4. A farmer in Georgia has a 100-acre farm on which to plant watermelons and cantaloupes. Every acre planted with watermelons requires 50 gallons of water per day and must be prepared for planting with 20 pounds of fertilizer. Every acre planted with cantaloupes requires 75 gallons of water per day and must be prepared with for planting with 15 pounds of fertilizer. The farmer estimates that it will take 2 hours of labor to harvest each acre planted with watermelons and 2.5 hours of labor for each acre planted with cantaloupes. He believes that watermelons will selce for about $3 each, and cantaloupes will sell for about $1 each. Every acre planted with watermelons is expected to yield 90 salable units. Every acre planted with cantaloupes is expected to yield 300 salable units. The farmer can pump 6,000 gallons of water per day for irrigation purposes from a shallow well. He can buy as much fertilizer as he needs at a cost of $10 per 50-pound bag. Finally, the farmer can hire laborers to the harvest the fields at a rate of $5 per hour. If the farmer sells all the watermelons and cantaloupes he produces, how many acres of each crop should the farmer plant to maximize profits? a. Reformulate an LP model for this problem. b. Sketch the feasible region for this problem. c. Determine the optimal solution to the problem by enumerating the corner points.

4. A farmer in Georgia has a 100-acre farm on which to plant watermelons and cantaloupes. Every acre planted with watermelons requires 50 gallons of water per day and must be prepared for planting with 20 pounds of fertilizer. Every acre planted with cantaloupes requires 75 gallons of water per day and must be prepared with for planting with 15 pounds of fertilizer. The farmer estimates that it will take 2 hours of labor to harvest each acre planted with watermelons and 2.5 hours of labor for each acre planted with cantaloupes. He believes that watermelons will selce for about $3 each, and cantaloupes will sell for about $1 each. Every acre planted with watermelons is expected to yield 90 salable units. Every acre planted with cantaloupes is expected to yield 300 salable units. The farmer can pump 6,000 gallons of water per day for irrigation purposes from a shallow well. He can buy as much fertilizer as he needs at a cost of $10 per 50-pound bag. Finally, the farmer can hire laborers to the harvest the fields at a rate of $5 per hour. If the farmer sells all the watermelons and cantaloupes he produces, how many acres of each crop should the farmer plant to maximize profits? a. Reformulate an LP model for this problem. b. Sketch the feasible region for this problem. c. Determine the optimal solution to the problem by enumerating the corner points.

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Consciously and sub-consciously we have “boxed” leadership in the same way. Looking back we interpret events and interactions, sort out the relevant and important, and apply meaning to the events. This assignment we will use Steve Jobs as our point of focus and our source for leadership events– our retrospective examination of his life as a leader. Assess Jobs as a leader from each perspective: 1. Traits (why traits failed) 2. Style (why style was underutilized) 3. Skills (skills that should have been used) Explain how Jobs’ leadership is explained through the lens of each: 1. Path-Goal 2. LMX 3. Transactional 4. Transformational 5. Charismatic 6. Authentic Non-traditional: 1. Follower (was Jobs a follower, how were followers a part of Jobs’ leadership?) 2. Conclusion (final heading – best represents Jobs and why others were ruled out) • APA format (margins, font, spacing) • APA in-text citations when needed • APA reference page • Proofread for grammar and content • Ensure that all headings and questions are addressed See agenda for headings Remember, this is a detailed analysis. Each of the above (a-j) should be a heading and explain how Jobs, as a leader, represents (or does not represent) the corresponding school of thought. Provide supplemental sources to give your position more credibility, but keep in mind that this is not a biography of Jobs (there are many recent biographies that do not qualify as acceptable sources for this assignment). Finally, which leadership perspective best identifies Steve Jobs as a leader? Explain why, and explain why other options were ruled out (k).

Consciously and sub-consciously we have “boxed” leadership in the same way. Looking back we interpret events and interactions, sort out the relevant and important, and apply meaning to the events. This assignment we will use Steve Jobs as our point of focus and our source for leadership events– our retrospective examination of his life as a leader. Assess Jobs as a leader from each perspective: 1. Traits (why traits failed) 2. Style (why style was underutilized) 3. Skills (skills that should have been used) Explain how Jobs’ leadership is explained through the lens of each: 1. Path-Goal 2. LMX 3. Transactional 4. Transformational 5. Charismatic 6. Authentic Non-traditional: 1. Follower (was Jobs a follower, how were followers a part of Jobs’ leadership?) 2. Conclusion (final heading – best represents Jobs and why others were ruled out) • APA format (margins, font, spacing) • APA in-text citations when needed • APA reference page • Proofread for grammar and content • Ensure that all headings and questions are addressed See agenda for headings Remember, this is a detailed analysis. Each of the above (a-j) should be a heading and explain how Jobs, as a leader, represents (or does not represent) the corresponding school of thought. Provide supplemental sources to give your position more credibility, but keep in mind that this is not a biography of Jobs (there are many recent biographies that do not qualify as acceptable sources for this assignment). Finally, which leadership perspective best identifies Steve Jobs as a leader? Explain why, and explain why other options were ruled out (k).

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BI 102 Lab 1 Writing Assignment How did the different concentrations of sucrose impact osmotic rate? This assignment requires you to evaluate a hypothesis and communicate the results of your experiment on the rate of osmosis into sucrose solutions of varying concentrations. The questions below are meant to guide you to reporting the key findings of your experiment and help you think through how to explain the findings and draw conclusions from them in a scientific manner. ASSIGNMENT: Please respond to the following questions to complete your laboratory write up. For this assignment you will only focus on the osmosis of water into sucrose concentrations of varying concentration. Make sure that your write up is accurate, and clearly written so that it is easily readable. A grading rubric is provided on the second page of this assignment. To earn full points on your write up, you must provide answers that align to the “meets” column of your grading rubric as well as meeting all “Quality of Writing and Mechanics” elements described in the rubric. There are also some tips on pages 3-4 of this assignment to help you succeed. FORMAT: • Type your responses, using 1.5 or double spacing. • Include the section headings (Hypothesis, Results, Analysis) and question number (example: 1, 2, 3, etc) in your answers but do not rewrite the question. • Graphs may be made with a computer program (example: Microsoft excel, Mac numbers, etc) or may be neatly produced with a ruler on graphing paper. • Print out the cover sheet on page 2 of this assignment, read and sign the academic honesty statement, and submit it with your write up. Your instructor WILL NOT accept a write up without the signed cover sheet. DUE DATE: Your write up is due at the beginning of class next week. Late assignments will have 1 point deducted per day up to 5 days, at which point the assignment will be assigned 0 points. Hypothesis and Prediction – Part 1 of Rubric 1. What did you think was going to happen in this experiment and why? You may find it helpful to state your answers to these questions as an “if-then” hypothesis-prediction. Be sure you have included a biological rationale that explains WHY you made this hypothesis/prediction. (You worked on this in question 2 on page 10 of this lab activity) Results – Part 2 of Rubric 2. How did the different concentrations of sucrose impact osmotic rate? Answer this question by creating a line graph that shows the results of your experiment. If you need assistance building a graph, there is a Guide to Graphing resource available on your Moodle lab course site. Analysis- Part 3 of Rubric 3. Explain why you think that the results shown in your graph support or refute your hypothesis (remember we never “prove” anything in science). Consider all your data and the overall data pattern as you answer this question. Don’t ignore unusual data that may not seem to fit into a specific patterns (“outliers”). Explain what you think might be behind these unusual data points. 4. What is the biological significance of your results? What biological concepts explain completely why these events happened in the experiment? How do these results help you understand the biology of the cell and how materials move back and forth across the cell membrane? (A hint: refer back to questions 1A-1F on page 10 of this lab activity). Think about giving a specific example. References- Mechanics Checklist 5. Provide at least one full citation (make sure you include an in-text citation that pinpoints where you used this resource) for a resource you made use of in performing the experiment, understanding the concepts and writing this assignment. (Perhaps your lab manual? Your textbook? A website?) If you used more than one resource, you need to cite each one! If you need help with citations, a Guide to Citing References is available on your Moodle lab course site. Please print out and submit this cover sheet with your lab writeup! Lab Writeup Assignment (1) Assessment Rubric-­‐ 10 points total Name: ________________________________________ Element Misses (1 point) Approaches (2 points) Meets (3 points) Hypothesis Clarity/Specificity Testability Rationale ___Hypothesis is unclear and hardto- understand ___Hypothesis is not testable ___No biological rationale for hypothesis or rationale is fully inaccurate ___Hypothesis included is clearly stated, but not specific or lacks specific details __Hypothesis is testable, but not in a feasible way in this lab ___Some foundation for hypothesis, but based in part on biological inaccuracy ___Hypothesis included is clearly stated and very specific ___Hypothesis is testable and could be tested within lab parameters ___Rationale for hypothesis is grounded in accurate biological information Graph Title Axes Variables Key Graph clarity Data accuracy ___Graph lacks a title ___Axes are not labeled ___Variables not addressed in graph ___No key or way to tell data points apart ___Graph is hard to read and comparisons cannot be made: Inappropriate graph type or use of scale ___Data graphed is inaccurate or does not relate to experiment ___Graph has a title that is not very descriptive ___Axes are either unlabeled, or units are unclear or wrong ___Variables addressed in graph, but not on correct axes ___Key included, but is hard to understand ___Graph is somewhat readable, comparisons can be made with difficulty: Appropriate graph type, but not scaled well ___Data graphed is partially accurate; some data is missing ___Graph has a concise, descriptive title ___Axes are labeled, including clarification of units used ___Variables on correct axes ___A clear, easy-to-use key to data points is included ___Graph is clearly readable and comparisons between treatments are easy to make: Graph type and scale are appropriate to data ___Data graphed is accurate and includes all relevant data, including controls (if needed) Analysis Hypothesis Scientific language Data addressed Explanation ___Hypothesis is not addressed ___Hypothesis is described using language like proven, true, or right ___No explanations for data patterns observed in graph or data does not support conclusions. ___No biological explanation for data trends or explanations are completely inaccurate ___Hypothesis is mentioned, but not linked well to data ___Hypothesis is not consistently described as supported or refuted ___Some data considered in conclusions but other data is ignored. Any unusual “outliers” are ignored ___Explanations include minimal or some inaccurate biological concepts ___Hypothesis is evaluated based upon data ___Hypothesis is consistently described as supported or refuted ___All data collected is considered and addressed by conclusions, including presence of outliers, ___Explanations include relevant and accurate biological concepts Quality of Writing and Mechanics: Worth 1 point. Writeup should meet all of the following criteria! Yes No ☐ ☐ Write up includes your name, the date, and your lab section ☐ ☐ Write up is free from spelling and grammatical errors (make sure you proofread!!) ☐ ☐ Write up is clear and easy-to-understand ☐ ☐ Write up includes full citation for at least one reference with corresponding in-text citation ☐ ☐ All portions of write up are clearly labeled, and question numbers are included Plagiarism refers to the use of original work, ideas, or text that are not your own. This includes cut-and-paste from websites, copying directly from texts, and copying the work of others, including fellow students. Telling someone your answers to the questions (including telling someone how to make their graph, question #2), or asking for the answers to any question, is cheating. (Asking someone how to make the graph for this assignment is NOT the same as asking for help learning excel or some other software). All forms of cheating, including plagiarism and copying of work will result in an immediate zero for the exam, quiz, or assignment. In the case of copying, all parties involved in the unethical behavior will earn zeros. Cheating students will be referred to the Student Conduct Committee for further action. You also have the right to appeal to the Student Conduct Committee. I have read and understand the plagiarism statement. ____________________________________________________ Signature Guidelines for Good Quality Scientific Reports Hypothesis and Prediction: The hypothesis is a tentative explanation for the phenomenon. Remember that: • A good hypothesis and prediction is testable (and should be testable under the conditions of our lab environment; For example, if your hypothesis requires shooting a rocket into space, then its not really testable under our laboratory conditions). • Your explanation can be ruled out through testing, or falsified. • A good hypothesis and prediction is detailed and specific in what it is testing. • A good hypothesis provides a rationale or explanation for why you think your prediction is reasonable and this rationale is based on what we know about biology. • A good prediction is specific and can be tested with a specific experiment. Examples*: I think that diet soda will float and regular soda will sink. {This hypothesis misses the goal. It is not specific as we don’t know where the sodas are floating and sinking, and it does not provide any explanation to explain why the hypothesis makes sense} Because diet soda does not contain sugar and regular soda does, the diet soda will float in a bucket of water, while regular soda will sink. {This hypothesis approaches the goal. It is more specific about the conditions, and it provides a partial explanation about why the hypothesis makes sense, but the connection between sugar and sinking is unclear} If diet soda does not contain sugar, then its density (mass/volume) is lower than that of regular soda which does contain sugar, and so diet soda will float in a bucket of water while regular soda sinks. {This hypothesis meets the goal. It is specific and the rationale- sugar affects density and density is what determines floating or sinking in water- is clearly articulated} *Note that these examples are for different experiments and investigations and NOT about your osmosis lab. They are provided only to help you think about what you need to include in your write up. Graph: The graph is a visual representation of the data you gathered while testing your hypothesis. Remember that: • A graph needs a concise title that clearly describes the data that it is showing. • Data must be put on the correct axes of the graph. In general, the data you collected (representing what you are trying to find out about) goes on the vertical (Y) axis. The supporting data that that describes how, when or under what conditions you collected your data goes on the horizontal (X) axis. (For this reason time nearly always goes on the X-axis). • Axes must be labeled, including the units in which data were recorded • Data points should be clearly marked and identified; a key is helpful if more than one group of data is included in the graph. • The scale of a graph is important. It should be consistent (there should be no change in the units or increments on a single axis) and appropriate to the data you collected Examples: {This graph misses the goal. There is no title, nor is there a key to help distinguish what the data points mean. The scale is too large- from 0 to 100 with an increment of 50, when the maximum number in the graph is 25- and makes it hard to interpret this graph. The x-axis is labeled, but without units (the months) and the y-axis has units, but the label is incomplete- number of what?} {This graph meets the goal. There is a descriptive title, and all of the axes are clearly labeled with units. There is a key so that we can distinguish what each set of data points represent. The dependent variable (number of individuals) is correctly placed on the y-axis with the independent variable of time placed on the x-axis. The scale of 0-30 is appropriate to the data, with each line on the x-axis representing an increment of 5.} 0 50 100 Number Month 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 March April May June July Number of individuals Month (2011) Population size of three different madtom catiCish in the Marais de Cygnes River in Spring/Summer 2011 Brindled madtom Neosho madtom Slender madtom Analysis: You need to evaluate your hypothesis based on the data patterns shown by your graph. Remember that: • You use data to determine support or refute your hypothesis. It is only possible to support a hypothesis, not to “prove” one (that would require testing every possible permutation and combination of factors). Your evaluation of your hypothesis should not be contradicted by the pattern shown by your data. • Refer back to the prediction you made as part of your hypothesis and use your data to justify your decision to support or refute your hypothesis. • In the “if” part of your hypothesis you should have provided a rationale, or explanation for the prediction you made in your hypothesis (“then” part of hypothesis”). Use this to help you explain why you think you observed the specific pattern of data revealed in your graph. • You should consider all of the data you collected in examining the support (or lack of support for your hypothesis). If there are unusual data points or “outliers” that don’t seem to fit the general pattern in your graph, explain what you think those mean. Examples: I was right. Diet Pepsi floated and so did Apricot Nectar. Regular Pepsi sank. Obviously the regular Pepsi was heavier. This helps us understand the concept of density, which is a really important one. {This analysis misses the goal. The hypothesis isn’t actually mentioned and the data is only briefly described. There is no explanation of the importance of the Apricot Nectar results. Finally, there is no connection to how these results help understand density or why it is biologically important} I hypothesized that diet soda would float, and all three cans of diet Pepsi did float while the regular Pepsi sank. This supports my hypothesis. Both types of Pepsi were 8.5 fluid ounces in volume, but the regular Pepsi also contained 16 grams of sugar. This means that the regular Pepsi had 16 more grams of mass provided by the sugar in the same amount of volume. This would lead to an increase in density, which explains why the regular soda cans sank. When we put in a can of Apricot Nectar, which had 19 grams of sugar, it floated. This was unexpected, but I think it is explained by the fact that an Apricot Nectar can had a volume of 7 fluid ounces, but the dimensions of the can are the same as that of a Pepsi can. A same-sized can with less liquid probably has an air space that helped it float. The results of this experiment help us understand how the air bladder of a fish, which creates an air space inside the fish, helps it float in the water and also how seaweeds and other living things with air spaces or other factors that decrease their density keep from sinking to the bottom of the water. {This analysis meets the goal. It clearly ties the hypothesis to the results and outlines what they mean. It describes how the results support the hypothesis, but also explains a possible reason behind the unusual results of the Apricot Nectar. Finally, there is a link to how this experiment helps us understand biology}

BI 102 Lab 1 Writing Assignment How did the different concentrations of sucrose impact osmotic rate? This assignment requires you to evaluate a hypothesis and communicate the results of your experiment on the rate of osmosis into sucrose solutions of varying concentrations. The questions below are meant to guide you to reporting the key findings of your experiment and help you think through how to explain the findings and draw conclusions from them in a scientific manner. ASSIGNMENT: Please respond to the following questions to complete your laboratory write up. For this assignment you will only focus on the osmosis of water into sucrose concentrations of varying concentration. Make sure that your write up is accurate, and clearly written so that it is easily readable. A grading rubric is provided on the second page of this assignment. To earn full points on your write up, you must provide answers that align to the “meets” column of your grading rubric as well as meeting all “Quality of Writing and Mechanics” elements described in the rubric. There are also some tips on pages 3-4 of this assignment to help you succeed. FORMAT: • Type your responses, using 1.5 or double spacing. • Include the section headings (Hypothesis, Results, Analysis) and question number (example: 1, 2, 3, etc) in your answers but do not rewrite the question. • Graphs may be made with a computer program (example: Microsoft excel, Mac numbers, etc) or may be neatly produced with a ruler on graphing paper. • Print out the cover sheet on page 2 of this assignment, read and sign the academic honesty statement, and submit it with your write up. Your instructor WILL NOT accept a write up without the signed cover sheet. DUE DATE: Your write up is due at the beginning of class next week. Late assignments will have 1 point deducted per day up to 5 days, at which point the assignment will be assigned 0 points. Hypothesis and Prediction – Part 1 of Rubric 1. What did you think was going to happen in this experiment and why? You may find it helpful to state your answers to these questions as an “if-then” hypothesis-prediction. Be sure you have included a biological rationale that explains WHY you made this hypothesis/prediction. (You worked on this in question 2 on page 10 of this lab activity) Results – Part 2 of Rubric 2. How did the different concentrations of sucrose impact osmotic rate? Answer this question by creating a line graph that shows the results of your experiment. If you need assistance building a graph, there is a Guide to Graphing resource available on your Moodle lab course site. Analysis- Part 3 of Rubric 3. Explain why you think that the results shown in your graph support or refute your hypothesis (remember we never “prove” anything in science). Consider all your data and the overall data pattern as you answer this question. Don’t ignore unusual data that may not seem to fit into a specific patterns (“outliers”). Explain what you think might be behind these unusual data points. 4. What is the biological significance of your results? What biological concepts explain completely why these events happened in the experiment? How do these results help you understand the biology of the cell and how materials move back and forth across the cell membrane? (A hint: refer back to questions 1A-1F on page 10 of this lab activity). Think about giving a specific example. References- Mechanics Checklist 5. Provide at least one full citation (make sure you include an in-text citation that pinpoints where you used this resource) for a resource you made use of in performing the experiment, understanding the concepts and writing this assignment. (Perhaps your lab manual? Your textbook? A website?) If you used more than one resource, you need to cite each one! If you need help with citations, a Guide to Citing References is available on your Moodle lab course site. Please print out and submit this cover sheet with your lab writeup! Lab Writeup Assignment (1) Assessment Rubric-­‐ 10 points total Name: ________________________________________ Element Misses (1 point) Approaches (2 points) Meets (3 points) Hypothesis Clarity/Specificity Testability Rationale ___Hypothesis is unclear and hardto- understand ___Hypothesis is not testable ___No biological rationale for hypothesis or rationale is fully inaccurate ___Hypothesis included is clearly stated, but not specific or lacks specific details __Hypothesis is testable, but not in a feasible way in this lab ___Some foundation for hypothesis, but based in part on biological inaccuracy ___Hypothesis included is clearly stated and very specific ___Hypothesis is testable and could be tested within lab parameters ___Rationale for hypothesis is grounded in accurate biological information Graph Title Axes Variables Key Graph clarity Data accuracy ___Graph lacks a title ___Axes are not labeled ___Variables not addressed in graph ___No key or way to tell data points apart ___Graph is hard to read and comparisons cannot be made: Inappropriate graph type or use of scale ___Data graphed is inaccurate or does not relate to experiment ___Graph has a title that is not very descriptive ___Axes are either unlabeled, or units are unclear or wrong ___Variables addressed in graph, but not on correct axes ___Key included, but is hard to understand ___Graph is somewhat readable, comparisons can be made with difficulty: Appropriate graph type, but not scaled well ___Data graphed is partially accurate; some data is missing ___Graph has a concise, descriptive title ___Axes are labeled, including clarification of units used ___Variables on correct axes ___A clear, easy-to-use key to data points is included ___Graph is clearly readable and comparisons between treatments are easy to make: Graph type and scale are appropriate to data ___Data graphed is accurate and includes all relevant data, including controls (if needed) Analysis Hypothesis Scientific language Data addressed Explanation ___Hypothesis is not addressed ___Hypothesis is described using language like proven, true, or right ___No explanations for data patterns observed in graph or data does not support conclusions. ___No biological explanation for data trends or explanations are completely inaccurate ___Hypothesis is mentioned, but not linked well to data ___Hypothesis is not consistently described as supported or refuted ___Some data considered in conclusions but other data is ignored. Any unusual “outliers” are ignored ___Explanations include minimal or some inaccurate biological concepts ___Hypothesis is evaluated based upon data ___Hypothesis is consistently described as supported or refuted ___All data collected is considered and addressed by conclusions, including presence of outliers, ___Explanations include relevant and accurate biological concepts Quality of Writing and Mechanics: Worth 1 point. Writeup should meet all of the following criteria! Yes No ☐ ☐ Write up includes your name, the date, and your lab section ☐ ☐ Write up is free from spelling and grammatical errors (make sure you proofread!!) ☐ ☐ Write up is clear and easy-to-understand ☐ ☐ Write up includes full citation for at least one reference with corresponding in-text citation ☐ ☐ All portions of write up are clearly labeled, and question numbers are included Plagiarism refers to the use of original work, ideas, or text that are not your own. This includes cut-and-paste from websites, copying directly from texts, and copying the work of others, including fellow students. Telling someone your answers to the questions (including telling someone how to make their graph, question #2), or asking for the answers to any question, is cheating. (Asking someone how to make the graph for this assignment is NOT the same as asking for help learning excel or some other software). All forms of cheating, including plagiarism and copying of work will result in an immediate zero for the exam, quiz, or assignment. In the case of copying, all parties involved in the unethical behavior will earn zeros. Cheating students will be referred to the Student Conduct Committee for further action. You also have the right to appeal to the Student Conduct Committee. I have read and understand the plagiarism statement. ____________________________________________________ Signature Guidelines for Good Quality Scientific Reports Hypothesis and Prediction: The hypothesis is a tentative explanation for the phenomenon. Remember that: • A good hypothesis and prediction is testable (and should be testable under the conditions of our lab environment; For example, if your hypothesis requires shooting a rocket into space, then its not really testable under our laboratory conditions). • Your explanation can be ruled out through testing, or falsified. • A good hypothesis and prediction is detailed and specific in what it is testing. • A good hypothesis provides a rationale or explanation for why you think your prediction is reasonable and this rationale is based on what we know about biology. • A good prediction is specific and can be tested with a specific experiment. Examples*: I think that diet soda will float and regular soda will sink. {This hypothesis misses the goal. It is not specific as we don’t know where the sodas are floating and sinking, and it does not provide any explanation to explain why the hypothesis makes sense} Because diet soda does not contain sugar and regular soda does, the diet soda will float in a bucket of water, while regular soda will sink. {This hypothesis approaches the goal. It is more specific about the conditions, and it provides a partial explanation about why the hypothesis makes sense, but the connection between sugar and sinking is unclear} If diet soda does not contain sugar, then its density (mass/volume) is lower than that of regular soda which does contain sugar, and so diet soda will float in a bucket of water while regular soda sinks. {This hypothesis meets the goal. It is specific and the rationale- sugar affects density and density is what determines floating or sinking in water- is clearly articulated} *Note that these examples are for different experiments and investigations and NOT about your osmosis lab. They are provided only to help you think about what you need to include in your write up. Graph: The graph is a visual representation of the data you gathered while testing your hypothesis. Remember that: • A graph needs a concise title that clearly describes the data that it is showing. • Data must be put on the correct axes of the graph. In general, the data you collected (representing what you are trying to find out about) goes on the vertical (Y) axis. The supporting data that that describes how, when or under what conditions you collected your data goes on the horizontal (X) axis. (For this reason time nearly always goes on the X-axis). • Axes must be labeled, including the units in which data were recorded • Data points should be clearly marked and identified; a key is helpful if more than one group of data is included in the graph. • The scale of a graph is important. It should be consistent (there should be no change in the units or increments on a single axis) and appropriate to the data you collected Examples: {This graph misses the goal. There is no title, nor is there a key to help distinguish what the data points mean. The scale is too large- from 0 to 100 with an increment of 50, when the maximum number in the graph is 25- and makes it hard to interpret this graph. The x-axis is labeled, but without units (the months) and the y-axis has units, but the label is incomplete- number of what?} {This graph meets the goal. There is a descriptive title, and all of the axes are clearly labeled with units. There is a key so that we can distinguish what each set of data points represent. The dependent variable (number of individuals) is correctly placed on the y-axis with the independent variable of time placed on the x-axis. The scale of 0-30 is appropriate to the data, with each line on the x-axis representing an increment of 5.} 0 50 100 Number Month 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 March April May June July Number of individuals Month (2011) Population size of three different madtom catiCish in the Marais de Cygnes River in Spring/Summer 2011 Brindled madtom Neosho madtom Slender madtom Analysis: You need to evaluate your hypothesis based on the data patterns shown by your graph. Remember that: • You use data to determine support or refute your hypothesis. It is only possible to support a hypothesis, not to “prove” one (that would require testing every possible permutation and combination of factors). Your evaluation of your hypothesis should not be contradicted by the pattern shown by your data. • Refer back to the prediction you made as part of your hypothesis and use your data to justify your decision to support or refute your hypothesis. • In the “if” part of your hypothesis you should have provided a rationale, or explanation for the prediction you made in your hypothesis (“then” part of hypothesis”). Use this to help you explain why you think you observed the specific pattern of data revealed in your graph. • You should consider all of the data you collected in examining the support (or lack of support for your hypothesis). If there are unusual data points or “outliers” that don’t seem to fit the general pattern in your graph, explain what you think those mean. Examples: I was right. Diet Pepsi floated and so did Apricot Nectar. Regular Pepsi sank. Obviously the regular Pepsi was heavier. This helps us understand the concept of density, which is a really important one. {This analysis misses the goal. The hypothesis isn’t actually mentioned and the data is only briefly described. There is no explanation of the importance of the Apricot Nectar results. Finally, there is no connection to how these results help understand density or why it is biologically important} I hypothesized that diet soda would float, and all three cans of diet Pepsi did float while the regular Pepsi sank. This supports my hypothesis. Both types of Pepsi were 8.5 fluid ounces in volume, but the regular Pepsi also contained 16 grams of sugar. This means that the regular Pepsi had 16 more grams of mass provided by the sugar in the same amount of volume. This would lead to an increase in density, which explains why the regular soda cans sank. When we put in a can of Apricot Nectar, which had 19 grams of sugar, it floated. This was unexpected, but I think it is explained by the fact that an Apricot Nectar can had a volume of 7 fluid ounces, but the dimensions of the can are the same as that of a Pepsi can. A same-sized can with less liquid probably has an air space that helped it float. The results of this experiment help us understand how the air bladder of a fish, which creates an air space inside the fish, helps it float in the water and also how seaweeds and other living things with air spaces or other factors that decrease their density keep from sinking to the bottom of the water. {This analysis meets the goal. It clearly ties the hypothesis to the results and outlines what they mean. It describes how the results support the hypothesis, but also explains a possible reason behind the unusual results of the Apricot Nectar. Finally, there is a link to how this experiment helps us understand biology}

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ENGL 122-Geist Drew Writing Assignment #3 Your first draft is due Monday, Oct. 26 with 3 copies. Conference days: Oct.30th and Nov. 2nd Your revised draft is due Wednesday, Nov. 4th Your Assignment: Type a 4 page essay about a quote you think should be added to the Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial Quote Wall. This can be a quote from a human right’s activist, a well-known person from your country, or someone else in the world. The quote must be related to human rights! Make sure that the quote is not already on the AFHRMQW. Tell us about the person who said the quote, and when and why they said what they said. Help your reader understand what the person meant by what he/she said, and why it is important for other’s to remember. Finally, help your reader understand why this particular quote would be a good quote to include on the Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial Quote Wall for people to read. If you include information from outside sources, make sure that you give full credit following the correct MLA format for in-text citations and the Works Cited page. Remember that Knight Cite might be a helpful tool. Here are some things to consider while you are brainstorming ideas for this assignment: Why is this person and what he/she said important to the whole world and not just his/her country? What is the significance of what this person said (did) to the rest of the world? How does this person serve as an example to others? What can we learn from this person? Do this person’s ideas/words transcend place and time? That means, is this person’s words and ideas still true TODAY and will they continue to be true in the FUTURE? How has this person and their words influenced or impacted you or your way of thinking? How are this person’s words related to human rights? Requirements: 1. Your essay must be 4-pages, typed, double-spaced and have 1-inch margins. 2. Use essay format: Name, Date, Assignment Name, Title, Essay 3. Your essay should be written in paragraph form with each paragraph indented. 4. Your essay should have an interesting title that catches the attention of the reader. 5. Think about your intended audience. Consider your writer’s voice based on your audience. Criteria for evaluating this essay: 1. You must choose a quote that you think should be added to the AFHRMQW. 2. You must have a clear main idea that includes your chosen quote and why it should be added to the AFH RMQW. 3. Your essay should include details, description and support from your experience and others. 4. Include your opinions about how this person and what they said/did has had an impact on you and your life. 5. Make sure that you have followed the correct MLA format for documenting in-text citations for summaries, quotes and other references. 6. Include a Works Cited page if you use sources other than your own ideas. REMEMBER THAT REVSION IS THE KEY! Please come and see me if you have any questions. Make Writing Center appointments early. This is a busy time!

ENGL 122-Geist Drew Writing Assignment #3 Your first draft is due Monday, Oct. 26 with 3 copies. Conference days: Oct.30th and Nov. 2nd Your revised draft is due Wednesday, Nov. 4th Your Assignment: Type a 4 page essay about a quote you think should be added to the Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial Quote Wall. This can be a quote from a human right’s activist, a well-known person from your country, or someone else in the world. The quote must be related to human rights! Make sure that the quote is not already on the AFHRMQW. Tell us about the person who said the quote, and when and why they said what they said. Help your reader understand what the person meant by what he/she said, and why it is important for other’s to remember. Finally, help your reader understand why this particular quote would be a good quote to include on the Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial Quote Wall for people to read. If you include information from outside sources, make sure that you give full credit following the correct MLA format for in-text citations and the Works Cited page. Remember that Knight Cite might be a helpful tool. Here are some things to consider while you are brainstorming ideas for this assignment: Why is this person and what he/she said important to the whole world and not just his/her country? What is the significance of what this person said (did) to the rest of the world? How does this person serve as an example to others? What can we learn from this person? Do this person’s ideas/words transcend place and time? That means, is this person’s words and ideas still true TODAY and will they continue to be true in the FUTURE? How has this person and their words influenced or impacted you or your way of thinking? How are this person’s words related to human rights? Requirements: 1. Your essay must be 4-pages, typed, double-spaced and have 1-inch margins. 2. Use essay format: Name, Date, Assignment Name, Title, Essay 3. Your essay should be written in paragraph form with each paragraph indented. 4. Your essay should have an interesting title that catches the attention of the reader. 5. Think about your intended audience. Consider your writer’s voice based on your audience. Criteria for evaluating this essay: 1. You must choose a quote that you think should be added to the AFHRMQW. 2. You must have a clear main idea that includes your chosen quote and why it should be added to the AFH RMQW. 3. Your essay should include details, description and support from your experience and others. 4. Include your opinions about how this person and what they said/did has had an impact on you and your life. 5. Make sure that you have followed the correct MLA format for documenting in-text citations for summaries, quotes and other references. 6. Include a Works Cited page if you use sources other than your own ideas. REMEMBER THAT REVSION IS THE KEY! Please come and see me if you have any questions. Make Writing Center appointments early. This is a busy time!

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Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture Spring 2015 Look through popular magazines, and see if you can find advertisements that objectify women in order to sell a product. Alternately, you may use an advertisement on television (but make sure to provide a link to the ad so I can see it!). Study these images then write a paper about objectification that deals with all or some of the following: • What effect(s), if any, do you think the objectification of women’s bodies has on our culture? • Jean Kilbourne states “turning a human being into a thing is almost always the first step toward justifying violence against that person.” What do you think she means by this? Do you agree with her reasoning? Why or why not? • Some people would argue that depicting a woman’s body as an object is a form of art. What is your opinion of this point of view? Explain your reasoning. • Why do you think that women are objectified more often than men are? • How does sexualization and objectification play out differently across racial lines? • Kilbourne explains that the consequences of being objectified are different – and more serious – for women than for men. Do you agree? How is the world different for women than it is for men? How do objectified images of women interact with those in our culture differently from the way images of men do? Why is it important to look at images in the context of the culture? • What is the difference between sexual objectification and sexual subjectification? (Ros Gill ) • How do ads construct violent white masculinity and how does that vision of masculinity hurt both men and women? Throughout your written analysis, be sure to make clear and specific reference to the images you selected, and please submit these images with your paper. Make sure you engage with and reference to at least 4 of the following authors: Kilbourne, Bordo, Hunter & Soto, Rose, Durham, Gill, Katz, Schuchardt, Ono and Buescher. Guidelines:  Keep your content focused on structural, systemic, institutional factors rather than the individual: BE ANALYTICAL NOT ANECDOTAL.  Avoid using the first person or including personal stories/reactions. You must make sure to actively engage with your readings: these essays need to be informed and framed by the theoretical material you have been reading this semester.  Keep within the 4-6 page limit; use 12-point font, double spacing and 1-inch margins.  Use formal writing conventions (introduction/thesis statement, body, conclusion) and correct grammar. Resources may be cited within the text of your paper, i.e. (Walters, 2013).

Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture Spring 2015 Look through popular magazines, and see if you can find advertisements that objectify women in order to sell a product. Alternately, you may use an advertisement on television (but make sure to provide a link to the ad so I can see it!). Study these images then write a paper about objectification that deals with all or some of the following: • What effect(s), if any, do you think the objectification of women’s bodies has on our culture? • Jean Kilbourne states “turning a human being into a thing is almost always the first step toward justifying violence against that person.” What do you think she means by this? Do you agree with her reasoning? Why or why not? • Some people would argue that depicting a woman’s body as an object is a form of art. What is your opinion of this point of view? Explain your reasoning. • Why do you think that women are objectified more often than men are? • How does sexualization and objectification play out differently across racial lines? • Kilbourne explains that the consequences of being objectified are different – and more serious – for women than for men. Do you agree? How is the world different for women than it is for men? How do objectified images of women interact with those in our culture differently from the way images of men do? Why is it important to look at images in the context of the culture? • What is the difference between sexual objectification and sexual subjectification? (Ros Gill ) • How do ads construct violent white masculinity and how does that vision of masculinity hurt both men and women? Throughout your written analysis, be sure to make clear and specific reference to the images you selected, and please submit these images with your paper. Make sure you engage with and reference to at least 4 of the following authors: Kilbourne, Bordo, Hunter & Soto, Rose, Durham, Gill, Katz, Schuchardt, Ono and Buescher. Guidelines:  Keep your content focused on structural, systemic, institutional factors rather than the individual: BE ANALYTICAL NOT ANECDOTAL.  Avoid using the first person or including personal stories/reactions. You must make sure to actively engage with your readings: these essays need to be informed and framed by the theoretical material you have been reading this semester.  Keep within the 4-6 page limit; use 12-point font, double spacing and 1-inch margins.  Use formal writing conventions (introduction/thesis statement, body, conclusion) and correct grammar. Resources may be cited within the text of your paper, i.e. (Walters, 2013).

The objectification of women has been a very controversial topic … Read More...
c. A wall with an area 0f 35 m2 is made up of six layers. On the inside is plaster 20 mm thick, then there is the brick 100 mm thick, followed by the insulation of 60 mm thick, then the brick of 100 mm thick, then there is the insulation of 65 mm thick and finally brick 100 mm thick. Calculate the thermal resistance, the heat transfer between the layers and the overall heat transfer coefficient given that the thermal conductivity of plaster is 20 W/ m K, the thermal conductivity of the brick is 0.6 W/m K and the thermal conductivity of the insulation is 0.08 W/ m K. The inner surface temperature of the wall is 22oC and the outer is -4oC.

c. A wall with an area 0f 35 m2 is made up of six layers. On the inside is plaster 20 mm thick, then there is the brick 100 mm thick, followed by the insulation of 60 mm thick, then the brick of 100 mm thick, then there is the insulation of 65 mm thick and finally brick 100 mm thick. Calculate the thermal resistance, the heat transfer between the layers and the overall heat transfer coefficient given that the thermal conductivity of plaster is 20 W/ m K, the thermal conductivity of the brick is 0.6 W/m K and the thermal conductivity of the insulation is 0.08 W/ m K. The inner surface temperature of the wall is 22oC and the outer is -4oC.

1) R= R1+ R2+ R3+ R4+ R5+ R6             = … Read More...
Assignment 5 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, March 5, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 6.13 A hand presses down on the book in the figure. Part A Is the normal force of the table on the book larger than, smaller than, or equal to ? ANSWER: Correct mg Equal to Larger than Smaller than mg mg mg Problem 6.2 The three ropes in the figure are tied to a small, very light ring. Two of these ropes are anchored to walls at right angles with the tensions shown in the figure. Part A What is the magnitude of the tension in the third rope? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the direction of the tension in the third rope? Express your answer using two significant figures. T  3 T3 = 94 N T  3 Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct The Normal Force When an object rests on a surface, there is always a force perpendicular to the surface; we call this the normal force, denoted by . The two questions to the right will explore the normal force. Part A A man attempts to pick up his suitcase of weight by pulling straight up on the handle. However, he is unable to lift the suitcase from the floor. Which statement about the magnitude of the normal force acting on the suitcase is true during the time that the man pulls upward on the suitcase? Hint 1. How to approach this problem First, identify the forces that act on the suitcase and draw a free-body diagram. Then use the fact that the suitcase is in equilibrium, , to examine how the forces acting on the suitcase relate to each other. Hint 2. Identify the correct free-body diagram Which of the figures represents the free-body diagram of the suitcase while the man is pulling on the handle with a force of magnitude ? = 58   below horizontal n ws n F = 0 fpull Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B A B C D The magnitude of the normal force is equal to the magnitude of the weight of the suitcase. The magnitude of the normal force is equal to the magnitude of the weight of the suitcase minus the magnitude of the force of the pull. The magnitude of the normal force is equal to the sum of the magnitude of the force of the pull and the magnitude of the suitcase’s weight. The magnitude of the normal force is greater than the magnitude of the weight of the suitcase. Typesetting math: 100% Now assume that the man of weight is tired and decides to sit on his suitcase. Which statement about the magnitude of the normal force acting on the suitcase is true during the time that the man is sitting on the suitcase? Hint 1. Identify the correct free-body diagram. Which of the figures represents the free-body diagram while the man is sitting atop the suitcase? Here the vector labeled is a force that has the same magnitude as the man’s weight. ANSWER: wm n wm Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Recognize that the normal force acting on an object is not always equal to the weight of that object. This is an important point to understand. Problem 6.5 A construction worker with a weight of 880 stands on a roof that is sloped at 18 . Part A What is the magnitude of the normal force of the roof on the worker? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct A B C D The magnitude of the normal force is equal to the magnitude of the suitcase’s weight. The magnitude of the normal force is equal to the magnitude of the suitcase’s weight minus the magnitude of the man’s weight. The magnitude of the normal force is equal to the sum of the magnitude of the man’s weight and the magnitude of the suitcase’s weight. The magnitude of the normal force is less than the magnitude of the suitcase’s weight. N  n = 840 N Typesetting math: 100% Problem 6.6 In each of the two free-body diagrams, the forces are acting on a 3.0 object. Part A For diagram , find the value of , the -component of the acceleration. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B For diagram the part A, find the value of the -component of the acceleration. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: kg ax x ax = -0.67 m s2 ay, y Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part C For diagram , find the value of , the -component of the acceleration. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D For diagram the part C, find the value of , the -component of the acceleration. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: ay = 0 m s2 ax x ax = 0.67 m s2 ay y Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 6.7 In each of the two free-body diagrams, the forces are acting on a 3.0 object. Part A Find the value of , the component of the acceleration in diagram (a). Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct ay = 0 m s2 kg ax x ax = 0.99 m s2 Typesetting math: 100% Part B Find the value of , the component of the acceleration in diagram (a). Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C Find the value of , the component of the acceleration in diagram (b). Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D Find the value of , the component of the acceleration in diagram (b). Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct ay y ay = 0 m s2 ax x ax = -0.18 m s2 ay y ay = 0 m s2 Typesetting math: 100% Problem 6.10 A horizontal rope is tied to a 53.0 box on frictionless ice. What is the tension in the rope if: Part A The box is at rest? Express your answer as an integer and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B The box moves at a steady = 4.80 ? Express your answer as an integer and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C The box = 4.80 and = 4.60 ? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: kg T = 0 N vx m/s T = 0 N vx m/s ax m/s2 Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 6.14 It takes the elevator in a skyscraper 4.5 to reach its cruising speed of 11 . A 60 passenger gets aboard on the ground floor. Part A What is the passenger’s weight before the elevator starts moving? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the passenger’s weight while the elevator is speeding up? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the passenger’s weight after the elevator reaches its cruising speed? T = 244 N s m/s kg w = 590 N w = 730 N Typesetting math: 100% Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Block on an Incline A block lies on a plane raised an angle from the horizontal. Three forces act upon the block: , the force of gravity; , the normal force; and , the force of friction. The coefficient of friction is large enough to prevent the block from sliding . Part A Consider coordinate system a, with the x axis along the plane. Which forces lie along the axes? ANSWER: w = 590 N  F  w F n F  f Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part B Which forces lie along the axes of the coordinate system b, in which the y axis is vertical? ANSWER: Correct only only only and and and and and F  f F  n F  w F  f F  n F  f F  w F  n F w F  f F  n F w only only only and and and and and F  f F  n F  w F  f F  n F  f F  w F  n F w F  f F  n F w Typesetting math: 100% Usually the best advice is to choose coordinate system so that the acceleration of the system is directly along one of the coordinate axes. If the system isn’t accelerating, then you are better off choosing the coordinate system with the most vectors along the coordinate axes. But now you are going to ignore that advice. You will find the normal force, , using vertical coordinate system b. In these coordinates you will find the magnitude appearing in both the x and y equations, each multiplied by a trigonometric function. Part C Because the block is not moving, the sum of the y components of the forces acting on the block must be zero. Find an expression for the sum of the y components of the forces acting on the block, using coordinate system b. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , , and . Hint 1. Find the y component of Write an expression for , the y component of the force , using coordinate system b. Express your answer in terms of and . Hint 1. Some geometry help – a useful angle The smaller angle between and the y-axis is also , as shown in the figure. ANSWER: F  n Fn Fn Ff Fw  F n Fny F  n Fn  F  n  Typesetting math: 100% Hint 2. Find the y component of Write an expression for , the y component of the force , using coordinate system b. Express your answer in terms of and . Hint 1. Some geometry help – a useful angle The smaller angle between and the x-axis is also , as shown in the figure. ANSWER: ANSWER: Fny = Fncos() F f Ffy F f Ff  F  f  Ffy = Ffsin() Fy = 0 = Fncos() + Ffsin() − Fw Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part D Because the block is not moving, the sum of the x components of the forces acting on the block must be zero. Find an expression for the sum of the x components of the forces acting on the block, using coordinate system b. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , , and . Hint 1. Find the x component of Write an expression for , the x component of the force , using coordinate system b. Express your answer in terms of and . ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part E To find the magnitude of the normal force, you must express in terms of since is an unknown. Using the equations you found in the two previous parts, find an expression for involving and but not . Hint 1. How to approach the problem From your answers to the previous two parts you should have two force equations ( and ). Combine these equations to eliminate . The key is to multiply the Fn Ff Fw  F n Fnx F  n Fn  Fnx = −Fnsin() Fx = 0 = −Fnsin() + Ffcos() Fn Fw Ff Fn Fw  Ff Typesetting math: 100% Fy = 0 Fx = 0 Ff equation for the y components by and the equation for the x components by , then add or subtract the two equations to eliminate the term . An alternative motivation for the algebra is to eliminate the trig functions in front of by using the trig identity . At the very least this would result in an equation that is simple to solve for . ANSWER: Correct Congratulations on working this through. Now realize that in coordinate system a, which is aligned with the plane, the y-coordinate equation is , which leads immediately to the result obtained here for . CONCLUSION: A thoughtful examination of which coordinate system to choose can save a lot of algebra. Contact Forces Introduced Learning Goal: To introduce contact forces (normal and friction forces) and to understand that, except for friction forces under certain circumstances, these forces must be determined from: net Force = ma. Two solid objects cannot occupy the same space at the same time. Indeed, when the objects touch, they exert repulsive normal forces on each other, as well as frictional forces that resist their slipping relative to each other. These contact forces arise from a complex interplay between the electrostatic forces between the electrons and ions in the objects and the laws of quantum mechanics. As two surfaces are pushed together these forces increase exponentially over an atomic distance scale, easily becoming strong enough to distort the bulk material in the objects if they approach too close. In everyday experience, contact forces are limited by the deformation or acceleration of the objects, rather than by the fundamental interatomic forces. Hence, we can conclude the following: The magnitude of contact forces is determined by , that is, by the other forces on, and acceleration of, the contacting bodies. The only exception is that the frictional forces cannot exceed (although they can be smaller than this or even zero). Normal and friction forces Two types of contact forces operate in typical mechanics problems, the normal and frictional forces, usually designated by and (or , or something similar) respectively. These are the components of the overall contact force: perpendicular to and parallel to the plane of contact. Kinetic friction when surfaces slide cos  sin  Ff cos() sin() Fn sin2() + cos2 () = 1 Fn Fn = Fwcos() Fy = Fn − FW cos() = 0 Fn F = ma μn n f Ffric n f Typesetting math: 100% When one surface is sliding past the other, experiments show three things about the friction force (denoted ): The frictional force opposes the relative motion at the 1. point of contact, 2. is proportional to the normal force, and 3. the ratio of the magnitude of the frictional force to that of the normal force is fairly constant over a wide range of speeds. The constant of proportionality is called the coefficient of kinetic friction, often designated . As long as the sliding continues, the frictional force is then (valid when the surfaces slide by each other). Static friction when surfaces don’t slide When there is no relative motion of the surfaces, the frictional force can assume any value from zero up to a maximum , where is the coefficient of static friction. Invariably, is larger than , in agreement with the observation that when a force is large enough that something breaks loose and starts to slide, it often accelerates. The frictional force for surfaces with no relative motion is therefore (valid when the contacting surfaces have no relative motion). The actual magnitude and direction of the static friction force are such that it (together with other forces on the object) causes the object to remain motionless with respect to the contacting surface as long as the static friction force required does not exceed . The equation is valid only when the surfaces are on the verge of sliding. Part A When two objects slide by one another, which of the following statements about the force of friction between them, is true? ANSWER: Correct Part B fk fk μk fk = μkn μsn μs μs μk fs ! μsn μsn fs = μsn The frictional force is always equal to . The frictional force is always less than . The frictional force is determined by other forces on the objects so it can be either equal to or less than . μkn μkn μkn Typesetting math: 100% When two objects are in contact with no relative motion, which of the following statements about the frictional force between them, is true? ANSWER: Correct For static friction, the actual magnitude and direction of the friction force are such that it, together with any other forces present, will cause the object to have the observed acceleration. The magnitude of the force cannot exceed . If the magnitude of static friction needed to keep acceleration equal to zero exceeds , then the object will slide subject to the resistance of kinetic friction. Do not automatically assume that unless you are considering a situation in which the magnitude of the static friction force is as large as possible (i.e., when determining at what point an object will just begin to slip). Whether the actual magnitude of the friction force is 0, less than , or equal to depends on the magnitude of the other forces (if any) as well as the acceleration of the object through . Part C When a board with a box on it is slowly tilted to larger and larger angle, common experience shows that the box will at some point “break loose” and start to accelerate down the board. The box begins to slide once the component of gravity acting parallel to the board just begins to exceeds the maximum force of static friction. Which of the following is the most general explanation for why the box accelerates down the board? ANSWER: The frictional force is always equal to . The frictional force is always less than . The frictional force is determined by other forces on the objects so it can be either equal to or less than . μsn μsn μsn μsn μsn fs = μsn μsn μsn F = ma Fg The force of kinetic friction is smaller than that of maximum static friction, but remains the same. Once the box is moving, is smaller than the force of maximum static friction but larger than the force of kinetic friction. Once the box is moving, is larger than the force of maximum static friction. When the box is stationary, equals the force of static friction, but once the box starts moving, the sliding reduces the normal force, which in turn reduces the friction. Fg Fg Fg Fg Typesetting math: 100% Correct At the point when the box finally does “break loose,” you know that the component of the box’s weight that is parallel to the board just exceeds (i.e., this component of gravitational force on the box has just reached a magnitude such that the force of static friction, which has a maximum value of , can no longer oppose it.) For the box to then accelerate, there must be a net force on the box along the board. Thus, the component of the box’s weight parallel to the board must be greater than the force of kinetic friction. Therefore the force of kinetic friction must be less than the force of static friction which implies , as expected. Part D Consider a problem in which a car of mass is on a road tilted at an angle . The normal force Select the best answer. ANSWER: Correct The key point is that contact forces must be determined from Newton’s equation. In the problem described above, there is not enough information given to determine the normal force (e.g., the acceleration is unknown). Each of the answer options is valid under some conditions ( , the car is sliding down an icy incline, or the car is going around a banked turn), but in fact none is likely to be correct if there are other forces on the car or if the car is accelerating. Do not memorize values for the normal force valid in different problems–you must determine from . Problem 6.17 Bonnie and Clyde are sliding a 323 bank safe across the floor to their getaway car. The safe slides with a constant speed if Clyde pushes from behind with 375 of force while Bonnie pulls forward on a rope with 335 of force. μsn μsn μkn μsn μk < μs M  is found using n = Mg n = Mg cos() n = Mg cos() F  = Ma  = 0 n F = ma kg N N Typesetting math: 100% Part A What is the safe's coefficient of kinetic friction on the bank floor? ANSWER: Correct Problem 6.19 A crate is placed on a horizontal conveyor belt. The materials are such that and . Part A Draw a free-body diagram showing all the forces on the crate if the conveyer belt runs at constant speed. Draw the force vectors with their tails at the dot. The orientation of your vectors will be graded. The exact length of your vectors will not be graded but the relative length of one to the other will be graded. ANSWER: 0.224 10 kg μs = 0.5 μk = 0.3 Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part B Draw a free-body diagram showing all the forces on the crate if the conveyer belt is speeding up. Draw the force vectors with their tails at the dot. The orientation of your vectors will be graded. The exact length of your vectors will not be graded but the relative length of one to the other will be graded. ANSWER: Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part C What is the maximum acceleration the belt can have without the crate slipping? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct amax = 4.9 m s2 Typesetting math: 100% Problem 6.28 A 1100 steel beam is supported by two ropes. Part A What is the tension in rope 1? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the tension in rope 2? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: kg T1 = 7000 N Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 6.35 The position of a 1.4 mass is given by , where is in seconds. Part A What is the net horizontal force on the mass at ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the net horizontal force on the mass at ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 6.39 T2 = 4800 N kg x = (2t3 − 3t2 )m t t = 0 s F = -8.4 N t = 1 s F = 8.4 N Typesetting math: 100% A rifle with a barrel length of 61 fires a 8 bullet with a horizontal speed of 400 . The bullet strikes a block of wood and penetrates to a depth of 11 . Part A What resistive force (assumed to be constant) does the wood exert on the bullet? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How long does it take the bullet to come to rest after entering the wood? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 6.45 You and your friend Peter are putting new shingles on a roof pitched at 21 . You're sitting on the very top of the roof when Peter, who is at the edge of the roof directly below you, 5.0 away, asks you for the box of nails. Rather than carry the 2.0 box of nails down to Peter, you decide to give the box a push and have it slide down to him. Part A If the coefficient of kinetic friction between the box and the roof is 0.55, with what speed should you push the box to have it gently come to rest right at the edge of the roof? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. cm g m/s cm fk = 5800 N = 5.5×10−4 t s  m kg Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Problem 6.54 The 2.0 wood box in the figure slides down a vertical wood wall while you push on it at a 45 angle. Part A What magnitude of force should you apply to cause the box to slide down at a constant speed? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct v = 3.9 ms kg  F = 23 N Typesetting math: 100% Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 98.8%. You received 114.57 out of a possible total of 116 points. Typesetting math: 100%

Assignment 5 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, March 5, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 6.13 A hand presses down on the book in the figure. Part A Is the normal force of the table on the book larger than, smaller than, or equal to ? ANSWER: Correct mg Equal to Larger than Smaller than mg mg mg Problem 6.2 The three ropes in the figure are tied to a small, very light ring. Two of these ropes are anchored to walls at right angles with the tensions shown in the figure. Part A What is the magnitude of the tension in the third rope? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the direction of the tension in the third rope? Express your answer using two significant figures. T  3 T3 = 94 N T  3 Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct The Normal Force When an object rests on a surface, there is always a force perpendicular to the surface; we call this the normal force, denoted by . The two questions to the right will explore the normal force. Part A A man attempts to pick up his suitcase of weight by pulling straight up on the handle. However, he is unable to lift the suitcase from the floor. Which statement about the magnitude of the normal force acting on the suitcase is true during the time that the man pulls upward on the suitcase? Hint 1. How to approach this problem First, identify the forces that act on the suitcase and draw a free-body diagram. Then use the fact that the suitcase is in equilibrium, , to examine how the forces acting on the suitcase relate to each other. Hint 2. Identify the correct free-body diagram Which of the figures represents the free-body diagram of the suitcase while the man is pulling on the handle with a force of magnitude ? = 58   below horizontal n ws n F = 0 fpull Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B A B C D The magnitude of the normal force is equal to the magnitude of the weight of the suitcase. The magnitude of the normal force is equal to the magnitude of the weight of the suitcase minus the magnitude of the force of the pull. The magnitude of the normal force is equal to the sum of the magnitude of the force of the pull and the magnitude of the suitcase’s weight. The magnitude of the normal force is greater than the magnitude of the weight of the suitcase. Typesetting math: 100% Now assume that the man of weight is tired and decides to sit on his suitcase. Which statement about the magnitude of the normal force acting on the suitcase is true during the time that the man is sitting on the suitcase? Hint 1. Identify the correct free-body diagram. Which of the figures represents the free-body diagram while the man is sitting atop the suitcase? Here the vector labeled is a force that has the same magnitude as the man’s weight. ANSWER: wm n wm Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Recognize that the normal force acting on an object is not always equal to the weight of that object. This is an important point to understand. Problem 6.5 A construction worker with a weight of 880 stands on a roof that is sloped at 18 . Part A What is the magnitude of the normal force of the roof on the worker? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct A B C D The magnitude of the normal force is equal to the magnitude of the suitcase’s weight. The magnitude of the normal force is equal to the magnitude of the suitcase’s weight minus the magnitude of the man’s weight. The magnitude of the normal force is equal to the sum of the magnitude of the man’s weight and the magnitude of the suitcase’s weight. The magnitude of the normal force is less than the magnitude of the suitcase’s weight. N  n = 840 N Typesetting math: 100% Problem 6.6 In each of the two free-body diagrams, the forces are acting on a 3.0 object. Part A For diagram , find the value of , the -component of the acceleration. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B For diagram the part A, find the value of the -component of the acceleration. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: kg ax x ax = -0.67 m s2 ay, y Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part C For diagram , find the value of , the -component of the acceleration. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D For diagram the part C, find the value of , the -component of the acceleration. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: ay = 0 m s2 ax x ax = 0.67 m s2 ay y Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 6.7 In each of the two free-body diagrams, the forces are acting on a 3.0 object. Part A Find the value of , the component of the acceleration in diagram (a). Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct ay = 0 m s2 kg ax x ax = 0.99 m s2 Typesetting math: 100% Part B Find the value of , the component of the acceleration in diagram (a). Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C Find the value of , the component of the acceleration in diagram (b). Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D Find the value of , the component of the acceleration in diagram (b). Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct ay y ay = 0 m s2 ax x ax = -0.18 m s2 ay y ay = 0 m s2 Typesetting math: 100% Problem 6.10 A horizontal rope is tied to a 53.0 box on frictionless ice. What is the tension in the rope if: Part A The box is at rest? Express your answer as an integer and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B The box moves at a steady = 4.80 ? Express your answer as an integer and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C The box = 4.80 and = 4.60 ? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: kg T = 0 N vx m/s T = 0 N vx m/s ax m/s2 Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 6.14 It takes the elevator in a skyscraper 4.5 to reach its cruising speed of 11 . A 60 passenger gets aboard on the ground floor. Part A What is the passenger’s weight before the elevator starts moving? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the passenger’s weight while the elevator is speeding up? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the passenger’s weight after the elevator reaches its cruising speed? T = 244 N s m/s kg w = 590 N w = 730 N Typesetting math: 100% Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Block on an Incline A block lies on a plane raised an angle from the horizontal. Three forces act upon the block: , the force of gravity; , the normal force; and , the force of friction. The coefficient of friction is large enough to prevent the block from sliding . Part A Consider coordinate system a, with the x axis along the plane. Which forces lie along the axes? ANSWER: w = 590 N  F  w F n F  f Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part B Which forces lie along the axes of the coordinate system b, in which the y axis is vertical? ANSWER: Correct only only only and and and and and F  f F  n F  w F  f F  n F  f F  w F  n F w F  f F  n F w only only only and and and and and F  f F  n F  w F  f F  n F  f F  w F  n F w F  f F  n F w Typesetting math: 100% Usually the best advice is to choose coordinate system so that the acceleration of the system is directly along one of the coordinate axes. If the system isn’t accelerating, then you are better off choosing the coordinate system with the most vectors along the coordinate axes. But now you are going to ignore that advice. You will find the normal force, , using vertical coordinate system b. In these coordinates you will find the magnitude appearing in both the x and y equations, each multiplied by a trigonometric function. Part C Because the block is not moving, the sum of the y components of the forces acting on the block must be zero. Find an expression for the sum of the y components of the forces acting on the block, using coordinate system b. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , , and . Hint 1. Find the y component of Write an expression for , the y component of the force , using coordinate system b. Express your answer in terms of and . Hint 1. Some geometry help – a useful angle The smaller angle between and the y-axis is also , as shown in the figure. ANSWER: F  n Fn Fn Ff Fw  F n Fny F  n Fn  F  n  Typesetting math: 100% Hint 2. Find the y component of Write an expression for , the y component of the force , using coordinate system b. Express your answer in terms of and . Hint 1. Some geometry help – a useful angle The smaller angle between and the x-axis is also , as shown in the figure. ANSWER: ANSWER: Fny = Fncos() F f Ffy F f Ff  F  f  Ffy = Ffsin() Fy = 0 = Fncos() + Ffsin() − Fw Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part D Because the block is not moving, the sum of the x components of the forces acting on the block must be zero. Find an expression for the sum of the x components of the forces acting on the block, using coordinate system b. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , , and . Hint 1. Find the x component of Write an expression for , the x component of the force , using coordinate system b. Express your answer in terms of and . ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part E To find the magnitude of the normal force, you must express in terms of since is an unknown. Using the equations you found in the two previous parts, find an expression for involving and but not . Hint 1. How to approach the problem From your answers to the previous two parts you should have two force equations ( and ). Combine these equations to eliminate . The key is to multiply the Fn Ff Fw  F n Fnx F  n Fn  Fnx = −Fnsin() Fx = 0 = −Fnsin() + Ffcos() Fn Fw Ff Fn Fw  Ff Typesetting math: 100% Fy = 0 Fx = 0 Ff equation for the y components by and the equation for the x components by , then add or subtract the two equations to eliminate the term . An alternative motivation for the algebra is to eliminate the trig functions in front of by using the trig identity . At the very least this would result in an equation that is simple to solve for . ANSWER: Correct Congratulations on working this through. Now realize that in coordinate system a, which is aligned with the plane, the y-coordinate equation is , which leads immediately to the result obtained here for . CONCLUSION: A thoughtful examination of which coordinate system to choose can save a lot of algebra. Contact Forces Introduced Learning Goal: To introduce contact forces (normal and friction forces) and to understand that, except for friction forces under certain circumstances, these forces must be determined from: net Force = ma. Two solid objects cannot occupy the same space at the same time. Indeed, when the objects touch, they exert repulsive normal forces on each other, as well as frictional forces that resist their slipping relative to each other. These contact forces arise from a complex interplay between the electrostatic forces between the electrons and ions in the objects and the laws of quantum mechanics. As two surfaces are pushed together these forces increase exponentially over an atomic distance scale, easily becoming strong enough to distort the bulk material in the objects if they approach too close. In everyday experience, contact forces are limited by the deformation or acceleration of the objects, rather than by the fundamental interatomic forces. Hence, we can conclude the following: The magnitude of contact forces is determined by , that is, by the other forces on, and acceleration of, the contacting bodies. The only exception is that the frictional forces cannot exceed (although they can be smaller than this or even zero). Normal and friction forces Two types of contact forces operate in typical mechanics problems, the normal and frictional forces, usually designated by and (or , or something similar) respectively. These are the components of the overall contact force: perpendicular to and parallel to the plane of contact. Kinetic friction when surfaces slide cos  sin  Ff cos() sin() Fn sin2() + cos2 () = 1 Fn Fn = Fwcos() Fy = Fn − FW cos() = 0 Fn F = ma μn n f Ffric n f Typesetting math: 100% When one surface is sliding past the other, experiments show three things about the friction force (denoted ): The frictional force opposes the relative motion at the 1. point of contact, 2. is proportional to the normal force, and 3. the ratio of the magnitude of the frictional force to that of the normal force is fairly constant over a wide range of speeds. The constant of proportionality is called the coefficient of kinetic friction, often designated . As long as the sliding continues, the frictional force is then (valid when the surfaces slide by each other). Static friction when surfaces don’t slide When there is no relative motion of the surfaces, the frictional force can assume any value from zero up to a maximum , where is the coefficient of static friction. Invariably, is larger than , in agreement with the observation that when a force is large enough that something breaks loose and starts to slide, it often accelerates. The frictional force for surfaces with no relative motion is therefore (valid when the contacting surfaces have no relative motion). The actual magnitude and direction of the static friction force are such that it (together with other forces on the object) causes the object to remain motionless with respect to the contacting surface as long as the static friction force required does not exceed . The equation is valid only when the surfaces are on the verge of sliding. Part A When two objects slide by one another, which of the following statements about the force of friction between them, is true? ANSWER: Correct Part B fk fk μk fk = μkn μsn μs μs μk fs ! μsn μsn fs = μsn The frictional force is always equal to . The frictional force is always less than . The frictional force is determined by other forces on the objects so it can be either equal to or less than . μkn μkn μkn Typesetting math: 100% When two objects are in contact with no relative motion, which of the following statements about the frictional force between them, is true? ANSWER: Correct For static friction, the actual magnitude and direction of the friction force are such that it, together with any other forces present, will cause the object to have the observed acceleration. The magnitude of the force cannot exceed . If the magnitude of static friction needed to keep acceleration equal to zero exceeds , then the object will slide subject to the resistance of kinetic friction. Do not automatically assume that unless you are considering a situation in which the magnitude of the static friction force is as large as possible (i.e., when determining at what point an object will just begin to slip). Whether the actual magnitude of the friction force is 0, less than , or equal to depends on the magnitude of the other forces (if any) as well as the acceleration of the object through . Part C When a board with a box on it is slowly tilted to larger and larger angle, common experience shows that the box will at some point “break loose” and start to accelerate down the board. The box begins to slide once the component of gravity acting parallel to the board just begins to exceeds the maximum force of static friction. Which of the following is the most general explanation for why the box accelerates down the board? ANSWER: The frictional force is always equal to . The frictional force is always less than . The frictional force is determined by other forces on the objects so it can be either equal to or less than . μsn μsn μsn μsn μsn fs = μsn μsn μsn F = ma Fg The force of kinetic friction is smaller than that of maximum static friction, but remains the same. Once the box is moving, is smaller than the force of maximum static friction but larger than the force of kinetic friction. Once the box is moving, is larger than the force of maximum static friction. When the box is stationary, equals the force of static friction, but once the box starts moving, the sliding reduces the normal force, which in turn reduces the friction. Fg Fg Fg Fg Typesetting math: 100% Correct At the point when the box finally does “break loose,” you know that the component of the box’s weight that is parallel to the board just exceeds (i.e., this component of gravitational force on the box has just reached a magnitude such that the force of static friction, which has a maximum value of , can no longer oppose it.) For the box to then accelerate, there must be a net force on the box along the board. Thus, the component of the box’s weight parallel to the board must be greater than the force of kinetic friction. Therefore the force of kinetic friction must be less than the force of static friction which implies , as expected. Part D Consider a problem in which a car of mass is on a road tilted at an angle . The normal force Select the best answer. ANSWER: Correct The key point is that contact forces must be determined from Newton’s equation. In the problem described above, there is not enough information given to determine the normal force (e.g., the acceleration is unknown). Each of the answer options is valid under some conditions ( , the car is sliding down an icy incline, or the car is going around a banked turn), but in fact none is likely to be correct if there are other forces on the car or if the car is accelerating. Do not memorize values for the normal force valid in different problems–you must determine from . Problem 6.17 Bonnie and Clyde are sliding a 323 bank safe across the floor to their getaway car. The safe slides with a constant speed if Clyde pushes from behind with 375 of force while Bonnie pulls forward on a rope with 335 of force. μsn μsn μkn μsn μk < μs M  is found using n = Mg n = Mg cos() n = Mg cos() F  = Ma  = 0 n F = ma kg N N Typesetting math: 100% Part A What is the safe's coefficient of kinetic friction on the bank floor? ANSWER: Correct Problem 6.19 A crate is placed on a horizontal conveyor belt. The materials are such that and . Part A Draw a free-body diagram showing all the forces on the crate if the conveyer belt runs at constant speed. Draw the force vectors with their tails at the dot. The orientation of your vectors will be graded. The exact length of your vectors will not be graded but the relative length of one to the other will be graded. ANSWER: 0.224 10 kg μs = 0.5 μk = 0.3 Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part B Draw a free-body diagram showing all the forces on the crate if the conveyer belt is speeding up. Draw the force vectors with their tails at the dot. The orientation of your vectors will be graded. The exact length of your vectors will not be graded but the relative length of one to the other will be graded. ANSWER: Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part C What is the maximum acceleration the belt can have without the crate slipping? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct amax = 4.9 m s2 Typesetting math: 100% Problem 6.28 A 1100 steel beam is supported by two ropes. Part A What is the tension in rope 1? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the tension in rope 2? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: kg T1 = 7000 N Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 6.35 The position of a 1.4 mass is given by , where is in seconds. Part A What is the net horizontal force on the mass at ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the net horizontal force on the mass at ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 6.39 T2 = 4800 N kg x = (2t3 − 3t2 )m t t = 0 s F = -8.4 N t = 1 s F = 8.4 N Typesetting math: 100% A rifle with a barrel length of 61 fires a 8 bullet with a horizontal speed of 400 . The bullet strikes a block of wood and penetrates to a depth of 11 . Part A What resistive force (assumed to be constant) does the wood exert on the bullet? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How long does it take the bullet to come to rest after entering the wood? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 6.45 You and your friend Peter are putting new shingles on a roof pitched at 21 . You're sitting on the very top of the roof when Peter, who is at the edge of the roof directly below you, 5.0 away, asks you for the box of nails. Rather than carry the 2.0 box of nails down to Peter, you decide to give the box a push and have it slide down to him. Part A If the coefficient of kinetic friction between the box and the roof is 0.55, with what speed should you push the box to have it gently come to rest right at the edge of the roof? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. cm g m/s cm fk = 5800 N = 5.5×10−4 t s  m kg Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Problem 6.54 The 2.0 wood box in the figure slides down a vertical wood wall while you push on it at a 45 angle. Part A What magnitude of force should you apply to cause the box to slide down at a constant speed? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct v = 3.9 ms kg  F = 23 N Typesetting math: 100% Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 98.8%. You received 114.57 out of a possible total of 116 points. Typesetting math: 100%

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