1 15325 Pre-work assignment Preparing your conflict scenario (four copies of your scenario must be brought to the workshop) Dear Participant, This letter introduces some pre-course work that is essential for you to complete before arriving at the workshop for the subject Negotiations and Conflict Management: 15325 – in which you are enrolled. The workshop will combine theory and practice in a manner intended to use the wisdom in the room to bring together our thinking about enacting the practices you will learn about. You will bring with you a scenario to work through during the workshop. This letter explains how to write that. 1 The situation (you can give it a title if that helps to frame it for you) Your first task is to identify a situation that is (or in your opinion is) unresolved and has potential to escalate into a matter causing stress, tension, delay or confusion. This may be something at work or in a context where you have the power to take action. You will use fictional names and disguise other facts to ensure confidentiality, but it is essential that this is a real situation – not a hypothetical or fictional one. 2 The Details To enable others to understand the context you will need to describe the following – A The people. Describe each person using the following items – Name – Use a fictional name for each person and do not include more than four others apart from yourself. You can use your own name if you wish or also disguise that as well. General facts about each person – gender, age range, role title, marital status (if relevant) work/life location (if other than yours) Personal characteristics – select at least 5 key words/phrases chosen from the list at the end of this letter Relationship to others in the scenario – boss, subordinate, peer, family member, relative etc. B The context. Type of business or other relevant information to provide a general setting for the moment you will use to describe the unresolved issue. C The event (moment in time). This can be at least partly imagined in that you will need to summarise a lot of information and it might be easier to do so if you write it as conversation even if that has not happened. 2 A sample example written in this way follows. This is a real scenario written by a person who will not be attending the workshop. It took 40 minutes to write. That involved 10 minutes to collect thoughts, select words and frame the setting and then 30 minutes to put it into the words you are reading. The advice is to allow yourself at least this amount of time and also to find a quiet space and time to write your scenario. Example Case Study Title – Where is that space? Setting – a Sydney residential street, in a smallish inner city suburb. There is a main road at one end of the street and a large schoolyard at the other end. At the corner of the street and the main road is a temporary church site whose owners are seeking to extend and develop the site. On the opposite corner is a second hand car yard with the imaginative title of “Junk your Jalopy” (JyJ). Aside from a block of six flats next to the home Eva has lived in for 12 years, all the other residences are single storey homes most built in the first two decades of the 20th century. Most residents have at least one car – often two. Umberto works at JyJ and may be a part owner. He doesn’t live nearby. On a recent occasion Eva, who is reasonably laid back but can be forgetful, was moved to anger by the presence, in the street outside her front door, of a very old and battered panel van that she knew did not belong to any of the residents. It has been there for nearly two weeks and meant that she was parking her car out of sight in a side lane, on land owned by the church. This is not official parking for the street and is often blocked off by the church. Walking to the corner one morning she saw Umberto taking photos of a motorbike and went to raise the issue of the van with him. He is not particularly interested in others’ concerns about the lack of parking and merely wants to make a success of the business. If that means parking extra cars in the street and annoying a few residents he’s opportunistic enough to do so without compunction. Although she is usually fearful of conflict Eva was determined to do something to try and put a stop to JYJ’s habit of parking cars illegally in the residential area. She opened the conversation by asking if Umberto knew anything about the van. He denied all knowledge of it and became quite aggressive (or at least it seemed that way to Eva) about the matter of cars in the street, denying that any were from JyJ, suggesting she talk to the owners of the spare parts yard facing the main road. As Eva tried to ask him to consider the needs and rights of residents, Umberto became ever more inflexible disregarding her issue and suggesting she leave his premises. Although she is quite creative, and has worked for 30 years in a variety of roles Eva is not always able to speak her mind easily, and his denials were not helping. He even began whinging about having to ‘cop the s—t’ for the spare parts yard but resisted the idea of marking his cars so residents could see those parked illegally were not his. 3 As she walked away Eva heard herself say “well if you do nothing about it, then you’ll have to continue copping the s—t, and I hope it hurts”, realising as she did so that she would not be any better off for her efforts. When she got home that night the van was gone – but a different one had arrived within four days. The issue is unresolved. Words to describe the people in your scenario accurate inquisitive empire building adaptable knowledgeable erratic analytical logical fearful of conflict broad in outlook loyal forgetful calm & confident observant frightened of failure caring opportunistic fussy challenging original impatient clever outgoing impulsive competitive outspoken indecisive conscientious perfectionist inflexible conscious of priorities persistent insular consultative persuasive laid back 4 co-operative practical manipulative creative professionally dedicated not interested in others diplomatic Marking Criteria for the Case Study How to get the maximum marks for the case study! For 10 marks – the case study – Accurately uses more than the required number of suggested words to describe the people in the scenario. That is the words used to describe the people are descriptive and placed appropriately to ensure a reader is able to create an informative word picture of each person. The sequence of events is presented in a manner that ensures the current situation, and possible consequences of any future actions, are easily understood by a reader not familiar with the context. Includes enough information to ensure that a stranger does not need to ask additional questions to affirm understanding of the situation as described in the case study. For 8 – 9 marks – the case study – Uses the set minimum number of words. The words are used correctly. The sequence is reasonably ordered, but readers find they need to ask one or two questions about the actual context, order of events. There is less that a sufficient amount of information to ensure that a stranger will quickly understand the nature of issues that remain unresolved. For 5 – 7 – the case study – Uses the set minimum number of words. Not all words are used appropriately in the context, but a stranger is able to gain an impression of the people. The sequence of events – as presented in the case study text – needs some re-ordering in response to questions from other readers to enable them to understand the issues. Strangers will need to seek additional information before they feel able to understand the issue and/or the context. For F = less than 5 – the case study – Uses fewer than the set minimum number of words. They do not add to the information about the people. 5 The sequence of events is unclear and does not represent the issue/s in a manner that can be understood by a stranger. A good deal of additional information is required before a stranger can understand the nature of the issues and context.

1 15325 Pre-work assignment Preparing your conflict scenario (four copies of your scenario must be brought to the workshop) Dear Participant, This letter introduces some pre-course work that is essential for you to complete before arriving at the workshop for the subject Negotiations and Conflict Management: 15325 – in which you are enrolled. The workshop will combine theory and practice in a manner intended to use the wisdom in the room to bring together our thinking about enacting the practices you will learn about. You will bring with you a scenario to work through during the workshop. This letter explains how to write that. 1 The situation (you can give it a title if that helps to frame it for you) Your first task is to identify a situation that is (or in your opinion is) unresolved and has potential to escalate into a matter causing stress, tension, delay or confusion. This may be something at work or in a context where you have the power to take action. You will use fictional names and disguise other facts to ensure confidentiality, but it is essential that this is a real situation – not a hypothetical or fictional one. 2 The Details To enable others to understand the context you will need to describe the following – A The people. Describe each person using the following items – Name – Use a fictional name for each person and do not include more than four others apart from yourself. You can use your own name if you wish or also disguise that as well. General facts about each person – gender, age range, role title, marital status (if relevant) work/life location (if other than yours) Personal characteristics – select at least 5 key words/phrases chosen from the list at the end of this letter Relationship to others in the scenario – boss, subordinate, peer, family member, relative etc. B The context. Type of business or other relevant information to provide a general setting for the moment you will use to describe the unresolved issue. C The event (moment in time). This can be at least partly imagined in that you will need to summarise a lot of information and it might be easier to do so if you write it as conversation even if that has not happened. 2 A sample example written in this way follows. This is a real scenario written by a person who will not be attending the workshop. It took 40 minutes to write. That involved 10 minutes to collect thoughts, select words and frame the setting and then 30 minutes to put it into the words you are reading. The advice is to allow yourself at least this amount of time and also to find a quiet space and time to write your scenario. Example Case Study Title – Where is that space? Setting – a Sydney residential street, in a smallish inner city suburb. There is a main road at one end of the street and a large schoolyard at the other end. At the corner of the street and the main road is a temporary church site whose owners are seeking to extend and develop the site. On the opposite corner is a second hand car yard with the imaginative title of “Junk your Jalopy” (JyJ). Aside from a block of six flats next to the home Eva has lived in for 12 years, all the other residences are single storey homes most built in the first two decades of the 20th century. Most residents have at least one car – often two. Umberto works at JyJ and may be a part owner. He doesn’t live nearby. On a recent occasion Eva, who is reasonably laid back but can be forgetful, was moved to anger by the presence, in the street outside her front door, of a very old and battered panel van that she knew did not belong to any of the residents. It has been there for nearly two weeks and meant that she was parking her car out of sight in a side lane, on land owned by the church. This is not official parking for the street and is often blocked off by the church. Walking to the corner one morning she saw Umberto taking photos of a motorbike and went to raise the issue of the van with him. He is not particularly interested in others’ concerns about the lack of parking and merely wants to make a success of the business. If that means parking extra cars in the street and annoying a few residents he’s opportunistic enough to do so without compunction. Although she is usually fearful of conflict Eva was determined to do something to try and put a stop to JYJ’s habit of parking cars illegally in the residential area. She opened the conversation by asking if Umberto knew anything about the van. He denied all knowledge of it and became quite aggressive (or at least it seemed that way to Eva) about the matter of cars in the street, denying that any were from JyJ, suggesting she talk to the owners of the spare parts yard facing the main road. As Eva tried to ask him to consider the needs and rights of residents, Umberto became ever more inflexible disregarding her issue and suggesting she leave his premises. Although she is quite creative, and has worked for 30 years in a variety of roles Eva is not always able to speak her mind easily, and his denials were not helping. He even began whinging about having to ‘cop the s—t’ for the spare parts yard but resisted the idea of marking his cars so residents could see those parked illegally were not his. 3 As she walked away Eva heard herself say “well if you do nothing about it, then you’ll have to continue copping the s—t, and I hope it hurts”, realising as she did so that she would not be any better off for her efforts. When she got home that night the van was gone – but a different one had arrived within four days. The issue is unresolved. Words to describe the people in your scenario accurate inquisitive empire building adaptable knowledgeable erratic analytical logical fearful of conflict broad in outlook loyal forgetful calm & confident observant frightened of failure caring opportunistic fussy challenging original impatient clever outgoing impulsive competitive outspoken indecisive conscientious perfectionist inflexible conscious of priorities persistent insular consultative persuasive laid back 4 co-operative practical manipulative creative professionally dedicated not interested in others diplomatic Marking Criteria for the Case Study How to get the maximum marks for the case study! For 10 marks – the case study – Accurately uses more than the required number of suggested words to describe the people in the scenario. That is the words used to describe the people are descriptive and placed appropriately to ensure a reader is able to create an informative word picture of each person. The sequence of events is presented in a manner that ensures the current situation, and possible consequences of any future actions, are easily understood by a reader not familiar with the context. Includes enough information to ensure that a stranger does not need to ask additional questions to affirm understanding of the situation as described in the case study. For 8 – 9 marks – the case study – Uses the set minimum number of words. The words are used correctly. The sequence is reasonably ordered, but readers find they need to ask one or two questions about the actual context, order of events. There is less that a sufficient amount of information to ensure that a stranger will quickly understand the nature of issues that remain unresolved. For 5 – 7 – the case study – Uses the set minimum number of words. Not all words are used appropriately in the context, but a stranger is able to gain an impression of the people. The sequence of events – as presented in the case study text – needs some re-ordering in response to questions from other readers to enable them to understand the issues. Strangers will need to seek additional information before they feel able to understand the issue and/or the context. For F = less than 5 – the case study – Uses fewer than the set minimum number of words. They do not add to the information about the people. 5 The sequence of events is unclear and does not represent the issue/s in a manner that can be understood by a stranger. A good deal of additional information is required before a stranger can understand the nature of the issues and context.

(Conflict scenario) Title – Who steal the gold?   Setting: … Read More...
Aristotle’s breadth of knowledge and exploration is amazing. Some of his most interesting ideas center around the ideas of happiness and virtue. What do you think about Aristotle’s suggestions for the happy life and the cultivation of virtue. Choose a virtue (e.g., courage, moderation, patience, responsibility, etc.) and also determine the excess and deficiency. Explore the meaning of this virtue and practice it through the week. As you hit the “mean” do you find yourself more happy?

Aristotle’s breadth of knowledge and exploration is amazing. Some of his most interesting ideas center around the ideas of happiness and virtue. What do you think about Aristotle’s suggestions for the happy life and the cultivation of virtue. Choose a virtue (e.g., courage, moderation, patience, responsibility, etc.) and also determine the excess and deficiency. Explore the meaning of this virtue and practice it through the week. As you hit the “mean” do you find yourself more happy?

“Happiness depends on ourselves.” additional than anyone else, Aristotle preserve … Read More...
http://www.constitution.org/mac/prince17.htm How does Machiavelli feel about cruelty versus clemency? A. Machiavelli equates clemency with being loved and cruelty with being despised, and suggests that being despised is acceptable. B. Machiavelli suggests that cruelty doesn’t always result in being despised and winning the love of your subjects is the most important thing. C. Machiavelli says that cruelty, when applied in a prudent manner, will be held in more esteem than too much mercy. D. Cruelty and clemency are identical; being merciful to one person means that you must be cruel to another. E. Clemency is equated with happiness, and a happy set of subjects is the ultimate goal of a successful leader. What is the difference between hatred and fear? A. Fear makes people respect you. Hatred makes them work against you. B. Fear and hatred follow one another. If you create fear you will eventually create hatred. All leaders should avoid this. C. Hatred from external powers breeds nationalism within your country, causing people to fear external powers. D. Fear and hatred are opposites. E. Hatred follows love; fear follows clemency. http://www.constitution.org/mac/prince23.htm According to Machiavelli, what is a flatterer? A. Someone who wants to lavish gifts upon you in exchange for power. B. An external power that wants to ally with you. C. Someone who will tell you what you think rather than giving their own opinion. D. Someone who tests your opinions against their own to make a good argument. E. An external power that wants to make strong trade alliances to weaken you over time. According to Machiavelli, what is the best way to seek truth from advisers? A. Advisors should present any complaints to you as a group. B. Advisors should be called upon when the leader has a question, otherwise they are to remain silent. C. An advisor should involve the public, allowing them to call the leader to court to listen to their opinions. D. The leader should listen carefully to one private advisor with whom he always disagrees. E. Machiavelli thinks that advisors are not helpful because they will always try to flatter their leader.

http://www.constitution.org/mac/prince17.htm How does Machiavelli feel about cruelty versus clemency? A. Machiavelli equates clemency with being loved and cruelty with being despised, and suggests that being despised is acceptable. B. Machiavelli suggests that cruelty doesn’t always result in being despised and winning the love of your subjects is the most important thing. C. Machiavelli says that cruelty, when applied in a prudent manner, will be held in more esteem than too much mercy. D. Cruelty and clemency are identical; being merciful to one person means that you must be cruel to another. E. Clemency is equated with happiness, and a happy set of subjects is the ultimate goal of a successful leader. What is the difference between hatred and fear? A. Fear makes people respect you. Hatred makes them work against you. B. Fear and hatred follow one another. If you create fear you will eventually create hatred. All leaders should avoid this. C. Hatred from external powers breeds nationalism within your country, causing people to fear external powers. D. Fear and hatred are opposites. E. Hatred follows love; fear follows clemency. http://www.constitution.org/mac/prince23.htm According to Machiavelli, what is a flatterer? A. Someone who wants to lavish gifts upon you in exchange for power. B. An external power that wants to ally with you. C. Someone who will tell you what you think rather than giving their own opinion. D. Someone who tests your opinions against their own to make a good argument. E. An external power that wants to make strong trade alliances to weaken you over time. According to Machiavelli, what is the best way to seek truth from advisers? A. Advisors should present any complaints to you as a group. B. Advisors should be called upon when the leader has a question, otherwise they are to remain silent. C. An advisor should involve the public, allowing them to call the leader to court to listen to their opinions. D. The leader should listen carefully to one private advisor with whom he always disagrees. E. Machiavelli thinks that advisors are not helpful because they will always try to flatter their leader.

http://www.constitution.org/mac/prince17.htm   How does Machiavelli feel about cruelty versus clemency? … Read More...
WEEKLY ASSIGNMENT #5 (WOW THAT TOOK A WHILE) NAME: 1. Find the linear approximation of the function f(x; y; z) = p x2 + y2 + z2 at some point to approximate a value of the number p (3:02)2 + (1:97)2 + (5:99)2. 1 2. Consider your favorite function, the Cobb-Douglas production function. P(L;K) = 1:5L:65K:35 modeling the production of the state of Idaho. Over time we discover that capitol is gradually increasing at an approximate rate of 0:02 units per year. If we decide as a group that we are perfectly happy with our production level and would rather have additional vacation time then how much can we decrease labor by each year and keep the same level of production. In how long(rounded up to the nearest year) will we have an additional week of vacation? 2 3. Use the chain rule to find dz dt or dw=dt (a) z = x?y x+2y x = et; y = e?t. (b) w = sin x cos x x = p t; y = 1=t. 4. Use the chain rule to find @z=@t or @z=@s (a) z = (x ? y)5 x = s2t; y = st2 (b) z = er cos  r = st;  = p x2 + y2. 3 5. The temperature at a point (x; y; z) is given by the function T(x; y; z) = 200e?x2?3y2?9z2 where T is measure in C and x; y; z in meters. (a) Find the rate of change of temperature at the point (2;?1; 2) in the direction toward the point (3;?3; 3). (b) In which direction does the temperature increase fastest, and what is that fastest rate? 4 6. Suppose (1; 1) is a critical point of a function f with continuous second derivatives. In each case, what can you say about f. (a) fxx(1; 1) = 4; fxy(1; 1) = 1; fyy(1; 1) = 2 (b) fxx(1; 1) = 4; fxy(1; 1) = 3; fyy(1; 1) = 2 (c) fxx(1; 1) = ?1; fxy(1; 1) = 6; fyy(1; 1) = 1 (d) fxx(1; 1) = ?1; fxy(1; 1) = 2; fyy(1; 1) = ?8 (e) fxx(1; 1) = 4; fxy(1; 1) = 6; fyy(1; 1) = 9 5 Bonus Show that f(x; y) = x2 + 4y2 ? 4xy + 2 has an infinite number of critical points, and for all of them D = 0 at each one. Then show that f has a local (and absolute) minimum at each critical point. 6

WEEKLY ASSIGNMENT #5 (WOW THAT TOOK A WHILE) NAME: 1. Find the linear approximation of the function f(x; y; z) = p x2 + y2 + z2 at some point to approximate a value of the number p (3:02)2 + (1:97)2 + (5:99)2. 1 2. Consider your favorite function, the Cobb-Douglas production function. P(L;K) = 1:5L:65K:35 modeling the production of the state of Idaho. Over time we discover that capitol is gradually increasing at an approximate rate of 0:02 units per year. If we decide as a group that we are perfectly happy with our production level and would rather have additional vacation time then how much can we decrease labor by each year and keep the same level of production. In how long(rounded up to the nearest year) will we have an additional week of vacation? 2 3. Use the chain rule to find dz dt or dw=dt (a) z = x?y x+2y x = et; y = e?t. (b) w = sin x cos x x = p t; y = 1=t. 4. Use the chain rule to find @z=@t or @z=@s (a) z = (x ? y)5 x = s2t; y = st2 (b) z = er cos  r = st;  = p x2 + y2. 3 5. The temperature at a point (x; y; z) is given by the function T(x; y; z) = 200e?x2?3y2?9z2 where T is measure in C and x; y; z in meters. (a) Find the rate of change of temperature at the point (2;?1; 2) in the direction toward the point (3;?3; 3). (b) In which direction does the temperature increase fastest, and what is that fastest rate? 4 6. Suppose (1; 1) is a critical point of a function f with continuous second derivatives. In each case, what can you say about f. (a) fxx(1; 1) = 4; fxy(1; 1) = 1; fyy(1; 1) = 2 (b) fxx(1; 1) = 4; fxy(1; 1) = 3; fyy(1; 1) = 2 (c) fxx(1; 1) = ?1; fxy(1; 1) = 6; fyy(1; 1) = 1 (d) fxx(1; 1) = ?1; fxy(1; 1) = 2; fyy(1; 1) = ?8 (e) fxx(1; 1) = 4; fxy(1; 1) = 6; fyy(1; 1) = 9 5 Bonus Show that f(x; y) = x2 + 4y2 ? 4xy + 2 has an infinite number of critical points, and for all of them D = 0 at each one. Then show that f has a local (and absolute) minimum at each critical point. 6

For this assignment, you will compose a letter designed to recruit students to join and support the agenda of one of three nonexistent student organizations that, were they to exist, would likely be very unpopular. The student organization for which you will be recruiting is determined by your last name: The first letter of your last name is… Your student organization assignment is… A – F The SETS Collective: SETS (Skip the Elevator, Take the Stairs) is dedicated to energy conservation on campus, particularly by eliminating elevator usage by pedestrians in any buildings on the UT-Austin campus. G – N O – Z Your recruiting letter must include eight (8) different persuasive strategies. Each strategy must be used in the service of encouraging students to join the organization and/or endorse its cause. In addition to your recruiting letter, you will also submit a commentary describing the different strategies you used in the recruiting letter. In this course, we utilize the TurnItIn tool. This service helps educators prevent plagiarism by detecting unoriginal content in student papers. In addition to acting as a plagiarism deterrent, it also has features designed to aid in educating students about plagiarism and importance of proper attribution of any borrowed content. For more information, please visit http://turnitin.com/. Below are a series of requirements for the paper assignment. Failure to satisfy these requirements will result in substantial point penalties. Also, failure to abide by the academic honesty policy described in the syllabus and maintained by the CMS department, the Moody College of Communication, and/or The University of Texas will result in a grade of F on the assignment and referral to the Dean of Students. Assignment Requirements • You must portray yourself as a recruiting officer (or Secretary of Recruitment) – not the President, VP, etc. – of the organization described in your letter. As a recruiting officer, you are not authorized to offer any rewards or bribes (gifts in the form of sports tickets, free meals, etc.) to people as an incentive to join the organization, nor are you allowed to make up fictional incentives (e.g., OBC students will enjoy an opportunity to participate in international conferences). Your letter should focus exclusively on the merits of joining the organization based on commitment to its cause. • Assume that organization has just been formed – i.e., do not portray it as having existed prior to the Spring of 2017. • You may also assume that there are currently only three members of the organization, the president, vice-president, and yourself (the Secretary of Recruitment). You CANNOT claim that there are “many members.” • You must use the following format for the recruiting letter AND the commentary: 12-point Times New Roman font, single-spaced (NOT double-spaced) on 8.5 X 11-inch white paper with 1-inch margins on all sides. • The recruiting letter must be no shorter than 2 nor longer than 3 pages; the commentary must be no longer than 2 pages. • Your recruiting letter must include only 8 (eight) DIFFERENT strategies discussed in the lectures and/or readings. You may use any principle/theory we have discussed EXCEPT for balance theory (which is too obvious) or deception (which isn’t persuasion per se). • Your commentary must identify the name OR what you did for of each strategy (e.g., Door In Face or Foot In The Door) used in your letter and describe the specific purpose(s) the strategy was used to achieve. At a minimum, your description of each strategy should consist of at least two complete sentences (16 sentences total). • Each strategy explanation in your commentary should be bulleted or numbered for easy identification • You may not lie under any circumstances. Lies include falsifications and/or distortions of the truth about the student organization (e.g., SURF is endorsed by the Fellowship of Christian Athletes). Also, you may not offer recruits bribes in any form (tickets, discounts, free food, cash, etc.) as an incentive for joining the organization. • Your completed assignment (recruiting letter + commentary) must be turned in on April 13th (a Thursday) at or before 9:30 a.m. Grading Rubric We will use the following rubric to evaluate and grade your letter + commentary. Assignment Component Possible Points Obtained Points Format, Spelling, Grammar, Coherence Are the letter and commentary written in the proper format? Do they consist of grammatical, coherent English sentences? Has the assignment been spell-checked? 4 Strategy 1 Example/Commentary Is the example an acceptable instance of the strategy? Is it different from the other strategies used? Is the strategy correctly identified and adequately explained in the commentary? 2 Strategy 2 Example/Commentary 2 Strategy 3 Example/Commentary 2 Strategy 4 Example/Commentary 2 Strategy 5 Example/Commentary 2 Strategy 6 Example/ Commentary 2 Strategy 7 Example/ Commentary 2 Strategy 8 Example/ Commentary 2 Lies/Deception/Bribes (-3 pts per instance) -3 (per instance) Total Score 20 Cannot use strategy of Balance Theory, Lie Write a persuasive essay and a commentary Commentary is about 8 strategies in letter • 8 bullets separate from the letter “foot-in-the-door” – “door-in-the-face” (rejection then retreat) o 1. Make a large (but reasonable) request to target  World you lend me $50? o 2. After request is rejected, make a smaller request  Well then, could you lend me $10? o Creating a “big” favor out of thin air! “low-balling” • An advantage is offered that induces a favorable purchase decision. Then, sometime after the decision has been made, but before the bargain is sealed, the original purchase buyer is deftly removed. 1.) Loss framing: Loss aversion 2.) Restriction: scarcity 3.) Positive self-feeling: Principle commitment 4.) Identification: Social Proof 5.) “Using Rhymes” is what you would write instead of Stroop effect: Fluency 6.) Virtual ownership: Endowment effect 7.) That’s not all: reciprocity 8.) Flattery: Likability 9.) Expertise strategy: Authority principle 10.) Inducing dissonance reduction: Norm of consistency 11.) Conformity concession: social proof 12.) Association similarity: Liking & Association principle Strategies – Use 8 (Cannot use Balance Theory or deception) Strategy Principle Sources/Notes Door in the Face Reciprocity 9/16 lecture Foot in the Door Consistency Norm 9/30 lecture That’s not all Reciprocity 9/16 lecture Flattery Likability Could someone give an example for Flattery?! I’m a little stuck… “Providing a statistic” Social Proof? why is this yellow? What principle is this? How did you use this as a strategy?? plz help AUTHORITY it depends how you use it ID-ing yourself as a student Likability <in cialdini chapter 5 they are talked about as 2 different things, so if you can argue it your way,Cialdini can support it what is the strategy for this? Perceptual Contrast What is this for? Low-Balling Might be considered lying. Soft-Sell Humor appeal did anyone use this?? Anyone??? What principle is this? Hard-sell ???????? Seek-and-Hide Fear Appeal ???? What principle does this fall under???? Pump and Dump social proof 10/9 lecture Bait-and-switch this kind of seems like deception, can we use it? Moral Appeal Commitment Rebecca’s Lecture 10/2 Voluntary instead of Mandatory Consistency Norm 9/30 lecture herd mentality social proof 10/14 lecture Loss framing Loss Aversion Endowment Effect this is a principle FYI Mere ownership Scarcity Dissonance Reduction Positive/negative self feelings Commitment to gain compliance Rebecca’s Lecture Principles Name STRATEGIES/Ideas Source/Notes Reciprocity That’s not all! Likability/Association Flattery, agreeing with said person, state similar social standings, “work with” them, show evidence of “good things” likeability/association ppt Consistency/Commitment Foot in the door, positive self-feelings, moral appeal, Social Proof/Conformity norm works when someone is uncertain about the right thing to do, and when the person they are watching is similar to them. Provide target with “evidence” that compliance is a common/frequent response among desired social group “we made other people happy, we’ll make you happy too” Priming the pump (tip jar example) Pump and dump (Scam, could be considered deception) Conformity and social proff ppt Authority Wearing a uniform, Titles, books, diplomas, awards, success, using a spokesperson, Scarcity/Supply and demand “Only a certain number of students allowed in” “only for college students” “Exclusive except to X” “Only a certain number of seats” Scarcity ppt Psychological Reactance Restricting access, censoring something, implying scarcity, Scarcity ppt Attractiveness Similarity Mentioning you are a student Perceptual Contrast Loss aversion gain or loss framing Scarcity ppt Balance Theory We aren’t allowed to use this Judgement Heuristic Price = product quality Use of long unfamilar words = intelligence fluency = trustworthinesss Fluency ppt Availability Heuristic Can you think of one example (out of ten) (for us) vs Can you think of then for the competitor - here’s our ten. Fluency ppt

For this assignment, you will compose a letter designed to recruit students to join and support the agenda of one of three nonexistent student organizations that, were they to exist, would likely be very unpopular. The student organization for which you will be recruiting is determined by your last name: The first letter of your last name is… Your student organization assignment is… A – F The SETS Collective: SETS (Skip the Elevator, Take the Stairs) is dedicated to energy conservation on campus, particularly by eliminating elevator usage by pedestrians in any buildings on the UT-Austin campus. G – N O – Z Your recruiting letter must include eight (8) different persuasive strategies. Each strategy must be used in the service of encouraging students to join the organization and/or endorse its cause. In addition to your recruiting letter, you will also submit a commentary describing the different strategies you used in the recruiting letter. In this course, we utilize the TurnItIn tool. This service helps educators prevent plagiarism by detecting unoriginal content in student papers. In addition to acting as a plagiarism deterrent, it also has features designed to aid in educating students about plagiarism and importance of proper attribution of any borrowed content. For more information, please visit http://turnitin.com/. Below are a series of requirements for the paper assignment. Failure to satisfy these requirements will result in substantial point penalties. Also, failure to abide by the academic honesty policy described in the syllabus and maintained by the CMS department, the Moody College of Communication, and/or The University of Texas will result in a grade of F on the assignment and referral to the Dean of Students. Assignment Requirements • You must portray yourself as a recruiting officer (or Secretary of Recruitment) – not the President, VP, etc. – of the organization described in your letter. As a recruiting officer, you are not authorized to offer any rewards or bribes (gifts in the form of sports tickets, free meals, etc.) to people as an incentive to join the organization, nor are you allowed to make up fictional incentives (e.g., OBC students will enjoy an opportunity to participate in international conferences). Your letter should focus exclusively on the merits of joining the organization based on commitment to its cause. • Assume that organization has just been formed – i.e., do not portray it as having existed prior to the Spring of 2017. • You may also assume that there are currently only three members of the organization, the president, vice-president, and yourself (the Secretary of Recruitment). You CANNOT claim that there are “many members.” • You must use the following format for the recruiting letter AND the commentary: 12-point Times New Roman font, single-spaced (NOT double-spaced) on 8.5 X 11-inch white paper with 1-inch margins on all sides. • The recruiting letter must be no shorter than 2 nor longer than 3 pages; the commentary must be no longer than 2 pages. • Your recruiting letter must include only 8 (eight) DIFFERENT strategies discussed in the lectures and/or readings. You may use any principle/theory we have discussed EXCEPT for balance theory (which is too obvious) or deception (which isn’t persuasion per se). • Your commentary must identify the name OR what you did for of each strategy (e.g., Door In Face or Foot In The Door) used in your letter and describe the specific purpose(s) the strategy was used to achieve. At a minimum, your description of each strategy should consist of at least two complete sentences (16 sentences total). • Each strategy explanation in your commentary should be bulleted or numbered for easy identification • You may not lie under any circumstances. Lies include falsifications and/or distortions of the truth about the student organization (e.g., SURF is endorsed by the Fellowship of Christian Athletes). Also, you may not offer recruits bribes in any form (tickets, discounts, free food, cash, etc.) as an incentive for joining the organization. • Your completed assignment (recruiting letter + commentary) must be turned in on April 13th (a Thursday) at or before 9:30 a.m. Grading Rubric We will use the following rubric to evaluate and grade your letter + commentary. Assignment Component Possible Points Obtained Points Format, Spelling, Grammar, Coherence Are the letter and commentary written in the proper format? Do they consist of grammatical, coherent English sentences? Has the assignment been spell-checked? 4 Strategy 1 Example/Commentary Is the example an acceptable instance of the strategy? Is it different from the other strategies used? Is the strategy correctly identified and adequately explained in the commentary? 2 Strategy 2 Example/Commentary 2 Strategy 3 Example/Commentary 2 Strategy 4 Example/Commentary 2 Strategy 5 Example/Commentary 2 Strategy 6 Example/ Commentary 2 Strategy 7 Example/ Commentary 2 Strategy 8 Example/ Commentary 2 Lies/Deception/Bribes (-3 pts per instance) -3 (per instance) Total Score 20 Cannot use strategy of Balance Theory, Lie Write a persuasive essay and a commentary Commentary is about 8 strategies in letter • 8 bullets separate from the letter “foot-in-the-door” – “door-in-the-face” (rejection then retreat) o 1. Make a large (but reasonable) request to target  World you lend me $50? o 2. After request is rejected, make a smaller request  Well then, could you lend me $10? o Creating a “big” favor out of thin air! “low-balling” • An advantage is offered that induces a favorable purchase decision. Then, sometime after the decision has been made, but before the bargain is sealed, the original purchase buyer is deftly removed. 1.) Loss framing: Loss aversion 2.) Restriction: scarcity 3.) Positive self-feeling: Principle commitment 4.) Identification: Social Proof 5.) “Using Rhymes” is what you would write instead of Stroop effect: Fluency 6.) Virtual ownership: Endowment effect 7.) That’s not all: reciprocity 8.) Flattery: Likability 9.) Expertise strategy: Authority principle 10.) Inducing dissonance reduction: Norm of consistency 11.) Conformity concession: social proof 12.) Association similarity: Liking & Association principle Strategies – Use 8 (Cannot use Balance Theory or deception) Strategy Principle Sources/Notes Door in the Face Reciprocity 9/16 lecture Foot in the Door Consistency Norm 9/30 lecture That’s not all Reciprocity 9/16 lecture Flattery Likability Could someone give an example for Flattery?! I’m a little stuck… “Providing a statistic” Social Proof? why is this yellow? What principle is this? How did you use this as a strategy?? plz help AUTHORITY it depends how you use it ID-ing yourself as a student Likability

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Define: 41 Things Philosophy is: 1. Ignorant 2. Selfish 3. Ironic 4. Plain 5. Misunderstood 6. A failure 7. Poor 8. Unscientific 9. Unteachable 10. Foolish 11. Abnormal 12. Divine trickery 13. Egalitarian 14. A divine calling 15. Laborious 16. Countercultural 17. Uncomfortable 18. Virtuous 19. Dangerous 20. Simplistic<br />21. Polemical 22. Therapeutic 23. “conformist” 24. Embarrassi ng 25. Invulnerable 26. Annoying 27. Pneumatic 28. Apolitic al 29. Docile/teachable 30. Messianic 31. Pious 32. Impract ical 33. Happy 34. Necessary 35. Death-defying 36. Fallible 37. Immortal 38. Confident 39. Painful 40. agnostic</br

Define: 41 Things Philosophy is: 1. Ignorant 2. Selfish 3. Ironic 4. Plain 5. Misunderstood 6. A failure 7. Poor 8. Unscientific 9. Unteachable 10. Foolish 11. Abnormal 12. Divine trickery 13. Egalitarian 14. A divine calling 15. Laborious 16. Countercultural 17. Uncomfortable 18. Virtuous 19. Dangerous 20. Simplistic
21. Polemical 22. Therapeutic 23. “conformist” 24. Embarrassi ng 25. Invulnerable 26. Annoying 27. Pneumatic 28. Apolitic al 29. Docile/teachable 30. Messianic 31. Pious 32. Impract ical 33. Happy 34. Necessary 35. Death-defying 36. Fallible 37. Immortal 38. Confident 39. Painful 40. agnostic

Ignorant- A person is said to be ignorant if he … Read More...
Ronald Wright, Stolen Continents, Ch. 3, pp. 72-83. It’s posted here on Moodle as a PDF( attached) 1.)What’s your gut reaction to this reading? 2.) Give a summary of the meeting and dialogue between the Inca Emperor Atawallpa and the Spanish. 3.) Give the date, place and basic elements of the successful confrontation the Spanish had with Inca Atawallpa and his soldiers. 4.) According to Wright’s account, what do you think is the main reason or reasons that Inca Atawallpa lost this confrontation? What is the evidence for your conclusion?”

Ronald Wright, Stolen Continents, Ch. 3, pp. 72-83. It’s posted here on Moodle as a PDF( attached) 1.)What’s your gut reaction to this reading? 2.) Give a summary of the meeting and dialogue between the Inca Emperor Atawallpa and the Spanish. 3.) Give the date, place and basic elements of the successful confrontation the Spanish had with Inca Atawallpa and his soldiers. 4.) According to Wright’s account, what do you think is the main reason or reasons that Inca Atawallpa lost this confrontation? What is the evidence for your conclusion?”

1) The book named “Stolen Continents” is written by Ronald … Read More...