Chapter 10 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, April 18, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy A One-Dimensional Inelastic Collision Block 1, of mass = 3.70 , moves along a frictionless air track with speed = 15.0 . It collides with block 2, of mass = 19.0 , which was initially at rest. The blocks stick together after the collision. Part A Find the magnitude of the total initial momentum of the two-block system. Express your answer numerically. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: m1 kg v1 m/s m2 kg pi Part B Find , the magnitude of the final velocity of the two-block system. Express your answer numerically. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C What is the change in the two-block system’s kinetic energy due to the collision? Express your answer numerically in joules. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: pi = kg m/s vf vf = m/s K = Kfinal − Kinitial K = J Conservation of Energy Ranking Task Six pendulums of various masses are released from various heights above a tabletop, as shown in the figures below. All the pendulums have the same length and are mounted such that at the vertical position their lowest points are the height of the tabletop and just do not strike the tabletop when released. Assume that the size of each bob is negligible. Part A Rank each pendulum on the basis of its initial gravitational potential energy (before being released) relative to the tabletop. Rank from largest to smallest To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: m h Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Momentum and Kinetic Energy Consider two objects (Object 1 and Object 2) moving in the same direction on a frictionless surface. Object 1 moves with speed and has mass . Object 2 moves with speed and has mass . Part A Which object has the larger magnitude of its momentum? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Which object has the larger kinetic energy? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: v1 = v m1 = 2m v2 = 2v m2 = m Object 1 has the greater magnitude of its momentum. Object 2 has the greater magnitude of its momentum. Both objects have the same magnitude of their momenta. Object 1 has the greater kinetic energy. Object 2 has the greater kinetic energy. The objects have the same kinetic energy. Projectile Motion and Conservation of Energy Ranking Task Part A Six baseball throws are shown below. In each case the baseball is thrown at the same initial speed and from the same height above the ground. Assume that the effects of air resistance are negligible. Rank these throws according to the speed of the baseball the instant before it hits the ground. Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: H PSS 10.1 Conservation of Mechanical Energy Learning Goal: To practice Problem-Solving Strategy 10.1 for conservation of mechanical energy problems. Tarzan, in one tree, sights Jane in another tree. He grabs the end of a vine with length 20 that makes an angle of 45 with the vertical, steps off his tree limb, and swings down and then up to Jane’s open arms. When he arrives, his vine makes an angle of 30 with the vertical. Determine whether he gives her a tender embrace or knocks her off her limb by calculating Tarzan’s speed just before he reaches Jane. You can ignore air resistance and the mass of the vine. PROBLEM-SOLVING STRATEGY 10.1 Conservation of mechanical energy MODEL: Choose a system without friction or other losses of mechanical energy. m   VISUALIZE: Draw a before-and-after pictorial representation. Define symbols that will be used in the problem, list known values, and identify what you’re trying to find. SOLVE: The mathematical representation is based on the law of conservation of mechanical energy: . ASSESS: Check that your result has the correct units, is reasonable, and answers the question. Model The problem does not involve friction, nor are there losses of mechanical energy, so conservation of mechanical energy applies. Model Tarzan and the vine as a pendulum. Visualize Part A Which of the following sketches can be used in drawing a before-and-after pictorial representation? ANSWER: Kf + Uf = Ki + Ui Solve Part B What is Tarzan’s speed just before he reaches Jane? Express your answer in meters per second to two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Assess Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Bungee Jumping Diagram A Diagram B Diagram C Diagram D vf vf = m/s Kate, a bungee jumper, wants to jump off the edge of a bridge that spans a river below. Kate has a mass , and the surface of the bridge is a height above the water. The bungee cord, which has length when unstretched, will first straighten and then stretch as Kate falls. Assume the following: The bungee cord behaves as an ideal spring once it begins to stretch, with spring constant . Kate doesn’t actually jump but simply steps off the edge of the bridge and falls straight downward. Kate’s height is negligible compared to the length of the bungee cord. Hence, she can be treated as a point particle. Use for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. Part A How far below the bridge will Kate eventually be hanging, once she stops oscillating and comes finally to rest? Assume that she doesn’t touch the water. Express the distance in terms of quantities given in the problem introduction. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Spinning Mass on a Spring An object of mass is attached to a spring with spring constant whose unstretched length is , and whose far end is fixed to a shaft that is rotating with angular speed . Neglect gravity and assume that the mass rotates with angular speed as shown. When solving this problem use an inertial coordinate system, as drawn here. m h L k g d = M k L Part A Given the angular speed , find the radius at which the mass rotates without moving toward or away from the origin. Express the radius in terms of , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C R( ) k L M R( ) = This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). ± Baby Bounce with a Hooke One of the pioneers of modern science, Sir Robert Hooke (1635-1703), studied the elastic properties of springs and formulated the law that bears his name. Hooke found the relationship among the force a spring exerts, , the distance from equilibrium the end of the spring is displaced, , and a number called the spring constant (or, sometimes, the force constant of the spring). According to Hooke, the force of the spring is directly proportional to its displacement from equilibrium, or . In its scalar form, this equation is simply . The negative sign indicates that the force that the spring exerts and its displacement have opposite directions. The value of depends on the geometry and the material of the spring; it can be easily determined experimentally using this scalar equation. Toy makers have always been interested in springs for the entertainment value of the motion they produce. One well-known application is a baby bouncer,which consists of a harness seat for a toddler, attached to a spring. The entire contraption hooks onto the top of a doorway. The idea is for the baby to hang in the seat with his or her feet just touching the ground so that a good push up will get the baby bouncing, providing potentially hours of entertainment. F  x k F = −kx F = −kx k Part A The following chart and accompanying graph depict an experiment to determine the spring constant for a baby bouncer. Displacement from equilibrium, ( ) Force exerted on the spring, ( ) 0 0 0.005 2.5 0.010 5.0 0.015 7.5 0.020 10 What is the spring constant of the spring being tested for the baby bouncer? Express your answer to two significant figures in newtons per meter. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Shooting a ball into a box Two children are trying to shoot a marble of mass into a small box using a spring-loaded gun that is fixed on a table and shoots horizontally from the edge of the table. The edge of the table is a height above the top of the box (the height of which is negligibly small), and the center of the box is a distance from the edge of the table. x m F N k k = N/m m H d The spring has a spring constant . The first child compresses the spring a distance and finds that the marble falls short of its target by a horizontal distance . Part A By what distance, , should the second child compress the spring so that the marble lands in the middle of the box? (Assume that height of the box is negligible, so that there is no chance that the marble will hit the side of the box before it lands in the bottom.) Express the distance in terms of , , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). k x1 d12 x2 m k g H d x2 = Elastic Collision in One Dimension Block 1, of mass , moves across a frictionless surface with speed . It collides elastically with block 2, of mass , which is at rest ( ). After the collision, block 1 moves with speed , while block 2 moves with speed . Assume that , so that after the collision, the two objects move off in the direction of the first object before the collision. Part A This collision is elastic. What quantities, if any, are conserved in this collision? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is the final speed of block 1? m1 ui m2 vi = 0 uf vf m1 > m2 kinetic energy only momentum only kinetic energy and momentum uf Express in terms of , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C What is the final speed of block 2? Express in terms of , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Ballistic Pendulum In a ballistic pendulum an object of mass is fired with an initial speed at a pendulum bob. The bob has a mass , which is suspended by a rod of length and negligible mass. After the collision, the pendulum and object stick together and swing to a maximum angular displacement as shown . uf m1 m2 ui uf = vf vf m1 m2 ui vf = m v0 M L  Part A Find an expression for , the initial speed of the fired object. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , , and and the acceleration due to gravity, . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B An experiment is done to compare the initial speed of bullets fired from different handguns: a 9.0 and a .44 caliber. The guns are fired into a 10- pendulum bob of length . Assume that the 9.0- bullet has a mass of 6.0 and the .44-caliber bullet has a mass of 12 . If the 9.0- bullet causes the pendulum to swing to a maximum angular displacement of 4.3 and the .44-caliber bullet causes a displacement of 10.1 , find the ratio of the initial speed of the 9.0- bullet to the speed of the .44-caliber bullet, . Express your answer numerically. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: v0 m M L  g v0 = mm kg L mm g g mm   mm (v /( 0 )9.0 v0)44 Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. (v0 )9.0/(v0 )44 =

Chapter 10 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, April 18, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy A One-Dimensional Inelastic Collision Block 1, of mass = 3.70 , moves along a frictionless air track with speed = 15.0 . It collides with block 2, of mass = 19.0 , which was initially at rest. The blocks stick together after the collision. Part A Find the magnitude of the total initial momentum of the two-block system. Express your answer numerically. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: m1 kg v1 m/s m2 kg pi Part B Find , the magnitude of the final velocity of the two-block system. Express your answer numerically. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C What is the change in the two-block system’s kinetic energy due to the collision? Express your answer numerically in joules. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: pi = kg m/s vf vf = m/s K = Kfinal − Kinitial K = J Conservation of Energy Ranking Task Six pendulums of various masses are released from various heights above a tabletop, as shown in the figures below. All the pendulums have the same length and are mounted such that at the vertical position their lowest points are the height of the tabletop and just do not strike the tabletop when released. Assume that the size of each bob is negligible. Part A Rank each pendulum on the basis of its initial gravitational potential energy (before being released) relative to the tabletop. Rank from largest to smallest To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: m h Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Momentum and Kinetic Energy Consider two objects (Object 1 and Object 2) moving in the same direction on a frictionless surface. Object 1 moves with speed and has mass . Object 2 moves with speed and has mass . Part A Which object has the larger magnitude of its momentum? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Which object has the larger kinetic energy? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: v1 = v m1 = 2m v2 = 2v m2 = m Object 1 has the greater magnitude of its momentum. Object 2 has the greater magnitude of its momentum. Both objects have the same magnitude of their momenta. Object 1 has the greater kinetic energy. Object 2 has the greater kinetic energy. The objects have the same kinetic energy. Projectile Motion and Conservation of Energy Ranking Task Part A Six baseball throws are shown below. In each case the baseball is thrown at the same initial speed and from the same height above the ground. Assume that the effects of air resistance are negligible. Rank these throws according to the speed of the baseball the instant before it hits the ground. Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: H PSS 10.1 Conservation of Mechanical Energy Learning Goal: To practice Problem-Solving Strategy 10.1 for conservation of mechanical energy problems. Tarzan, in one tree, sights Jane in another tree. He grabs the end of a vine with length 20 that makes an angle of 45 with the vertical, steps off his tree limb, and swings down and then up to Jane’s open arms. When he arrives, his vine makes an angle of 30 with the vertical. Determine whether he gives her a tender embrace or knocks her off her limb by calculating Tarzan’s speed just before he reaches Jane. You can ignore air resistance and the mass of the vine. PROBLEM-SOLVING STRATEGY 10.1 Conservation of mechanical energy MODEL: Choose a system without friction or other losses of mechanical energy. m   VISUALIZE: Draw a before-and-after pictorial representation. Define symbols that will be used in the problem, list known values, and identify what you’re trying to find. SOLVE: The mathematical representation is based on the law of conservation of mechanical energy: . ASSESS: Check that your result has the correct units, is reasonable, and answers the question. Model The problem does not involve friction, nor are there losses of mechanical energy, so conservation of mechanical energy applies. Model Tarzan and the vine as a pendulum. Visualize Part A Which of the following sketches can be used in drawing a before-and-after pictorial representation? ANSWER: Kf + Uf = Ki + Ui Solve Part B What is Tarzan’s speed just before he reaches Jane? Express your answer in meters per second to two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Assess Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Bungee Jumping Diagram A Diagram B Diagram C Diagram D vf vf = m/s Kate, a bungee jumper, wants to jump off the edge of a bridge that spans a river below. Kate has a mass , and the surface of the bridge is a height above the water. The bungee cord, which has length when unstretched, will first straighten and then stretch as Kate falls. Assume the following: The bungee cord behaves as an ideal spring once it begins to stretch, with spring constant . Kate doesn’t actually jump but simply steps off the edge of the bridge and falls straight downward. Kate’s height is negligible compared to the length of the bungee cord. Hence, she can be treated as a point particle. Use for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. Part A How far below the bridge will Kate eventually be hanging, once she stops oscillating and comes finally to rest? Assume that she doesn’t touch the water. Express the distance in terms of quantities given in the problem introduction. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Spinning Mass on a Spring An object of mass is attached to a spring with spring constant whose unstretched length is , and whose far end is fixed to a shaft that is rotating with angular speed . Neglect gravity and assume that the mass rotates with angular speed as shown. When solving this problem use an inertial coordinate system, as drawn here. m h L k g d = M k L Part A Given the angular speed , find the radius at which the mass rotates without moving toward or away from the origin. Express the radius in terms of , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C R( ) k L M R( ) = This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). ± Baby Bounce with a Hooke One of the pioneers of modern science, Sir Robert Hooke (1635-1703), studied the elastic properties of springs and formulated the law that bears his name. Hooke found the relationship among the force a spring exerts, , the distance from equilibrium the end of the spring is displaced, , and a number called the spring constant (or, sometimes, the force constant of the spring). According to Hooke, the force of the spring is directly proportional to its displacement from equilibrium, or . In its scalar form, this equation is simply . The negative sign indicates that the force that the spring exerts and its displacement have opposite directions. The value of depends on the geometry and the material of the spring; it can be easily determined experimentally using this scalar equation. Toy makers have always been interested in springs for the entertainment value of the motion they produce. One well-known application is a baby bouncer,which consists of a harness seat for a toddler, attached to a spring. The entire contraption hooks onto the top of a doorway. The idea is for the baby to hang in the seat with his or her feet just touching the ground so that a good push up will get the baby bouncing, providing potentially hours of entertainment. F  x k F = −kx F = −kx k Part A The following chart and accompanying graph depict an experiment to determine the spring constant for a baby bouncer. Displacement from equilibrium, ( ) Force exerted on the spring, ( ) 0 0 0.005 2.5 0.010 5.0 0.015 7.5 0.020 10 What is the spring constant of the spring being tested for the baby bouncer? Express your answer to two significant figures in newtons per meter. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Shooting a ball into a box Two children are trying to shoot a marble of mass into a small box using a spring-loaded gun that is fixed on a table and shoots horizontally from the edge of the table. The edge of the table is a height above the top of the box (the height of which is negligibly small), and the center of the box is a distance from the edge of the table. x m F N k k = N/m m H d The spring has a spring constant . The first child compresses the spring a distance and finds that the marble falls short of its target by a horizontal distance . Part A By what distance, , should the second child compress the spring so that the marble lands in the middle of the box? (Assume that height of the box is negligible, so that there is no chance that the marble will hit the side of the box before it lands in the bottom.) Express the distance in terms of , , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). k x1 d12 x2 m k g H d x2 = Elastic Collision in One Dimension Block 1, of mass , moves across a frictionless surface with speed . It collides elastically with block 2, of mass , which is at rest ( ). After the collision, block 1 moves with speed , while block 2 moves with speed . Assume that , so that after the collision, the two objects move off in the direction of the first object before the collision. Part A This collision is elastic. What quantities, if any, are conserved in this collision? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is the final speed of block 1? m1 ui m2 vi = 0 uf vf m1 > m2 kinetic energy only momentum only kinetic energy and momentum uf Express in terms of , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C What is the final speed of block 2? Express in terms of , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Ballistic Pendulum In a ballistic pendulum an object of mass is fired with an initial speed at a pendulum bob. The bob has a mass , which is suspended by a rod of length and negligible mass. After the collision, the pendulum and object stick together and swing to a maximum angular displacement as shown . uf m1 m2 ui uf = vf vf m1 m2 ui vf = m v0 M L  Part A Find an expression for , the initial speed of the fired object. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , , and and the acceleration due to gravity, . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B An experiment is done to compare the initial speed of bullets fired from different handguns: a 9.0 and a .44 caliber. The guns are fired into a 10- pendulum bob of length . Assume that the 9.0- bullet has a mass of 6.0 and the .44-caliber bullet has a mass of 12 . If the 9.0- bullet causes the pendulum to swing to a maximum angular displacement of 4.3 and the .44-caliber bullet causes a displacement of 10.1 , find the ratio of the initial speed of the 9.0- bullet to the speed of the .44-caliber bullet, . Express your answer numerically. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: v0 m M L  g v0 = mm kg L mm g g mm   mm (v /( 0 )9.0 v0)44 Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. (v0 )9.0/(v0 )44 =

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1-Two notions serve as the basis for all torts: wrongs and compensation. True False 2-The goal of tort law is to put a defendant in the position that he or she would have been in had the tort occurred to the defendant. True False 3-Hayley is injured in an accident precipitated by Isolde. Hayley files a tort action against Isolde, seeking to recover for the damage suffered. Damages that are intended to compensate or reimburse a plaintiff for actual losses are: compensatory damages. reimbursement damages. actual damages. punitive damages. 4-Ladd throws a rock intending to hit Minh but misses and hits Nasir instead. On the basis of the tort of battery, Nasir can sue: Ladd. Minh. the rightful owner of the rock. no one. 4-Luella trespasses on Merchandise Mart’s property. Through the use of reasonable force, Merchandise Mart’s security guard detains Luella until the police arrive. Merchandise Mart is liable for: assault. battery. false imprisonment. none of the choice 6-The extreme risk of an activity is a defense against imposing strict liability. True False 7-Misrepresentation in an ad is enough to show an intent to induce the reliance of anyone who may use the product. True False 8-Luke is playing a video game on a defective disk that melts in his game player, starting a fire that injures his hands. Luke files a suit against Mystic Maze, Inc., the game’s maker under the doctrine of strict liability. A significant application of this doctrine is in the area of: cyber torts. intentional torts. product liability. unintentional torts 9-More than two hundred years ago, the Declaration of Independence recognized the importance of protecting creative works. True False 10-n 2014, Cloud Computing Corporation registers its trademark as provided by federal law. After the first renewal, this registration: is renewable every ten years. is renewable every twenty years. runs for life of the corporation plus seventy years. runs forever. 11-Wendy works as a weather announcer for a TV station under the character name Weather Wendy. Wendy can register her character’s name as: a certification mark. a trade name. a service mark. none of the choices 12-Much of the material on the Internet, including software and database information, is not copyrighted. True False 13-In a criminal case, the state must prove its case by a preponderance of the evidence. True False 14-Under the Fourth Amendmentt, general searches through a person’s belongings are permissible. True False 15-Maura enters a gas station and points a gun at the clerk Nate. She then forces Nate to open the cash register and give her all the money. Maura can be charged with: burglary. robbery. larceny. receiving stolen property. 16-Reno, driving while intoxicated, causes a car accident that results in the death of Santo. Reno is arrested and charged with a felony. A felony is a crime punishable by death or imprisonment for: any period of time. more than one year. more than six months. more than ten days. 17-Corporate officers and directors may be held criminally liable for the actions of employees under their supervision. True False 18-Sal assures Tom that she will deliver a truckload of hay to his cattle ranch. A person’s declaration to do a certain act is part of the definition of: an expectation. a moral obligation. a prediction. a promise. 19-Lark promises to buy Mac’s used textbook for $60. Lark is: an offeror. an offeree a promisee. a promisor. 20-Casey offers to sell a certain used forklift to DIY Lumber Outlet, but Casey dies before DIY accepts. Most likely, Casey’s death: did not affect the offer. shortened the time of the offer but did not terminated it. extended the time of the offer. terminated the offer.

1-Two notions serve as the basis for all torts: wrongs and compensation. True False 2-The goal of tort law is to put a defendant in the position that he or she would have been in had the tort occurred to the defendant. True False 3-Hayley is injured in an accident precipitated by Isolde. Hayley files a tort action against Isolde, seeking to recover for the damage suffered. Damages that are intended to compensate or reimburse a plaintiff for actual losses are: compensatory damages. reimbursement damages. actual damages. punitive damages. 4-Ladd throws a rock intending to hit Minh but misses and hits Nasir instead. On the basis of the tort of battery, Nasir can sue: Ladd. Minh. the rightful owner of the rock. no one. 4-Luella trespasses on Merchandise Mart’s property. Through the use of reasonable force, Merchandise Mart’s security guard detains Luella until the police arrive. Merchandise Mart is liable for: assault. battery. false imprisonment. none of the choice 6-The extreme risk of an activity is a defense against imposing strict liability. True False 7-Misrepresentation in an ad is enough to show an intent to induce the reliance of anyone who may use the product. True False 8-Luke is playing a video game on a defective disk that melts in his game player, starting a fire that injures his hands. Luke files a suit against Mystic Maze, Inc., the game’s maker under the doctrine of strict liability. A significant application of this doctrine is in the area of: cyber torts. intentional torts. product liability. unintentional torts 9-More than two hundred years ago, the Declaration of Independence recognized the importance of protecting creative works. True False 10-n 2014, Cloud Computing Corporation registers its trademark as provided by federal law. After the first renewal, this registration: is renewable every ten years. is renewable every twenty years. runs for life of the corporation plus seventy years. runs forever. 11-Wendy works as a weather announcer for a TV station under the character name Weather Wendy. Wendy can register her character’s name as: a certification mark. a trade name. a service mark. none of the choices 12-Much of the material on the Internet, including software and database information, is not copyrighted. True False 13-In a criminal case, the state must prove its case by a preponderance of the evidence. True False 14-Under the Fourth Amendmentt, general searches through a person’s belongings are permissible. True False 15-Maura enters a gas station and points a gun at the clerk Nate. She then forces Nate to open the cash register and give her all the money. Maura can be charged with: burglary. robbery. larceny. receiving stolen property. 16-Reno, driving while intoxicated, causes a car accident that results in the death of Santo. Reno is arrested and charged with a felony. A felony is a crime punishable by death or imprisonment for: any period of time. more than one year. more than six months. more than ten days. 17-Corporate officers and directors may be held criminally liable for the actions of employees under their supervision. True False 18-Sal assures Tom that she will deliver a truckload of hay to his cattle ranch. A person’s declaration to do a certain act is part of the definition of: an expectation. a moral obligation. a prediction. a promise. 19-Lark promises to buy Mac’s used textbook for $60. Lark is: an offeror. an offeree a promisee. a promisor. 20-Casey offers to sell a certain used forklift to DIY Lumber Outlet, but Casey dies before DIY accepts. Most likely, Casey’s death: did not affect the offer. shortened the time of the offer but did not terminated it. extended the time of the offer. terminated the offer.

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PHY-102: Energy and Circular Motion Exercises Complete the following exercises. 1. A rifle with a longer barrel can fire bullets with a larger velocity than a rifle with a shorter barrel. a. Explain this using the impulse-momentum theorem. b. Explain this using the work-energy theorem 2. Use physics terms to explain the benefits of crumple zones in modern cars. 3. When a gun is fired at the shooting range, the gun recoils (moves backward). Explain this using the law of conservation of momentum. 4. Rank the following in terms of increasing inertia: A. A 10,000 kg train car at rest B. A 100 kg person running at 5 m/s C. A 1200 kg car going 15 m/s D. A 15 kg meteor going at a speed of 1000 m/s 5. Rank the following in terms of increasing momentum: A. A 10,000 kg train car at rest B. A 100 kg person running at 5 m/s C. A 1200 kg car going 15 m/s D. A 15 kg meteor going at a speed of 1000 m/s 6. Rank the following in terms of increasing kinetic energy: A. A 1200 kg car going 15 m/s B. A 10,000 kg train car at rest C. A 15 kg meteor going at a speed of 1000 m/s D. A 100 kg person running at 5 m/s 7. Ben (55 kg) is standing on very slippery ice when Junior (25 kg) bumps into him. Junior was moving at a speed of 8 m/s before the collision and Ben and Junior embrace after the collision. Find the speed of Ben and Junior as they move across the ice after the collision. Give the answer in m/s. Describe the work you did to get the answer. 8. Identical marbles are released from the same height on each of the following four frictionless ramps. Compare the speed of the marbles at the end of each ramp. Explain your reasoning. 9. A force of only 150 N can lift a 600 N sack of flour to a height of 0.50 m when using a lever as shown in the diagram below. a. Find the work done on the sack of flour (in J). b. Find the distance you must push with the 150 N force on the left side (in m). c. Briefly explain the benefit of using a lever to lift a heavy object. 10. Rank the following in terms of increasing power. A. Doing 100 J of work in 10 seconds. B. Doing 100 J of work in 5 seconds. C. Doing 200 J of work in 5 seconds. D. Doing 400 J of work in 30 seconds. 11. A student lifts a 25 kg mass a vertical distance of 1.6 m in a time of 2.0 seconds. a. Find the force needed to lift the mass (in N). b. Find the work done by the student (in J). c. Find the power exerted by the student (in W). 12. A satellite is put into an orbit at a distance from the center of the Earth equal to twice the distance from the center of the Earth to the surface. If the satellite had a weight at the surface of 4000 N, what is the force of gravity (weight) of the satellite when it is in its orbit? Give your answer in newtons, N. 13. Consider a satellite in a circular orbit around the Earth. a. Why is it important to give a satellite a horizontal speed when placing it in orbit? b. What will happen if the horizontal speed is too small? c. What will happen if the horizontal speed is too large? 14. If you drop an object from a distance of 1 meter above the ground, where would it fall to the ground in the shortest time: Atop Mt. Everest or in New York? 15. Why do the astronauts aboard the space station appear to be weightless? 16. Why do the passengers on a high-flying airplane not appear weightless, similar to the astronauts on the space station? 17. A ranger needs to capture a monkey hanging on a tree branch. The ranger aims his dart gun directly at the monkey and fires the tranquilizer dart. However, the monkey lets go of the branch at exactly the same time as the ranger fires the dart. Will the monkey get hit or will it avoid the dart? The remaining questions are multiple-choice questions: 18. Compared to its weight on Earth, a 5 kg object on the moon will weigh A. the same amount. B. less. C. more. 19. Compared to its mass on Earth, a 5 kg object on the moon will have A. the same mass. B. less mass. C. more mass. 20. The reason padded dashboards are used in cars is that they A. look nice and feel good. B. decrease the impulse in a collision. C. increase the force of impact in a collision. D. decrease the momentum of a collision. E. increase the time of impact in a collision. 21. Suppose you are standing on a frozen lake where there is no friction between your feet and the ice. What can you do to get off the lake? A. Bend over touching the ice in front of you and then bring you feet to your hands. B. Walk very slowly on tiptoe. C. Get on your hands and knees and crawl off the ice. D. Throw something in the direction opposite to the way you want to go. 22. A car travels in a circle with constant speed. Which of the following is true? A. The net force on the car is zero because the car is not accelerating. B. The net force on the car is directed forward, in the direction of travel. C. The net force on the car is directed inward, toward the center of the curve. D. The net force on the car is directed outward, away from the center of the curve. 23. A job is done slowly, and an identical job is done quickly. Which of the following is true? a. They require the same amount of force, but different amounts of work. b. They require the same amount of work, but different amounts of power. c. They require the same amounts of power, but different amounts of work. d. They require the same amounts of work, but different amounts of energy. 24. How many joules of work are done on a box when a force of 60 N pushes it 5 m in 3 seconds? a. 300 J b. 12 J c. 100 J d. 36 J e. 4 J 25. A 1 kg cart moving with a speed of 3 m/s collides with a 2 kg cart at rest. If the carts stick together after the collision, with what speed will they move after the collision? a. 3 m/s b. 1.5 m/s c. 1 m/s d. 2 m/s

PHY-102: Energy and Circular Motion Exercises Complete the following exercises. 1. A rifle with a longer barrel can fire bullets with a larger velocity than a rifle with a shorter barrel. a. Explain this using the impulse-momentum theorem. b. Explain this using the work-energy theorem 2. Use physics terms to explain the benefits of crumple zones in modern cars. 3. When a gun is fired at the shooting range, the gun recoils (moves backward). Explain this using the law of conservation of momentum. 4. Rank the following in terms of increasing inertia: A. A 10,000 kg train car at rest B. A 100 kg person running at 5 m/s C. A 1200 kg car going 15 m/s D. A 15 kg meteor going at a speed of 1000 m/s 5. Rank the following in terms of increasing momentum: A. A 10,000 kg train car at rest B. A 100 kg person running at 5 m/s C. A 1200 kg car going 15 m/s D. A 15 kg meteor going at a speed of 1000 m/s 6. Rank the following in terms of increasing kinetic energy: A. A 1200 kg car going 15 m/s B. A 10,000 kg train car at rest C. A 15 kg meteor going at a speed of 1000 m/s D. A 100 kg person running at 5 m/s 7. Ben (55 kg) is standing on very slippery ice when Junior (25 kg) bumps into him. Junior was moving at a speed of 8 m/s before the collision and Ben and Junior embrace after the collision. Find the speed of Ben and Junior as they move across the ice after the collision. Give the answer in m/s. Describe the work you did to get the answer. 8. Identical marbles are released from the same height on each of the following four frictionless ramps. Compare the speed of the marbles at the end of each ramp. Explain your reasoning. 9. A force of only 150 N can lift a 600 N sack of flour to a height of 0.50 m when using a lever as shown in the diagram below. a. Find the work done on the sack of flour (in J). b. Find the distance you must push with the 150 N force on the left side (in m). c. Briefly explain the benefit of using a lever to lift a heavy object. 10. Rank the following in terms of increasing power. A. Doing 100 J of work in 10 seconds. B. Doing 100 J of work in 5 seconds. C. Doing 200 J of work in 5 seconds. D. Doing 400 J of work in 30 seconds. 11. A student lifts a 25 kg mass a vertical distance of 1.6 m in a time of 2.0 seconds. a. Find the force needed to lift the mass (in N). b. Find the work done by the student (in J). c. Find the power exerted by the student (in W). 12. A satellite is put into an orbit at a distance from the center of the Earth equal to twice the distance from the center of the Earth to the surface. If the satellite had a weight at the surface of 4000 N, what is the force of gravity (weight) of the satellite when it is in its orbit? Give your answer in newtons, N. 13. Consider a satellite in a circular orbit around the Earth. a. Why is it important to give a satellite a horizontal speed when placing it in orbit? b. What will happen if the horizontal speed is too small? c. What will happen if the horizontal speed is too large? 14. If you drop an object from a distance of 1 meter above the ground, where would it fall to the ground in the shortest time: Atop Mt. Everest or in New York? 15. Why do the astronauts aboard the space station appear to be weightless? 16. Why do the passengers on a high-flying airplane not appear weightless, similar to the astronauts on the space station? 17. A ranger needs to capture a monkey hanging on a tree branch. The ranger aims his dart gun directly at the monkey and fires the tranquilizer dart. However, the monkey lets go of the branch at exactly the same time as the ranger fires the dart. Will the monkey get hit or will it avoid the dart? The remaining questions are multiple-choice questions: 18. Compared to its weight on Earth, a 5 kg object on the moon will weigh A. the same amount. B. less. C. more. 19. Compared to its mass on Earth, a 5 kg object on the moon will have A. the same mass. B. less mass. C. more mass. 20. The reason padded dashboards are used in cars is that they A. look nice and feel good. B. decrease the impulse in a collision. C. increase the force of impact in a collision. D. decrease the momentum of a collision. E. increase the time of impact in a collision. 21. Suppose you are standing on a frozen lake where there is no friction between your feet and the ice. What can you do to get off the lake? A. Bend over touching the ice in front of you and then bring you feet to your hands. B. Walk very slowly on tiptoe. C. Get on your hands and knees and crawl off the ice. D. Throw something in the direction opposite to the way you want to go. 22. A car travels in a circle with constant speed. Which of the following is true? A. The net force on the car is zero because the car is not accelerating. B. The net force on the car is directed forward, in the direction of travel. C. The net force on the car is directed inward, toward the center of the curve. D. The net force on the car is directed outward, away from the center of the curve. 23. A job is done slowly, and an identical job is done quickly. Which of the following is true? a. They require the same amount of force, but different amounts of work. b. They require the same amount of work, but different amounts of power. c. They require the same amounts of power, but different amounts of work. d. They require the same amounts of work, but different amounts of energy. 24. How many joules of work are done on a box when a force of 60 N pushes it 5 m in 3 seconds? a. 300 J b. 12 J c. 100 J d. 36 J e. 4 J 25. A 1 kg cart moving with a speed of 3 m/s collides with a 2 kg cart at rest. If the carts stick together after the collision, with what speed will they move after the collision? a. 3 m/s b. 1.5 m/s c. 1 m/s d. 2 m/s

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CAUSAL ANALYSIS GUIDELINES: According to John J. Ruskiewicz and Jay T. Dolmage, “We all analyze and explain things daily. Someone asks, ‘Why?’ We reply, ‘Because . . .’ and then offer reasons and rationales” (138). This type of thinking is at the core of the causal analysis. You will write a causal analysis which explores, through carefully examined research and logical analysis, certain causes or factors which contribute to an issue or problematic situation, based on the topic you choose to write on. Your causal analysis should explore more than one type of cause, such as necessary causes, sufficient causes, precipitating causes, proximate causes, remote causes, reciprocal causes, contributing factors, and chains of causes, as outlined in our course text in the chapter devoted to Causal Analyses. Your project should also reflect significant critical thinking skills. In addition to the actual causal analysis essay, you will be also create an annotated bibliography. These process elements will help you organize and focus your ideas and research in a beneficial way. The following is an organizational structure that outlines the chronology and content of your Causal Analysis: I. Introduction: In one (or at the most two) paragraph(s) introduce your topic. Give a brief overview of your topic and thesis in a few sentences. your evaluative claim and your causal claim. It should be specific, logical, and clear. II. History/Background to Current Situation: This section should take as much space as needed—a few to several paragraphs. Discuss the significant and relevant history of your topic up to the current situation and how it came to be. Use research as needed to give precise and accurate background for context in making your later causal argument. Comment on your research as well, so that you don’t lose your voice. As you explore other points of view, your own point of view will evolve in significant ways. III. Evaluative Claim: Once you have given a brief history/background of the current situation, evaluate the situation, the topic, as it is at present. Again, use research as appropriate to support your judgments. While this section of your essay could run anywhere from one to three paragraphs, typically one paragraph is the norm, as you are basically passing judgment on the situation, arguing evaluatively. This is an argument of pathos and logos, predominantly. IV. Causal Argument: This is the longest portion of your essay, the “meat,” the heart of your work. Once you have detailed the history/background to current situation and evaluated the current situation, you are ready to present your causal analysis. Demonstrate a link between the current situation and the causes for its negative condition. Of course, you will use current significant and relevant research to support your causal claim, and you will want to find the most dominant and pervasive logical causes, utilizing research, for the current situation as possible. These will connect forward as well to your proposal. Remember to use specific supporting detail/examples, and to analyze all of your research causally, thoroughly, and with clarity. NOTE: SECTIONS THREE AND FOUR ABOVE ARE INTERCHANGEABLE. IN OTHER WORDS, IF YOU FEEL YOU CAN PRESENT A BETTER ARGUMENT BY SHOWING CAUSES FIRST AND THEN EVALUATING THE CURRENT SITUATION, THAT CAN WORK JUST AS WELL AS THE ORDER OUTLINED ABOVE. I WILL LEAVE IT UP TO YOU AS THE WRITER TO ESTABLISH WHICH ORDER WORKS MOST EFFECTIVELY. V. Counterargument/Conditions of Rebuttal and Rebuttal: There will be those who disagree with you so you will want to acknowledge their points of view. What are their assumptions about this topic? What questions do they raise for consideration? Acknowledging other points of view gives your essay credibility and shows that you have been fair and broad in your inquiry and presentation. (You will need at least one credible source to represent at least one counterargument.) Then explain how you have considered this counterargument, but still find your own analysis to be more logical and accurate; this is your rebuttal. VI. Conclusion: Summarize the meaningful conclusions you have drawn clearly and precisely, remembering to resummarize your thesis. Give your specific proposal here as well. This will become your transition paragraph between the causal analysis and the proposal, so you must state your proposal precisely to pave the way for the proposal argument in full to come. Keep in mind these critical thinking outcomes: • Pursue the best information via reliable research (no Internet web sites should be used—Use the library electronic databases, such as ____, for academic research. • Engage in broad and deep inquiry • Analyze different points of view • Examine and challenge your own underlying assumptions as you undergo this exciting journey in scholarship. Please also reflect on these questions as you progress through your research and project work: About yourself: • What assumptions (beliefs) did you have about this topic coming into the project? • Have some of those assumptions been challenged? Have some been validated? • What questions do you still have about your issue? • What questions have you been able to answer through your research? About your audience: • What questions might your audience have about your topic? What points of view do they represent? • What information do you want to provide to help answer those questions? • How can you address a diverse audience so that its members will be moved to see your own point of view as significant and worth consideration? • How has pursuing the best information in a fair and honest, ethical, and logical manner allowed you to show respect for your audience as well as yourself as a thinker? Documentation Style: MLA format for paper format, in-text citations, works cited page, and annotated bibliography format. Paper Length: 6-8 double-spaced pages. Annotated Bibliography: At least 4 sources, formatted in MLA style. List of Sources Page: At least 5-8 sources used; formatted in MLA style. Warning: Plagiarism is punishable with an “F,” so be sure to document your research carefully. Causal Analysis Topics Choose one: • Causes of bullying • Causes of gun violence in schools • Causes of obesity in children • Causes of lying / Reasons why people lie • Causes of the fear of darkness Write in the 3rd-person point of view (using pronouns such as he, she, they, etc.). Do not write in the 1st- person (I, me, etc.) or 2nd-person (you, your) point of view.

CAUSAL ANALYSIS GUIDELINES: According to John J. Ruskiewicz and Jay T. Dolmage, “We all analyze and explain things daily. Someone asks, ‘Why?’ We reply, ‘Because . . .’ and then offer reasons and rationales” (138). This type of thinking is at the core of the causal analysis. You will write a causal analysis which explores, through carefully examined research and logical analysis, certain causes or factors which contribute to an issue or problematic situation, based on the topic you choose to write on. Your causal analysis should explore more than one type of cause, such as necessary causes, sufficient causes, precipitating causes, proximate causes, remote causes, reciprocal causes, contributing factors, and chains of causes, as outlined in our course text in the chapter devoted to Causal Analyses. Your project should also reflect significant critical thinking skills. In addition to the actual causal analysis essay, you will be also create an annotated bibliography. These process elements will help you organize and focus your ideas and research in a beneficial way. The following is an organizational structure that outlines the chronology and content of your Causal Analysis: I. Introduction: In one (or at the most two) paragraph(s) introduce your topic. Give a brief overview of your topic and thesis in a few sentences. your evaluative claim and your causal claim. It should be specific, logical, and clear. II. History/Background to Current Situation: This section should take as much space as needed—a few to several paragraphs. Discuss the significant and relevant history of your topic up to the current situation and how it came to be. Use research as needed to give precise and accurate background for context in making your later causal argument. Comment on your research as well, so that you don’t lose your voice. As you explore other points of view, your own point of view will evolve in significant ways. III. Evaluative Claim: Once you have given a brief history/background of the current situation, evaluate the situation, the topic, as it is at present. Again, use research as appropriate to support your judgments. While this section of your essay could run anywhere from one to three paragraphs, typically one paragraph is the norm, as you are basically passing judgment on the situation, arguing evaluatively. This is an argument of pathos and logos, predominantly. IV. Causal Argument: This is the longest portion of your essay, the “meat,” the heart of your work. Once you have detailed the history/background to current situation and evaluated the current situation, you are ready to present your causal analysis. Demonstrate a link between the current situation and the causes for its negative condition. Of course, you will use current significant and relevant research to support your causal claim, and you will want to find the most dominant and pervasive logical causes, utilizing research, for the current situation as possible. These will connect forward as well to your proposal. Remember to use specific supporting detail/examples, and to analyze all of your research causally, thoroughly, and with clarity. NOTE: SECTIONS THREE AND FOUR ABOVE ARE INTERCHANGEABLE. IN OTHER WORDS, IF YOU FEEL YOU CAN PRESENT A BETTER ARGUMENT BY SHOWING CAUSES FIRST AND THEN EVALUATING THE CURRENT SITUATION, THAT CAN WORK JUST AS WELL AS THE ORDER OUTLINED ABOVE. I WILL LEAVE IT UP TO YOU AS THE WRITER TO ESTABLISH WHICH ORDER WORKS MOST EFFECTIVELY. V. Counterargument/Conditions of Rebuttal and Rebuttal: There will be those who disagree with you so you will want to acknowledge their points of view. What are their assumptions about this topic? What questions do they raise for consideration? Acknowledging other points of view gives your essay credibility and shows that you have been fair and broad in your inquiry and presentation. (You will need at least one credible source to represent at least one counterargument.) Then explain how you have considered this counterargument, but still find your own analysis to be more logical and accurate; this is your rebuttal. VI. Conclusion: Summarize the meaningful conclusions you have drawn clearly and precisely, remembering to resummarize your thesis. Give your specific proposal here as well. This will become your transition paragraph between the causal analysis and the proposal, so you must state your proposal precisely to pave the way for the proposal argument in full to come. Keep in mind these critical thinking outcomes: • Pursue the best information via reliable research (no Internet web sites should be used—Use the library electronic databases, such as ____, for academic research. • Engage in broad and deep inquiry • Analyze different points of view • Examine and challenge your own underlying assumptions as you undergo this exciting journey in scholarship. Please also reflect on these questions as you progress through your research and project work: About yourself: • What assumptions (beliefs) did you have about this topic coming into the project? • Have some of those assumptions been challenged? Have some been validated? • What questions do you still have about your issue? • What questions have you been able to answer through your research? About your audience: • What questions might your audience have about your topic? What points of view do they represent? • What information do you want to provide to help answer those questions? • How can you address a diverse audience so that its members will be moved to see your own point of view as significant and worth consideration? • How has pursuing the best information in a fair and honest, ethical, and logical manner allowed you to show respect for your audience as well as yourself as a thinker? Documentation Style: MLA format for paper format, in-text citations, works cited page, and annotated bibliography format. Paper Length: 6-8 double-spaced pages. Annotated Bibliography: At least 4 sources, formatted in MLA style. List of Sources Page: At least 5-8 sources used; formatted in MLA style. Warning: Plagiarism is punishable with an “F,” so be sure to document your research carefully. Causal Analysis Topics Choose one: • Causes of bullying • Causes of gun violence in schools • Causes of obesity in children • Causes of lying / Reasons why people lie • Causes of the fear of darkness Write in the 3rd-person point of view (using pronouns such as he, she, they, etc.). Do not write in the 1st- person (I, me, etc.) or 2nd-person (you, your) point of view.

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Assignment 3 Due: 11:59pm on Friday, February 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Problem 2.68 As a science project, you drop a watermelon off the top of the Empire State Building, 320 m above the sidewalk. It so happens that Superman flies by at the instant you release the watermelon. Superman is headed straight down with a speed of 36.0 . Part A How fast is the watermelon going when it passes Superman? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 2.63 A motorist is driving at when she sees that a traffic light ahead has just turned red. She knows that this light stays red for , and she wants to reach the light just as it turns green again. It takes her to step on the brakes and begin slowing. Part A What is her speed as she reaches the light at the instant it turns green? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: m/s 72.0 ms 20 m/s 200 m 15 s 1.0 s 5.71 ms Correct Conceptual Question 4.1 Part A At this instant, is the particle in the figurespeeding up, slowing down, or traveling at constant speed? ANSWER: Correct Part B Is this particle curving to the right, curving to the left, or traveling straight? Speeding up Slowing down Traveling at constant speed ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 4.2 Part A At this instant, is the particle in the following figure speeding up, slowing down, or traveling at constant speed? ANSWER: Curving to the right Curving to the left Traveling straight Correct Part B Is this particle curving upward, curving downward, or traveling straight? ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.8 A particle’s trajectory is described by and , where is in s. Part A What is the particle’s speed at ? ANSWER: The particle is speeding up. The particle is slowing down. The particle is traveling at constant speed. The particle is curving upward. The particle is curving downward. The particle is traveling straight. x = ( 1 −2 ) m 2 t3 t2 y = ( 1 −2t) m 2 t2 t t = 0 s v = 2 m/s Correct Part B What is the particle’s speed at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the particle’s direction of motion, measured as an angle from the x-axis, at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the particle’s direction of motion, measured as an angle from the x-axis, at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: t = 5.0s v = 18 m/s t = 0 s  = -90  counterclockwise from the +x axis. t = 5.0s  = 9.7  counterclockwise from the +x axis. Correct Problem 4.9 A rocket-powered hockey puck moves on a horizontal frictionless table. The figure shows the graph of and the figure shows the graph of , the x- and y-components of the puck’s velocity, respectively. The puck starts at the origin. Part A In which direction is the puck moving at = 3 ? Give your answer as an angle from the x-axis. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part B vx vy t s = 51   above the x-axis How far from the origin is the puck at 5 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 4.13 A rifle is aimed horizontally at a target 51.0 away. The bullet hits the target 1.50 below the aim point. You may want to review ( pages 91 – 95) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Quadratic Equations Part A What was the bullet’s flight time? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Start by drawing a picture of the bullet’s trajectory, including where it leaves the gun and where it hits the target. You can assume that the gun was held parallel to the ground. Label the distances given in the problem. Choose an x-y coordinate system, making sure to label the origin. It is conventional to have x in the horizontal direction and y in the vertical direction. What is the y coordinate when the bullet leaves the gun? What is the y coordinate when it hits the target? What is the initial velocity in the y direction? What is the acceleration in the y direction? What is the equation that describes the motion in the vertical y direction as a function of time? Can you use the equation for to determine the time of flight? Why was it not necessary to include the motion in the x direction? s s = 180 cm m cm y(t) y(t) ANSWER: Correct Part B What was the bullet’s speed as it left the barrel? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem In the coordinate system introduced in Part A, what are the x coordinates when the bullet leaves the gun and when it hits the target? Is there any acceleration in the x direction? What is the equation that describes the motion in the horizontal x direction as a function of time? Can you use the equation for to determine the initial velocity? ANSWER: Correct Introduction to Projectile Motion Learning Goal: To understand the basic concepts of projectile motion. Projectile motion may seem rather complex at first. However, by breaking it down into components, you will find that it is really no different than the one-dimensional motions that you have already studied. One of the most often used techniques in physics is to divide two- and three-dimensional quantities into components. For instance, in projectile motion, a particle has some initial velocity . In general, this velocity can point in any direction on the xy plane and can have any magnitude. To make a problem more managable, it is common to break up such a quantity into its x component and its y component . 5.53×10−2 s x(t) x(t) 922 ms v vx vy Consider a particle with initial velocity that has magnitude 12.0 and is directed 60.0 above the negative x axis. Part A What is the x component of ? Express your answer in meters per second. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the y component of ? Express your answer in meters per second. ANSWER: Correct Breaking up the velocities into components is particularly useful when the components do not affect each other. Eventually, you will learn about situations in which the components of velocity do affect one another, but for now you will only be looking at problems where they do not. So, if there is acceleration in the x direction but not in the y direction, then the x component of the velocity will change, but the y component of the velocity will not. Part C Look at this applet. The motion diagram for a projectile is displayed, as are the motion diagrams for each component. The x-component motion diagram is what you would get if you shined a spotlight down on the particle as it moved and recorded the motion of its shadow. Similarly, if you shined a spotlight to the left and recorded the particle’s shadow, you would get the motion diagram for its y component. How would you describe the two motion diagrams for the components? ANSWER: v m/s degrees vx v vx = -6.00 m/s vy v vy = 10.4 m/s Correct As you can see, the two components of the motion obey their own independent kinematic laws. For the vertical component, there is an acceleration downward with magnitude . Thus, you can calculate the vertical position of the particle at any time using the standard kinematic equation . Similarly, there is no acceleration in the horizontal direction, so the horizontal position of the particle is given by the standard kinematic equation . Now, consider this applet. Two balls are simultaneously dropped from a height of 5.0 . Part D How long does it take for the balls to reach the ground? Use 10 for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. Express your answer in seconds to two significant figures. Hint 1. How to approach the problem The balls are released from rest at a height of 5.0 at time . Using these numbers and basic kinematics, you can determine the amount of time it takes for the balls to reach the ground. ANSWER: Correct This situation, which you have dealt with before (motion under the constant acceleration of gravity), is actually a special case of projectile motion. Think of this as projectile motion where the horizontal component of the initial velocity is zero. Both the vertical and horizontal components exhibit motion with constant nonzero acceleration. The vertical component exhibits motion with constant nonzero acceleration, whereas the horizontal component exhibits constant-velocity motion. The vertical component exhibits constant-velocity motion, whereas the horizontal component exhibits motion with constant nonzero acceleration. Both the vertical and horizontal components exhibit motion with constant velocity. g = 10 m/s2 y = y0 + v0 t + (1/2)at2 x = x0 + v0 t m tg m/s2 m t = 0 s tg = 1.0 s Part E Imagine the ball on the left is given a nonzero initial speed in the horizontal direction, while the ball on the right continues to fall with zero initial velocity. What horizontal speed must the ball on the left start with so that it hits the ground at the same position as the ball on the right? Remember that the two balls are released, starting a horizontal distance of 3.0 apart. Express your answer in meters per second to two significant figures. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Recall from Part B that the horizontal component of velocity does not change during projectile motion. Therefore, you need to find the horizontal component of velocity such that, in a time , the ball will move horizontally 3.0 . You can assume that its initial x coordinate is . ANSWER: Correct You can adjust the horizontal speeds in this applet. Notice that regardless of what horizontal speeds you give to the balls, they continue to move vertically in the same way (i.e., they are at the same y coordinate at the same time). Problem 4.12 A ball thrown horizontally at 27 travels a horizontal distance of 49 before hitting the ground. Part A From what height was the ball thrown? Express your answer using two significant figures with the appropriate units. ANSWER: vx m vx tg = 1.0 s m x0 = 0.0 m vx = 3.0 m/s m/s m h = 16 m Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 4.20 The figure shows the angular-velocity-versus-time graph for a particle moving in a circle. You may want to review ( page ) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: The Definite Integral Part A How many revolutions does the object make during the first 3.5 ? Express your answer using two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: s n = Incorrect; Try Again Problem 4.26 To withstand “g-forces” of up to 10 g’s, caused by suddenly pulling out of a steep dive, fighter jet pilots train on a “human centrifuge.” 10 g’s is an acceleration of . Part A If the length of the centrifuge arm is 10.0 , at what speed is the rider moving when she experiences 10 g’s? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.28 Your roommate is working on his bicycle and has the bike upside down. He spins the 60.0 -diameter wheel, and you notice that a pebble stuck in the tread goes by three times every second. Part A What is the pebble’s speed? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct 98 m/s2 m 31.3 ms cm 5.65 ms Part B What is the pebble’s acceleration? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 4.43 On the Apollo 14 mission to the moon, astronaut Alan Shepard hit a golf ball with a 6 iron. The acceleration due to gravity on the moon is 1/6 of its value on earth. Suppose he hits the ball with a speed of 13 at an angle 50 above the horizontal. You may want to review ( pages 90 – 95) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Quadratic Equations Part A How much farther did the ball travel on the moon than it would have on earth? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Start by drawing a picture of the path of the golf ball, showing its starting and ending points. Choose a coordinate system, and label the origin. It is conventional to let x be the horizontal direction and y the vertical direction. What is the initial velocity in the x and y directions? What is the acceleration in the x and y directions on the moon and on the earth? What are the equations for and as a function of time, and , respectively? What is the y coordinate when the golf ball hits the ground? Can you use this information to determine the time of flight on the moon and on the earth? 107 m s2 m/s  x y x(t) y(t) Once you have the time of flight, how can you use the equation to determine the total distance traveled? Compare the distance traveled on the moon to the distance traveled on the earth . ANSWER: Correct Part B For how much more time was the ball in flight? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is the equation describing as a function of time? What is the initial x component of the ball’s velocity? How are the initial x component of the ball’s velocity and the distance traveled related to the time of flight? What is the difference between the time of flight on the moon and on earth? ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.42 In the Olympic shotput event, an athlete throws the shot with an initial speed of 12 at a 40.0 angle from the horizontal. The shot leaves her hand at a height of 1.8 above the ground. x(t) L = 85 m x(t) x t = 10 s m/s  m Part A How far does the shot travel? Express your answer to four significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B Repeat the calculation of part (a) for angles of 42.5 , 45.0 , and 47.5 . Express your answer to four significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C Express your answer to four significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D x = 16.36 m    x(42.5 ) = 16.39 m x(45.0 ) = 16.31 m Express your answer to four significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part E At what angle of release does she throw the farthest? ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.44 A ball is thrown toward a cliff of height with a speed of 32 and an angle of 60 above horizontal. It lands on the edge of the cliff 3.2 later. Part A How high is the cliff? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: x(47.5 ) = 16.13 m 40.0 42.5 45.0 47.5 h m/s  s h = 39 m Answer Requested Part B What was the maximum height of the ball? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the ball’s impact speed? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.58 A typical laboratory centrifuge rotates at 3600 . Test tubes have to be placed into a centrifuge very carefully because of the very large accelerations. Part A What is the acceleration at the end of a test tube that is 10 from the axis of rotation? Express your answer with the appropriate units. hmax = 39 m v = 16 ms rpm cm ANSWER: Correct Part B For comparison, what is the magnitude of the acceleration a test tube would experience if dropped from a height of 1.0 and stopped in a 1.7-ms-long encounter with a hard floor? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.62 Communications satellites are placed in a circular orbit where they stay directly over a fixed point on the equator as the earth rotates. These are called geosynchronous orbits. The radius of the earth is , and the altitude of a geosynchronous orbit is ( 22000 miles). Part A What is the speed of a satellite in a geosynchronous orbit? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct a = 1.42×104 m s2 m a = 2610 m s2 6.37 × 106m 3.58 × 107m  v = 3070 ms Part B What is the magnitude of the acceleration of a satellite in a geosynchronous orbit? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 89.5%. You received 103.82 out of a possible total of 116 points. a = 0.223 m s2

Assignment 3 Due: 11:59pm on Friday, February 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Problem 2.68 As a science project, you drop a watermelon off the top of the Empire State Building, 320 m above the sidewalk. It so happens that Superman flies by at the instant you release the watermelon. Superman is headed straight down with a speed of 36.0 . Part A How fast is the watermelon going when it passes Superman? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 2.63 A motorist is driving at when she sees that a traffic light ahead has just turned red. She knows that this light stays red for , and she wants to reach the light just as it turns green again. It takes her to step on the brakes and begin slowing. Part A What is her speed as she reaches the light at the instant it turns green? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: m/s 72.0 ms 20 m/s 200 m 15 s 1.0 s 5.71 ms Correct Conceptual Question 4.1 Part A At this instant, is the particle in the figurespeeding up, slowing down, or traveling at constant speed? ANSWER: Correct Part B Is this particle curving to the right, curving to the left, or traveling straight? Speeding up Slowing down Traveling at constant speed ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 4.2 Part A At this instant, is the particle in the following figure speeding up, slowing down, or traveling at constant speed? ANSWER: Curving to the right Curving to the left Traveling straight Correct Part B Is this particle curving upward, curving downward, or traveling straight? ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.8 A particle’s trajectory is described by and , where is in s. Part A What is the particle’s speed at ? ANSWER: The particle is speeding up. The particle is slowing down. The particle is traveling at constant speed. The particle is curving upward. The particle is curving downward. The particle is traveling straight. x = ( 1 −2 ) m 2 t3 t2 y = ( 1 −2t) m 2 t2 t t = 0 s v = 2 m/s Correct Part B What is the particle’s speed at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the particle’s direction of motion, measured as an angle from the x-axis, at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the particle’s direction of motion, measured as an angle from the x-axis, at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: t = 5.0s v = 18 m/s t = 0 s  = -90  counterclockwise from the +x axis. t = 5.0s  = 9.7  counterclockwise from the +x axis. Correct Problem 4.9 A rocket-powered hockey puck moves on a horizontal frictionless table. The figure shows the graph of and the figure shows the graph of , the x- and y-components of the puck’s velocity, respectively. The puck starts at the origin. Part A In which direction is the puck moving at = 3 ? Give your answer as an angle from the x-axis. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part B vx vy t s = 51   above the x-axis How far from the origin is the puck at 5 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 4.13 A rifle is aimed horizontally at a target 51.0 away. The bullet hits the target 1.50 below the aim point. You may want to review ( pages 91 – 95) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Quadratic Equations Part A What was the bullet’s flight time? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Start by drawing a picture of the bullet’s trajectory, including where it leaves the gun and where it hits the target. You can assume that the gun was held parallel to the ground. Label the distances given in the problem. Choose an x-y coordinate system, making sure to label the origin. It is conventional to have x in the horizontal direction and y in the vertical direction. What is the y coordinate when the bullet leaves the gun? What is the y coordinate when it hits the target? What is the initial velocity in the y direction? What is the acceleration in the y direction? What is the equation that describes the motion in the vertical y direction as a function of time? Can you use the equation for to determine the time of flight? Why was it not necessary to include the motion in the x direction? s s = 180 cm m cm y(t) y(t) ANSWER: Correct Part B What was the bullet’s speed as it left the barrel? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem In the coordinate system introduced in Part A, what are the x coordinates when the bullet leaves the gun and when it hits the target? Is there any acceleration in the x direction? What is the equation that describes the motion in the horizontal x direction as a function of time? Can you use the equation for to determine the initial velocity? ANSWER: Correct Introduction to Projectile Motion Learning Goal: To understand the basic concepts of projectile motion. Projectile motion may seem rather complex at first. However, by breaking it down into components, you will find that it is really no different than the one-dimensional motions that you have already studied. One of the most often used techniques in physics is to divide two- and three-dimensional quantities into components. For instance, in projectile motion, a particle has some initial velocity . In general, this velocity can point in any direction on the xy plane and can have any magnitude. To make a problem more managable, it is common to break up such a quantity into its x component and its y component . 5.53×10−2 s x(t) x(t) 922 ms v vx vy Consider a particle with initial velocity that has magnitude 12.0 and is directed 60.0 above the negative x axis. Part A What is the x component of ? Express your answer in meters per second. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the y component of ? Express your answer in meters per second. ANSWER: Correct Breaking up the velocities into components is particularly useful when the components do not affect each other. Eventually, you will learn about situations in which the components of velocity do affect one another, but for now you will only be looking at problems where they do not. So, if there is acceleration in the x direction but not in the y direction, then the x component of the velocity will change, but the y component of the velocity will not. Part C Look at this applet. The motion diagram for a projectile is displayed, as are the motion diagrams for each component. The x-component motion diagram is what you would get if you shined a spotlight down on the particle as it moved and recorded the motion of its shadow. Similarly, if you shined a spotlight to the left and recorded the particle’s shadow, you would get the motion diagram for its y component. How would you describe the two motion diagrams for the components? ANSWER: v m/s degrees vx v vx = -6.00 m/s vy v vy = 10.4 m/s Correct As you can see, the two components of the motion obey their own independent kinematic laws. For the vertical component, there is an acceleration downward with magnitude . Thus, you can calculate the vertical position of the particle at any time using the standard kinematic equation . Similarly, there is no acceleration in the horizontal direction, so the horizontal position of the particle is given by the standard kinematic equation . Now, consider this applet. Two balls are simultaneously dropped from a height of 5.0 . Part D How long does it take for the balls to reach the ground? Use 10 for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. Express your answer in seconds to two significant figures. Hint 1. How to approach the problem The balls are released from rest at a height of 5.0 at time . Using these numbers and basic kinematics, you can determine the amount of time it takes for the balls to reach the ground. ANSWER: Correct This situation, which you have dealt with before (motion under the constant acceleration of gravity), is actually a special case of projectile motion. Think of this as projectile motion where the horizontal component of the initial velocity is zero. Both the vertical and horizontal components exhibit motion with constant nonzero acceleration. The vertical component exhibits motion with constant nonzero acceleration, whereas the horizontal component exhibits constant-velocity motion. The vertical component exhibits constant-velocity motion, whereas the horizontal component exhibits motion with constant nonzero acceleration. Both the vertical and horizontal components exhibit motion with constant velocity. g = 10 m/s2 y = y0 + v0 t + (1/2)at2 x = x0 + v0 t m tg m/s2 m t = 0 s tg = 1.0 s Part E Imagine the ball on the left is given a nonzero initial speed in the horizontal direction, while the ball on the right continues to fall with zero initial velocity. What horizontal speed must the ball on the left start with so that it hits the ground at the same position as the ball on the right? Remember that the two balls are released, starting a horizontal distance of 3.0 apart. Express your answer in meters per second to two significant figures. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Recall from Part B that the horizontal component of velocity does not change during projectile motion. Therefore, you need to find the horizontal component of velocity such that, in a time , the ball will move horizontally 3.0 . You can assume that its initial x coordinate is . ANSWER: Correct You can adjust the horizontal speeds in this applet. Notice that regardless of what horizontal speeds you give to the balls, they continue to move vertically in the same way (i.e., they are at the same y coordinate at the same time). Problem 4.12 A ball thrown horizontally at 27 travels a horizontal distance of 49 before hitting the ground. Part A From what height was the ball thrown? Express your answer using two significant figures with the appropriate units. ANSWER: vx m vx tg = 1.0 s m x0 = 0.0 m vx = 3.0 m/s m/s m h = 16 m Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 4.20 The figure shows the angular-velocity-versus-time graph for a particle moving in a circle. You may want to review ( page ) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: The Definite Integral Part A How many revolutions does the object make during the first 3.5 ? Express your answer using two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: s n = Incorrect; Try Again Problem 4.26 To withstand “g-forces” of up to 10 g’s, caused by suddenly pulling out of a steep dive, fighter jet pilots train on a “human centrifuge.” 10 g’s is an acceleration of . Part A If the length of the centrifuge arm is 10.0 , at what speed is the rider moving when she experiences 10 g’s? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.28 Your roommate is working on his bicycle and has the bike upside down. He spins the 60.0 -diameter wheel, and you notice that a pebble stuck in the tread goes by three times every second. Part A What is the pebble’s speed? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct 98 m/s2 m 31.3 ms cm 5.65 ms Part B What is the pebble’s acceleration? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 4.43 On the Apollo 14 mission to the moon, astronaut Alan Shepard hit a golf ball with a 6 iron. The acceleration due to gravity on the moon is 1/6 of its value on earth. Suppose he hits the ball with a speed of 13 at an angle 50 above the horizontal. You may want to review ( pages 90 – 95) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Quadratic Equations Part A How much farther did the ball travel on the moon than it would have on earth? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Start by drawing a picture of the path of the golf ball, showing its starting and ending points. Choose a coordinate system, and label the origin. It is conventional to let x be the horizontal direction and y the vertical direction. What is the initial velocity in the x and y directions? What is the acceleration in the x and y directions on the moon and on the earth? What are the equations for and as a function of time, and , respectively? What is the y coordinate when the golf ball hits the ground? Can you use this information to determine the time of flight on the moon and on the earth? 107 m s2 m/s  x y x(t) y(t) Once you have the time of flight, how can you use the equation to determine the total distance traveled? Compare the distance traveled on the moon to the distance traveled on the earth . ANSWER: Correct Part B For how much more time was the ball in flight? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is the equation describing as a function of time? What is the initial x component of the ball’s velocity? How are the initial x component of the ball’s velocity and the distance traveled related to the time of flight? What is the difference between the time of flight on the moon and on earth? ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.42 In the Olympic shotput event, an athlete throws the shot with an initial speed of 12 at a 40.0 angle from the horizontal. The shot leaves her hand at a height of 1.8 above the ground. x(t) L = 85 m x(t) x t = 10 s m/s  m Part A How far does the shot travel? Express your answer to four significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B Repeat the calculation of part (a) for angles of 42.5 , 45.0 , and 47.5 . Express your answer to four significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C Express your answer to four significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D x = 16.36 m    x(42.5 ) = 16.39 m x(45.0 ) = 16.31 m Express your answer to four significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part E At what angle of release does she throw the farthest? ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.44 A ball is thrown toward a cliff of height with a speed of 32 and an angle of 60 above horizontal. It lands on the edge of the cliff 3.2 later. Part A How high is the cliff? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: x(47.5 ) = 16.13 m 40.0 42.5 45.0 47.5 h m/s  s h = 39 m Answer Requested Part B What was the maximum height of the ball? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the ball’s impact speed? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.58 A typical laboratory centrifuge rotates at 3600 . Test tubes have to be placed into a centrifuge very carefully because of the very large accelerations. Part A What is the acceleration at the end of a test tube that is 10 from the axis of rotation? Express your answer with the appropriate units. hmax = 39 m v = 16 ms rpm cm ANSWER: Correct Part B For comparison, what is the magnitude of the acceleration a test tube would experience if dropped from a height of 1.0 and stopped in a 1.7-ms-long encounter with a hard floor? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.62 Communications satellites are placed in a circular orbit where they stay directly over a fixed point on the equator as the earth rotates. These are called geosynchronous orbits. The radius of the earth is , and the altitude of a geosynchronous orbit is ( 22000 miles). Part A What is the speed of a satellite in a geosynchronous orbit? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct a = 1.42×104 m s2 m a = 2610 m s2 6.37 × 106m 3.58 × 107m  v = 3070 ms Part B What is the magnitude of the acceleration of a satellite in a geosynchronous orbit? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 89.5%. You received 103.82 out of a possible total of 116 points. a = 0.223 m s2

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Assignment 8 Due: 11:59pm on Friday, April 4, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 10.3 Part A If a particle’s speed increases by a factor of 5, by what factor does its kinetic energy change? ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 10.11 A spring is compressed 1.5 . Part A How far must you compress a spring with twice the spring constant to store the same amount of energy? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct = 25 K2 K1 cm x = 1.1 cm Problem 10.2 The lowest point in Death Valley is below sea level. The summit of nearby Mt. Whitney has an elevation of 4420 . Part A What is the change in potential energy of an energetic 80 hiker who makes it from the floor of Death Valley to the top of Mt.Whitney? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.3 Part A At what speed does a 1800 compact car have the same kinetic energy as a 1.80×104 truck going 21.0 ? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.5 A boy reaches out of a window and tosses a ball straight up with a speed of 13 . The ball is 21 above the ground as he releases it. 85m m kg U = 3.5×106 J kg kg km/hr vc = 66.4 km hr m/s m Part A Use energy to find the ball’s maximum height above the ground. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B Use energy to find the ball’s speed as it passes the window on its way down. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C Use energy to find the speed of impact on the ground. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Hmax = 30 m v = 13 ms v = 24 ms Problem 10.8 A 59.0 skateboarder wants to just make it to the upper edge of a “quarter pipe,” a track that is one-quarter of a circle with a radius of 2.30 . Part A What speed does he need at the bottom? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.12 A 1500 car traveling at 12 suddenly runs out of gas while approaching the valley shown in the figure. The alert driver immediately puts the car in neutral so that it will roll. Part A kg m 6.71 ms kg m/s What will be the car’s speed as it coasts into the gas station on the other side of the valley? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Ups and Downs Learning Goal: To apply the law of conservation of energy to an object launched upward in the gravitational field of the earth. In the absence of nonconservative forces such as friction and air resistance, the total mechanical energy in a closed system is conserved. This is one particular case of the law of conservation of energy. In this problem, you will apply the law of conservation of energy to different objects launched from the earth. The energy transformations that take place involve the object’s kinetic energy and its gravitational potential energy . The law of conservation of energy for such cases implies that the sum of the object’s kinetic energy and potential energy does not change with time. This idea can be expressed by the equation , where “i” denotes the “initial” moment and “f” denotes the “final” moment. Since any two moments will work, the choice of the moments to consider is, technically, up to you. That choice, though, is usually suggested by the question posed in the problem. First, let us consider an object launched vertically upward with an initial speed . Neglect air resistance. Part A As the projectile goes upward, what energy changes take place? ANSWER: v = 6.8 ms K = (1/2)mv2 U = mgh Ki + Ui = Kf + Uf v Correct Part B At the top point of the flight, what can be said about the projectile’s kinetic and potential energy? ANSWER: Correct Strictly speaking, it is not the ball that possesses potential energy; rather, it is the system “Earth-ball.” Although we will often talk about “the gravitational potential energy of an elevated object,” it is useful to keep in mind that the energy, in fact, is associated with the interactions between the earth and the elevated object. Part C The potential energy of the object at the moment of launch __________. ANSWER: Both kinetic and potential energy decrease. Both kinetic and potential energy increase. Kinetic energy decreases; potential energy increases. Kinetic energy increases; potential energy decreases. Both kinetic and potential energy are at their maximum values. Both kinetic and potential energy are at their minimum values. Kinetic energy is at a maximum; potential energy is at a minimum. Kinetic energy is at a minimum; potential energy is at a maximum. Correct Usually, the zero level is chosen so as to make the relevant calculations simpler. In this case, it makes good sense to assume that at the ground level–but this is not, by any means, the only choice! Part D Using conservation of energy, find the maximum height to which the object will rise. Express your answer in terms of and the magnitude of the acceleration of gravity . ANSWER: Correct You may remember this result from kinematics. It is comforting to know that our new approach yields the same answer. Part E At what height above the ground does the projectile have a speed of ? Express your answer in terms of and the magnitude of the acceleration of gravity . ANSWER: is negative is positive is zero depends on the choice of the “zero level” of potential energy U = 0 hmax v g hmax = v2 2g h 0.5v v g h = 3 v2 8g Correct Part F What is the speed of the object at the height of ? Express your answer in terms of and . Use three significant figures in the numeric coefficient. Hint 1. How to approach the problem You are being asked for the speed at half of the maximum height. You know that at the initial height ( ), the speed is . All of the energy is kinetic energy, and so, the total energy is . At the maximum height, all of the energy is potential energy. Since the gravitational potential energy is proportional to , half of the initial kinetic energy must have been converted to potential energy when the projectile is at . Thus, the kinetic energy must be half of its original value (i.e., when ). You need to determine the speed, as a multiple of , that corresponds to such a kinetic energy. ANSWER: Correct Let us now consider objects launched at an angle. For such situations, using conservation of energy leads to a quicker solution than can be produced by kinematics. Part G A ball is launched as a projectile with initial speed at an angle above the horizontal. Using conservation of energy, find the maximum height of the ball’s flight. Express your answer in terms of , , and . Hint 1. Find the final kinetic energy Find the final kinetic energy of the ball. Here, the best choice of “final” moment is the point at which the ball reaches its maximum height, since this is the point we are interested in. u (1/2)hmax v g h = 0 v (1/2)mv2 h (1/2)hmax (1/4)mv2 h = (1/2)hmax v u = 0.707v v hmax v g Kf Express your answer in terms of , , and . Hint 1. Find the speed at the maximum height The speed of the ball at the maximum height is __________. ANSWER: ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part H A ball is launched with initial speed from ground level up a frictionless slope. The slope makes an angle with the horizontal. Using conservation of energy, find the maximum vertical height to which the ball will climb. Express your answer in terms of , , and . You may or may not use all of these quantities. v m 0 v v cos v sin v tan Kf = 0.5m(vcos( ))2 hmax = (vsin( ))2 2g v hmax v g ANSWER: Correct Interestingly, the answer does not depend on . The difference between this situation and the projectile case is that the ball moving up a slope has no kinetic energy at the top of its trajectory whereas the projectile launched at an angle does. Part I A ball is launched with initial speed from the ground level up a frictionless hill. The hill becomes steeper as the ball slides up; however, the ball remains in contact with the hill at all times. Using conservation of energy, find the maximum vertical height to which the ball will climb. Express your answer in terms of and . ANSWER: Correct The profile of the hill does not matter; the equation would have the same terms regardless of the steepness of the hill. Problem 10.14 A 12- -long spring is attached to the ceiling. When a 2.2 mass is hung from it, the spring stretches to a length of 17 . Part A What is the spring constant ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. hmax = v2 2g v hmax v g hmax = v2 2g Ki + Ui = Kf + Uf cm kg cm k ANSWER: Correct Part B How long is the spring when a 3.0 mass is suspended from it? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 10.17 A 6.2 mass hanging from a spring scale is slowly lowered onto a vertical spring, as shown in . You may want to review ( pages 255 – 257) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Solving Algebraic Equations = 430 k Nm kg y = 19 cm kg Part A What does the spring scale read just before the mass touches the lower spring? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Draw a picture showing the forces acting on the mass before it touches the scale. What is the net force on the mass? What is the force on the mass due to gravity? What is the force on the mass due to the scale? ANSWER: Correct Part B The scale reads 22 when the lower spring has been compressed by 2.7 . What is the value of the spring constant for the lower spring? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Draw a picture showing the forces acting on the mass. What is the net force on the mass? What is the force on the mass due to gravity? What is the force on the mass due to the scale? Use these to determine the force on the mass by the spring, taking note of the directions from your picture. How is the spring constant related to the force by the spring and the compression of the spring? Check your units. ANSWER: F = 61 N N cm k = 1400 k Nm Correct Part C At what compression length will the scale read zero? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Draw a picture showing the forces on the mass. When the scale reads zero, what is the force on the mass due to the scale? What is the gravitational force on the mass? What is the force on the mass by the spring? How is the compression length related to the force by the spring and the spring constant? Check your units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.18 Part A How far must you stretch a spring with = 800 to store 180 of energy? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: y = 4.2 cm k N/m J Correct Problem 10.22 A 15 runaway grocery cart runs into a spring with spring constant 230 and compresses it by 57 . Part A What was the speed of the cart just before it hit the spring? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Spring Gun A spring-loaded toy gun is used to shoot a ball straight up in the air. The ball reaches a maximum height , measured from the equilibrium position of the spring. s = 0.67 m kg N/m cm v = 2.2 ms H Part A The same ball is shot straight up a second time from the same gun, but this time the spring is compressed only half as far before firing. How far up does the ball go this time? Neglect friction. Assume that the spring is ideal and that the distance by which the spring is compressed is negligible compared to . Hint 1. Potential energy of the spring The potential energy of a spring is proportional to the square of the distance the spring is compressed. The spring was compressed half the distance, so the mass, when launched, has one quarter of the energy as in the first trial. Hint 2. Potential energy of the ball At the highest point in the ball’s trajectory, all of the spring’s potential energy has been converted into gravitational potential energy of the ball. ANSWER: Correct A Bullet Is Fired into a Wooden Block A bullet of mass is fired horizontally with speed at a wooden block of mass resting on a frictionless table. The bullet hits the block and becomes completely embedded within it. After the bullet has come to rest within the block, the block, with the bullet in it, is traveling at speed . H height = H 4 mb vi mw vf Part A Which of the following best describes this collision? Hint 1. Types of collisions An inelastic collision is a collision in which kinetic energy is not conserved. In a partially inelastic collision, kinetic energy is lost, but the objects colliding do not stick together. From this information, you can infer what completely inelastic and elastic collisions are. ANSWER: Correct Part B Which of the following quantities, if any, are conserved during this collision? Hint 1. When is kinetic energy conserved? Kinetic energy is conserved only in perfectly elastic collisions. ANSWER: perfectly elastic partially inelastic perfectly inelastic Correct Part C What is the speed of the block/bullet system after the collision? Express your answer in terms of , , and . Hint 1. Find the momentum after the collision What is the total momentum of the block/bullet system after the collision? Express your answer in terms of and other given quantities. ANSWER: Hint 2. Use conservation of momentum The momentum of the block/bullet system is conserved. Therefore, the momentum before the collision is the same as the momentum after the collision. Find a second expression for , this time expressed as the total momentum of the system before the collision. Express your answer in terms of and other given quantities. ANSWER: kinetic energy only momentum only kinetic energy and momentum neither momentum nor kinetic energy vi mw mb ptotal vf ptotal = (mw + mb)vf ptotal vi ptotal = mbvi ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.31 Ball 1, with a mass of 150 and traveling at 15.0 , collides head on with ball 2, which has a mass of 340 and is initially at rest. Part A What are the final velocities of each ball if the collision is perfectly elastic? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C vf = mb vi mb+mw g m/s g (vfx) = -5.82 1 ms (vfx) = 9.18 2 ms What are the final velocities of each ball if the collision is perfectly inelastic? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 10.43 A package of mass is released from rest at a warehouse loading dock and slides down the = 2.2 – high, frictionless chute to a waiting truck. Unfortunately, the truck driver went on a break without having removed the previous package, of mass , from the bottom of the chute. You may want to review ( pages 265 – 269) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Solving Algebraic Equations (vfx) = 4.59 1 ms (vfx) = 4.59 2 ms m h m 2m Part A Suppose the packages stick together. What is their common speed after the collision? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem There are two parts to this problem: the block sliding down the frictionless incline and the collision. What conservation laws are valid in each part? In terms of , what are the kinetic and potential energies of the block at the top of the incline? What is the potential energy of the same block at the bottom just before the collision? What are the kinetic energy and velocity of block just before the collision? What is conserved during the collision? What is the total momentum of the two blocks before the collision? What is the momentum of the two blocks stuck together after the collision? What is the velocity of the two blocks after the collision? ANSWER: Correct Part B Suppose the collision between the packages is perfectly elastic. To what height does the package of mass rebound? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem There are three parts to this problem: the block sliding down the incline, the collision, and mass going back up the incline. What conservation laws are valid in each part? m m v = 2.2 ms m m What is an elastic collision? For an elastic collision, how are the initial and final velocities related when one of the masses is initially at rest? Using the velocity of just before the collision from Part A, what is the velocity of just after the collision in this case? What are the kinetic and potential energies of mass just after the collision? What is the kinetic energy of mass at its maximum rebound height? Using conservation of energy, what is the potential energy of mass at its maximum height? What is the maximum height? ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.35 A cannon tilted up at a 35.0 angle fires a cannon ball at 79.0 from atop a 21.0 -high fortress wall. Part A What is the ball’s impact speed on the ground below? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.45 A 1000 safe is 2.5 above a heavy-duty spring when the rope holding the safe breaks. The safe hits the spring and compresses it 48 . m m m m m h = 24 cm $ m/s m vf = 81.6 ms kg m cm Part A What is the spring constant of the spring? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.49 A 100 block on a frictionless table is firmly attached to one end of a spring with = 21 . The other end of the spring is anchored to the wall. A 30 ball is thrown horizontally toward the block with a speed of 6.0 . Part A If the collision is perfectly elastic, what is the ball’s speed immediately after the collision? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the maximum compression of the spring? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: = 2.5×105 k Nm g k N/m g m/s v = 3.2 ms Correct Part C Repeat part A for the case of a perfectly inelastic collision. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D Repeat part B for the case of a perfectly inelastic collision. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 99.4%. You received 120.28 out of a possible total of 121 points. x = 0.19 m v = 1.4 ms x = 0.11 m

Assignment 8 Due: 11:59pm on Friday, April 4, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 10.3 Part A If a particle’s speed increases by a factor of 5, by what factor does its kinetic energy change? ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 10.11 A spring is compressed 1.5 . Part A How far must you compress a spring with twice the spring constant to store the same amount of energy? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct = 25 K2 K1 cm x = 1.1 cm Problem 10.2 The lowest point in Death Valley is below sea level. The summit of nearby Mt. Whitney has an elevation of 4420 . Part A What is the change in potential energy of an energetic 80 hiker who makes it from the floor of Death Valley to the top of Mt.Whitney? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.3 Part A At what speed does a 1800 compact car have the same kinetic energy as a 1.80×104 truck going 21.0 ? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.5 A boy reaches out of a window and tosses a ball straight up with a speed of 13 . The ball is 21 above the ground as he releases it. 85m m kg U = 3.5×106 J kg kg km/hr vc = 66.4 km hr m/s m Part A Use energy to find the ball’s maximum height above the ground. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B Use energy to find the ball’s speed as it passes the window on its way down. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C Use energy to find the speed of impact on the ground. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Hmax = 30 m v = 13 ms v = 24 ms Problem 10.8 A 59.0 skateboarder wants to just make it to the upper edge of a “quarter pipe,” a track that is one-quarter of a circle with a radius of 2.30 . Part A What speed does he need at the bottom? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.12 A 1500 car traveling at 12 suddenly runs out of gas while approaching the valley shown in the figure. The alert driver immediately puts the car in neutral so that it will roll. Part A kg m 6.71 ms kg m/s What will be the car’s speed as it coasts into the gas station on the other side of the valley? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Ups and Downs Learning Goal: To apply the law of conservation of energy to an object launched upward in the gravitational field of the earth. In the absence of nonconservative forces such as friction and air resistance, the total mechanical energy in a closed system is conserved. This is one particular case of the law of conservation of energy. In this problem, you will apply the law of conservation of energy to different objects launched from the earth. The energy transformations that take place involve the object’s kinetic energy and its gravitational potential energy . The law of conservation of energy for such cases implies that the sum of the object’s kinetic energy and potential energy does not change with time. This idea can be expressed by the equation , where “i” denotes the “initial” moment and “f” denotes the “final” moment. Since any two moments will work, the choice of the moments to consider is, technically, up to you. That choice, though, is usually suggested by the question posed in the problem. First, let us consider an object launched vertically upward with an initial speed . Neglect air resistance. Part A As the projectile goes upward, what energy changes take place? ANSWER: v = 6.8 ms K = (1/2)mv2 U = mgh Ki + Ui = Kf + Uf v Correct Part B At the top point of the flight, what can be said about the projectile’s kinetic and potential energy? ANSWER: Correct Strictly speaking, it is not the ball that possesses potential energy; rather, it is the system “Earth-ball.” Although we will often talk about “the gravitational potential energy of an elevated object,” it is useful to keep in mind that the energy, in fact, is associated with the interactions between the earth and the elevated object. Part C The potential energy of the object at the moment of launch __________. ANSWER: Both kinetic and potential energy decrease. Both kinetic and potential energy increase. Kinetic energy decreases; potential energy increases. Kinetic energy increases; potential energy decreases. Both kinetic and potential energy are at their maximum values. Both kinetic and potential energy are at their minimum values. Kinetic energy is at a maximum; potential energy is at a minimum. Kinetic energy is at a minimum; potential energy is at a maximum. Correct Usually, the zero level is chosen so as to make the relevant calculations simpler. In this case, it makes good sense to assume that at the ground level–but this is not, by any means, the only choice! Part D Using conservation of energy, find the maximum height to which the object will rise. Express your answer in terms of and the magnitude of the acceleration of gravity . ANSWER: Correct You may remember this result from kinematics. It is comforting to know that our new approach yields the same answer. Part E At what height above the ground does the projectile have a speed of ? Express your answer in terms of and the magnitude of the acceleration of gravity . ANSWER: is negative is positive is zero depends on the choice of the “zero level” of potential energy U = 0 hmax v g hmax = v2 2g h 0.5v v g h = 3 v2 8g Correct Part F What is the speed of the object at the height of ? Express your answer in terms of and . Use three significant figures in the numeric coefficient. Hint 1. How to approach the problem You are being asked for the speed at half of the maximum height. You know that at the initial height ( ), the speed is . All of the energy is kinetic energy, and so, the total energy is . At the maximum height, all of the energy is potential energy. Since the gravitational potential energy is proportional to , half of the initial kinetic energy must have been converted to potential energy when the projectile is at . Thus, the kinetic energy must be half of its original value (i.e., when ). You need to determine the speed, as a multiple of , that corresponds to such a kinetic energy. ANSWER: Correct Let us now consider objects launched at an angle. For such situations, using conservation of energy leads to a quicker solution than can be produced by kinematics. Part G A ball is launched as a projectile with initial speed at an angle above the horizontal. Using conservation of energy, find the maximum height of the ball’s flight. Express your answer in terms of , , and . Hint 1. Find the final kinetic energy Find the final kinetic energy of the ball. Here, the best choice of “final” moment is the point at which the ball reaches its maximum height, since this is the point we are interested in. u (1/2)hmax v g h = 0 v (1/2)mv2 h (1/2)hmax (1/4)mv2 h = (1/2)hmax v u = 0.707v v hmax v g Kf Express your answer in terms of , , and . Hint 1. Find the speed at the maximum height The speed of the ball at the maximum height is __________. ANSWER: ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part H A ball is launched with initial speed from ground level up a frictionless slope. The slope makes an angle with the horizontal. Using conservation of energy, find the maximum vertical height to which the ball will climb. Express your answer in terms of , , and . You may or may not use all of these quantities. v m 0 v v cos v sin v tan Kf = 0.5m(vcos( ))2 hmax = (vsin( ))2 2g v hmax v g ANSWER: Correct Interestingly, the answer does not depend on . The difference between this situation and the projectile case is that the ball moving up a slope has no kinetic energy at the top of its trajectory whereas the projectile launched at an angle does. Part I A ball is launched with initial speed from the ground level up a frictionless hill. The hill becomes steeper as the ball slides up; however, the ball remains in contact with the hill at all times. Using conservation of energy, find the maximum vertical height to which the ball will climb. Express your answer in terms of and . ANSWER: Correct The profile of the hill does not matter; the equation would have the same terms regardless of the steepness of the hill. Problem 10.14 A 12- -long spring is attached to the ceiling. When a 2.2 mass is hung from it, the spring stretches to a length of 17 . Part A What is the spring constant ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. hmax = v2 2g v hmax v g hmax = v2 2g Ki + Ui = Kf + Uf cm kg cm k ANSWER: Correct Part B How long is the spring when a 3.0 mass is suspended from it? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 10.17 A 6.2 mass hanging from a spring scale is slowly lowered onto a vertical spring, as shown in . You may want to review ( pages 255 – 257) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Solving Algebraic Equations = 430 k Nm kg y = 19 cm kg Part A What does the spring scale read just before the mass touches the lower spring? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Draw a picture showing the forces acting on the mass before it touches the scale. What is the net force on the mass? What is the force on the mass due to gravity? What is the force on the mass due to the scale? ANSWER: Correct Part B The scale reads 22 when the lower spring has been compressed by 2.7 . What is the value of the spring constant for the lower spring? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Draw a picture showing the forces acting on the mass. What is the net force on the mass? What is the force on the mass due to gravity? What is the force on the mass due to the scale? Use these to determine the force on the mass by the spring, taking note of the directions from your picture. How is the spring constant related to the force by the spring and the compression of the spring? Check your units. ANSWER: F = 61 N N cm k = 1400 k Nm Correct Part C At what compression length will the scale read zero? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Draw a picture showing the forces on the mass. When the scale reads zero, what is the force on the mass due to the scale? What is the gravitational force on the mass? What is the force on the mass by the spring? How is the compression length related to the force by the spring and the spring constant? Check your units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.18 Part A How far must you stretch a spring with = 800 to store 180 of energy? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: y = 4.2 cm k N/m J Correct Problem 10.22 A 15 runaway grocery cart runs into a spring with spring constant 230 and compresses it by 57 . Part A What was the speed of the cart just before it hit the spring? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Spring Gun A spring-loaded toy gun is used to shoot a ball straight up in the air. The ball reaches a maximum height , measured from the equilibrium position of the spring. s = 0.67 m kg N/m cm v = 2.2 ms H Part A The same ball is shot straight up a second time from the same gun, but this time the spring is compressed only half as far before firing. How far up does the ball go this time? Neglect friction. Assume that the spring is ideal and that the distance by which the spring is compressed is negligible compared to . Hint 1. Potential energy of the spring The potential energy of a spring is proportional to the square of the distance the spring is compressed. The spring was compressed half the distance, so the mass, when launched, has one quarter of the energy as in the first trial. Hint 2. Potential energy of the ball At the highest point in the ball’s trajectory, all of the spring’s potential energy has been converted into gravitational potential energy of the ball. ANSWER: Correct A Bullet Is Fired into a Wooden Block A bullet of mass is fired horizontally with speed at a wooden block of mass resting on a frictionless table. The bullet hits the block and becomes completely embedded within it. After the bullet has come to rest within the block, the block, with the bullet in it, is traveling at speed . H height = H 4 mb vi mw vf Part A Which of the following best describes this collision? Hint 1. Types of collisions An inelastic collision is a collision in which kinetic energy is not conserved. In a partially inelastic collision, kinetic energy is lost, but the objects colliding do not stick together. From this information, you can infer what completely inelastic and elastic collisions are. ANSWER: Correct Part B Which of the following quantities, if any, are conserved during this collision? Hint 1. When is kinetic energy conserved? Kinetic energy is conserved only in perfectly elastic collisions. ANSWER: perfectly elastic partially inelastic perfectly inelastic Correct Part C What is the speed of the block/bullet system after the collision? Express your answer in terms of , , and . Hint 1. Find the momentum after the collision What is the total momentum of the block/bullet system after the collision? Express your answer in terms of and other given quantities. ANSWER: Hint 2. Use conservation of momentum The momentum of the block/bullet system is conserved. Therefore, the momentum before the collision is the same as the momentum after the collision. Find a second expression for , this time expressed as the total momentum of the system before the collision. Express your answer in terms of and other given quantities. ANSWER: kinetic energy only momentum only kinetic energy and momentum neither momentum nor kinetic energy vi mw mb ptotal vf ptotal = (mw + mb)vf ptotal vi ptotal = mbvi ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.31 Ball 1, with a mass of 150 and traveling at 15.0 , collides head on with ball 2, which has a mass of 340 and is initially at rest. Part A What are the final velocities of each ball if the collision is perfectly elastic? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C vf = mb vi mb+mw g m/s g (vfx) = -5.82 1 ms (vfx) = 9.18 2 ms What are the final velocities of each ball if the collision is perfectly inelastic? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 10.43 A package of mass is released from rest at a warehouse loading dock and slides down the = 2.2 – high, frictionless chute to a waiting truck. Unfortunately, the truck driver went on a break without having removed the previous package, of mass , from the bottom of the chute. You may want to review ( pages 265 – 269) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Solving Algebraic Equations (vfx) = 4.59 1 ms (vfx) = 4.59 2 ms m h m 2m Part A Suppose the packages stick together. What is their common speed after the collision? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem There are two parts to this problem: the block sliding down the frictionless incline and the collision. What conservation laws are valid in each part? In terms of , what are the kinetic and potential energies of the block at the top of the incline? What is the potential energy of the same block at the bottom just before the collision? What are the kinetic energy and velocity of block just before the collision? What is conserved during the collision? What is the total momentum of the two blocks before the collision? What is the momentum of the two blocks stuck together after the collision? What is the velocity of the two blocks after the collision? ANSWER: Correct Part B Suppose the collision between the packages is perfectly elastic. To what height does the package of mass rebound? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem There are three parts to this problem: the block sliding down the incline, the collision, and mass going back up the incline. What conservation laws are valid in each part? m m v = 2.2 ms m m What is an elastic collision? For an elastic collision, how are the initial and final velocities related when one of the masses is initially at rest? Using the velocity of just before the collision from Part A, what is the velocity of just after the collision in this case? What are the kinetic and potential energies of mass just after the collision? What is the kinetic energy of mass at its maximum rebound height? Using conservation of energy, what is the potential energy of mass at its maximum height? What is the maximum height? ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.35 A cannon tilted up at a 35.0 angle fires a cannon ball at 79.0 from atop a 21.0 -high fortress wall. Part A What is the ball’s impact speed on the ground below? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.45 A 1000 safe is 2.5 above a heavy-duty spring when the rope holding the safe breaks. The safe hits the spring and compresses it 48 . m m m m m h = 24 cm $ m/s m vf = 81.6 ms kg m cm Part A What is the spring constant of the spring? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.49 A 100 block on a frictionless table is firmly attached to one end of a spring with = 21 . The other end of the spring is anchored to the wall. A 30 ball is thrown horizontally toward the block with a speed of 6.0 . Part A If the collision is perfectly elastic, what is the ball’s speed immediately after the collision? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the maximum compression of the spring? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: = 2.5×105 k Nm g k N/m g m/s v = 3.2 ms Correct Part C Repeat part A for the case of a perfectly inelastic collision. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D Repeat part B for the case of a perfectly inelastic collision. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 99.4%. You received 120.28 out of a possible total of 121 points. x = 0.19 m v = 1.4 ms x = 0.11 m

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