BusCom 201 – Section 009 Writing Assignment 2 – Information Request Response Letter Draft Due 6 p.m., Monday, February 24, 2014 (2 copies – 2 copies – 2 copies) Final Due 6 p.m., Monday, March 3, 2014 (1 copy) __________________________________________________________________________ Learning Objectives When completing this assignment, students will be able to  employ the deductive sequence to respond favorably to an information request  adapt the message to the receiver by using the “you attitude”  format a letter Background Keene Enterprises, Inc. (KEI) is a small business employing approximately 250 people. It is headquartered at 2456 Prosperity Lane, Boise, ID 83706. The type of business is as follows:  Team 1: Sporting goods store chain (retail)  Team 2: Accounting firm (office)  Team 3: Commercial construction (building)  Team 4: Restaurant chain (service)  Team 5: Electronics production (manufacturing) You are KEI’s Chief Sustainability Officer (CSO). Jim Meyers is a sophomore at BSU. He has completed most of his required basic courses and is trying to decide on a career. He is particularly interested in the field of sustainability and has contacted you for advice on the following topics:  What does a CSO do?  What kind of education is recommended?  What is the outlook for employment as a CSO?  What salary can a CSO expect to earn? Jim’s address is 850 Bluebonnet Court, Eagle, ID 83616. Assignment Write a letter to Jim responding favorably to his request for information. Research and provide concrete information. Include a subject line. Highlight specific answers to his questions in a bullet list using an articulate, concise writing style. Remember to show sincere interest in Jim and his request and reader benefit. Offer to follow up and make it easy for him to do so. Format Follow the standard letter format handed out in class (also available in Course Documents, Resources folder in Blackboard). Create a professional letterhead for Keene Enterprises, Inc. Remember to sign your letter. Grading Rubric On reverse.

BusCom 201 – Section 009 Writing Assignment 2 – Information Request Response Letter Draft Due 6 p.m., Monday, February 24, 2014 (2 copies – 2 copies – 2 copies) Final Due 6 p.m., Monday, March 3, 2014 (1 copy) __________________________________________________________________________ Learning Objectives When completing this assignment, students will be able to  employ the deductive sequence to respond favorably to an information request  adapt the message to the receiver by using the “you attitude”  format a letter Background Keene Enterprises, Inc. (KEI) is a small business employing approximately 250 people. It is headquartered at 2456 Prosperity Lane, Boise, ID 83706. The type of business is as follows:  Team 1: Sporting goods store chain (retail)  Team 2: Accounting firm (office)  Team 3: Commercial construction (building)  Team 4: Restaurant chain (service)  Team 5: Electronics production (manufacturing) You are KEI’s Chief Sustainability Officer (CSO). Jim Meyers is a sophomore at BSU. He has completed most of his required basic courses and is trying to decide on a career. He is particularly interested in the field of sustainability and has contacted you for advice on the following topics:  What does a CSO do?  What kind of education is recommended?  What is the outlook for employment as a CSO?  What salary can a CSO expect to earn? Jim’s address is 850 Bluebonnet Court, Eagle, ID 83616. Assignment Write a letter to Jim responding favorably to his request for information. Research and provide concrete information. Include a subject line. Highlight specific answers to his questions in a bullet list using an articulate, concise writing style. Remember to show sincere interest in Jim and his request and reader benefit. Offer to follow up and make it easy for him to do so. Format Follow the standard letter format handed out in class (also available in Course Documents, Resources folder in Blackboard). Create a professional letterhead for Keene Enterprises, Inc. Remember to sign your letter. Grading Rubric On reverse.

Keene Enterprises, Inc. 2456 Prosperity Lane Boise, ID 83706 www.keene.enterprises.com … Read More...
The Classic Five-Part Structure 1. Introduce the topic to be argued. Establish its importance. 2. Provide background information so readers will be able to follow your discussion. 3. State your claim (your argumentative thesis) and develop your argument by making a logical appeal. Support your claims with facts, opinions, and examples. If appropriate, mix an emotional appeal or an appeal to authority with your logical appeals. 4. Acknowledge counterarguments and treat them with respect. Rebut these arguments. Reject their evidence or their logic or concede some validity and modify your claim accordingly. Be flexible; you might split the counterarguments and rebut them one at a time at different locations in the paper, or you might begin the paper with a counterargument, rebut it, and then move on to your own claim. 5. Conclude by summarizing the main points of your argument. Then remind readers of what you want them to believe or do. Give them something to remember. The Problem-Solution Structure I. There is a serious problem. A. The problem exists and is growing. (Provide support for argument.) B. The problem is serious. (Provide support.) C. Current methods cannot cope with the problem. (Provide support.) II. There is a solution to the problem. (Your claim goes here.) A. The solution is practical. (Provide support.) B. The solution is desirable. (Provide support.) C. We can implement the solution. (Provide support.) D. Alternate solutions are not as strong as the proposed solution. (Review – and reject – competing solutions.) In both cases, you know before you begin writing whether you will use an inductive (analytic) or deductive (synthetic) arrangement for your argument. The decision to move inductively or deductively is about strategy. Induction moves from support to a claim. Deduction moves from a claim to support – to particular facts, opinions, and examples. This is the preferred form for most writing in the humanities. You can position your claim at the beginning, middle, or end of your presentation. In the problem/solution structure, the claim is made only after the writer introduces a problem. With the five-part structure, you have more flexibility in positioning your claim. One factor that can help determine placement is the likelihood of your audience agreeing with you. When your audience is likely to be neutral or supportive, making your claim early on will not alienate readers (synthetic presentation). When your audience is likely to disagree, placing your thesis at the end of your presentation allows you time to build a consensus, step by step, until you reach your conclusion (analytical presentation).

The Classic Five-Part Structure 1. Introduce the topic to be argued. Establish its importance. 2. Provide background information so readers will be able to follow your discussion. 3. State your claim (your argumentative thesis) and develop your argument by making a logical appeal. Support your claims with facts, opinions, and examples. If appropriate, mix an emotional appeal or an appeal to authority with your logical appeals. 4. Acknowledge counterarguments and treat them with respect. Rebut these arguments. Reject their evidence or their logic or concede some validity and modify your claim accordingly. Be flexible; you might split the counterarguments and rebut them one at a time at different locations in the paper, or you might begin the paper with a counterargument, rebut it, and then move on to your own claim. 5. Conclude by summarizing the main points of your argument. Then remind readers of what you want them to believe or do. Give them something to remember. The Problem-Solution Structure I. There is a serious problem. A. The problem exists and is growing. (Provide support for argument.) B. The problem is serious. (Provide support.) C. Current methods cannot cope with the problem. (Provide support.) II. There is a solution to the problem. (Your claim goes here.) A. The solution is practical. (Provide support.) B. The solution is desirable. (Provide support.) C. We can implement the solution. (Provide support.) D. Alternate solutions are not as strong as the proposed solution. (Review – and reject – competing solutions.) In both cases, you know before you begin writing whether you will use an inductive (analytic) or deductive (synthetic) arrangement for your argument. The decision to move inductively or deductively is about strategy. Induction moves from support to a claim. Deduction moves from a claim to support – to particular facts, opinions, and examples. This is the preferred form for most writing in the humanities. You can position your claim at the beginning, middle, or end of your presentation. In the problem/solution structure, the claim is made only after the writer introduces a problem. With the five-part structure, you have more flexibility in positioning your claim. One factor that can help determine placement is the likelihood of your audience agreeing with you. When your audience is likely to be neutral or supportive, making your claim early on will not alienate readers (synthetic presentation). When your audience is likely to disagree, placing your thesis at the end of your presentation allows you time to build a consensus, step by step, until you reach your conclusion (analytical presentation).

info@checkyourstudy.com
b. The following figure shows the areas of regions bounded by the graph of f (x) and the x axis. Use the figure to evaluate each of the integrals that follow.

b. The following figure shows the areas of regions bounded by the graph of f (x) and the x axis. Use the figure to evaluate each of the integrals that follow.

For any additional help, please contact: info@checkyourstudy.com Call and Whatsapp … Read More...
Excel Review Assignment #1 – ISM3011 Ask before/after/during class or come into office/online hours if you have questions on any of this. Refer to the syllabus on Academic Dishonesty and group/individual work and allowable help for all projects – also remember it’s your responsibility to protect your work. Before you start — read this whole assignment and use your optional text and/or review the tutorials as necessary on Canvas or www.bwarner.org/tips. A project overview for each project is also available. Part 1 – Create / Download / Parts • Create a blank workbook. Name it using your Last name followed by your initials and _ 1EX (underscore then 1EX). For Example: WarnerBL_1EX .xlsx. Either extension is fine. • Download the Word file Ex1 Data1-F15.docx and copy/paste Word table from the file into the 2nd worksheet in your workbook. Name the tab ‘2014 Sales’. • Download the Word file Ex1 Data2-F15.docx and copy/paste Word table from the file into the 3rd worksheet in your workbook. Name the tab ‘2015 Sales’. • Adjust the column widths of both Sales worksheets so that no data is cut off. • Do not add any formulas or cells to the Sales worksheets Part 2 – Summary Worksheet • Create a summary sheet from the Sales worksheets. Name the worksheet ‘Summary’. Build two summaries on this worksheet. Summary 1: Comparison of Sales by Month and Summary 2: Comparison of Sales by Store ID. • Use the project overview as a guide for the format. Use colors, borders and backgrounds to make the worksheet look professional. o Include the following:  Month and Store ID headings that reference the 2014 Sales worksheet. This means if ‘January’ is changed to ‘Jan’ in the 2014 Sales worksheet, the summary worksheet heading will also change. Do the same with the Store ID and 2014 Sales worksheet.  Formulas that reference the 2014 and 2015 Sales worksheets. If the Sales worksheets change, the summary worksheet should also adjust automatically.  Correct format for all book totals (commas, no decimal places)  Correct % change formulas in both tables. This is how much the totals have changed compared to the 2014 totals.  Correct format for all % change (% sign, 1 decimal place).  Use borders and background colors on the column & row headings for both tables of data • On the summary worksheet, use conditional formatting to highlight any % change cell that greater than zero with a bright color background. If the % change is negative, display the value with a red font and no background color. o There should be only two conditional formats set on each cell. o **Note – to do the conditional formatting steps, you can set the conditional formatting for one cell and then use the format painter to apply to other appropriate cells. If the values are all changed, the conditional formatting should still work. Once you have it working, check by changing some values & see if the conditional formatting changes correctly. Return to the original values/formulas in the cell before you submit. If you don’t use the format painter for this be sure you still try it out & understand how it works. Part 3 – Chart • Create 2 column graphs displaying Totals by Month and Totals by Store ID. Include: • Titles on both chart as well as labeling on the x and the y axis. • Color fonts for the title and axis labels (not dark blue or black) • Large font for the title (at least 16 point) • Include a legend • Format the background (chart area/walls) of the graph with a texture – use one that is easy to see. • Be sure that if any headings or numbers in the worksheets change, these changes are automatically reflected in your chart. • Add a star or banner shape between the two charts and add your name. Be sure the text is part of the shape (not a shape and a separate text box). Part 4 – Finishing Up • Be sure your worksheet tabs are named correctly and if possible, make each worksheet tab a distinctly different color. If your version of Excel doesn’t allow this, don’t worry about it. But do delete any additional worksheets in the workbook. • Create a title in the first row of your summary worksheet. Use the merge and center feature (across all columns with data) and a larger font & different font color (not blue or black). Also add a background color. Add a comment with your email address and the date your spreadsheet was created. • Below the title, add a row with the current date (use the today or now formula) so it is updated whenever the spreadsheet is opened). • Check your formulas, be sure they are correct and make sense. For example, if you are subtracting 2 numbers don’t use the SUM formulas (sum is for adding). Excel may figure out what you mean, but we want the formulas to be used correctly (show that you understand how to use them). • Check your worksheet for errors! Potential errors in cells show up as small green triangles in the top left corner of each cell. Do a little Googling on error checking for your version of Excel and be sure you have error checking turned on and that you reconcile each error so they don’t display when we open your project for grading. Sample: Project Submission Instructions / Notes: • Office/online hours get busy as deadlines approach. If you procrastinate and wait until the last days to work on your project, you may not be able to get all the help you want. • The only way we can fairly grade the projects is if we check for each requirement. Please go through the instructions before you submit & be sure you have done each one correctly so you don’t miss out on points. Compare your solution to the project overview. • Submitting: o Remember to leave all of the internal file properties intact for your project, if they are modified or deleted, you project won’t be accepted (see syllabus for more on this). o Read and follow the instructions in the Assignments section of Canvas on uploading and checking your upload. If you follow these instructions you can ensure that your project is uploaded correctly (and is the correct project). Be sure that Access / Excel are closed before you try to upload your project files. o If your project doesn’t upload correctly before the due date, it will be considered late and be assessed the late penalty – even it was finished on time. This is the only way we can ensure that students check their Canvas submissions. • Technology problems relating to your home computer (Windows based or Mac), internet connection or slow Canvas access are not valid excuses for late/missing work, unless Canvas is down for 6+ hours on the due date. Computers at USF computer labs and the library are available; leave enough time to access them as needed. Also give yourself enough time that if a TA can’t answer a question, you’ll have time to contact me & I can either help you or make an allowance in your grade. If you wait until the last days, I may not be able to do either.

Excel Review Assignment #1 – ISM3011 Ask before/after/during class or come into office/online hours if you have questions on any of this. Refer to the syllabus on Academic Dishonesty and group/individual work and allowable help for all projects – also remember it’s your responsibility to protect your work. Before you start — read this whole assignment and use your optional text and/or review the tutorials as necessary on Canvas or www.bwarner.org/tips. A project overview for each project is also available. Part 1 – Create / Download / Parts • Create a blank workbook. Name it using your Last name followed by your initials and _ 1EX (underscore then 1EX). For Example: WarnerBL_1EX .xlsx. Either extension is fine. • Download the Word file Ex1 Data1-F15.docx and copy/paste Word table from the file into the 2nd worksheet in your workbook. Name the tab ‘2014 Sales’. • Download the Word file Ex1 Data2-F15.docx and copy/paste Word table from the file into the 3rd worksheet in your workbook. Name the tab ‘2015 Sales’. • Adjust the column widths of both Sales worksheets so that no data is cut off. • Do not add any formulas or cells to the Sales worksheets Part 2 – Summary Worksheet • Create a summary sheet from the Sales worksheets. Name the worksheet ‘Summary’. Build two summaries on this worksheet. Summary 1: Comparison of Sales by Month and Summary 2: Comparison of Sales by Store ID. • Use the project overview as a guide for the format. Use colors, borders and backgrounds to make the worksheet look professional. o Include the following:  Month and Store ID headings that reference the 2014 Sales worksheet. This means if ‘January’ is changed to ‘Jan’ in the 2014 Sales worksheet, the summary worksheet heading will also change. Do the same with the Store ID and 2014 Sales worksheet.  Formulas that reference the 2014 and 2015 Sales worksheets. If the Sales worksheets change, the summary worksheet should also adjust automatically.  Correct format for all book totals (commas, no decimal places)  Correct % change formulas in both tables. This is how much the totals have changed compared to the 2014 totals.  Correct format for all % change (% sign, 1 decimal place).  Use borders and background colors on the column & row headings for both tables of data • On the summary worksheet, use conditional formatting to highlight any % change cell that greater than zero with a bright color background. If the % change is negative, display the value with a red font and no background color. o There should be only two conditional formats set on each cell. o **Note – to do the conditional formatting steps, you can set the conditional formatting for one cell and then use the format painter to apply to other appropriate cells. If the values are all changed, the conditional formatting should still work. Once you have it working, check by changing some values & see if the conditional formatting changes correctly. Return to the original values/formulas in the cell before you submit. If you don’t use the format painter for this be sure you still try it out & understand how it works. Part 3 – Chart • Create 2 column graphs displaying Totals by Month and Totals by Store ID. Include: • Titles on both chart as well as labeling on the x and the y axis. • Color fonts for the title and axis labels (not dark blue or black) • Large font for the title (at least 16 point) • Include a legend • Format the background (chart area/walls) of the graph with a texture – use one that is easy to see. • Be sure that if any headings or numbers in the worksheets change, these changes are automatically reflected in your chart. • Add a star or banner shape between the two charts and add your name. Be sure the text is part of the shape (not a shape and a separate text box). Part 4 – Finishing Up • Be sure your worksheet tabs are named correctly and if possible, make each worksheet tab a distinctly different color. If your version of Excel doesn’t allow this, don’t worry about it. But do delete any additional worksheets in the workbook. • Create a title in the first row of your summary worksheet. Use the merge and center feature (across all columns with data) and a larger font & different font color (not blue or black). Also add a background color. Add a comment with your email address and the date your spreadsheet was created. • Below the title, add a row with the current date (use the today or now formula) so it is updated whenever the spreadsheet is opened). • Check your formulas, be sure they are correct and make sense. For example, if you are subtracting 2 numbers don’t use the SUM formulas (sum is for adding). Excel may figure out what you mean, but we want the formulas to be used correctly (show that you understand how to use them). • Check your worksheet for errors! Potential errors in cells show up as small green triangles in the top left corner of each cell. Do a little Googling on error checking for your version of Excel and be sure you have error checking turned on and that you reconcile each error so they don’t display when we open your project for grading. Sample: Project Submission Instructions / Notes: • Office/online hours get busy as deadlines approach. If you procrastinate and wait until the last days to work on your project, you may not be able to get all the help you want. • The only way we can fairly grade the projects is if we check for each requirement. Please go through the instructions before you submit & be sure you have done each one correctly so you don’t miss out on points. Compare your solution to the project overview. • Submitting: o Remember to leave all of the internal file properties intact for your project, if they are modified or deleted, you project won’t be accepted (see syllabus for more on this). o Read and follow the instructions in the Assignments section of Canvas on uploading and checking your upload. If you follow these instructions you can ensure that your project is uploaded correctly (and is the correct project). Be sure that Access / Excel are closed before you try to upload your project files. o If your project doesn’t upload correctly before the due date, it will be considered late and be assessed the late penalty – even it was finished on time. This is the only way we can ensure that students check their Canvas submissions. • Technology problems relating to your home computer (Windows based or Mac), internet connection or slow Canvas access are not valid excuses for late/missing work, unless Canvas is down for 6+ hours on the due date. Computers at USF computer labs and the library are available; leave enough time to access them as needed. Also give yourself enough time that if a TA can’t answer a question, you’ll have time to contact me & I can either help you or make an allowance in your grade. If you wait until the last days, I may not be able to do either.

No expert has answered this question yet. You can browse … Read More...
1000 words Total. Answer each question in paragraph form https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wzicXbnmllc In the video, presented by Brooke Deterline, talks about creating ethical cultures in a business. One of Brooke’s main point was courage. She defines courage as our ability to act from our hearts in the face of fear and is a skill that we can build with practice. Brooke gives an example of life without courage and shows us many scenarios where it is still happening today, 10 years after the ENRON scandal. Courage is something that lacks in social situations where wrong is being done. She states that we all are vulnerable to situation influence all the time and that it is natural human wiring. It seems that most of us, including myself, can become a bystander to follow a leader or a group that we know is doing wrong because we want to be accepted. (1) Why do you think that the most ethical and compassionate among us can easily betray our values, in the face of challenging situations? What challenges does one face when they are presented with a difficult situation? (2) Do you believe that with practice we can retrain our brains to override our natural fear response when we are put in these challenging situations? Managers sometimes face business problems that raise difficult questions. When being faced with these problems they must choose between two ways of resolving it. Each of these alternatives is the right thing to do, but they can not do both ways. Badaracco characterizes right-versus-right dilemmas as “dirty-hands problems,” where managers or any employee often have to “get their hands dirty” by making tough choices between competing virtues such as honesty, fairness, respect, objectivity, and responsibility. He shows us three managers that face different right- versus-right conflicts. We see that these managers have the responsibilities to live up to the commitments they have made and the standards by which they want live by. However, it is not that simple to choose from wanting to be a successful manager and a decent, responsible person. (3) After reading the three different extremes of right- versus- right, why do you think that Badaracco emphasizes on the statement made by Oliver Wendell Holmes, “I do not give a fig for the simplicity on the this side complexity, but i would give my life for the simplicity on the other side of complexity,” and what do you think it means? A manager often encounters right-versus-right dilemmas where professional responsibilities conflict with personal values. For example, a senior manager may have knowledge of plans to lay off an employee-friend who is planning the purchase of a new home. Warning the friend about the upcoming layoff would certainly help the friend avoid the difficulty of paying for a new home without a job, but it may also violate an agreement with senior management and shareholders to keep such plans confidential until these plans are properly implemented. (4) In a challenging situation like this, should mangers rely on fundamental ethical principles and the company’s mission statement to help them decide what to do or should they consult their own moral instincts and intuitions?

1000 words Total. Answer each question in paragraph form https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wzicXbnmllc In the video, presented by Brooke Deterline, talks about creating ethical cultures in a business. One of Brooke’s main point was courage. She defines courage as our ability to act from our hearts in the face of fear and is a skill that we can build with practice. Brooke gives an example of life without courage and shows us many scenarios where it is still happening today, 10 years after the ENRON scandal. Courage is something that lacks in social situations where wrong is being done. She states that we all are vulnerable to situation influence all the time and that it is natural human wiring. It seems that most of us, including myself, can become a bystander to follow a leader or a group that we know is doing wrong because we want to be accepted. (1) Why do you think that the most ethical and compassionate among us can easily betray our values, in the face of challenging situations? What challenges does one face when they are presented with a difficult situation? (2) Do you believe that with practice we can retrain our brains to override our natural fear response when we are put in these challenging situations? Managers sometimes face business problems that raise difficult questions. When being faced with these problems they must choose between two ways of resolving it. Each of these alternatives is the right thing to do, but they can not do both ways. Badaracco characterizes right-versus-right dilemmas as “dirty-hands problems,” where managers or any employee often have to “get their hands dirty” by making tough choices between competing virtues such as honesty, fairness, respect, objectivity, and responsibility. He shows us three managers that face different right- versus-right conflicts. We see that these managers have the responsibilities to live up to the commitments they have made and the standards by which they want live by. However, it is not that simple to choose from wanting to be a successful manager and a decent, responsible person. (3) After reading the three different extremes of right- versus- right, why do you think that Badaracco emphasizes on the statement made by Oliver Wendell Holmes, “I do not give a fig for the simplicity on the this side complexity, but i would give my life for the simplicity on the other side of complexity,” and what do you think it means? A manager often encounters right-versus-right dilemmas where professional responsibilities conflict with personal values. For example, a senior manager may have knowledge of plans to lay off an employee-friend who is planning the purchase of a new home. Warning the friend about the upcoming layoff would certainly help the friend avoid the difficulty of paying for a new home without a job, but it may also violate an agreement with senior management and shareholders to keep such plans confidential until these plans are properly implemented. (4) In a challenging situation like this, should mangers rely on fundamental ethical principles and the company’s mission statement to help them decide what to do or should they consult their own moral instincts and intuitions?