunities available to you R – Relevant. They form part of your development either on this award, in your employability prospects or in your current job role T – Timebound. They can be achieved within a given timescale Whilst there are 5 rows in the table below, please feel free to add more. However be sure that you need to do this development and that they fit within the scope of the above criteria. Area What I am going to do. How I am going to do it When I am going to do it by Force Field Analysis This technique was designed by Kurt Lewin (1947 and 1953). In the business world it is used for decision making, looking at forces that need to be considered when implementing change – it can be said to be a specialised method of weighing up the pros and cons of a decision. Having looked at your personal strengths and weaknesses we would like you to use this technique to become aware of those factors that will help/hinder, give you motivation for or may act against, your personal development. Whilst you could do this for each of your objectives we want you to think in terms of where you would like to be at the end of your Masters programme. In the central pillar, put in a statement of where you want to be at the end of the course. Then in the arrows either side look at those factors/forces that may work in your favour. Be realistic and please add as many arrows that you think may be necessary; use a separate page for the module if it makes it easier to structure your thoughts. Forces or factors working for achieving your desired outcome Where I want to be Forces or factors against working against you achieving your desired outcome

Module Overview Summary of Module Description For full details, go to Module Descriptor. Aims The aim of this module is to: • Develop individuals for a career in business and management • Enhance and develop employability , professional and lifelong learning skills and personal development Learning Outcomes Learners will be able to critically evaluate the acquisition of a range of academic and professional skills using a number of theoretical frameworks. Assessment – Summary Category Assessment Description Duration Word Count Weight (%) Written Assignment Essay 1 Reflective Essay N/A 3000 45 For full details, go to Assessment. Additional Information Remember that a variety of Resources is available to support your learning materials.Skills and character audit This document provides an initial picture of your skills and character. It will also provide the basis of further documents that make up the first assignment on the module. It is based on the skills statements that form a fundamental part of your Masters programme which were approved by a validation panel that consisted of members of staff in the Business School, academic staff from other higher education institutions and employers. The statements in the form are there for you and you will not be judged on whether your responses are positive or negative. The responses should enable you to identify what you are good or bad at from which you can create a personal SLOT analysis (Strengths, Limitations, Opportunities, Threats). From this SLOT analysis you can then concentrate on developing certain areas that will enhance your academic and professional development. We would very much like to” get to know” you through this document and would encourage you to also complete the notes section. In this you could give us a rationale for your responses to the questions. As a guide to how you should gauge your response consider the following: Strongly agree – I have a wide range of experience in this area and have been commended by a tutor or employer for my efforts in this area Agree – I am comfortable with this aspect and have been able to demonstrate my ability Disagree – I am Ok with this but realise that I do need to improve Strongly disagree – I know I am weak in this area and need to focus on this as I could fine this weakness to be detrimental to my progression Explain why – please take the room to consider the reasons for your answer as this is the reflection that is of most value. Do not worry if your section spills onto the next page.   Intellectual (thinking) skills Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree I am a creative person who can adapt my thinking to circumstances I am able to organise my thoughts, analyse, synthesise and critically appraise situations I can identify assumptions, evaluate statements in terms of evidence, detect false logic or reasoning, identify implicit values, define terms adequately and generalise appropriately Explain why: Professional/Vocational skills Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree I use a wide range of techniques in approaching and solving problems. I am comfortable with a range of research techniques I am able to analyse and interpret quantitative data I am able to analyse and interpret qualitative data My leadership skills are well developed and I can adapt them to different situations I am able to manage people effectively Motivating myself and others comes easy to me I am aware of my responsibilities to myself, the organisation and other people I treat people with respect and consideration Explain why:   Key/Common skills Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree I am able to use mathematical techniques to analyse data I can effectively interpret numerical data including tables and charts I am able to use a wide range of software on a PC I use a range Information Technology devices to communicate and access information I am a good listener I am able to communicate my ideas well in a face-to-face situation I can adapt my written style to suit an audiences needs I am comfortable presenting my ideas to an audience Whenever I have completed a task I always reflect on the experience with a view to seeking continuous improvement I manage my time effectively I am always prompt when asked to complete a task I am aware of the need to be sensitive to the cultural differences to which I have been exposed I am keen to learn about other people and their country and culture I enjoy working with others to complete a task I know my own character and am sensitive of this in a group situation I understand that a group is made of individuals and I am sensitive to the needs and preferences of others I will always ensure that I get my views across in a meeting I am willing to accept the viewpoint of others I always give 100% in a group task Explain why: SLOT Analysis Having responded to the statements above you should now be in a position to look forward and recognise those areas on which your development will be based. The SLOT analysis can help you to arrange this. Strengths – can be those skills and characteristics to which you have responded positively to in the previous section. It is worth noting that whilst you may be strong in these areas that does not mean you ignore their development. Indeed you may be able to utilise these strengths in the development of areas identified as weaknesses or to overcome strengths, this will enhance those skills and characteristics. Limitations – All of us can identify some sort of limitation to our skills. None of us should be afraid of doing this as this is the first stage on the improvement and development of these weaknesses. Opportunities – These arise or can be created. When thinking of this look ahead at opportunities that will arise in a professional, academic or social context within which your development can take place. Threats – Many threats from your development can come from within – your own characteristics e.g. poor time management can lead to missing deadlines. However we could equally identify a busy lifestyle as a threat to our development. Once again think widely in terms of where the threat will come from. Do not worry if you find that a strength can also be a limitation. This is often true as a characteristic you have may be strength in one situation but a limitation in another. E.g. you may be an assertive person, which is positive, but this could be negative in a group situation. Please try and elaborate this in the notes section at the foot of the table. SLOT Analysis (you may need to use two pages to set out this analysis) Strengths Limitations Opportunities Threats Analysis of the Bullet points in the SLOT table Objectives Having undertaken some analysis of your skills and characteristics the aim of this next section is to identify various aspects of your development during the course of this module, other modules on your course, and extra-curricular activities. Make sure the objectives are SMART:- S – Specific. Clearly identified from the exercises undertaken M – Measurable. The outcomes can be easily demonstrated (to yourself, and where possible others) A – Achievable. They can be done given the opportunities available to you R – Relevant. They form part of your development either on this award, in your employability prospects or in your current job role T – Timebound. They can be achieved within a given timescale Whilst there are 5 rows in the table below, please feel free to add more. However be sure that you need to do this development and that they fit within the scope of the above criteria. Area What I am going to do. How I am going to do it When I am going to do it by Force Field Analysis This technique was designed by Kurt Lewin (1947 and 1953). In the business world it is used for decision making, looking at forces that need to be considered when implementing change – it can be said to be a specialised method of weighing up the pros and cons of a decision. Having looked at your personal strengths and weaknesses we would like you to use this technique to become aware of those factors that will help/hinder, give you motivation for or may act against, your personal development. Whilst you could do this for each of your objectives we want you to think in terms of where you would like to be at the end of your Masters programme. In the central pillar, put in a statement of where you want to be at the end of the course. Then in the arrows either side look at those factors/forces that may work in your favour. Be realistic and please add as many arrows that you think may be necessary; use a separate page for the module if it makes it easier to structure your thoughts. Forces or factors working for achieving your desired outcome Where I want to be Forces or factors against working against you achieving your desired outcome

  Intellectual (thinking) skills   Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly … Read More...
Chapter 15 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 16, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Fluid Pressure in a U-Tube A U-tube is filled with water, and the two arms are capped. The tube is cylindrical, and the right arm has twice the radius of the left arm. The caps have negligible mass, are watertight, and can freely slide up and down the tube. Part A A one-inch depth of sand is poured onto the cap on each arm. After the caps have moved (if necessary) to reestablish equilibrium, is the right cap higher, lower, or the same height as the left cap? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Pressure in the Ocean The pressure at 10 below the surface of the ocean is about 2.00×105 . Part A higher lower the same height m Pa Which of the following statements is true? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Now consider the pressure 20 below the surface of the ocean. Which of the following statements is true? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Relating Pressure and Height in a Container Learning Goal: To understand the derivation of the law relating height and pressure in a container. The weight of a column of seawater 1 in cross section and 10 high is about 2.00×105 . The weight of a column of seawater 1 in cross section and 10 high plus the weight of a column of air with the same cross section extending up to the top of the atmosphere is about 2.00×105 . The weight of 1 of seawater at 10 below the surface of the ocean is about 2.00×105 . The density of seawater is about 2.00×105 times the density of air at sea level. m2 m N m2 m N m3 m N m The pressure is twice that at a depth of 10 . The pressure is the same as that at a depth of 10 . The pressure is equal to that at a depth of 10 plus the weight per 1 cross sectional area of a column of seawater 10 high. The pressure is equal to the weight per 1 cross sectional area of a column of seawater 20 high. m m m m2 m m2 m In this problem, you will derive the law relating pressure to height in a container by analyzing a particular system. A container of uniform cross-sectional area is filled with liquid of uniform density . Consider a thin horizontal layer of liquid (thickness ) at a height as measured from the bottom of the container. Let the pressure exerted upward on the bottom of the layer be and the pressure exerted downward on the top be . Assume throughout the problem that the system is in equilibrium (the container has not been recently shaken or moved, etc.). Part A What is , the magnitude of the force exerted upward on the bottom of the liquid? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is , the magnitude of the force exerted downward on the top of the liquid? A  dy y p p + dp Fup Fup = Fdown You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C What is the weight of the thin layer of liquid? Express your answer in terms of quantities given in the problem introduction and , the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D Since the liquid is in equilibrium, the net force on the thin layer of liquid is zero. Complete the force equation for the sum of the vertical forces acting on the liquid layer described in the problem introduction. Express your answer in terms of quantities given in the problem introduction and taking upward forces to be positive. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Fdown = wlayer g wlayer = Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). A Submerged Ball A ball of mass and volume is lowered on a string into a fluid of density . Assume that the object would sink to the bottom if it were not supported by the string. Part A  = = i Fy,i mb V f What is the tension in the string when the ball is fully submerged but not touching the bottom, as shown in the figure? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the given quantities and , the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Archimedes’ Principle Learning Goal: To understand the applications of Archimedes’ principle. Archimedes’ principle is a powerful tool for solving many problems involving equilibrium in fluids. It states the following: When a body is partially or completely submerged in a fluid (either a liquid or a gas), the fluid exerts an upward force on the body equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the body. As a result of the upward Archimedes force (often called the buoyant force), some objects may float in a fluid, and all of them appear to weigh less. This is the familiar phenomenon of buoyancy. Quantitatively, the buoyant force can be found as , where is the force, is the density of the fluid, is the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity, and is the volume of the displaced fluid. In this problem, you will be asked several qualitative questions that should help you develop a feel for Archimedes’ principle. An object is placed in a fluid and then released. Assume that the object either floats to the surface (settling so that the object is partly above and partly below the fluid surface) or sinks to the bottom. (Note that for Parts A through D, you should assume that the object has settled in equilibrium.) Part A Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force is equal to the weight of fluid displaced by the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? T g T = Fbuoyant = fluidgV Fbuoyant fluid g V You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force is equal to the weight of the amount of fluid that has the same total volume as the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force equals the weight of the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? for every object submerged partially or completely in a fluid only for an object that floats only for an object that sinks for no object submerged in a fluid for an object that is partially submerged in a fluid only for an object that floats for an object completely submerged in a fluid for no object partially or completely submerged in a fluid You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force is less than the weight of the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? ANSWER: Now apply what you know to some more complicated situations. Part E An object is floating in equilibrium on the surface of a liquid. The object is then removed and placed in another container, filled with a denser liquid. What would you observe? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: for every object submerged partially or completely in a fluid for an object that floats only for an object that sinks for no object submerged in a fluid for every object submerged partially or completely in a fluid for an object that floats for an object that sinks for no object submerged in a fluid Part F An object is floating in equilibrium on the surface of a liquid. The object is then removed and placed in another container, filled with a less dense liquid. What would you observe? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part G Two objects, T and B, have identical size and shape and have uniform density. They are carefully placed in a container filled with a liquid. Both objects float in equilibrium. Less of object T is submerged than of object B, which floats, fully submerged, closer to the bottom of the container. Which of the following statements is true? ANSWER: The object would sink all the way to the bottom. The object would float submerged more deeply than in the first container. The object would float submerged less deeply than in the first container. More than one of these outcomes is possible. The object would sink all the way to the bottom. The object would float submerged more deeply than in the first container. The object would float submerged less deeply than in the first container. More than one of these outcomes is possible. Object T has a greater density than object B. Object B has a greater density than object T. Both objects have the same density. ± Buoyant Force Conceptual Question A rectangular wooden block of weight floats with exactly one-half of its volume below the waterline. Part A What is the buoyant force acting on the block? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B W The buoyant force cannot be determined. 2W W 1 W 2 The density of water is 1.00 . What is the density of the block? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). g/cm3 2.00 between 1.00 and 2.00 1.00 between 0.50 and 1.00 0.50 The density cannot be determined. g/cm3 g/cm3 g/cm3 g/cm3 g/cm3 Flow Velocity of Blood Conceptual Question Arteriosclerotic plaques forming on the inner walls of arteries can decrease the effective cross-sectional area of an artery. Even small changes in the effective area of an artery can lead to very large changes in the blood pressure in the artery and possibly to the collapse of the blood vessel. Imagine a healthy artery, with blood flow velocity of and mass per unit volume of . The kinetic energy per unit volume of blood is given by Imagine that plaque has narrowed an artery to one-fifth of its normal cross-sectional area (an 80% blockage). Part A Compared to normal blood flow velocity, , what is the velocity of blood as it passes through this blockage? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C v0 = 0.14 m/s  = 1050 kg/m3 K0 =  . 1 2 v20 v0 80v0 20v0 5v0 v0/5 This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). For parts D – F imagine that plaque has grown to a 90% blockage. Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). ± Playing with a Water Hose Two children, Ferdinand and Isabella, are playing with a water hose on a sunny summer day. Isabella is holding the hose in her hand 1.0 meters above the ground and is trying to spray Ferdinand, who is standing 10.0 meters away. Part A Will Isabella be able to spray Ferdinand if the water is flowing out of the hose at a constant speed of 3.5 meters per second? Assume that the hose is pointed parallel to the ground and take the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity to be 9.81 meters per second, per second. You did not open hints for this part. v0 g ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Tactics Box 15.2 Finding Whether an Object Floats or Sinks Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 15.2 Finding whether an object floats or sinks. If you hold an object underwater and then release it, it can float to the surface, sink, or remain “hanging” in the water, depending on whether the fluid density is larger than, smaller than, or equal to the object’s average density . These conditions are summarized in this Tactics Box. Yes No f avg TACTICS BOX 15.2 Finding whether an object floats or sinks Object sinks Object floats Object has neutral buoyancy An object sinks if it weighs more than the fluid it displaces, that is, if its average density is greater than the density of the fluid: . An object floats on the surface if it weighs less than the fluid it displaces, that is, if its average density is less than the density of the fluid: . An object hangs motionless in the fluid if it weighs exactly the same as the fluid it displaces. It has neutral buoyancy if its average density equals the density of the fluid: . Part A Ice at 0.0 has a density of 917 . A 3.00 ice cube is gently released inside a small container filled with oil and is observed to be neutrally buoyant. What is the density of the oil, ? Express your answer in kilograms per meter cubed to three significant figures. ANSWER: Part B Once the ice cube melts, what happens to the liquid water that it produces? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: avg > f avg < f avg = f 'C kg/m3 cm3 oil oil = kg/m3 Part C What happens if some ethyl alcohol of density 790 is poured into the container after the ice cube has melted? ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. The liquid water sinks to the bottom of the container. The liquid water rises to the surface and floats on top of the oil. The liquid water is in static equilibrium at the location where the ice cube was originally placed. kg/m3 A layer of ethyl alcohol forms between the oil and the water. The layer of ethyl alcohol forms at the bottom of the container. The layer of ethyl alcohol forms on the surface.

Chapter 15 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 16, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Fluid Pressure in a U-Tube A U-tube is filled with water, and the two arms are capped. The tube is cylindrical, and the right arm has twice the radius of the left arm. The caps have negligible mass, are watertight, and can freely slide up and down the tube. Part A A one-inch depth of sand is poured onto the cap on each arm. After the caps have moved (if necessary) to reestablish equilibrium, is the right cap higher, lower, or the same height as the left cap? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Pressure in the Ocean The pressure at 10 below the surface of the ocean is about 2.00×105 . Part A higher lower the same height m Pa Which of the following statements is true? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Now consider the pressure 20 below the surface of the ocean. Which of the following statements is true? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Relating Pressure and Height in a Container Learning Goal: To understand the derivation of the law relating height and pressure in a container. The weight of a column of seawater 1 in cross section and 10 high is about 2.00×105 . The weight of a column of seawater 1 in cross section and 10 high plus the weight of a column of air with the same cross section extending up to the top of the atmosphere is about 2.00×105 . The weight of 1 of seawater at 10 below the surface of the ocean is about 2.00×105 . The density of seawater is about 2.00×105 times the density of air at sea level. m2 m N m2 m N m3 m N m The pressure is twice that at a depth of 10 . The pressure is the same as that at a depth of 10 . The pressure is equal to that at a depth of 10 plus the weight per 1 cross sectional area of a column of seawater 10 high. The pressure is equal to the weight per 1 cross sectional area of a column of seawater 20 high. m m m m2 m m2 m In this problem, you will derive the law relating pressure to height in a container by analyzing a particular system. A container of uniform cross-sectional area is filled with liquid of uniform density . Consider a thin horizontal layer of liquid (thickness ) at a height as measured from the bottom of the container. Let the pressure exerted upward on the bottom of the layer be and the pressure exerted downward on the top be . Assume throughout the problem that the system is in equilibrium (the container has not been recently shaken or moved, etc.). Part A What is , the magnitude of the force exerted upward on the bottom of the liquid? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is , the magnitude of the force exerted downward on the top of the liquid? A  dy y p p + dp Fup Fup = Fdown You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C What is the weight of the thin layer of liquid? Express your answer in terms of quantities given in the problem introduction and , the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D Since the liquid is in equilibrium, the net force on the thin layer of liquid is zero. Complete the force equation for the sum of the vertical forces acting on the liquid layer described in the problem introduction. Express your answer in terms of quantities given in the problem introduction and taking upward forces to be positive. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Fdown = wlayer g wlayer = Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). A Submerged Ball A ball of mass and volume is lowered on a string into a fluid of density . Assume that the object would sink to the bottom if it were not supported by the string. Part A  = = i Fy,i mb V f What is the tension in the string when the ball is fully submerged but not touching the bottom, as shown in the figure? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the given quantities and , the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Archimedes’ Principle Learning Goal: To understand the applications of Archimedes’ principle. Archimedes’ principle is a powerful tool for solving many problems involving equilibrium in fluids. It states the following: When a body is partially or completely submerged in a fluid (either a liquid or a gas), the fluid exerts an upward force on the body equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the body. As a result of the upward Archimedes force (often called the buoyant force), some objects may float in a fluid, and all of them appear to weigh less. This is the familiar phenomenon of buoyancy. Quantitatively, the buoyant force can be found as , where is the force, is the density of the fluid, is the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity, and is the volume of the displaced fluid. In this problem, you will be asked several qualitative questions that should help you develop a feel for Archimedes’ principle. An object is placed in a fluid and then released. Assume that the object either floats to the surface (settling so that the object is partly above and partly below the fluid surface) or sinks to the bottom. (Note that for Parts A through D, you should assume that the object has settled in equilibrium.) Part A Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force is equal to the weight of fluid displaced by the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? T g T = Fbuoyant = fluidgV Fbuoyant fluid g V You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force is equal to the weight of the amount of fluid that has the same total volume as the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force equals the weight of the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? for every object submerged partially or completely in a fluid only for an object that floats only for an object that sinks for no object submerged in a fluid for an object that is partially submerged in a fluid only for an object that floats for an object completely submerged in a fluid for no object partially or completely submerged in a fluid You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force is less than the weight of the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? ANSWER: Now apply what you know to some more complicated situations. Part E An object is floating in equilibrium on the surface of a liquid. The object is then removed and placed in another container, filled with a denser liquid. What would you observe? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: for every object submerged partially or completely in a fluid for an object that floats only for an object that sinks for no object submerged in a fluid for every object submerged partially or completely in a fluid for an object that floats for an object that sinks for no object submerged in a fluid Part F An object is floating in equilibrium on the surface of a liquid. The object is then removed and placed in another container, filled with a less dense liquid. What would you observe? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part G Two objects, T and B, have identical size and shape and have uniform density. They are carefully placed in a container filled with a liquid. Both objects float in equilibrium. Less of object T is submerged than of object B, which floats, fully submerged, closer to the bottom of the container. Which of the following statements is true? ANSWER: The object would sink all the way to the bottom. The object would float submerged more deeply than in the first container. The object would float submerged less deeply than in the first container. More than one of these outcomes is possible. The object would sink all the way to the bottom. The object would float submerged more deeply than in the first container. The object would float submerged less deeply than in the first container. More than one of these outcomes is possible. Object T has a greater density than object B. Object B has a greater density than object T. Both objects have the same density. ± Buoyant Force Conceptual Question A rectangular wooden block of weight floats with exactly one-half of its volume below the waterline. Part A What is the buoyant force acting on the block? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B W The buoyant force cannot be determined. 2W W 1 W 2 The density of water is 1.00 . What is the density of the block? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). g/cm3 2.00 between 1.00 and 2.00 1.00 between 0.50 and 1.00 0.50 The density cannot be determined. g/cm3 g/cm3 g/cm3 g/cm3 g/cm3 Flow Velocity of Blood Conceptual Question Arteriosclerotic plaques forming on the inner walls of arteries can decrease the effective cross-sectional area of an artery. Even small changes in the effective area of an artery can lead to very large changes in the blood pressure in the artery and possibly to the collapse of the blood vessel. Imagine a healthy artery, with blood flow velocity of and mass per unit volume of . The kinetic energy per unit volume of blood is given by Imagine that plaque has narrowed an artery to one-fifth of its normal cross-sectional area (an 80% blockage). Part A Compared to normal blood flow velocity, , what is the velocity of blood as it passes through this blockage? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C v0 = 0.14 m/s  = 1050 kg/m3 K0 =  . 1 2 v20 v0 80v0 20v0 5v0 v0/5 This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). For parts D – F imagine that plaque has grown to a 90% blockage. Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). ± Playing with a Water Hose Two children, Ferdinand and Isabella, are playing with a water hose on a sunny summer day. Isabella is holding the hose in her hand 1.0 meters above the ground and is trying to spray Ferdinand, who is standing 10.0 meters away. Part A Will Isabella be able to spray Ferdinand if the water is flowing out of the hose at a constant speed of 3.5 meters per second? Assume that the hose is pointed parallel to the ground and take the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity to be 9.81 meters per second, per second. You did not open hints for this part. v0 g ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Tactics Box 15.2 Finding Whether an Object Floats or Sinks Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 15.2 Finding whether an object floats or sinks. If you hold an object underwater and then release it, it can float to the surface, sink, or remain “hanging” in the water, depending on whether the fluid density is larger than, smaller than, or equal to the object’s average density . These conditions are summarized in this Tactics Box. Yes No f avg TACTICS BOX 15.2 Finding whether an object floats or sinks Object sinks Object floats Object has neutral buoyancy An object sinks if it weighs more than the fluid it displaces, that is, if its average density is greater than the density of the fluid: . An object floats on the surface if it weighs less than the fluid it displaces, that is, if its average density is less than the density of the fluid: . An object hangs motionless in the fluid if it weighs exactly the same as the fluid it displaces. It has neutral buoyancy if its average density equals the density of the fluid: . Part A Ice at 0.0 has a density of 917 . A 3.00 ice cube is gently released inside a small container filled with oil and is observed to be neutrally buoyant. What is the density of the oil, ? Express your answer in kilograms per meter cubed to three significant figures. ANSWER: Part B Once the ice cube melts, what happens to the liquid water that it produces? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: avg > f avg < f avg = f 'C kg/m3 cm3 oil oil = kg/m3 Part C What happens if some ethyl alcohol of density 790 is poured into the container after the ice cube has melted? ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. The liquid water sinks to the bottom of the container. The liquid water rises to the surface and floats on top of the oil. The liquid water is in static equilibrium at the location where the ice cube was originally placed. kg/m3 A layer of ethyl alcohol forms between the oil and the water. The layer of ethyl alcohol forms at the bottom of the container. The layer of ethyl alcohol forms on the surface.

please email info@checkyourstudy.com Chapter 15 Practice Problems (Practice – no … Read More...
ePortfolio Reflection Questions: Final Entry Please add answers to the following questions in your “ePortfolio Part 2” Google document. 1. What skills do you feel you acquired throughout the process of building your power plant that you would feel comfortable adding to a resume (remember back to your checklist if you need help)? 2. What type of a team member do you feel you became during the building process; for example: equal member, leader, machinist, reporter? Why do you feel you had to take on this role? 3. How well did your team follow their team contract written at the beginning of the semester? 4. Based on the complexity and efficiency of renewable energy you learned after this semester, what are your feelings towards pursuing a career in the energy field? Would you prefer to work with renewable energy, or other types of established energies? 5. Looking back over your build process, what do you feel you would have done differently if given a second chance? 6. Explain several pitfalls you encountered during the build process where you had to change your project from the proposal? 7. Do you feel you had all the necessary knowledge prior to beginning the energy project to build a powerful plant? If not, what other information could have been provided earlier to help? 8. Out of all the labs and the project, which activity do you feel you learned the most that will help you with your student success at ASU? Why? 9. Overall, explain your experience with FSE 100; for example, was it positive, negative, helpful in deciding your major, frustrating, too easy, too hard? 10. Provide a picture of you and your team working together.

ePortfolio Reflection Questions: Final Entry Please add answers to the following questions in your “ePortfolio Part 2” Google document. 1. What skills do you feel you acquired throughout the process of building your power plant that you would feel comfortable adding to a resume (remember back to your checklist if you need help)? 2. What type of a team member do you feel you became during the building process; for example: equal member, leader, machinist, reporter? Why do you feel you had to take on this role? 3. How well did your team follow their team contract written at the beginning of the semester? 4. Based on the complexity and efficiency of renewable energy you learned after this semester, what are your feelings towards pursuing a career in the energy field? Would you prefer to work with renewable energy, or other types of established energies? 5. Looking back over your build process, what do you feel you would have done differently if given a second chance? 6. Explain several pitfalls you encountered during the build process where you had to change your project from the proposal? 7. Do you feel you had all the necessary knowledge prior to beginning the energy project to build a powerful plant? If not, what other information could have been provided earlier to help? 8. Out of all the labs and the project, which activity do you feel you learned the most that will help you with your student success at ASU? Why? 9. Overall, explain your experience with FSE 100; for example, was it positive, negative, helpful in deciding your major, frustrating, too easy, too hard? 10. Provide a picture of you and your team working together.

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ENG 100 – Critique Assignment Sheet Rough Draft Due for Peer Response: Tuesday, September 29 First Draft Due (submit for feedback): Thursday, October 1 Final Draft with Outline Due: Thursday, October 8 Highlighting, Labeling, and Reflection: Thursday, October 8 Submit hard copies in class and upload to turnitin.com (Password: English, Class ID: 10423941) What is a Critique? A critique is a “formal evaluation [that offers your] judgment of a text—whether the reading was effective, ineffective, valuable, or trivial.” In a critique, “your goal is to convince readers to accept your judgments concerning the quality of the reading” based on specific criteria you have established (Wilhoit 87). Additionally, a critique is comprised of many integrated parts: introduction to the text, introduction to and brief background on the general topic, brief summary properly placed in the essay, a discussion of the criteria chosen for evaluation, a discussion of the criteria using specific examples/information from the text (this discussion should be the largest section of your essay by far!!), instances of personal response, and a conclusion. All of these items should relate to your overall evaluation/thesis of the text. The Assignment: Instead of a written essay, your “text” will be either a movie or a documentary. You will follow the same standards that you would use for a critique based off of an essay but you will adapt the integrated parts to fit a film critique. In order to effectively address this assignment, complete the following steps: STEP I: Choose either a movie or documentary • Base your choice on the strength of your feelings, whether hate, love, respect, etc., because you do not have to like the film in order to write a solid and coherent critique. You might have more to say about a film you dislike. Also choose a genre of film that you understand (i.e. romantic comedy, drama, indie-film, comedy, documentary). • Think about the important components for this specific genre. STEP II: Watch and Annotate the film • Note the major points within the film, how you felt while watching it, and what made you feel that way. • Keep in mind the film’s genre and whether or not your chosen film fits any of those criteria. STEP III: Analyze (break the film into parts) • Break the film down into your genre-driven criteria. • Choose 4-5 criteria and then determine what sections/components of the film either represent effectiveness or ineffectiveness. STEP IV: Evaluate the film (using the criteria and your personal standards) • Evaluate the film according to the criteria list we will generate in class. • To help create your thesis claim, determine whether the film, based on your criteria and standards, is an excellent, mediocre, terrible, etc. representation of your chosen genre. • For example: While the costume and design are fantastic and interesting, the film 300 is a mediocre example of historical drama because the history of Greece and Asia is inaccurate and the female characters are weak. STEP V: Find outside sources—one should agree with you and one should disagree • Check out a review website, such as imdb.com, and locate a few reviews of your film. In your critique, you will be expected to reference other film reviewers to develop and support your own arguments. Please note that those reviews must be cited properly, both in-text citations and the Works Cited page entries. The basic structure of the critique is as follows: • An introduction that o Introduces the film and provides an adequate amount of background information, including the intended audience, to give the reader context (i.e. a cartoon might not be meant for college-age viewers) o Includes a thesis statement that presents the film as either an excellent, mediocre, or terrible representation of your chosen genre o Explains at least three-four different criteria as the basis for your thesis/argument • A summary that is o Brief, neutral and comprehensive o No more than one paragraph in length • Body Paragraphs including o Support of your thesis using specific examples from the film o More than one example to support your argument o Either direct quotes or paraphrased information from the source text, reviews, outside information (websites, blogs, credible sources) or a combination of all three to support your argument • A counter-claim o Based on an outside review/blog/article disagreeing with your opinion or one criteria o Includes either a refutation or concession of the reviewer’s opinion • A conclusion including o A restatement of your main points and thesis o A final recommendation • A Work Cited page that o Includes all referenced materials including the source text The bulk of your critique should consist of your qualified opinion of the film – unlike the summary, your opinion matters here. In the body of your paper, you will need about three to five main points to support your thesis statement. You will develop each of these points in a section of your essay, each section consisting of about three paragraphs. You will make claims in your topic sentences, provide examples from the text, and then explain your reasons, using source support where possible. Evaluation A successful critique will contain all of the following: • Creative and clearly stated criteria • A debatable thesis statement • A brief background and summary of the film • 80% of the essay is located within the body paragraphs • Topic sentences that transition from one criteria to the next • Body paragraphs clearly and accurately reflecting your criteria and opinion • Body paragraphs that include more than one example as support • Conclusion including a summation and thoughtful recommendation • Correct MLA documentation including signal phrases and in-text citations • A Work Cited page including all sources referenced • Correct grammar and mechanics • Effective and meaningful transitions • Meaningful and descriptive word choices • Literary present tense and grammatical 3rd person • Length of 3-5 pages • Follows the basic structure for a critique Possible Points (25 % of final grade): • Outline 5 % • Peer Response Workshop with Rough Draft 5 % • Highlighted Revisions, & Reflection 10 % • Final Draft: 80 % Upload to Turnitin.com, using Password: English and Class ID: 10423941. Your grade will not be finalized until you have done this.

ENG 100 – Critique Assignment Sheet Rough Draft Due for Peer Response: Tuesday, September 29 First Draft Due (submit for feedback): Thursday, October 1 Final Draft with Outline Due: Thursday, October 8 Highlighting, Labeling, and Reflection: Thursday, October 8 Submit hard copies in class and upload to turnitin.com (Password: English, Class ID: 10423941) What is a Critique? A critique is a “formal evaluation [that offers your] judgment of a text—whether the reading was effective, ineffective, valuable, or trivial.” In a critique, “your goal is to convince readers to accept your judgments concerning the quality of the reading” based on specific criteria you have established (Wilhoit 87). Additionally, a critique is comprised of many integrated parts: introduction to the text, introduction to and brief background on the general topic, brief summary properly placed in the essay, a discussion of the criteria chosen for evaluation, a discussion of the criteria using specific examples/information from the text (this discussion should be the largest section of your essay by far!!), instances of personal response, and a conclusion. All of these items should relate to your overall evaluation/thesis of the text. The Assignment: Instead of a written essay, your “text” will be either a movie or a documentary. You will follow the same standards that you would use for a critique based off of an essay but you will adapt the integrated parts to fit a film critique. In order to effectively address this assignment, complete the following steps: STEP I: Choose either a movie or documentary • Base your choice on the strength of your feelings, whether hate, love, respect, etc., because you do not have to like the film in order to write a solid and coherent critique. You might have more to say about a film you dislike. Also choose a genre of film that you understand (i.e. romantic comedy, drama, indie-film, comedy, documentary). • Think about the important components for this specific genre. STEP II: Watch and Annotate the film • Note the major points within the film, how you felt while watching it, and what made you feel that way. • Keep in mind the film’s genre and whether or not your chosen film fits any of those criteria. STEP III: Analyze (break the film into parts) • Break the film down into your genre-driven criteria. • Choose 4-5 criteria and then determine what sections/components of the film either represent effectiveness or ineffectiveness. STEP IV: Evaluate the film (using the criteria and your personal standards) • Evaluate the film according to the criteria list we will generate in class. • To help create your thesis claim, determine whether the film, based on your criteria and standards, is an excellent, mediocre, terrible, etc. representation of your chosen genre. • For example: While the costume and design are fantastic and interesting, the film 300 is a mediocre example of historical drama because the history of Greece and Asia is inaccurate and the female characters are weak. STEP V: Find outside sources—one should agree with you and one should disagree • Check out a review website, such as imdb.com, and locate a few reviews of your film. In your critique, you will be expected to reference other film reviewers to develop and support your own arguments. Please note that those reviews must be cited properly, both in-text citations and the Works Cited page entries. The basic structure of the critique is as follows: • An introduction that o Introduces the film and provides an adequate amount of background information, including the intended audience, to give the reader context (i.e. a cartoon might not be meant for college-age viewers) o Includes a thesis statement that presents the film as either an excellent, mediocre, or terrible representation of your chosen genre o Explains at least three-four different criteria as the basis for your thesis/argument • A summary that is o Brief, neutral and comprehensive o No more than one paragraph in length • Body Paragraphs including o Support of your thesis using specific examples from the film o More than one example to support your argument o Either direct quotes or paraphrased information from the source text, reviews, outside information (websites, blogs, credible sources) or a combination of all three to support your argument • A counter-claim o Based on an outside review/blog/article disagreeing with your opinion or one criteria o Includes either a refutation or concession of the reviewer’s opinion • A conclusion including o A restatement of your main points and thesis o A final recommendation • A Work Cited page that o Includes all referenced materials including the source text The bulk of your critique should consist of your qualified opinion of the film – unlike the summary, your opinion matters here. In the body of your paper, you will need about three to five main points to support your thesis statement. You will develop each of these points in a section of your essay, each section consisting of about three paragraphs. You will make claims in your topic sentences, provide examples from the text, and then explain your reasons, using source support where possible. Evaluation A successful critique will contain all of the following: • Creative and clearly stated criteria • A debatable thesis statement • A brief background and summary of the film • 80% of the essay is located within the body paragraphs • Topic sentences that transition from one criteria to the next • Body paragraphs clearly and accurately reflecting your criteria and opinion • Body paragraphs that include more than one example as support • Conclusion including a summation and thoughtful recommendation • Correct MLA documentation including signal phrases and in-text citations • A Work Cited page including all sources referenced • Correct grammar and mechanics • Effective and meaningful transitions • Meaningful and descriptive word choices • Literary present tense and grammatical 3rd person • Length of 3-5 pages • Follows the basic structure for a critique Possible Points (25 % of final grade): • Outline 5 % • Peer Response Workshop with Rough Draft 5 % • Highlighted Revisions, & Reflection 10 % • Final Draft: 80 % Upload to Turnitin.com, using Password: English and Class ID: 10423941. Your grade will not be finalized until you have done this.

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Que 1: studies have shown that healthy menstruating women : a) Should not participate in sports b) often feel ill or weak when exercising c) are able to safely engage in athletic activities d) can contaminate others and should not engage in contact sports

Que 1: studies have shown that healthy menstruating women : a) Should not participate in sports b) often feel ill or weak when exercising c) are able to safely engage in athletic activities d) can contaminate others and should not engage in contact sports

Que 1: studies have shown that healthy menstruating women : … Read More...