PlotCycloidArc(8.5) Math98 HW4 The cylcoid is the plane curve traced out by a point on a circle as the circle rolls without slipping on a straight line.1 In this exercise we will use MATLAB to create an animation of a circle rolling on a straight line, while a point on the circle traces the cycloid. a. Implement a MATLAB function of the form function PlotCycloidArc(ArcLength). This function takes in a positive number ArcLength and displays a snapshot of the cirle rolling (without slipping) on the x-axis while a point on the cirlce traces the cycloid. The circle is initially centered at (0,1) and has radius 1, and the initial tracing point is taken to be (0, 0). An example output is shown in the above ?gure. As in the ?gure, plot the cycloid arc black, the circle blue, and use a red dot for the tracing point. Hint: If the circle has rolled for a length of arc t = 0, the coordinates of the tracing point are (t-sin t, 1-cos t). b. Implement a MATLAB function of the form function CycloidMovie(NumHumps,NumIntervals). This function will output an animation of the circle rolling along a line while a point on the circle traces the cycloid. This function inputs two natural numbers NumHumps and NumIntervals representing the number of periods (or humps) of the cycloid and the number or frames per hump that will be used to make the animation, respectively. Use the getframe command to save frames outputted from PlotCycloidArc and the movie command to play them back together as a movie. Use the axis command to view the frames on the rectan- gle [0, 2pNumHumps] × [0, 5/2]. Also label the ticks 0, 2p, . . . , 2pNumHumps on the x axis with the strings 1See Wikipedia for more on the cycloid. 0, 2p, . . . , 2pNumHumps and do the same for 1, 2 on the y axis (see the ?gure above). Label the movie ’Cycloid Animation’. Submit MATLAB code for both parts a and b and a printout the ?gures obtained by the commands PlotCycloidArc(8.5), PlotCycloidArc(12), and CycloidMovie(3,10)

PlotCycloidArc(8.5) Math98 HW4 The cylcoid is the plane curve traced out by a point on a circle as the circle rolls without slipping on a straight line.1 In this exercise we will use MATLAB to create an animation of a circle rolling on a straight line, while a point on the circle traces the cycloid. a. Implement a MATLAB function of the form function PlotCycloidArc(ArcLength). This function takes in a positive number ArcLength and displays a snapshot of the cirle rolling (without slipping) on the x-axis while a point on the cirlce traces the cycloid. The circle is initially centered at (0,1) and has radius 1, and the initial tracing point is taken to be (0, 0). An example output is shown in the above ?gure. As in the ?gure, plot the cycloid arc black, the circle blue, and use a red dot for the tracing point. Hint: If the circle has rolled for a length of arc t = 0, the coordinates of the tracing point are (t-sin t, 1-cos t). b. Implement a MATLAB function of the form function CycloidMovie(NumHumps,NumIntervals). This function will output an animation of the circle rolling along a line while a point on the circle traces the cycloid. This function inputs two natural numbers NumHumps and NumIntervals representing the number of periods (or humps) of the cycloid and the number or frames per hump that will be used to make the animation, respectively. Use the getframe command to save frames outputted from PlotCycloidArc and the movie command to play them back together as a movie. Use the axis command to view the frames on the rectan- gle [0, 2pNumHumps] × [0, 5/2]. Also label the ticks 0, 2p, . . . , 2pNumHumps on the x axis with the strings 1See Wikipedia for more on the cycloid. 0, 2p, . . . , 2pNumHumps and do the same for 1, 2 on the y axis (see the ?gure above). Label the movie ’Cycloid Animation’. Submit MATLAB code for both parts a and b and a printout the ?gures obtained by the commands PlotCycloidArc(8.5), PlotCycloidArc(12), and CycloidMovie(3,10)

info@checkyourstudy.com Operations Team Whatsapp( +91 9911743277)
Assignment 2 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 2.6 Part A The figure shows the position-versus-time graph for a moving object. At which lettered point or points: Is the object moving the slowest? Is the object moving the fastest? Is the object at rest? Drag the appropriate items to their respective bins. ANSWER: Correct Part B At which lettered point or points is the object moving to the negative direction? ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 2.7 The figure shows the position-versus-time graph for a moving object. At which lettered point or points: Part A Is the object moving the fastest? ANSWER: A B C D E Correct Part B Is the object speeding up? ANSWER: Correct Part C Is the object moving to the left and turning around? ANSWER: A B C D E F A B C D E F Correct Kinematic Vocabulary One of the difficulties in studying mechanics is that many common words are used with highly specific technical meanings, among them velocity, acceleration, position, speed, and displacement. The series of questions in this problem is designed to get you to try to think of these quantities like a physicist. Answer the questions in this problem using words from the following list: A. position B. direction C. displacement D. coordinates E. velocity F. acceleration G. distance H. magnitude I. vector J. scalar K. components Part A Velocity differs from speed in that velocity indicates a particle’s __________ of motion. Enter the letter from the list given in the problem introduction that best completes the sentence. ANSWER: Correct Part B Unlike speed, velocity is a __________ quantity. Enter the letter from the list given in the problem introduction that best completes the sentence. ANSWER: Correct Part C A vector has, by definition, both __________ and direction. Enter the letter from the list given in the problem introduction that best completes the sentence. ANSWER: Correct Part D Once you have selected a coordinate system, you can express a two-dimensional vector using a pair of quantities known collectively as __________. Enter the letter from the list given in the problem introduction that best completes the sentence. ANSWER: Correct Part E Speed differs from velocity in the same way that __________ differs from displacement. Enter the letter from the list given in the problem introduction that best completes the sentence. Hint 1. Definition of displacement Displacement is the vector that indicates the difference of two positions (e.g., the final position from the initial position). Being a vector, it is independent of the coordinate system used to describe it (although its vector components depend on the coordinate system). ANSWER: Correct Part F Consider a physical situation in which a particle moves from point A to point B. This process is described from two coordinate systems that are identical except that they have different origins. The __________ of the particle at point A differ(s) as expressed in one coordinate system compared to the other, but the __________ from A to B is/are the same as expressed in both coordinate systems. Type the letters from the list given in the problem introduction that best complete the sentence. Separate the letters with commas. There is more than one correct answer, but you should only enter one pair of comma-separated letters. For example, if the words “vector” and “scalar” fit best in the blanks, enter I,J. ANSWER: Correct The coordinates of a point will depend on the coordinate system that is chosen, but there are several other quantities that are independent of the choice of origin for a coordinate system: in particular, distance, displacement, direction, and velocity. In working physics problems, unless you are interested in the position of an object or event relative to a specific origin, you can usually choose the coordinate system origin to be wherever is most convenient or intuitive. Note that the vector indicating a displacement from A to B is usually represented as . Part G Identify the following physical quantities as scalars or vectors. ANSWER: rB A = rB − rA Correct Problem 2.4 The figure is the position-versus-time graph of a jogger. Part A What is the jogger’s velocity at = 10 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Answer Requested Part B What is the jogger’s velocity at = 25 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the jogger’s velocity at = 35 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: t s v = 1.3 ms t s v = 0 ms t s v = -5.0 ms Correct Analyzing Position versus Time Graphs: Conceptual Question Two cars travel on the parallel lanes of a two-lane road. The cars’ motions are represented by the position versus time graph shown in the figure. Answer the questions using the times from the graph indicated by letters. Part A At which of the times do the two cars pass each other? Hint 1. Two cars passing Two objects can pass each other only if they have the same position at the same time. ANSWER: Correct Part B Are the two cars traveling in the same direction when they pass each other? ANSWER: Correct Part C At which of the lettered times, if any, does car #1 momentarily stop? Hint 1. Determining velocity from a position versus time graph The slope on a position versus time graph is the “rise” (change in position) over the “run” (change in time). In physics, the ratio of change in position over change in time is defined as the velocity. Thus, the slope on a position versus time graph is the velocity of the object being graphed. ANSWER: A B C D E None Cannot be determined yes no Correct Part D At which of the lettered times, if any, does car #2 momentarily stop? Hint 1. Determining velocity from a position versus time graph The slope on a position versus time graph is the “rise” (change in position) over the “run” (change in time). In physics, the ratio of change in position over change in time is defined as the velocity. Thus, the slope on a position versus time graph is the velocity of the object being graphed. ANSWER: A B C D E none cannot be determined A B C D E none cannot be determined Correct Part E At which of the lettered times are the cars moving with nearly identical velocity? Hint 1. Determining Velocity from a Position versus Time Graph The slope on a position versus time graph is the “rise” (change in position) over the “run” (change in time). In physics, the ratio of change in position over change in time is defined as the velocity. Thus, the slope on a position versus time graph is the velocity of the object being graphed. ANSWER: Correct Problem 2.6 A particle starts from 10 at = 0 and moves with the velocity graph shown in the figure. A B C D E None Cannot be determined m t0 Part A Does this particle have a turning point? ANSWER: Correct Part B If so, at what time? Express your answer using two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the object’s position at = 2, 3, 4 ? Yes No t = 1.0 s t s Express your answers using two significant figures separated by commas. ANSWER: Correct Overcoming a Head Start Cars A and B are racing each other along the same straight road in the following manner: Car A has a head start and is a distance beyond the starting line at . The starting line is at . Car A travels at a constant speed . Car B starts at the starting line but has a better engine than Car A, and thus Car B travels at a constant speed , which is greater than . Part A How long after Car B started the race will Car B catch up with Car A? Express the time in terms of given quantities. Hint 1. Consider the kinematics relation Write an expression for the displacement of Car A from the starting line at a time after Car B starts. (Note that we are taking this time to be .) Answer in terms of , , , and for time, and take at the starting line. Hint 1. What is the acceleration of Car A? The acceleration of Car A is zero, so the general formula has at least one term equal to zero. ANSWER: Hint 2. What is the relation between the positions of the two cars? x2 , x3 , x4 = 10,16,26 m DA t = 0 x = 0 vA vB vA t t = 0 vA vB DA t x = 0 x(t) = x0 + v0t + (1/2)at2 xA(t) = DA + vAt The positions of the two cars are equal at time . Hint 3. Consider Car B’s position as a function of time Write down an expression for the position of Car B at time after starting. Give your answer in terms of any variables needed (use for time). ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B How far from Car B’s starting line will the cars be when Car B passes Car A? Express your answer in terms of known quantities. (You may use as well.) Hint 1. Which expression should you use? Just use your expression for the position of either car after time , and substitute in the correct value for (found in the previous part). ANSWER: Correct tcatch t t xB(t) = vBt tcatch = DA vB−vA tcatch t = 0 tcatch dpass = vBDA vB−vA Problem 2.11 The figure shows the velocity graph of a particle moving along the x-axis. Its initial position is at . At = 2 , what are the particle’s (a) position, (b) velocity, and (c) acceleration? Part A Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: x0 = 2 m t0 = 0 t s x = 6.0 m vx = 4.0 ms Correct Part C Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 2.13 A jet plane is cruising at 300 when suddenly the pilot turns the engines up to full throttle. After traveling 3.9 , the jet is moving with a speed of 400 . Part A What is the jet’s acceleration, assuming it to be a constant acceleration? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 2.20 A rock is tossed straight up with a velocity of 22 When it returns, it falls into a hole deep. You may want to review ( pages 51 – 54) . ax = 2.0 m s2 m/s km m/s a = 9.0 m s2 m/s 10 m For help with math skills, you may want to review: Quadratic Equations For general problem-solving tips and strategies for this topic, you may want to view a Video Tutor Solution of Time in the air for a tossed ball. Part A What is the rock’s velocity as it hits the bottom of the hole? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Start by drawing a picture of the path of the rock, including its launch point, initial direction, and end point in the hole. Choose a coordinate system, and indicate it on your picture. Where is ? What is the positive direction? What is the position of the launch point and the bottom of the hole? In this coordinate system, what is the sign of the initial velocity and the sign of the acceleration? Calling the launch time , what is the equation for as a function of time? What is the position at the bottom of the hole? This will lead to a quadratic equation for the time when the rock hits the bottom of the hole. The quadratic equation has two solutions for the time. Not all mathematical solutions make sense physically. Which solution makes sense physically in terms of the picture that you drew at the beginning? Keeping the same coordinate system, what is the velocity in the direction as a function of time? What is the velocity when the rock hits the bottom of the hole? ANSWER: Correct Part B How long is the rock in the air, from the instant it is released until it hits the bottom of the hole? Express your answer with the appropriate units. y = 0 m y t = 0 y y t y y v = -26.1 ms Hint 1. How to approach the problem How is the time the rock was in the air related to the time at which the rock hit the ground in Part A? ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 2.23 A particle moving along the x-axis has its position described by the function 2.00 5.00 5.00 , where is in s. At = 4.00, what are the particle’s (a) position, (b) velocity, and (c) acceleration? You may want to review ( pages 38 – 42) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Differentiation of Polynomial Functions t = 4.90 s x = ( t3 − t + ) m t t Part A Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Evaluate the position at time = 4.00 . ANSWER: Correct Part B Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem How do you determine the velocity as a function of time, , from the position, ? What calculus operation do you have to perform? Once you have , how do you determine at a particular time? ANSWER: Correct Part C Express your answer with the appropriate units. t s 113 m v(t) x(t) v(t) v 91.0 ms Hint 1. How to approach the problem How do you determine the acceleration as a function of time, , from the velocity, ? What calculus operation do you have to perform? Once you have , how do you determine the acceleration at a particular time? ANSWER: Correct Problem 2.26 A particle’s position on the x-axis is given by the function 6.00 6.00 , where is in s. Part A Where is the particle when = 4.00 ? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 2.30 A particle’s velocity is described by the function = , where is in . a(t) v(t) a(t) 48.0 m s2 x = (t2 − t + ) m t vx m/s 1.00 m vx t2 − 7t + 7 m/s t s Part A How many turning points does the particle reach. Express your answer as an integer. ANSWER: Correct Part B At what times does the particle reach its turning points? Express your answers using two significant figures separated by a comma. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the particle’s acceleration at each of the turning points? Express your answers using two significant figures separated by a comma. ANSWER: Correct 2 t1 , t2 = 5.8,1.2 s a1 , a2 = 4.6,-4.6 m/s2 Problem 2.49 A 200 weather rocket is loaded with 100 of fuel and fired straight up. It accelerates upward at 35 for 30 , then runs out of fuel. Ignore any air resistance effects. Part A What is the rocket’s maximum altitude? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How long is the rocket in the air? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Answer Requested Problem 2.52 A hotel elevator ascends with maximum speed of . Its acceleration and deceleration both have a magnitude of . Part A How far does the elevator move while accelerating to full speed from rest? kg kg m/s2 s h = 72 km t = 260 s 200 m 5 m/s 1.0 m/s2 Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How long does it take to make the complete trip from bottom to top? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Answer Requested Components of Vectors Shown is a 10 by 10 grid, with coordinate axes x and y . The grid runs from -5 to 5 on both axes. Drawn on this grid are four vectors, labeled through . This problem will ask you various questions about these vectors. All answers should be in decimal notation, unless otherwise specified. 12.5 m 45.0 s A D Part A What is the x component of ? Express your answer to two significant figures. Hint 1. How to derive the component A component of a vector is its length (but with appropriate sign) along a particular coordinate axis, the axes being specfied in advance. You are asked for the component of that lies along the x axis, which is horizontal in this problem. Imagine two lines perpendicular to the x axis running from the head (end with the arrow) and tail of down to the x axis. The length of the x axis between the points where these lines intersect is the x component of . In this problem, the x component is the x coordinate at which the perpendicular from the head of the vector hits the origin (because the tail of the vector is at the origin). ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the y component of ? Express your answer to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Correct A A A A Ax = 2.5 A Ay = 3 Part C What is the y component of ? Express your answer to the nearest integer. Hint 1. Consider the direction Don’t forget the sign. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the component of ? Express your answer to the nearest integer. Hint 1. How to find the start and end points of the vector components A vector is defined only by its magnitude and direction. The starting point of the vector is of no consequence to its definition. Therefore, you need to somehow eliminate the starting point from your answer. You can run two perpendiculars to the x axis, one from the head (end with the arrow) of , and another to the tail, with the x component being the difference between x coordinates of head and tail (negative if the tail is to the right of the head). Another way is to imagine bringing the tail of to the origin, and then using the same procedure you used before to find the components of and . This is equivalent to the previous method, but it might be easier to visualize. ANSWER: B By = -3 x C C C A B Cx = -2 Correct The following questions will ask you to give both components of vectors using the ordered pairs method. In this method, the x component is written first, followed by a comma, and then the y component. For example, the components of would be written 2.5,3 in ordered pair notation. The answers below are all integers, so estimate the components to the nearest whole number. Part E In ordered pair notation, write down the components of vector . Express your answers to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Correct Part F In ordered pair notation, write down the components of vector . Express your answers to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Correct Part G What is true about and ? Choose from the pulldown list below. A B Bx, By = 2,-3 D Dx, Dy = 2,-3 B D ANSWER: Correct Problem 3.6 Find x- and y-components of the following vectors. Part A Express your answers using two significant figures. Enter your answers numerically separated by a comma. ANSWER: Correct Part B Express your answers using two significant figures. Enter your answers numerically separated by a comma. ANSWER: They have different components and are not the same vectors. They have the same components but are not the same vectors. They are the same vectors. = (r 430m, 60& below positive x − axis) rx, ry = 210,-370 m v = (610m/s, 23& above positive x − axis) Correct Part C Express your answers using two significant figures. Enter your answers numerically separated by a comma. ANSWER: Correct Problem 3.10 Part A Draw . Draw the vector with its tail at the origin. ANSWER: vx, vy = 560,240 m/s a = (7.3m/s2 , negative y − direction) ax, ay = 0,-7.3 m/s2 B = −4 + 4 ı ^  ^ Correct Part B Find the magnitude of . Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct B B = 5.7 Part C Find the direction of . Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part D Draw . Draw the vector with its tail at the origin. ANSWER: B = 45 above the B negative x-axis & = (−2.0 − 1.0 ) cm r ı ^  ^ Correct Part E Find the magnitude of . Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct r r = 2.2 cm Part F Find the direction of . ANSWER: Correct Part G Draw . Draw the vector with its tail at the origin. ANSWER: r = 26.6 below the r negative x-axis & = (−10 − 100 ) m/s v ı ^  ^ Correct Part H Find the magnitude of . Express your answer using four significant figures. ANSWER: Correct v v = 100.5 m/s Part I Find the direction of . ANSWER: Correct Part J Draw . Draw the vector with it’s tail at the origin. ANSWER: v = 84.3 below the v negative x-axis & = (20 + 10 ) m/ a ı ^  ^ s2 Correct Part K Find the magnitude of . ANSWER: Correct Part L a a = 22.4 m/s2 Find the direction of . ANSWER: Correct Problem 3.14 Let , , and . Part A What is the component form of vector ? ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the magnitude of vector ? ANSWER: a = 26.6 above the a positive x-axis & A = 5 − 2 ı ^  ^ B = −2 + 6 ı ^  ^ D = A − B D D = 7 − 8 ı ^  ^ D = −7 − 5 ı ^  ^ D = 7 + 8 ı ^  ^ D = 4 + 5 ı ^  ^ D Correct Part C What is the direction of vector ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Problem 3.15 Let , , and . Part A Write vector in component form. ANSWER: D = 10.6 D  = 49 & below positive x-axis A = 4 − 2 ı ^  ^ B = −3 + 5 ı ^  ^ E = 4A + 2B E E = 10 + 2 ı ^  ^ E = + 10 ı ^  ^ E = −10 ^ E = 10 − 2 ı ^  ^ Correct Part B Draw vectors , , and . Draw the vectors with their tails at the origin. ANSWER: Correct Part C A B E What is the magnitude of vector ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the direction of vector ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Problem 3.24 Part A What is the angle between vectors and in the figure? Express your answer with the appropriate units. E E = 10.0 E  = 11 & counterclockwise from positive direction of x-axis  E F ANSWER: Correct Part B Use components to determine the magnitude of . ANSWER: Correct Part C Use components to determine the direction of . Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 91.3%.  = 71.6 & G = E + F  G = 3.00 G = E + F   = 90.0 & You received 129.62 out of a possible total of 142 points.

Assignment 2 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 2.6 Part A The figure shows the position-versus-time graph for a moving object. At which lettered point or points: Is the object moving the slowest? Is the object moving the fastest? Is the object at rest? Drag the appropriate items to their respective bins. ANSWER: Correct Part B At which lettered point or points is the object moving to the negative direction? ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 2.7 The figure shows the position-versus-time graph for a moving object. At which lettered point or points: Part A Is the object moving the fastest? ANSWER: A B C D E Correct Part B Is the object speeding up? ANSWER: Correct Part C Is the object moving to the left and turning around? ANSWER: A B C D E F A B C D E F Correct Kinematic Vocabulary One of the difficulties in studying mechanics is that many common words are used with highly specific technical meanings, among them velocity, acceleration, position, speed, and displacement. The series of questions in this problem is designed to get you to try to think of these quantities like a physicist. Answer the questions in this problem using words from the following list: A. position B. direction C. displacement D. coordinates E. velocity F. acceleration G. distance H. magnitude I. vector J. scalar K. components Part A Velocity differs from speed in that velocity indicates a particle’s __________ of motion. Enter the letter from the list given in the problem introduction that best completes the sentence. ANSWER: Correct Part B Unlike speed, velocity is a __________ quantity. Enter the letter from the list given in the problem introduction that best completes the sentence. ANSWER: Correct Part C A vector has, by definition, both __________ and direction. Enter the letter from the list given in the problem introduction that best completes the sentence. ANSWER: Correct Part D Once you have selected a coordinate system, you can express a two-dimensional vector using a pair of quantities known collectively as __________. Enter the letter from the list given in the problem introduction that best completes the sentence. ANSWER: Correct Part E Speed differs from velocity in the same way that __________ differs from displacement. Enter the letter from the list given in the problem introduction that best completes the sentence. Hint 1. Definition of displacement Displacement is the vector that indicates the difference of two positions (e.g., the final position from the initial position). Being a vector, it is independent of the coordinate system used to describe it (although its vector components depend on the coordinate system). ANSWER: Correct Part F Consider a physical situation in which a particle moves from point A to point B. This process is described from two coordinate systems that are identical except that they have different origins. The __________ of the particle at point A differ(s) as expressed in one coordinate system compared to the other, but the __________ from A to B is/are the same as expressed in both coordinate systems. Type the letters from the list given in the problem introduction that best complete the sentence. Separate the letters with commas. There is more than one correct answer, but you should only enter one pair of comma-separated letters. For example, if the words “vector” and “scalar” fit best in the blanks, enter I,J. ANSWER: Correct The coordinates of a point will depend on the coordinate system that is chosen, but there are several other quantities that are independent of the choice of origin for a coordinate system: in particular, distance, displacement, direction, and velocity. In working physics problems, unless you are interested in the position of an object or event relative to a specific origin, you can usually choose the coordinate system origin to be wherever is most convenient or intuitive. Note that the vector indicating a displacement from A to B is usually represented as . Part G Identify the following physical quantities as scalars or vectors. ANSWER: rB A = rB − rA Correct Problem 2.4 The figure is the position-versus-time graph of a jogger. Part A What is the jogger’s velocity at = 10 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Answer Requested Part B What is the jogger’s velocity at = 25 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the jogger’s velocity at = 35 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: t s v = 1.3 ms t s v = 0 ms t s v = -5.0 ms Correct Analyzing Position versus Time Graphs: Conceptual Question Two cars travel on the parallel lanes of a two-lane road. The cars’ motions are represented by the position versus time graph shown in the figure. Answer the questions using the times from the graph indicated by letters. Part A At which of the times do the two cars pass each other? Hint 1. Two cars passing Two objects can pass each other only if they have the same position at the same time. ANSWER: Correct Part B Are the two cars traveling in the same direction when they pass each other? ANSWER: Correct Part C At which of the lettered times, if any, does car #1 momentarily stop? Hint 1. Determining velocity from a position versus time graph The slope on a position versus time graph is the “rise” (change in position) over the “run” (change in time). In physics, the ratio of change in position over change in time is defined as the velocity. Thus, the slope on a position versus time graph is the velocity of the object being graphed. ANSWER: A B C D E None Cannot be determined yes no Correct Part D At which of the lettered times, if any, does car #2 momentarily stop? Hint 1. Determining velocity from a position versus time graph The slope on a position versus time graph is the “rise” (change in position) over the “run” (change in time). In physics, the ratio of change in position over change in time is defined as the velocity. Thus, the slope on a position versus time graph is the velocity of the object being graphed. ANSWER: A B C D E none cannot be determined A B C D E none cannot be determined Correct Part E At which of the lettered times are the cars moving with nearly identical velocity? Hint 1. Determining Velocity from a Position versus Time Graph The slope on a position versus time graph is the “rise” (change in position) over the “run” (change in time). In physics, the ratio of change in position over change in time is defined as the velocity. Thus, the slope on a position versus time graph is the velocity of the object being graphed. ANSWER: Correct Problem 2.6 A particle starts from 10 at = 0 and moves with the velocity graph shown in the figure. A B C D E None Cannot be determined m t0 Part A Does this particle have a turning point? ANSWER: Correct Part B If so, at what time? Express your answer using two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the object’s position at = 2, 3, 4 ? Yes No t = 1.0 s t s Express your answers using two significant figures separated by commas. ANSWER: Correct Overcoming a Head Start Cars A and B are racing each other along the same straight road in the following manner: Car A has a head start and is a distance beyond the starting line at . The starting line is at . Car A travels at a constant speed . Car B starts at the starting line but has a better engine than Car A, and thus Car B travels at a constant speed , which is greater than . Part A How long after Car B started the race will Car B catch up with Car A? Express the time in terms of given quantities. Hint 1. Consider the kinematics relation Write an expression for the displacement of Car A from the starting line at a time after Car B starts. (Note that we are taking this time to be .) Answer in terms of , , , and for time, and take at the starting line. Hint 1. What is the acceleration of Car A? The acceleration of Car A is zero, so the general formula has at least one term equal to zero. ANSWER: Hint 2. What is the relation between the positions of the two cars? x2 , x3 , x4 = 10,16,26 m DA t = 0 x = 0 vA vB vA t t = 0 vA vB DA t x = 0 x(t) = x0 + v0t + (1/2)at2 xA(t) = DA + vAt The positions of the two cars are equal at time . Hint 3. Consider Car B’s position as a function of time Write down an expression for the position of Car B at time after starting. Give your answer in terms of any variables needed (use for time). ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B How far from Car B’s starting line will the cars be when Car B passes Car A? Express your answer in terms of known quantities. (You may use as well.) Hint 1. Which expression should you use? Just use your expression for the position of either car after time , and substitute in the correct value for (found in the previous part). ANSWER: Correct tcatch t t xB(t) = vBt tcatch = DA vB−vA tcatch t = 0 tcatch dpass = vBDA vB−vA Problem 2.11 The figure shows the velocity graph of a particle moving along the x-axis. Its initial position is at . At = 2 , what are the particle’s (a) position, (b) velocity, and (c) acceleration? Part A Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: x0 = 2 m t0 = 0 t s x = 6.0 m vx = 4.0 ms Correct Part C Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 2.13 A jet plane is cruising at 300 when suddenly the pilot turns the engines up to full throttle. After traveling 3.9 , the jet is moving with a speed of 400 . Part A What is the jet’s acceleration, assuming it to be a constant acceleration? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 2.20 A rock is tossed straight up with a velocity of 22 When it returns, it falls into a hole deep. You may want to review ( pages 51 – 54) . ax = 2.0 m s2 m/s km m/s a = 9.0 m s2 m/s 10 m For help with math skills, you may want to review: Quadratic Equations For general problem-solving tips and strategies for this topic, you may want to view a Video Tutor Solution of Time in the air for a tossed ball. Part A What is the rock’s velocity as it hits the bottom of the hole? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Start by drawing a picture of the path of the rock, including its launch point, initial direction, and end point in the hole. Choose a coordinate system, and indicate it on your picture. Where is ? What is the positive direction? What is the position of the launch point and the bottom of the hole? In this coordinate system, what is the sign of the initial velocity and the sign of the acceleration? Calling the launch time , what is the equation for as a function of time? What is the position at the bottom of the hole? This will lead to a quadratic equation for the time when the rock hits the bottom of the hole. The quadratic equation has two solutions for the time. Not all mathematical solutions make sense physically. Which solution makes sense physically in terms of the picture that you drew at the beginning? Keeping the same coordinate system, what is the velocity in the direction as a function of time? What is the velocity when the rock hits the bottom of the hole? ANSWER: Correct Part B How long is the rock in the air, from the instant it is released until it hits the bottom of the hole? Express your answer with the appropriate units. y = 0 m y t = 0 y y t y y v = -26.1 ms Hint 1. How to approach the problem How is the time the rock was in the air related to the time at which the rock hit the ground in Part A? ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 2.23 A particle moving along the x-axis has its position described by the function 2.00 5.00 5.00 , where is in s. At = 4.00, what are the particle’s (a) position, (b) velocity, and (c) acceleration? You may want to review ( pages 38 – 42) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Differentiation of Polynomial Functions t = 4.90 s x = ( t3 − t + ) m t t Part A Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Evaluate the position at time = 4.00 . ANSWER: Correct Part B Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem How do you determine the velocity as a function of time, , from the position, ? What calculus operation do you have to perform? Once you have , how do you determine at a particular time? ANSWER: Correct Part C Express your answer with the appropriate units. t s 113 m v(t) x(t) v(t) v 91.0 ms Hint 1. How to approach the problem How do you determine the acceleration as a function of time, , from the velocity, ? What calculus operation do you have to perform? Once you have , how do you determine the acceleration at a particular time? ANSWER: Correct Problem 2.26 A particle’s position on the x-axis is given by the function 6.00 6.00 , where is in s. Part A Where is the particle when = 4.00 ? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 2.30 A particle’s velocity is described by the function = , where is in . a(t) v(t) a(t) 48.0 m s2 x = (t2 − t + ) m t vx m/s 1.00 m vx t2 − 7t + 7 m/s t s Part A How many turning points does the particle reach. Express your answer as an integer. ANSWER: Correct Part B At what times does the particle reach its turning points? Express your answers using two significant figures separated by a comma. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the particle’s acceleration at each of the turning points? Express your answers using two significant figures separated by a comma. ANSWER: Correct 2 t1 , t2 = 5.8,1.2 s a1 , a2 = 4.6,-4.6 m/s2 Problem 2.49 A 200 weather rocket is loaded with 100 of fuel and fired straight up. It accelerates upward at 35 for 30 , then runs out of fuel. Ignore any air resistance effects. Part A What is the rocket’s maximum altitude? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How long is the rocket in the air? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Answer Requested Problem 2.52 A hotel elevator ascends with maximum speed of . Its acceleration and deceleration both have a magnitude of . Part A How far does the elevator move while accelerating to full speed from rest? kg kg m/s2 s h = 72 km t = 260 s 200 m 5 m/s 1.0 m/s2 Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How long does it take to make the complete trip from bottom to top? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Answer Requested Components of Vectors Shown is a 10 by 10 grid, with coordinate axes x and y . The grid runs from -5 to 5 on both axes. Drawn on this grid are four vectors, labeled through . This problem will ask you various questions about these vectors. All answers should be in decimal notation, unless otherwise specified. 12.5 m 45.0 s A D Part A What is the x component of ? Express your answer to two significant figures. Hint 1. How to derive the component A component of a vector is its length (but with appropriate sign) along a particular coordinate axis, the axes being specfied in advance. You are asked for the component of that lies along the x axis, which is horizontal in this problem. Imagine two lines perpendicular to the x axis running from the head (end with the arrow) and tail of down to the x axis. The length of the x axis between the points where these lines intersect is the x component of . In this problem, the x component is the x coordinate at which the perpendicular from the head of the vector hits the origin (because the tail of the vector is at the origin). ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the y component of ? Express your answer to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Correct A A A A Ax = 2.5 A Ay = 3 Part C What is the y component of ? Express your answer to the nearest integer. Hint 1. Consider the direction Don’t forget the sign. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the component of ? Express your answer to the nearest integer. Hint 1. How to find the start and end points of the vector components A vector is defined only by its magnitude and direction. The starting point of the vector is of no consequence to its definition. Therefore, you need to somehow eliminate the starting point from your answer. You can run two perpendiculars to the x axis, one from the head (end with the arrow) of , and another to the tail, with the x component being the difference between x coordinates of head and tail (negative if the tail is to the right of the head). Another way is to imagine bringing the tail of to the origin, and then using the same procedure you used before to find the components of and . This is equivalent to the previous method, but it might be easier to visualize. ANSWER: B By = -3 x C C C A B Cx = -2 Correct The following questions will ask you to give both components of vectors using the ordered pairs method. In this method, the x component is written first, followed by a comma, and then the y component. For example, the components of would be written 2.5,3 in ordered pair notation. The answers below are all integers, so estimate the components to the nearest whole number. Part E In ordered pair notation, write down the components of vector . Express your answers to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Correct Part F In ordered pair notation, write down the components of vector . Express your answers to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Correct Part G What is true about and ? Choose from the pulldown list below. A B Bx, By = 2,-3 D Dx, Dy = 2,-3 B D ANSWER: Correct Problem 3.6 Find x- and y-components of the following vectors. Part A Express your answers using two significant figures. Enter your answers numerically separated by a comma. ANSWER: Correct Part B Express your answers using two significant figures. Enter your answers numerically separated by a comma. ANSWER: They have different components and are not the same vectors. They have the same components but are not the same vectors. They are the same vectors. = (r 430m, 60& below positive x − axis) rx, ry = 210,-370 m v = (610m/s, 23& above positive x − axis) Correct Part C Express your answers using two significant figures. Enter your answers numerically separated by a comma. ANSWER: Correct Problem 3.10 Part A Draw . Draw the vector with its tail at the origin. ANSWER: vx, vy = 560,240 m/s a = (7.3m/s2 , negative y − direction) ax, ay = 0,-7.3 m/s2 B = −4 + 4 ı ^  ^ Correct Part B Find the magnitude of . Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct B B = 5.7 Part C Find the direction of . Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part D Draw . Draw the vector with its tail at the origin. ANSWER: B = 45 above the B negative x-axis & = (−2.0 − 1.0 ) cm r ı ^  ^ Correct Part E Find the magnitude of . Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct r r = 2.2 cm Part F Find the direction of . ANSWER: Correct Part G Draw . Draw the vector with its tail at the origin. ANSWER: r = 26.6 below the r negative x-axis & = (−10 − 100 ) m/s v ı ^  ^ Correct Part H Find the magnitude of . Express your answer using four significant figures. ANSWER: Correct v v = 100.5 m/s Part I Find the direction of . ANSWER: Correct Part J Draw . Draw the vector with it’s tail at the origin. ANSWER: v = 84.3 below the v negative x-axis & = (20 + 10 ) m/ a ı ^  ^ s2 Correct Part K Find the magnitude of . ANSWER: Correct Part L a a = 22.4 m/s2 Find the direction of . ANSWER: Correct Problem 3.14 Let , , and . Part A What is the component form of vector ? ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the magnitude of vector ? ANSWER: a = 26.6 above the a positive x-axis & A = 5 − 2 ı ^  ^ B = −2 + 6 ı ^  ^ D = A − B D D = 7 − 8 ı ^  ^ D = −7 − 5 ı ^  ^ D = 7 + 8 ı ^  ^ D = 4 + 5 ı ^  ^ D Correct Part C What is the direction of vector ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Problem 3.15 Let , , and . Part A Write vector in component form. ANSWER: D = 10.6 D  = 49 & below positive x-axis A = 4 − 2 ı ^  ^ B = −3 + 5 ı ^  ^ E = 4A + 2B E E = 10 + 2 ı ^  ^ E = + 10 ı ^  ^ E = −10 ^ E = 10 − 2 ı ^  ^ Correct Part B Draw vectors , , and . Draw the vectors with their tails at the origin. ANSWER: Correct Part C A B E What is the magnitude of vector ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the direction of vector ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Problem 3.24 Part A What is the angle between vectors and in the figure? Express your answer with the appropriate units. E E = 10.0 E  = 11 & counterclockwise from positive direction of x-axis  E F ANSWER: Correct Part B Use components to determine the magnitude of . ANSWER: Correct Part C Use components to determine the direction of . Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 91.3%.  = 71.6 & G = E + F  G = 3.00 G = E + F   = 90.0 & You received 129.62 out of a possible total of 142 points.

please email info@checkyourstudy.com
Assignment 11 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, April 30, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 13.2 The gravitational force of a star on orbiting planet 1 is . Planet 2, which is twice as massive as planet 1 and orbits at twice the distance from the star, experiences gravitational force . Part A What is the ratio ? ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 13.3 A 1500 satellite and a 2200 satellite follow exactly the same orbit around the earth. Part A What is the ratio of the force on the first satellite to that on the second satellite? ANSWER: Correct F1 F2 F1 F2 = 2 F1 F2 kg kg F1 F2 = 0.682 F1 F2 Part B What is the ratio of the acceleration of the first satellite to that of the second satellite? ANSWER: Correct Problem 13.2 The centers of a 15.0 lead ball and a 90.0 lead ball are separated by 9.00 . Part A What gravitational force does each exert on the other? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the ratio of this gravitational force to the weight of the 90.0 ball? ANSWER: a1 a2 = 1 a1 a2 kg g cm 1.11×10−8 N g 1.26×10−8 Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 13.6 The space shuttle orbits 310 above the surface of the earth. Part A What is the gravitational force on a 7.5 sphere inside the space shuttle? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct ± A Satellite in Orbit A satellite used in a cellular telephone network has a mass of 2310 and is in a circular orbit at a height of 650 above the surface of the earth. Part A What is the gravitational force on the satellite? Take the gravitational constant to be = 6.67×10−11 , the mass of the earth to be = 5.97×1024 , and the radius of the Earth to be = 6.38×106 . Express your answer in newtons. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Use the equation for the law of gravitation to calculate the force on the satellite. Be careful about the units when performing the calculations. km kg Fe on s = 67.0 N kg km Fgrav G N m2/kg2 me kg re m Typesetting math: 100% Hint 2. Law of gravitation According to Newton’s law of gravitation, , where is the gravitational constant, and are the masses of the two objects, and is the distance between the centers of mass of the two objects. Hint 3. Calculate the distance between the centers of mass What is the distance from the center of mass of the satellite to the center of mass of the earth? Express your answer in meters. ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B What fraction is this of the satellite’s weight at the surface of the earth? Take the free-fall acceleration at the surface of the earth to be = 9.80 . Hint 1. How to approach the problem All you need to do is to take the ratio of the gravitational force on the satellite to the weight of the satellite at ground level. There are two ways to do this, depending on how you define the force of gravity at the surface of the earth. ANSWER: F = Gm1m2/r2 G m1 m2 r r = 7.03×10r 6 m = 1.86×10Fgrav 4 N g m/s2 0.824 Typesetting math: 100% Correct Although it is easy to find the weight of the satellite using the constant acceleration due to gravity, it is instructional to consider the weight calculated using the law of gravitation: . Dividing the gravitational force on the satellite by , we find that the ratio of the forces due to the earth’s gravity is simply the square of the ratio of the earth’s radius to the sum of the earth’s radius and the height of the orbit of the satellite above the earth, . This will also be the fraction of the weight of, say, an astronaut in an orbit at the same altitude. Notice that an astronaut’s weight is never zero. When people speak of “weightlessness” in space, what they really mean is “free fall.” Problem 13.8 Part A What is the free-fall acceleration at the surface of the moon? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the free-fall acceleration at the surface of the Jupiter? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct w = G m/ me r2e Fgrav = Gmem/(re + h)2 w [re/(re + h)]2 gmoon = 1.62 m s2 gJupiter = 25.9 m s2 Typesetting math: 100% Enhanced EOC: Problem 13.14 A rocket is launched straight up from the earth’s surface at a speed of 1.90×104 . You may want to review ( pages 362 – 365) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Mathematical Expressions Involving Squares Part A What is its speed when it is very far away from the earth? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is conserved in this problem? What is the rocket’s initial kinetic energy in terms of its unknown mass, ? What is the rocket’s initial gravitational potential energy in terms of its unknown mass, ? When the rocket is very far away from the Earth, what is its gravitational potential energy? Using conservation of energy, what is the rocket’s kinetic energy when it is very far away from the Earth? Therefore, what is the rocket’s velocity when it is very far away from the Earth? ANSWER: Correct Problem 13.13 Part A m/s m m 1.54×104 ms Typesetting math: 100% What is the escape speed from Venus? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 13.17 The asteroid belt circles the sun between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. One asteroid has a period of 4.2 earth years. Part A What is the asteroid’s orbital radius? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the asteroid’s orbital speed? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: vescape = 10.4 km s = 3.89×1011 R m = 1.85×104 v ms Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 13.32 Part A At what height above the earth is the acceleration due to gravity 15.0% of its value at the surface? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the speed of a satellite orbiting at that height? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 13.36 Two meteoroids are heading for earth. Their speeds as they cross the moon’s orbit are 2 . 1.01×107 m 4920 ms km/s Typesetting math: 100% Part A The first meteoroid is heading straight for earth. What is its speed of impact? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B The second misses the earth by 5500 . What is its speed at its closest point? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Problem 14.2 An air-track glider attached to a spring oscillates between the 11.0 mark and the 67.0 mark on the track. The glider completes 11.0 oscillations in 32.0 . Part A What is the period of the oscillations? Express your answer with the appropriate units. v1 = 11.3 km s km v2 = cm cm s Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the frequency of the oscillations? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the angular frequency of the oscillations? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the amplitude? Express your answer with the appropriate units. 2.91 s 0.344 Hz 2.16 rad s Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Part E What is the maximum speed of the glider? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Good Vibes: Introduction to Oscillations Learning Goal: To learn the basic terminology and relationships among the main characteristics of simple harmonic motion. Motion that repeats itself over and over is called periodic motion. There are many examples of periodic motion: the earth revolving around the sun, an elastic ball bouncing up and down, or a block attached to a spring oscillating back and forth. The last example differs from the first two, in that it represents a special kind of periodic motion called simple harmonic motion. The conditions that lead to simple harmonic motion are as follows: There must be a position of stable equilibrium. There must be a restoring force acting on the oscillating object. The direction of this force must always point toward the equilibrium, and its magnitude must be directly proportional to the magnitude of the object’s displacement from its equilibrium position. Mathematically, the restoring force is given by , where is the displacement from equilibrium and is a constant that depends on the properties of the oscillating system. The resistive forces in the system must be reasonably small. In this problem, we will introduce some of the basic quantities that describe oscillations and the relationships among them. Consider a block of mass attached to a spring with force constant , as shown in the figure. The spring can be either stretched or compressed. The block slides on a frictionless horizontal surface, as shown. When the spring is relaxed, the block is located at . If the 28.0 cm 60.5 cms F  F = −kx x k m k x = 0 Typesetting math: 100% block is pulled to the right a distance and then released, will be the amplitude of the resulting oscillations. Assume that the mechanical energy of the block-spring system remains unchanged in the subsequent motion of the block. Part A After the block is released from , it will ANSWER: Correct As the block begins its motion to the left, it accelerates. Although the restoring force decreases as the block approaches equilibrium, it still pulls the block to the left, so by the time the equilibrium position is reached, the block has gained some speed. It will, therefore, pass the equilibrium position and keep moving, compressing the spring. The spring will now be pushing the block to the right, and the block will slow down, temporarily coming to rest at . After is reached, the block will begin its motion to the right, pushed by the spring. The block will pass the equilibrium position and continue until it reaches , completing one cycle of motion. The motion will then repeat; if, as we’ve assumed, there is no friction, the motion will repeat indefinitely. The time it takes the block to complete one cycle is called the period. Usually, the period is denoted and is measured in seconds. The frequency, denoted , is the number of cycles that are completed per unit of time: . In SI units, is measured in inverse seconds, or hertz ( ). A A x = A remain at rest. move to the left until it reaches equilibrium and stop there. move to the left until it reaches and stop there. move to the left until it reaches and then begin to move to the right. x = −A x = −A x = −A x = −A x = A T f f = 1/T f Hz Typesetting math: 100% Part B If the period is doubled, the frequency is ANSWER: Correct Part C An oscillating object takes 0.10 to complete one cycle; that is, its period is 0.10 . What is its frequency ? Express your answer in hertz. ANSWER: Correct unchanged. doubled. halved. s s f f = 10 Hz Typesetting math: 100% Part D If the frequency is 40 , what is the period ? Express your answer in seconds. ANSWER: Correct The following questions refer to the figure that graphically depicts the oscillations of the block on the spring. Note that the vertical axis represents the x coordinate of the oscillating object, and the horizontal axis represents time. Part E Which points on the x axis are located a distance from the equilibrium position? ANSWER: Hz T T = 0.025 s A Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part F Suppose that the period is . Which of the following points on the t axis are separated by the time interval ? ANSWER: Correct Now assume for the remaining Parts G – J, that the x coordinate of point R is 0.12 and the t coordinate of point K is 0.0050 . Part G What is the period ? Express your answer in seconds. Hint 1. How to approach the problem In moving from the point to the point K, what fraction of a full wavelength is covered? Call that fraction . Then you can set . Dividing by the fraction will give the R only Q only both R and Q T T K and L K and M K and P L and N M and P m s T t = 0 a aT = 0.005 s a Typesetting math: 100% period . ANSWER: Correct Part H How much time does the block take to travel from the point of maximum displacement to the opposite point of maximum displacement? Express your answer in seconds. ANSWER: Correct Part I What distance does the object cover during one period of oscillation? Express your answer in meters. ANSWER: Correct Part J What distance does the object cover between the moments labeled K and N on the graph? T T = 0.02 s t t = 0.01 s d d = 0.48 m d Typesetting math: 100% Express your answer in meters. ANSWER: Correct Problem 14.4 Part A What is the amplitude of the oscillation shown in the figure? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct d = 0.36 m A = 20.0 cm Typesetting math: 100% Part B What is the frequency of this oscillation? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the phase constant? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Problem 14.10 An air-track glider attached to a spring oscillates with a period of 1.50 . At the glider is 4.60 left of the equilibrium position and moving to the right at 33.4 . Part A What is the phase constant? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: f = 0.25 Hz 0 = s t = 0 s cm cm/s Typesetting math: 100% Incorrect; Try Again Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Problem 14.12 A 140 air-track glider is attached to a spring. The glider is pushed in 12.2 and released. A student with a stopwatch finds that 14.0 oscillations take 19.0 . Part A What is the spring constant? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: 0 = g cm s Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 14.14 The position of a 50 g oscillating mass is given by , where is in s. If necessary, round your answers to three significant figures. Determine: Part A The amplitude. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B The period. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C 3.00 Nm x(t) = (2.0 cm)cos(10t − /4) t 2.00 cm 0.628 s Typesetting math: 100% The spring constant. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part D The phase constant. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G Typesetting math: 100% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part I This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Enhanced EOC: Problem 14.17 A spring with spring constant 16 hangs from the ceiling. A ball is attached to the spring and allowed to come to rest. It is then pulled down 4.0 and released. The ball makes 35 oscillations in 18 seconds. You may want to review ( pages 389 – 391) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Differentiation of Trigonometric Functions Part A What is its the mass of the ball? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is the period of oscillation? What is the angular frequency of the oscillations? How is the angular frequency related to the mass and spring constant? What is the mass? N/m cm s Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Part B What is its maximum speed? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is the amplitude of the oscillations? How is the maximum speed related to the amplitude of the oscillations and the angular frequency? ANSWER: Correct Changing the Period of a Pendulum A simple pendulum consisting of a bob of mass attached to a string of length swings with a period . Part A If the bob’s mass is doubled, approximately what will the pendulum’s new period be? Hint 1. Period of a simple pendulum The period of a simple pendulum of length is given by m = 110 g vmax = 49 cms m L T Typesetting math: 10T0% L , where is the acceleration due to gravity. ANSWER: Correct Part B If the pendulum is brought on the moon where the gravitational acceleration is about , approximately what will its period now be? Hint 1. How to approach the problem Recall the formula of the period of a simple pendulum. Since the gravitational acceleration appears in the denominator, the period must increase when the gravitational acceleration decreases. ANSWER: T = 2 Lg −−  g T/2 T &2T 2T g/6 T/6 T/&6 &6T 6T Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part C If the pendulum is taken into the orbiting space station what will happen to the bob? Hint 1. How to approach the problem Recall that the oscillations of a simple pendulum occur when a pendulum bob is raised above its equilibrium position and let go, causing the pendulum bob to fall. The gravitational force acts to bring the bob back to its equilibrium position. In the space station, the earth’s gravity acts on both the station and everything inside it, giving them the same acceleration. These objects are said to be in free fall. ANSWER: Correct In the space station, where all objects undergo the same acceleration due to the earth’s gravity, the tension in the string is zero and the bob does not fall relative to the point to which the string is attached. Problem 14.20 A 175 ball is tied to a string. It is pulled to an angle of 8.0 and released to swing as a pendulum. A student with a stopwatch finds that 15 oscillations take 13 . Part A How long is the string? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. It will continue to oscillate in a vertical plane with the same period. It will no longer oscillate because there is no gravity in space. It will no longer oscillate because both the pendulum and the point to which it is attached are in free fall. It will oscillate much faster with a period that approaches zero. g ( s Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Problem 14.22 Part A What is the length of a pendulum whose period on the moon matches the period of a 2.1- -long pendulum on the earth? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 14.42 An ultrasonic transducer, of the type used in medical ultrasound imaging, is a very thin disk ( = 0.17 ) driven back and forth in SHM at by an electromagnetic coil. Part A The maximum restoring force that can be applied to the disk without breaking it is 4.4×104 . What is the maximum oscillation amplitude that won’t rupture the disk? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: L = 19 cm m lmoon = 0.35 m m g 1.0 MHz N amax = 6.6 μm Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part B What is the disk’s maximum speed at this amplitude? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 81.4%. You received 117.25 out of a possible total of 144 points. vmax = 41 ms

Assignment 11 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, April 30, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 13.2 The gravitational force of a star on orbiting planet 1 is . Planet 2, which is twice as massive as planet 1 and orbits at twice the distance from the star, experiences gravitational force . Part A What is the ratio ? ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 13.3 A 1500 satellite and a 2200 satellite follow exactly the same orbit around the earth. Part A What is the ratio of the force on the first satellite to that on the second satellite? ANSWER: Correct F1 F2 F1 F2 = 2 F1 F2 kg kg F1 F2 = 0.682 F1 F2 Part B What is the ratio of the acceleration of the first satellite to that of the second satellite? ANSWER: Correct Problem 13.2 The centers of a 15.0 lead ball and a 90.0 lead ball are separated by 9.00 . Part A What gravitational force does each exert on the other? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the ratio of this gravitational force to the weight of the 90.0 ball? ANSWER: a1 a2 = 1 a1 a2 kg g cm 1.11×10−8 N g 1.26×10−8 Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 13.6 The space shuttle orbits 310 above the surface of the earth. Part A What is the gravitational force on a 7.5 sphere inside the space shuttle? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct ± A Satellite in Orbit A satellite used in a cellular telephone network has a mass of 2310 and is in a circular orbit at a height of 650 above the surface of the earth. Part A What is the gravitational force on the satellite? Take the gravitational constant to be = 6.67×10−11 , the mass of the earth to be = 5.97×1024 , and the radius of the Earth to be = 6.38×106 . Express your answer in newtons. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Use the equation for the law of gravitation to calculate the force on the satellite. Be careful about the units when performing the calculations. km kg Fe on s = 67.0 N kg km Fgrav G N m2/kg2 me kg re m Typesetting math: 100% Hint 2. Law of gravitation According to Newton’s law of gravitation, , where is the gravitational constant, and are the masses of the two objects, and is the distance between the centers of mass of the two objects. Hint 3. Calculate the distance between the centers of mass What is the distance from the center of mass of the satellite to the center of mass of the earth? Express your answer in meters. ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B What fraction is this of the satellite’s weight at the surface of the earth? Take the free-fall acceleration at the surface of the earth to be = 9.80 . Hint 1. How to approach the problem All you need to do is to take the ratio of the gravitational force on the satellite to the weight of the satellite at ground level. There are two ways to do this, depending on how you define the force of gravity at the surface of the earth. ANSWER: F = Gm1m2/r2 G m1 m2 r r = 7.03×10r 6 m = 1.86×10Fgrav 4 N g m/s2 0.824 Typesetting math: 100% Correct Although it is easy to find the weight of the satellite using the constant acceleration due to gravity, it is instructional to consider the weight calculated using the law of gravitation: . Dividing the gravitational force on the satellite by , we find that the ratio of the forces due to the earth’s gravity is simply the square of the ratio of the earth’s radius to the sum of the earth’s radius and the height of the orbit of the satellite above the earth, . This will also be the fraction of the weight of, say, an astronaut in an orbit at the same altitude. Notice that an astronaut’s weight is never zero. When people speak of “weightlessness” in space, what they really mean is “free fall.” Problem 13.8 Part A What is the free-fall acceleration at the surface of the moon? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the free-fall acceleration at the surface of the Jupiter? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct w = G m/ me r2e Fgrav = Gmem/(re + h)2 w [re/(re + h)]2 gmoon = 1.62 m s2 gJupiter = 25.9 m s2 Typesetting math: 100% Enhanced EOC: Problem 13.14 A rocket is launched straight up from the earth’s surface at a speed of 1.90×104 . You may want to review ( pages 362 – 365) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Mathematical Expressions Involving Squares Part A What is its speed when it is very far away from the earth? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is conserved in this problem? What is the rocket’s initial kinetic energy in terms of its unknown mass, ? What is the rocket’s initial gravitational potential energy in terms of its unknown mass, ? When the rocket is very far away from the Earth, what is its gravitational potential energy? Using conservation of energy, what is the rocket’s kinetic energy when it is very far away from the Earth? Therefore, what is the rocket’s velocity when it is very far away from the Earth? ANSWER: Correct Problem 13.13 Part A m/s m m 1.54×104 ms Typesetting math: 100% What is the escape speed from Venus? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 13.17 The asteroid belt circles the sun between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. One asteroid has a period of 4.2 earth years. Part A What is the asteroid’s orbital radius? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the asteroid’s orbital speed? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: vescape = 10.4 km s = 3.89×1011 R m = 1.85×104 v ms Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 13.32 Part A At what height above the earth is the acceleration due to gravity 15.0% of its value at the surface? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the speed of a satellite orbiting at that height? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 13.36 Two meteoroids are heading for earth. Their speeds as they cross the moon’s orbit are 2 . 1.01×107 m 4920 ms km/s Typesetting math: 100% Part A The first meteoroid is heading straight for earth. What is its speed of impact? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B The second misses the earth by 5500 . What is its speed at its closest point? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Problem 14.2 An air-track glider attached to a spring oscillates between the 11.0 mark and the 67.0 mark on the track. The glider completes 11.0 oscillations in 32.0 . Part A What is the period of the oscillations? Express your answer with the appropriate units. v1 = 11.3 km s km v2 = cm cm s Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the frequency of the oscillations? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the angular frequency of the oscillations? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the amplitude? Express your answer with the appropriate units. 2.91 s 0.344 Hz 2.16 rad s Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Part E What is the maximum speed of the glider? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Good Vibes: Introduction to Oscillations Learning Goal: To learn the basic terminology and relationships among the main characteristics of simple harmonic motion. Motion that repeats itself over and over is called periodic motion. There are many examples of periodic motion: the earth revolving around the sun, an elastic ball bouncing up and down, or a block attached to a spring oscillating back and forth. The last example differs from the first two, in that it represents a special kind of periodic motion called simple harmonic motion. The conditions that lead to simple harmonic motion are as follows: There must be a position of stable equilibrium. There must be a restoring force acting on the oscillating object. The direction of this force must always point toward the equilibrium, and its magnitude must be directly proportional to the magnitude of the object’s displacement from its equilibrium position. Mathematically, the restoring force is given by , where is the displacement from equilibrium and is a constant that depends on the properties of the oscillating system. The resistive forces in the system must be reasonably small. In this problem, we will introduce some of the basic quantities that describe oscillations and the relationships among them. Consider a block of mass attached to a spring with force constant , as shown in the figure. The spring can be either stretched or compressed. The block slides on a frictionless horizontal surface, as shown. When the spring is relaxed, the block is located at . If the 28.0 cm 60.5 cms F  F = −kx x k m k x = 0 Typesetting math: 100% block is pulled to the right a distance and then released, will be the amplitude of the resulting oscillations. Assume that the mechanical energy of the block-spring system remains unchanged in the subsequent motion of the block. Part A After the block is released from , it will ANSWER: Correct As the block begins its motion to the left, it accelerates. Although the restoring force decreases as the block approaches equilibrium, it still pulls the block to the left, so by the time the equilibrium position is reached, the block has gained some speed. It will, therefore, pass the equilibrium position and keep moving, compressing the spring. The spring will now be pushing the block to the right, and the block will slow down, temporarily coming to rest at . After is reached, the block will begin its motion to the right, pushed by the spring. The block will pass the equilibrium position and continue until it reaches , completing one cycle of motion. The motion will then repeat; if, as we’ve assumed, there is no friction, the motion will repeat indefinitely. The time it takes the block to complete one cycle is called the period. Usually, the period is denoted and is measured in seconds. The frequency, denoted , is the number of cycles that are completed per unit of time: . In SI units, is measured in inverse seconds, or hertz ( ). A A x = A remain at rest. move to the left until it reaches equilibrium and stop there. move to the left until it reaches and stop there. move to the left until it reaches and then begin to move to the right. x = −A x = −A x = −A x = −A x = A T f f = 1/T f Hz Typesetting math: 100% Part B If the period is doubled, the frequency is ANSWER: Correct Part C An oscillating object takes 0.10 to complete one cycle; that is, its period is 0.10 . What is its frequency ? Express your answer in hertz. ANSWER: Correct unchanged. doubled. halved. s s f f = 10 Hz Typesetting math: 100% Part D If the frequency is 40 , what is the period ? Express your answer in seconds. ANSWER: Correct The following questions refer to the figure that graphically depicts the oscillations of the block on the spring. Note that the vertical axis represents the x coordinate of the oscillating object, and the horizontal axis represents time. Part E Which points on the x axis are located a distance from the equilibrium position? ANSWER: Hz T T = 0.025 s A Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part F Suppose that the period is . Which of the following points on the t axis are separated by the time interval ? ANSWER: Correct Now assume for the remaining Parts G – J, that the x coordinate of point R is 0.12 and the t coordinate of point K is 0.0050 . Part G What is the period ? Express your answer in seconds. Hint 1. How to approach the problem In moving from the point to the point K, what fraction of a full wavelength is covered? Call that fraction . Then you can set . Dividing by the fraction will give the R only Q only both R and Q T T K and L K and M K and P L and N M and P m s T t = 0 a aT = 0.005 s a Typesetting math: 100% period . ANSWER: Correct Part H How much time does the block take to travel from the point of maximum displacement to the opposite point of maximum displacement? Express your answer in seconds. ANSWER: Correct Part I What distance does the object cover during one period of oscillation? Express your answer in meters. ANSWER: Correct Part J What distance does the object cover between the moments labeled K and N on the graph? T T = 0.02 s t t = 0.01 s d d = 0.48 m d Typesetting math: 100% Express your answer in meters. ANSWER: Correct Problem 14.4 Part A What is the amplitude of the oscillation shown in the figure? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct d = 0.36 m A = 20.0 cm Typesetting math: 100% Part B What is the frequency of this oscillation? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the phase constant? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Problem 14.10 An air-track glider attached to a spring oscillates with a period of 1.50 . At the glider is 4.60 left of the equilibrium position and moving to the right at 33.4 . Part A What is the phase constant? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: f = 0.25 Hz 0 = s t = 0 s cm cm/s Typesetting math: 100% Incorrect; Try Again Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Problem 14.12 A 140 air-track glider is attached to a spring. The glider is pushed in 12.2 and released. A student with a stopwatch finds that 14.0 oscillations take 19.0 . Part A What is the spring constant? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: 0 = g cm s Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 14.14 The position of a 50 g oscillating mass is given by , where is in s. If necessary, round your answers to three significant figures. Determine: Part A The amplitude. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B The period. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C 3.00 Nm x(t) = (2.0 cm)cos(10t − /4) t 2.00 cm 0.628 s Typesetting math: 100% The spring constant. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part D The phase constant. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G Typesetting math: 100% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part I This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Enhanced EOC: Problem 14.17 A spring with spring constant 16 hangs from the ceiling. A ball is attached to the spring and allowed to come to rest. It is then pulled down 4.0 and released. The ball makes 35 oscillations in 18 seconds. You may want to review ( pages 389 – 391) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Differentiation of Trigonometric Functions Part A What is its the mass of the ball? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is the period of oscillation? What is the angular frequency of the oscillations? How is the angular frequency related to the mass and spring constant? What is the mass? N/m cm s Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Part B What is its maximum speed? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is the amplitude of the oscillations? How is the maximum speed related to the amplitude of the oscillations and the angular frequency? ANSWER: Correct Changing the Period of a Pendulum A simple pendulum consisting of a bob of mass attached to a string of length swings with a period . Part A If the bob’s mass is doubled, approximately what will the pendulum’s new period be? Hint 1. Period of a simple pendulum The period of a simple pendulum of length is given by m = 110 g vmax = 49 cms m L T Typesetting math: 10T0% L , where is the acceleration due to gravity. ANSWER: Correct Part B If the pendulum is brought on the moon where the gravitational acceleration is about , approximately what will its period now be? Hint 1. How to approach the problem Recall the formula of the period of a simple pendulum. Since the gravitational acceleration appears in the denominator, the period must increase when the gravitational acceleration decreases. ANSWER: T = 2 Lg −−  g T/2 T &2T 2T g/6 T/6 T/&6 &6T 6T Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part C If the pendulum is taken into the orbiting space station what will happen to the bob? Hint 1. How to approach the problem Recall that the oscillations of a simple pendulum occur when a pendulum bob is raised above its equilibrium position and let go, causing the pendulum bob to fall. The gravitational force acts to bring the bob back to its equilibrium position. In the space station, the earth’s gravity acts on both the station and everything inside it, giving them the same acceleration. These objects are said to be in free fall. ANSWER: Correct In the space station, where all objects undergo the same acceleration due to the earth’s gravity, the tension in the string is zero and the bob does not fall relative to the point to which the string is attached. Problem 14.20 A 175 ball is tied to a string. It is pulled to an angle of 8.0 and released to swing as a pendulum. A student with a stopwatch finds that 15 oscillations take 13 . Part A How long is the string? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. It will continue to oscillate in a vertical plane with the same period. It will no longer oscillate because there is no gravity in space. It will no longer oscillate because both the pendulum and the point to which it is attached are in free fall. It will oscillate much faster with a period that approaches zero. g ( s Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Problem 14.22 Part A What is the length of a pendulum whose period on the moon matches the period of a 2.1- -long pendulum on the earth? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 14.42 An ultrasonic transducer, of the type used in medical ultrasound imaging, is a very thin disk ( = 0.17 ) driven back and forth in SHM at by an electromagnetic coil. Part A The maximum restoring force that can be applied to the disk without breaking it is 4.4×104 . What is the maximum oscillation amplitude that won’t rupture the disk? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: L = 19 cm m lmoon = 0.35 m m g 1.0 MHz N amax = 6.6 μm Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part B What is the disk’s maximum speed at this amplitude? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 81.4%. You received 117.25 out of a possible total of 144 points. vmax = 41 ms

info@checkyourstudy.com
The electron transport chain is, in essence, a series of redox reactions that conclude cellular respiration. During these redox reactions, _____. Hint 1.

The electron transport chain is, in essence, a series of redox reactions that conclude cellular respiration. During these redox reactions, _____. Hint 1.

NAD+ is reduced, which then oxidizes an electron acceptor in … Read More...
5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 Problem List 5.1 Total mass of a shell 5.2 Tunnel through the moon 5.3 Gravitational eld above the center of a thin hoop 5.4 Gravitational force near a metal-cored planet surrounded by a gaseous cloud 5.5 Sphere with linearly increasing mass density 5.6 Jumping o Vesta 5.7 Gravitational force between two massive rods 5.8 Potential energy { Check your answer! 5.9 Ways of solving gravitational problems 5.10 Rod with linearly increasing mass density 5.11 Sphere with constant internal gravitational eld 5.12 Throwing a rock o the moon These problems are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Un- ported License. Please share and/or modify. Back to Problem List 1 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.1 Total mass of a shell Given: Marino { Fall 2011 Consider a spherical shell that extends from r = R to r = 2R with a non-uniform density (r) = 0r. What is the total mass of the shell? Back to Problem List 2 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.2 Tunnel through the moon Given: Marino { Fall 2011 Imagine that NASA digs a straight tunnel through the center of the moon (see gure) to access the Moon’s 3He deposits. An astronaut places a rock in the tunnel at the surface of the moon, and releases it (from rest). Show that the rock obeys the force law for a mass connected to a spring. What is the spring constant? Find the oscillation period for this motion if you assume that Moon has a mass of 7.351022 kg and a radius of 1.74106 m. Assume the moon’s density is uniform throughout its volume, and ignore the moon’s rotation. Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 Imagine (in a parallel universe of unlimited budgets) that NASA digs a straight tunnel through the center of the moon (see gure). A robot place a rock in the tunnel at position r = r0 from the center of the moon, and releases it (from rest). Use Newton’s second law to write the equation of motion of the rock and solve for r(t). Explain in words the rock’s motion. Does the rock return to its initial position at any later time? If so, how long does it takes to return to it? (Give a formula, and a number.) Assume the moon’s density is uniform throughout its volume, and ignore the moon’s rotation. Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Now lets consider our (real) planet Earth, with total mass M and radius R which we will approximate as a uniform mass density, (r) = 0. (a) Neglecting rotational and frictional e ects, show that a particle dropped into a hole drilled straight through the center of the earth all the way to the far side will oscillate between the two endpoints. (Hint: you will need to set up, and solve, an ODE for the motion) (b) Find the period of the oscillation of this motion. Get a number (in minutes) as a nal result, using data for the earth’s size and mass. (How does that compare to ying to Perth and back?!) Extra Credit: OK, even with unlimited budgets, digging a tunnel through the center of the earth is preposterous. But, suppose instead that the tunnel is a straight-line \chord” through the earth, say directly from New York to Los Angeles. Show that your nal answer for the time taken does not depend on the location of that chord! This is rather remarkable – look again at the time for a free-fall trip (no energy required, except perhaps to compensate for friction) How long would that trip take? Could this work?! Back to Problem List 3 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.3 Gravitational eld above the center of a thin hoop Given: Pollock { Spring 2011, Spring 2012 Consider a very (in nitesimally!) thin but massive loop, radius R (total mass M), centered around the origin, sitting in the x-y plane. Assume it has a uniform linear mass density  (which has units of kg/m) all around it. (So, it’s like a skinny donut that is mostly hole, centered around the z-axis) (a) What is  in terms of M and R? What is the direction of the gravitational eld generated by this mass distribution at a point in space a distance z above the center of the donut, i.e. at (0; 0; z) Explain your reasoning for the direction carefully, try not to simply \wave your hands.” (The answer is extremely intuitive, but can you justify that it is correct?) (b) Compute the gravitational eld, ~g, at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating Newton’s law of gravity, summing over all in nitesimal \chunks” of mass along the loop. (c) Compute the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating ?Gdm=r, sum- ming over all in nitesimal \chunks” dm along the loop. Then, take the z-component of the gradient of this potential to check that you agree with your result from the previous part. (d) In the two separate limits z << R and z >> R, Taylor expand your g- eld (in the z-direction)out only to the rst non-zero term, and convince us that both limits make good physical sense. (e) Can you use Gauss’ law to gure out the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z)? (If so, do it and check your previous answers. If not, why not?) Extra credit: If you place a small mass a small distance z away from the center, use your Taylor limit for z << R above to write a simple ODE for the equation of motion. Solve it, and discuss the motion Back to Problem List 4 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.4 Gravitational force near a metal-cored planet surrounded by a gaseous cloud Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 Jupiter is composed of a dense spherical core (of liquid metallic hydrogen!) of radius Rc. It is sur- rounded by a spherical cloud of gaseous hydrogen of radius Rg, where Rg > Rc. Let’s assume that the core is of uniform density c and the gaseous cloud is also of uniform density g. What is the gravitational force on an object of mass m that is located at a radius r from the center of Jupiter? Note that you must consider the cases where the object is inside the core, within the gas layer, and outside of the planet. Back to Problem List 5 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.5 Sphere with linearly increasing mass density Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 A planet of mass M and radius R has a nonuniform density that varies with r, the distance from the center according to  = Ar for 0  r  R. (a) What is the constant A in terms of M and R? Does this density pro le strike you as physically plausible, or is just designed as a mathematical exercise? (Brie y, explain) (b) Determine the gravitational force on a satellite of mass m orbiting this planet. In words, please outline the method you plan to use for your solution. (Use the easiest method you can come up with!) In your calculation, you will need to argue that the magnitude of ~g(r; ; ) depends only on r. Be very explicit about this – how do you know that it doesn’t, in fact, depend on  or ? (c) Determine the gravitational force felt by a rock of mass m inside the planet, located at radius r < R. (If the method you use is di erent than in part b, explain why you switched. If not, just proceed!) Explicitly check your result for this part by considering the limits r ! 0 and r ! R. Back to Problem List 6 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.6 Jumping o Vesta Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 You are stranded on the surface of the asteroid Vesta. If the mass of the asteroid is M and its radius is R, how fast would you have to jump o its surface to be able to escape from its gravitational eld? (Your estimate should be based on parameters that characterize the asteroid, not parameters that describe your jumping ability.) Given your formula, look up the approximate mass and radius of the asteroid Vesta 3 and determine a numerical value of the escape velocity. Could you escape in this way? (Brie y, explain) If so, roughly how big in radius is the maximum the asteroid could be, for you to still escape this way? If not, estimate how much smaller an asteroid you would need, to escape from it in this way? Figure 1: Back to Problem List 7 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.7 Gravitational force between two massive rods Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 Consider two identical uniform rods of length L and mass m lying along the same line and having their closest points separated by a distance d as shown in the gure (a) Calculate the mutual force between these rods, both its direction and magnitude. (b) Now do several checks. First, make sure the units worked out (!) The, nd the magnitude of the force in the limit L ! 0. What do you expect? Brie y, discuss. Lastly, nd the magnitude of the force in the limit d ! 1 ? Again, is it what you expect? Brie y, discuss. Figure 2: Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Determining the gravitational force between two rods: (a) Consider a thin, uniform rod of mass m and length L (and negligible other dimensions) lying on the x axis (from x=-L to 0), as shown in g 1a. Derive a formula for the gravitational eld \g" at any arbitrary point x to the right of the origin (but still on the x-axis!) due to this rod. (b) Now suppose a second rod of length L and mass m sits on the x axis as shown in g 1b, with the left edge a distance \d" away. Calculate the mutual gravitational force between these rods. (c) Let's do some checks! Show that the units work out in parts a and b. Find the magnitude of the force in part a, in the limit x >> L: What do you expect? Brie y, discuss! Finally, verify that your answer to part b gives what you expect in the limit d >> L. ( Hint: This is a bit harder! You need to consistently expand everything to second order, not just rst, because of some interesting cancellations) Fig 1a Fig 1b L m +x x=0 L x=0 x=d m Fig 1a Fig 1b L m +x x=0 L +x x=0 x=d L m m Back to Problem List 8 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.8 Potential energy { Check your answer! Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 On the last exam, we had a problem with a at ring, uniform mass per unit area of , inner radius of R, outer radius of 2R. A satellite (mass m) sat a distance z above the center of the ring. We asked for the gravitational potential energy, and the answer was U(z) = ?2Gm( p 4R2 + z2 ? p R2 + z2) (1) (a) If you are far from the disk (on the z axis), what do you expect for the formula for U(z)? (Don’t say \0″ – as usual, we want the functional form of U(z) as you move far away. Also, explicitly state what we mean by \far away”. (Please don’t compare something with units to something without units!) (b) Show explicitly that the formula above does indeed give precisely the functional dependence you expect. Back to Problem List 9 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.9 Ways of solving gravitational problems Given: Pollock { Spring 2011, Spring 2012 Infinite cylinder ρ=cr x z (a) Half-infinite line mass, uniform linear mass density, λ x (b) R z  P Figure 3: (a) An in nite cylinder of radius R centered on the z-axis, with non-uniform volume mass density  = cr, where r is the radius in cylindrical coordinates. (b) A half-in nite line of mass on the x-axis extending from x = 0 to x = +1, with uniform linear mass density . There are two general methods we use to solve gravitational problems (i.e. nd ~g given some distribution of mass). (a) Describe these two methods. We claim one of these methods is easiest to solve for ~g of mass distribution (a) above, and the other method is easiest to solve for ~g of the mass distribution (b) above. Which method goes with which mass distribution? Please justify your answer. (b) Find ~g of the mass distribution (a) above for any arbitrary point outside the cylinder. (c) Find the x component of the gravitational acceleration, gx, generated by the mass distribution labeled (b) above, at a point P a given distance z up the positive z-axis (as shown). Back to Problem List 10 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.10 Rod with linearly increasing mass density Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Consider a very (in nitesimally!) thin but massive rod, length L (total mass M), centered around the origin, sitting along the x-axis. (So the left end is at (-L/2, 0,0) and the right end is at (+L/2,0,0) Assume the mass density  (which has units of kg/m)is not uniform, but instead varies linearly with distance from the origin, (x) = cjxj. (a) What is that constant \c” in terms of M and L? What is the direction of the gravitational eld generated by this mass distribution at a point in space a distance z above the center of the rod, i.e. at (0; 0; z) Explain your reasoning for the direction carefully, try not to simply \wave your hands.” (The answer is extremely intuitive, but can you justify that it is correct?) (b) Compute the gravitational eld, ~g, at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating Newton’s law of gravity, summing over all in nitesimal \chunks” of mass along the rod. (c) Compute the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating ?Gdm=r, sum- ming over all in nitesimal \chunks” dm along the rod. Then, take the z-component of the gradient of this potential to check that you agree with your result from the previous part. (d) In the limit of large z what do you expect for the functional form for gravitational potential? (Hint: Don’t just say it goes to zero! It’s a rod of mass M, when you’re far away what does it look like? How does it go to zero?) What does \large z” mean here? Use the binomial (or Taylor) expansion to verify that your formula does indeed give exactly what you expect. (Hint: you cannot Taylor expand in something BIG, you have to Taylor expand in something small.) (e) Can you use Gauss’ law to gure out the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z)? (If so, do it and check your previous answers. If not, why not?) Back to Problem List 11 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.11 Sphere with constant internal gravitational eld Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 (a) Imagine a planet of total mass M and radius R which has a nonuniform mass density that varies just with r, the distance from the center. For this (admittedly very unusual!) planet, suppose the gravitational eld strength inside the planet turns out to be independent of the radial distance within the sphere. Find the function describing the mass density  = (r) of this planet. (Your nal answer should be written in terms of the given constants.) (b) Now, determine the gravitational force on a satellite of mass m orbiting this planet at distance r > R. (Use the easiest method you can come up with!) Explain your work in words as well as formulas. For instance, in your calculation, you will need to argue that the magnitude of ~g(r; ; ) depends only on r. Be explicit about this – how do you know that it doesn’t, in fact, depend on  or ? (c) As a nal check, explicitly show that your solutions inside and outside the planet (parts a and b) are consistent when r = R. Please also comment on whether this density pro le strikes you as physically plausible, or is it just designed as a mathematical exercise? Defend your reasoning. Back to Problem List 12 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.12 Throwing a rock o the moon Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Assuming that asteroids have roughly the same mass density as the moon, make an estimate of the largest asteroid that an astronaut could be standing on, and still have a chance of throwing a small object (with their arms, no machinery!) so that it completely escapes the asteroid’s gravitational eld. (This minimum speed is called \escape velocity”) Is the size you computed typical for asteroids in our solar system? Back to Problem List 13

5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 Problem List 5.1 Total mass of a shell 5.2 Tunnel through the moon 5.3 Gravitational eld above the center of a thin hoop 5.4 Gravitational force near a metal-cored planet surrounded by a gaseous cloud 5.5 Sphere with linearly increasing mass density 5.6 Jumping o Vesta 5.7 Gravitational force between two massive rods 5.8 Potential energy { Check your answer! 5.9 Ways of solving gravitational problems 5.10 Rod with linearly increasing mass density 5.11 Sphere with constant internal gravitational eld 5.12 Throwing a rock o the moon These problems are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Un- ported License. Please share and/or modify. Back to Problem List 1 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.1 Total mass of a shell Given: Marino { Fall 2011 Consider a spherical shell that extends from r = R to r = 2R with a non-uniform density (r) = 0r. What is the total mass of the shell? Back to Problem List 2 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.2 Tunnel through the moon Given: Marino { Fall 2011 Imagine that NASA digs a straight tunnel through the center of the moon (see gure) to access the Moon’s 3He deposits. An astronaut places a rock in the tunnel at the surface of the moon, and releases it (from rest). Show that the rock obeys the force law for a mass connected to a spring. What is the spring constant? Find the oscillation period for this motion if you assume that Moon has a mass of 7.351022 kg and a radius of 1.74106 m. Assume the moon’s density is uniform throughout its volume, and ignore the moon’s rotation. Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 Imagine (in a parallel universe of unlimited budgets) that NASA digs a straight tunnel through the center of the moon (see gure). A robot place a rock in the tunnel at position r = r0 from the center of the moon, and releases it (from rest). Use Newton’s second law to write the equation of motion of the rock and solve for r(t). Explain in words the rock’s motion. Does the rock return to its initial position at any later time? If so, how long does it takes to return to it? (Give a formula, and a number.) Assume the moon’s density is uniform throughout its volume, and ignore the moon’s rotation. Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Now lets consider our (real) planet Earth, with total mass M and radius R which we will approximate as a uniform mass density, (r) = 0. (a) Neglecting rotational and frictional e ects, show that a particle dropped into a hole drilled straight through the center of the earth all the way to the far side will oscillate between the two endpoints. (Hint: you will need to set up, and solve, an ODE for the motion) (b) Find the period of the oscillation of this motion. Get a number (in minutes) as a nal result, using data for the earth’s size and mass. (How does that compare to ying to Perth and back?!) Extra Credit: OK, even with unlimited budgets, digging a tunnel through the center of the earth is preposterous. But, suppose instead that the tunnel is a straight-line \chord” through the earth, say directly from New York to Los Angeles. Show that your nal answer for the time taken does not depend on the location of that chord! This is rather remarkable – look again at the time for a free-fall trip (no energy required, except perhaps to compensate for friction) How long would that trip take? Could this work?! Back to Problem List 3 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.3 Gravitational eld above the center of a thin hoop Given: Pollock { Spring 2011, Spring 2012 Consider a very (in nitesimally!) thin but massive loop, radius R (total mass M), centered around the origin, sitting in the x-y plane. Assume it has a uniform linear mass density  (which has units of kg/m) all around it. (So, it’s like a skinny donut that is mostly hole, centered around the z-axis) (a) What is  in terms of M and R? What is the direction of the gravitational eld generated by this mass distribution at a point in space a distance z above the center of the donut, i.e. at (0; 0; z) Explain your reasoning for the direction carefully, try not to simply \wave your hands.” (The answer is extremely intuitive, but can you justify that it is correct?) (b) Compute the gravitational eld, ~g, at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating Newton’s law of gravity, summing over all in nitesimal \chunks” of mass along the loop. (c) Compute the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating ?Gdm=r, sum- ming over all in nitesimal \chunks” dm along the loop. Then, take the z-component of the gradient of this potential to check that you agree with your result from the previous part. (d) In the two separate limits z << R and z >> R, Taylor expand your g- eld (in the z-direction)out only to the rst non-zero term, and convince us that both limits make good physical sense. (e) Can you use Gauss’ law to gure out the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z)? (If so, do it and check your previous answers. If not, why not?) Extra credit: If you place a small mass a small distance z away from the center, use your Taylor limit for z << R above to write a simple ODE for the equation of motion. Solve it, and discuss the motion Back to Problem List 4 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.4 Gravitational force near a metal-cored planet surrounded by a gaseous cloud Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 Jupiter is composed of a dense spherical core (of liquid metallic hydrogen!) of radius Rc. It is sur- rounded by a spherical cloud of gaseous hydrogen of radius Rg, where Rg > Rc. Let’s assume that the core is of uniform density c and the gaseous cloud is also of uniform density g. What is the gravitational force on an object of mass m that is located at a radius r from the center of Jupiter? Note that you must consider the cases where the object is inside the core, within the gas layer, and outside of the planet. Back to Problem List 5 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.5 Sphere with linearly increasing mass density Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 A planet of mass M and radius R has a nonuniform density that varies with r, the distance from the center according to  = Ar for 0  r  R. (a) What is the constant A in terms of M and R? Does this density pro le strike you as physically plausible, or is just designed as a mathematical exercise? (Brie y, explain) (b) Determine the gravitational force on a satellite of mass m orbiting this planet. In words, please outline the method you plan to use for your solution. (Use the easiest method you can come up with!) In your calculation, you will need to argue that the magnitude of ~g(r; ; ) depends only on r. Be very explicit about this – how do you know that it doesn’t, in fact, depend on  or ? (c) Determine the gravitational force felt by a rock of mass m inside the planet, located at radius r < R. (If the method you use is di erent than in part b, explain why you switched. If not, just proceed!) Explicitly check your result for this part by considering the limits r ! 0 and r ! R. Back to Problem List 6 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.6 Jumping o Vesta Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 You are stranded on the surface of the asteroid Vesta. If the mass of the asteroid is M and its radius is R, how fast would you have to jump o its surface to be able to escape from its gravitational eld? (Your estimate should be based on parameters that characterize the asteroid, not parameters that describe your jumping ability.) Given your formula, look up the approximate mass and radius of the asteroid Vesta 3 and determine a numerical value of the escape velocity. Could you escape in this way? (Brie y, explain) If so, roughly how big in radius is the maximum the asteroid could be, for you to still escape this way? If not, estimate how much smaller an asteroid you would need, to escape from it in this way? Figure 1: Back to Problem List 7 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.7 Gravitational force between two massive rods Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 Consider two identical uniform rods of length L and mass m lying along the same line and having their closest points separated by a distance d as shown in the gure (a) Calculate the mutual force between these rods, both its direction and magnitude. (b) Now do several checks. First, make sure the units worked out (!) The, nd the magnitude of the force in the limit L ! 0. What do you expect? Brie y, discuss. Lastly, nd the magnitude of the force in the limit d ! 1 ? Again, is it what you expect? Brie y, discuss. Figure 2: Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Determining the gravitational force between two rods: (a) Consider a thin, uniform rod of mass m and length L (and negligible other dimensions) lying on the x axis (from x=-L to 0), as shown in g 1a. Derive a formula for the gravitational eld \g" at any arbitrary point x to the right of the origin (but still on the x-axis!) due to this rod. (b) Now suppose a second rod of length L and mass m sits on the x axis as shown in g 1b, with the left edge a distance \d" away. Calculate the mutual gravitational force between these rods. (c) Let's do some checks! Show that the units work out in parts a and b. Find the magnitude of the force in part a, in the limit x >> L: What do you expect? Brie y, discuss! Finally, verify that your answer to part b gives what you expect in the limit d >> L. ( Hint: This is a bit harder! You need to consistently expand everything to second order, not just rst, because of some interesting cancellations) Fig 1a Fig 1b L m +x x=0 L x=0 x=d m Fig 1a Fig 1b L m +x x=0 L +x x=0 x=d L m m Back to Problem List 8 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.8 Potential energy { Check your answer! Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 On the last exam, we had a problem with a at ring, uniform mass per unit area of , inner radius of R, outer radius of 2R. A satellite (mass m) sat a distance z above the center of the ring. We asked for the gravitational potential energy, and the answer was U(z) = ?2Gm( p 4R2 + z2 ? p R2 + z2) (1) (a) If you are far from the disk (on the z axis), what do you expect for the formula for U(z)? (Don’t say \0″ – as usual, we want the functional form of U(z) as you move far away. Also, explicitly state what we mean by \far away”. (Please don’t compare something with units to something without units!) (b) Show explicitly that the formula above does indeed give precisely the functional dependence you expect. Back to Problem List 9 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.9 Ways of solving gravitational problems Given: Pollock { Spring 2011, Spring 2012 Infinite cylinder ρ=cr x z (a) Half-infinite line mass, uniform linear mass density, λ x (b) R z  P Figure 3: (a) An in nite cylinder of radius R centered on the z-axis, with non-uniform volume mass density  = cr, where r is the radius in cylindrical coordinates. (b) A half-in nite line of mass on the x-axis extending from x = 0 to x = +1, with uniform linear mass density . There are two general methods we use to solve gravitational problems (i.e. nd ~g given some distribution of mass). (a) Describe these two methods. We claim one of these methods is easiest to solve for ~g of mass distribution (a) above, and the other method is easiest to solve for ~g of the mass distribution (b) above. Which method goes with which mass distribution? Please justify your answer. (b) Find ~g of the mass distribution (a) above for any arbitrary point outside the cylinder. (c) Find the x component of the gravitational acceleration, gx, generated by the mass distribution labeled (b) above, at a point P a given distance z up the positive z-axis (as shown). Back to Problem List 10 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.10 Rod with linearly increasing mass density Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Consider a very (in nitesimally!) thin but massive rod, length L (total mass M), centered around the origin, sitting along the x-axis. (So the left end is at (-L/2, 0,0) and the right end is at (+L/2,0,0) Assume the mass density  (which has units of kg/m)is not uniform, but instead varies linearly with distance from the origin, (x) = cjxj. (a) What is that constant \c” in terms of M and L? What is the direction of the gravitational eld generated by this mass distribution at a point in space a distance z above the center of the rod, i.e. at (0; 0; z) Explain your reasoning for the direction carefully, try not to simply \wave your hands.” (The answer is extremely intuitive, but can you justify that it is correct?) (b) Compute the gravitational eld, ~g, at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating Newton’s law of gravity, summing over all in nitesimal \chunks” of mass along the rod. (c) Compute the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating ?Gdm=r, sum- ming over all in nitesimal \chunks” dm along the rod. Then, take the z-component of the gradient of this potential to check that you agree with your result from the previous part. (d) In the limit of large z what do you expect for the functional form for gravitational potential? (Hint: Don’t just say it goes to zero! It’s a rod of mass M, when you’re far away what does it look like? How does it go to zero?) What does \large z” mean here? Use the binomial (or Taylor) expansion to verify that your formula does indeed give exactly what you expect. (Hint: you cannot Taylor expand in something BIG, you have to Taylor expand in something small.) (e) Can you use Gauss’ law to gure out the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z)? (If so, do it and check your previous answers. If not, why not?) Back to Problem List 11 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.11 Sphere with constant internal gravitational eld Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 (a) Imagine a planet of total mass M and radius R which has a nonuniform mass density that varies just with r, the distance from the center. For this (admittedly very unusual!) planet, suppose the gravitational eld strength inside the planet turns out to be independent of the radial distance within the sphere. Find the function describing the mass density  = (r) of this planet. (Your nal answer should be written in terms of the given constants.) (b) Now, determine the gravitational force on a satellite of mass m orbiting this planet at distance r > R. (Use the easiest method you can come up with!) Explain your work in words as well as formulas. For instance, in your calculation, you will need to argue that the magnitude of ~g(r; ; ) depends only on r. Be explicit about this – how do you know that it doesn’t, in fact, depend on  or ? (c) As a nal check, explicitly show that your solutions inside and outside the planet (parts a and b) are consistent when r = R. Please also comment on whether this density pro le strikes you as physically plausible, or is it just designed as a mathematical exercise? Defend your reasoning. Back to Problem List 12 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.12 Throwing a rock o the moon Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Assuming that asteroids have roughly the same mass density as the moon, make an estimate of the largest asteroid that an astronaut could be standing on, and still have a chance of throwing a small object (with their arms, no machinery!) so that it completely escapes the asteroid’s gravitational eld. (This minimum speed is called \escape velocity”) Is the size you computed typical for asteroids in our solar system? Back to Problem List 13

Electric Field due to Point Charges 1a. Problem 21.39 b. Problem 21.40 2. Problem 21.38 3. Problem 21.41 Electric Field due to Continuous Distributions 4a. Problem 22.13 Hint: Solve for E(x>5.0m) to complete parts b, c, & d. b. Solve for E(x>5.0m) if the charge density isn’t uniform: λ(x) = C x2 5. Problem 22.20 Extra Credit: We have used point charges to calculate the electric field due to a ring of charge at locations above its center, and then integrated rings to calculate the on-axis electric field due to a disk of uniform charge. Integrate a stack of disks in order to calculate the electric field due to a uniform sphere of radius R and total charge Q, as measured at a distance r>R. Electric Field Lines 6a. Problem 21.13 b. Sketch electric field lines for the charge distribution in Problem 21.12. 7. Sketch the electric field lines emanating from: a. A uniform ring of charge, with radius R and total charge Q (granting a linear density λ=Q/2πR). b. A uniform disk of charge, with radius R and total charge Q (granting a surface density σ=Q/πR2). c. An infinite plane of charge, of uniform charge density σ.

Electric Field due to Point Charges 1a. Problem 21.39 b. Problem 21.40 2. Problem 21.38 3. Problem 21.41 Electric Field due to Continuous Distributions 4a. Problem 22.13 Hint: Solve for E(x>5.0m) to complete parts b, c, & d. b. Solve for E(x>5.0m) if the charge density isn’t uniform: λ(x) = C x2 5. Problem 22.20 Extra Credit: We have used point charges to calculate the electric field due to a ring of charge at locations above its center, and then integrated rings to calculate the on-axis electric field due to a disk of uniform charge. Integrate a stack of disks in order to calculate the electric field due to a uniform sphere of radius R and total charge Q, as measured at a distance r>R. Electric Field Lines 6a. Problem 21.13 b. Sketch electric field lines for the charge distribution in Problem 21.12. 7. Sketch the electric field lines emanating from: a. A uniform ring of charge, with radius R and total charge Q (granting a linear density λ=Q/2πR). b. A uniform disk of charge, with radius R and total charge Q (granting a surface density σ=Q/πR2). c. An infinite plane of charge, of uniform charge density σ.

info@checkyourstudy.com
Assignment 8 Due: 11:59pm on Friday, April 4, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 10.3 Part A If a particle’s speed increases by a factor of 5, by what factor does its kinetic energy change? ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 10.11 A spring is compressed 1.5 . Part A How far must you compress a spring with twice the spring constant to store the same amount of energy? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct = 25 K2 K1 cm x = 1.1 cm Problem 10.2 The lowest point in Death Valley is below sea level. The summit of nearby Mt. Whitney has an elevation of 4420 . Part A What is the change in potential energy of an energetic 80 hiker who makes it from the floor of Death Valley to the top of Mt.Whitney? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.3 Part A At what speed does a 1800 compact car have the same kinetic energy as a 1.80×104 truck going 21.0 ? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.5 A boy reaches out of a window and tosses a ball straight up with a speed of 13 . The ball is 21 above the ground as he releases it. 85m m kg U = 3.5×106 J kg kg km/hr vc = 66.4 km hr m/s m Part A Use energy to find the ball’s maximum height above the ground. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B Use energy to find the ball’s speed as it passes the window on its way down. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C Use energy to find the speed of impact on the ground. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Hmax = 30 m v = 13 ms v = 24 ms Problem 10.8 A 59.0 skateboarder wants to just make it to the upper edge of a “quarter pipe,” a track that is one-quarter of a circle with a radius of 2.30 . Part A What speed does he need at the bottom? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.12 A 1500 car traveling at 12 suddenly runs out of gas while approaching the valley shown in the figure. The alert driver immediately puts the car in neutral so that it will roll. Part A kg m 6.71 ms kg m/s What will be the car’s speed as it coasts into the gas station on the other side of the valley? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Ups and Downs Learning Goal: To apply the law of conservation of energy to an object launched upward in the gravitational field of the earth. In the absence of nonconservative forces such as friction and air resistance, the total mechanical energy in a closed system is conserved. This is one particular case of the law of conservation of energy. In this problem, you will apply the law of conservation of energy to different objects launched from the earth. The energy transformations that take place involve the object’s kinetic energy and its gravitational potential energy . The law of conservation of energy for such cases implies that the sum of the object’s kinetic energy and potential energy does not change with time. This idea can be expressed by the equation , where “i” denotes the “initial” moment and “f” denotes the “final” moment. Since any two moments will work, the choice of the moments to consider is, technically, up to you. That choice, though, is usually suggested by the question posed in the problem. First, let us consider an object launched vertically upward with an initial speed . Neglect air resistance. Part A As the projectile goes upward, what energy changes take place? ANSWER: v = 6.8 ms K = (1/2)mv2 U = mgh Ki + Ui = Kf + Uf v Correct Part B At the top point of the flight, what can be said about the projectile’s kinetic and potential energy? ANSWER: Correct Strictly speaking, it is not the ball that possesses potential energy; rather, it is the system “Earth-ball.” Although we will often talk about “the gravitational potential energy of an elevated object,” it is useful to keep in mind that the energy, in fact, is associated with the interactions between the earth and the elevated object. Part C The potential energy of the object at the moment of launch __________. ANSWER: Both kinetic and potential energy decrease. Both kinetic and potential energy increase. Kinetic energy decreases; potential energy increases. Kinetic energy increases; potential energy decreases. Both kinetic and potential energy are at their maximum values. Both kinetic and potential energy are at their minimum values. Kinetic energy is at a maximum; potential energy is at a minimum. Kinetic energy is at a minimum; potential energy is at a maximum. Correct Usually, the zero level is chosen so as to make the relevant calculations simpler. In this case, it makes good sense to assume that at the ground level–but this is not, by any means, the only choice! Part D Using conservation of energy, find the maximum height to which the object will rise. Express your answer in terms of and the magnitude of the acceleration of gravity . ANSWER: Correct You may remember this result from kinematics. It is comforting to know that our new approach yields the same answer. Part E At what height above the ground does the projectile have a speed of ? Express your answer in terms of and the magnitude of the acceleration of gravity . ANSWER: is negative is positive is zero depends on the choice of the “zero level” of potential energy U = 0 hmax v g hmax = v2 2g h 0.5v v g h = 3 v2 8g Correct Part F What is the speed of the object at the height of ? Express your answer in terms of and . Use three significant figures in the numeric coefficient. Hint 1. How to approach the problem You are being asked for the speed at half of the maximum height. You know that at the initial height ( ), the speed is . All of the energy is kinetic energy, and so, the total energy is . At the maximum height, all of the energy is potential energy. Since the gravitational potential energy is proportional to , half of the initial kinetic energy must have been converted to potential energy when the projectile is at . Thus, the kinetic energy must be half of its original value (i.e., when ). You need to determine the speed, as a multiple of , that corresponds to such a kinetic energy. ANSWER: Correct Let us now consider objects launched at an angle. For such situations, using conservation of energy leads to a quicker solution than can be produced by kinematics. Part G A ball is launched as a projectile with initial speed at an angle above the horizontal. Using conservation of energy, find the maximum height of the ball’s flight. Express your answer in terms of , , and . Hint 1. Find the final kinetic energy Find the final kinetic energy of the ball. Here, the best choice of “final” moment is the point at which the ball reaches its maximum height, since this is the point we are interested in. u (1/2)hmax v g h = 0 v (1/2)mv2 h (1/2)hmax (1/4)mv2 h = (1/2)hmax v u = 0.707v v hmax v g Kf Express your answer in terms of , , and . Hint 1. Find the speed at the maximum height The speed of the ball at the maximum height is __________. ANSWER: ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part H A ball is launched with initial speed from ground level up a frictionless slope. The slope makes an angle with the horizontal. Using conservation of energy, find the maximum vertical height to which the ball will climb. Express your answer in terms of , , and . You may or may not use all of these quantities. v m 0 v v cos v sin v tan Kf = 0.5m(vcos( ))2 hmax = (vsin( ))2 2g v hmax v g ANSWER: Correct Interestingly, the answer does not depend on . The difference between this situation and the projectile case is that the ball moving up a slope has no kinetic energy at the top of its trajectory whereas the projectile launched at an angle does. Part I A ball is launched with initial speed from the ground level up a frictionless hill. The hill becomes steeper as the ball slides up; however, the ball remains in contact with the hill at all times. Using conservation of energy, find the maximum vertical height to which the ball will climb. Express your answer in terms of and . ANSWER: Correct The profile of the hill does not matter; the equation would have the same terms regardless of the steepness of the hill. Problem 10.14 A 12- -long spring is attached to the ceiling. When a 2.2 mass is hung from it, the spring stretches to a length of 17 . Part A What is the spring constant ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. hmax = v2 2g v hmax v g hmax = v2 2g Ki + Ui = Kf + Uf cm kg cm k ANSWER: Correct Part B How long is the spring when a 3.0 mass is suspended from it? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 10.17 A 6.2 mass hanging from a spring scale is slowly lowered onto a vertical spring, as shown in . You may want to review ( pages 255 – 257) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Solving Algebraic Equations = 430 k Nm kg y = 19 cm kg Part A What does the spring scale read just before the mass touches the lower spring? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Draw a picture showing the forces acting on the mass before it touches the scale. What is the net force on the mass? What is the force on the mass due to gravity? What is the force on the mass due to the scale? ANSWER: Correct Part B The scale reads 22 when the lower spring has been compressed by 2.7 . What is the value of the spring constant for the lower spring? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Draw a picture showing the forces acting on the mass. What is the net force on the mass? What is the force on the mass due to gravity? What is the force on the mass due to the scale? Use these to determine the force on the mass by the spring, taking note of the directions from your picture. How is the spring constant related to the force by the spring and the compression of the spring? Check your units. ANSWER: F = 61 N N cm k = 1400 k Nm Correct Part C At what compression length will the scale read zero? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Draw a picture showing the forces on the mass. When the scale reads zero, what is the force on the mass due to the scale? What is the gravitational force on the mass? What is the force on the mass by the spring? How is the compression length related to the force by the spring and the spring constant? Check your units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.18 Part A How far must you stretch a spring with = 800 to store 180 of energy? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: y = 4.2 cm k N/m J Correct Problem 10.22 A 15 runaway grocery cart runs into a spring with spring constant 230 and compresses it by 57 . Part A What was the speed of the cart just before it hit the spring? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Spring Gun A spring-loaded toy gun is used to shoot a ball straight up in the air. The ball reaches a maximum height , measured from the equilibrium position of the spring. s = 0.67 m kg N/m cm v = 2.2 ms H Part A The same ball is shot straight up a second time from the same gun, but this time the spring is compressed only half as far before firing. How far up does the ball go this time? Neglect friction. Assume that the spring is ideal and that the distance by which the spring is compressed is negligible compared to . Hint 1. Potential energy of the spring The potential energy of a spring is proportional to the square of the distance the spring is compressed. The spring was compressed half the distance, so the mass, when launched, has one quarter of the energy as in the first trial. Hint 2. Potential energy of the ball At the highest point in the ball’s trajectory, all of the spring’s potential energy has been converted into gravitational potential energy of the ball. ANSWER: Correct A Bullet Is Fired into a Wooden Block A bullet of mass is fired horizontally with speed at a wooden block of mass resting on a frictionless table. The bullet hits the block and becomes completely embedded within it. After the bullet has come to rest within the block, the block, with the bullet in it, is traveling at speed . H height = H 4 mb vi mw vf Part A Which of the following best describes this collision? Hint 1. Types of collisions An inelastic collision is a collision in which kinetic energy is not conserved. In a partially inelastic collision, kinetic energy is lost, but the objects colliding do not stick together. From this information, you can infer what completely inelastic and elastic collisions are. ANSWER: Correct Part B Which of the following quantities, if any, are conserved during this collision? Hint 1. When is kinetic energy conserved? Kinetic energy is conserved only in perfectly elastic collisions. ANSWER: perfectly elastic partially inelastic perfectly inelastic Correct Part C What is the speed of the block/bullet system after the collision? Express your answer in terms of , , and . Hint 1. Find the momentum after the collision What is the total momentum of the block/bullet system after the collision? Express your answer in terms of and other given quantities. ANSWER: Hint 2. Use conservation of momentum The momentum of the block/bullet system is conserved. Therefore, the momentum before the collision is the same as the momentum after the collision. Find a second expression for , this time expressed as the total momentum of the system before the collision. Express your answer in terms of and other given quantities. ANSWER: kinetic energy only momentum only kinetic energy and momentum neither momentum nor kinetic energy vi mw mb ptotal vf ptotal = (mw + mb)vf ptotal vi ptotal = mbvi ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.31 Ball 1, with a mass of 150 and traveling at 15.0 , collides head on with ball 2, which has a mass of 340 and is initially at rest. Part A What are the final velocities of each ball if the collision is perfectly elastic? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C vf = mb vi mb+mw g m/s g (vfx) = -5.82 1 ms (vfx) = 9.18 2 ms What are the final velocities of each ball if the collision is perfectly inelastic? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 10.43 A package of mass is released from rest at a warehouse loading dock and slides down the = 2.2 – high, frictionless chute to a waiting truck. Unfortunately, the truck driver went on a break without having removed the previous package, of mass , from the bottom of the chute. You may want to review ( pages 265 – 269) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Solving Algebraic Equations (vfx) = 4.59 1 ms (vfx) = 4.59 2 ms m h m 2m Part A Suppose the packages stick together. What is their common speed after the collision? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem There are two parts to this problem: the block sliding down the frictionless incline and the collision. What conservation laws are valid in each part? In terms of , what are the kinetic and potential energies of the block at the top of the incline? What is the potential energy of the same block at the bottom just before the collision? What are the kinetic energy and velocity of block just before the collision? What is conserved during the collision? What is the total momentum of the two blocks before the collision? What is the momentum of the two blocks stuck together after the collision? What is the velocity of the two blocks after the collision? ANSWER: Correct Part B Suppose the collision between the packages is perfectly elastic. To what height does the package of mass rebound? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem There are three parts to this problem: the block sliding down the incline, the collision, and mass going back up the incline. What conservation laws are valid in each part? m m v = 2.2 ms m m What is an elastic collision? For an elastic collision, how are the initial and final velocities related when one of the masses is initially at rest? Using the velocity of just before the collision from Part A, what is the velocity of just after the collision in this case? What are the kinetic and potential energies of mass just after the collision? What is the kinetic energy of mass at its maximum rebound height? Using conservation of energy, what is the potential energy of mass at its maximum height? What is the maximum height? ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.35 A cannon tilted up at a 35.0 angle fires a cannon ball at 79.0 from atop a 21.0 -high fortress wall. Part A What is the ball’s impact speed on the ground below? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.45 A 1000 safe is 2.5 above a heavy-duty spring when the rope holding the safe breaks. The safe hits the spring and compresses it 48 . m m m m m h = 24 cm $ m/s m vf = 81.6 ms kg m cm Part A What is the spring constant of the spring? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.49 A 100 block on a frictionless table is firmly attached to one end of a spring with = 21 . The other end of the spring is anchored to the wall. A 30 ball is thrown horizontally toward the block with a speed of 6.0 . Part A If the collision is perfectly elastic, what is the ball’s speed immediately after the collision? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the maximum compression of the spring? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: = 2.5×105 k Nm g k N/m g m/s v = 3.2 ms Correct Part C Repeat part A for the case of a perfectly inelastic collision. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D Repeat part B for the case of a perfectly inelastic collision. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 99.4%. You received 120.28 out of a possible total of 121 points. x = 0.19 m v = 1.4 ms x = 0.11 m

Assignment 8 Due: 11:59pm on Friday, April 4, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 10.3 Part A If a particle’s speed increases by a factor of 5, by what factor does its kinetic energy change? ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 10.11 A spring is compressed 1.5 . Part A How far must you compress a spring with twice the spring constant to store the same amount of energy? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct = 25 K2 K1 cm x = 1.1 cm Problem 10.2 The lowest point in Death Valley is below sea level. The summit of nearby Mt. Whitney has an elevation of 4420 . Part A What is the change in potential energy of an energetic 80 hiker who makes it from the floor of Death Valley to the top of Mt.Whitney? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.3 Part A At what speed does a 1800 compact car have the same kinetic energy as a 1.80×104 truck going 21.0 ? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.5 A boy reaches out of a window and tosses a ball straight up with a speed of 13 . The ball is 21 above the ground as he releases it. 85m m kg U = 3.5×106 J kg kg km/hr vc = 66.4 km hr m/s m Part A Use energy to find the ball’s maximum height above the ground. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B Use energy to find the ball’s speed as it passes the window on its way down. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C Use energy to find the speed of impact on the ground. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Hmax = 30 m v = 13 ms v = 24 ms Problem 10.8 A 59.0 skateboarder wants to just make it to the upper edge of a “quarter pipe,” a track that is one-quarter of a circle with a radius of 2.30 . Part A What speed does he need at the bottom? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.12 A 1500 car traveling at 12 suddenly runs out of gas while approaching the valley shown in the figure. The alert driver immediately puts the car in neutral so that it will roll. Part A kg m 6.71 ms kg m/s What will be the car’s speed as it coasts into the gas station on the other side of the valley? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Ups and Downs Learning Goal: To apply the law of conservation of energy to an object launched upward in the gravitational field of the earth. In the absence of nonconservative forces such as friction and air resistance, the total mechanical energy in a closed system is conserved. This is one particular case of the law of conservation of energy. In this problem, you will apply the law of conservation of energy to different objects launched from the earth. The energy transformations that take place involve the object’s kinetic energy and its gravitational potential energy . The law of conservation of energy for such cases implies that the sum of the object’s kinetic energy and potential energy does not change with time. This idea can be expressed by the equation , where “i” denotes the “initial” moment and “f” denotes the “final” moment. Since any two moments will work, the choice of the moments to consider is, technically, up to you. That choice, though, is usually suggested by the question posed in the problem. First, let us consider an object launched vertically upward with an initial speed . Neglect air resistance. Part A As the projectile goes upward, what energy changes take place? ANSWER: v = 6.8 ms K = (1/2)mv2 U = mgh Ki + Ui = Kf + Uf v Correct Part B At the top point of the flight, what can be said about the projectile’s kinetic and potential energy? ANSWER: Correct Strictly speaking, it is not the ball that possesses potential energy; rather, it is the system “Earth-ball.” Although we will often talk about “the gravitational potential energy of an elevated object,” it is useful to keep in mind that the energy, in fact, is associated with the interactions between the earth and the elevated object. Part C The potential energy of the object at the moment of launch __________. ANSWER: Both kinetic and potential energy decrease. Both kinetic and potential energy increase. Kinetic energy decreases; potential energy increases. Kinetic energy increases; potential energy decreases. Both kinetic and potential energy are at their maximum values. Both kinetic and potential energy are at their minimum values. Kinetic energy is at a maximum; potential energy is at a minimum. Kinetic energy is at a minimum; potential energy is at a maximum. Correct Usually, the zero level is chosen so as to make the relevant calculations simpler. In this case, it makes good sense to assume that at the ground level–but this is not, by any means, the only choice! Part D Using conservation of energy, find the maximum height to which the object will rise. Express your answer in terms of and the magnitude of the acceleration of gravity . ANSWER: Correct You may remember this result from kinematics. It is comforting to know that our new approach yields the same answer. Part E At what height above the ground does the projectile have a speed of ? Express your answer in terms of and the magnitude of the acceleration of gravity . ANSWER: is negative is positive is zero depends on the choice of the “zero level” of potential energy U = 0 hmax v g hmax = v2 2g h 0.5v v g h = 3 v2 8g Correct Part F What is the speed of the object at the height of ? Express your answer in terms of and . Use three significant figures in the numeric coefficient. Hint 1. How to approach the problem You are being asked for the speed at half of the maximum height. You know that at the initial height ( ), the speed is . All of the energy is kinetic energy, and so, the total energy is . At the maximum height, all of the energy is potential energy. Since the gravitational potential energy is proportional to , half of the initial kinetic energy must have been converted to potential energy when the projectile is at . Thus, the kinetic energy must be half of its original value (i.e., when ). You need to determine the speed, as a multiple of , that corresponds to such a kinetic energy. ANSWER: Correct Let us now consider objects launched at an angle. For such situations, using conservation of energy leads to a quicker solution than can be produced by kinematics. Part G A ball is launched as a projectile with initial speed at an angle above the horizontal. Using conservation of energy, find the maximum height of the ball’s flight. Express your answer in terms of , , and . Hint 1. Find the final kinetic energy Find the final kinetic energy of the ball. Here, the best choice of “final” moment is the point at which the ball reaches its maximum height, since this is the point we are interested in. u (1/2)hmax v g h = 0 v (1/2)mv2 h (1/2)hmax (1/4)mv2 h = (1/2)hmax v u = 0.707v v hmax v g Kf Express your answer in terms of , , and . Hint 1. Find the speed at the maximum height The speed of the ball at the maximum height is __________. ANSWER: ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part H A ball is launched with initial speed from ground level up a frictionless slope. The slope makes an angle with the horizontal. Using conservation of energy, find the maximum vertical height to which the ball will climb. Express your answer in terms of , , and . You may or may not use all of these quantities. v m 0 v v cos v sin v tan Kf = 0.5m(vcos( ))2 hmax = (vsin( ))2 2g v hmax v g ANSWER: Correct Interestingly, the answer does not depend on . The difference between this situation and the projectile case is that the ball moving up a slope has no kinetic energy at the top of its trajectory whereas the projectile launched at an angle does. Part I A ball is launched with initial speed from the ground level up a frictionless hill. The hill becomes steeper as the ball slides up; however, the ball remains in contact with the hill at all times. Using conservation of energy, find the maximum vertical height to which the ball will climb. Express your answer in terms of and . ANSWER: Correct The profile of the hill does not matter; the equation would have the same terms regardless of the steepness of the hill. Problem 10.14 A 12- -long spring is attached to the ceiling. When a 2.2 mass is hung from it, the spring stretches to a length of 17 . Part A What is the spring constant ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. hmax = v2 2g v hmax v g hmax = v2 2g Ki + Ui = Kf + Uf cm kg cm k ANSWER: Correct Part B How long is the spring when a 3.0 mass is suspended from it? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 10.17 A 6.2 mass hanging from a spring scale is slowly lowered onto a vertical spring, as shown in . You may want to review ( pages 255 – 257) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Solving Algebraic Equations = 430 k Nm kg y = 19 cm kg Part A What does the spring scale read just before the mass touches the lower spring? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Draw a picture showing the forces acting on the mass before it touches the scale. What is the net force on the mass? What is the force on the mass due to gravity? What is the force on the mass due to the scale? ANSWER: Correct Part B The scale reads 22 when the lower spring has been compressed by 2.7 . What is the value of the spring constant for the lower spring? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Draw a picture showing the forces acting on the mass. What is the net force on the mass? What is the force on the mass due to gravity? What is the force on the mass due to the scale? Use these to determine the force on the mass by the spring, taking note of the directions from your picture. How is the spring constant related to the force by the spring and the compression of the spring? Check your units. ANSWER: F = 61 N N cm k = 1400 k Nm Correct Part C At what compression length will the scale read zero? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Draw a picture showing the forces on the mass. When the scale reads zero, what is the force on the mass due to the scale? What is the gravitational force on the mass? What is the force on the mass by the spring? How is the compression length related to the force by the spring and the spring constant? Check your units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.18 Part A How far must you stretch a spring with = 800 to store 180 of energy? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: y = 4.2 cm k N/m J Correct Problem 10.22 A 15 runaway grocery cart runs into a spring with spring constant 230 and compresses it by 57 . Part A What was the speed of the cart just before it hit the spring? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Spring Gun A spring-loaded toy gun is used to shoot a ball straight up in the air. The ball reaches a maximum height , measured from the equilibrium position of the spring. s = 0.67 m kg N/m cm v = 2.2 ms H Part A The same ball is shot straight up a second time from the same gun, but this time the spring is compressed only half as far before firing. How far up does the ball go this time? Neglect friction. Assume that the spring is ideal and that the distance by which the spring is compressed is negligible compared to . Hint 1. Potential energy of the spring The potential energy of a spring is proportional to the square of the distance the spring is compressed. The spring was compressed half the distance, so the mass, when launched, has one quarter of the energy as in the first trial. Hint 2. Potential energy of the ball At the highest point in the ball’s trajectory, all of the spring’s potential energy has been converted into gravitational potential energy of the ball. ANSWER: Correct A Bullet Is Fired into a Wooden Block A bullet of mass is fired horizontally with speed at a wooden block of mass resting on a frictionless table. The bullet hits the block and becomes completely embedded within it. After the bullet has come to rest within the block, the block, with the bullet in it, is traveling at speed . H height = H 4 mb vi mw vf Part A Which of the following best describes this collision? Hint 1. Types of collisions An inelastic collision is a collision in which kinetic energy is not conserved. In a partially inelastic collision, kinetic energy is lost, but the objects colliding do not stick together. From this information, you can infer what completely inelastic and elastic collisions are. ANSWER: Correct Part B Which of the following quantities, if any, are conserved during this collision? Hint 1. When is kinetic energy conserved? Kinetic energy is conserved only in perfectly elastic collisions. ANSWER: perfectly elastic partially inelastic perfectly inelastic Correct Part C What is the speed of the block/bullet system after the collision? Express your answer in terms of , , and . Hint 1. Find the momentum after the collision What is the total momentum of the block/bullet system after the collision? Express your answer in terms of and other given quantities. ANSWER: Hint 2. Use conservation of momentum The momentum of the block/bullet system is conserved. Therefore, the momentum before the collision is the same as the momentum after the collision. Find a second expression for , this time expressed as the total momentum of the system before the collision. Express your answer in terms of and other given quantities. ANSWER: kinetic energy only momentum only kinetic energy and momentum neither momentum nor kinetic energy vi mw mb ptotal vf ptotal = (mw + mb)vf ptotal vi ptotal = mbvi ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.31 Ball 1, with a mass of 150 and traveling at 15.0 , collides head on with ball 2, which has a mass of 340 and is initially at rest. Part A What are the final velocities of each ball if the collision is perfectly elastic? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C vf = mb vi mb+mw g m/s g (vfx) = -5.82 1 ms (vfx) = 9.18 2 ms What are the final velocities of each ball if the collision is perfectly inelastic? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 10.43 A package of mass is released from rest at a warehouse loading dock and slides down the = 2.2 – high, frictionless chute to a waiting truck. Unfortunately, the truck driver went on a break without having removed the previous package, of mass , from the bottom of the chute. You may want to review ( pages 265 – 269) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Solving Algebraic Equations (vfx) = 4.59 1 ms (vfx) = 4.59 2 ms m h m 2m Part A Suppose the packages stick together. What is their common speed after the collision? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem There are two parts to this problem: the block sliding down the frictionless incline and the collision. What conservation laws are valid in each part? In terms of , what are the kinetic and potential energies of the block at the top of the incline? What is the potential energy of the same block at the bottom just before the collision? What are the kinetic energy and velocity of block just before the collision? What is conserved during the collision? What is the total momentum of the two blocks before the collision? What is the momentum of the two blocks stuck together after the collision? What is the velocity of the two blocks after the collision? ANSWER: Correct Part B Suppose the collision between the packages is perfectly elastic. To what height does the package of mass rebound? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem There are three parts to this problem: the block sliding down the incline, the collision, and mass going back up the incline. What conservation laws are valid in each part? m m v = 2.2 ms m m What is an elastic collision? For an elastic collision, how are the initial and final velocities related when one of the masses is initially at rest? Using the velocity of just before the collision from Part A, what is the velocity of just after the collision in this case? What are the kinetic and potential energies of mass just after the collision? What is the kinetic energy of mass at its maximum rebound height? Using conservation of energy, what is the potential energy of mass at its maximum height? What is the maximum height? ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.35 A cannon tilted up at a 35.0 angle fires a cannon ball at 79.0 from atop a 21.0 -high fortress wall. Part A What is the ball’s impact speed on the ground below? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.45 A 1000 safe is 2.5 above a heavy-duty spring when the rope holding the safe breaks. The safe hits the spring and compresses it 48 . m m m m m h = 24 cm $ m/s m vf = 81.6 ms kg m cm Part A What is the spring constant of the spring? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.49 A 100 block on a frictionless table is firmly attached to one end of a spring with = 21 . The other end of the spring is anchored to the wall. A 30 ball is thrown horizontally toward the block with a speed of 6.0 . Part A If the collision is perfectly elastic, what is the ball’s speed immediately after the collision? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the maximum compression of the spring? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: = 2.5×105 k Nm g k N/m g m/s v = 3.2 ms Correct Part C Repeat part A for the case of a perfectly inelastic collision. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D Repeat part B for the case of a perfectly inelastic collision. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 99.4%. You received 120.28 out of a possible total of 121 points. x = 0.19 m v = 1.4 ms x = 0.11 m

please email info@checkyourstudy.com
Chapter 04 Homework Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 23, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Activity: Investigating Survivorship Curves Click here to complete this activity. Then answer the questions. Part A Which of these species typically has a mortality rate that remains fairly constant over an individual’s life span? ANSWER: Correct The mortality rate of robins remains relatively constant throughout their life span. Part B Oyster populations are primarily, if not exclusively, composed of _____. ANSWER: Correct Young oysters have a very high mortality rate; older oysters have a much lower mortality rate. Thus, most oyster populations consist primarily of older individuals. Part C Which of these organisms has a survivorship curve similar to that of oysters? ANSWER: grasses oysters elephants robins humans juveniles adults prereproductive oysters larval and juvenile oysters larvae Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 1 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Correct Grasses, like oysters, have a relatively high mortality rate early in their life span, after which the mortality rate decreases. Part D Which of these organisms has a survivorship curve similar to that of humans? ANSWER: Correct The mortality rate of elephants, like that of humans, remains relatively low for much of their life span and then dramatically increases for older individuals. BioFlix Quiz: Population Ecology Watch the animation at left before answering the questions below. cats robins elephants grasses humans cats oysters grasses robins elephants Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 2 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Part A An ideal habitat with unlimited resources is associated with Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for Population Ecology ANSWER: Correct Populations grow exponentially with unlimited resources. Part B The maximum population a habitat can support is its Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for Population Ecology ANSWER: Correct Part C Logistic growth involves Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for Population Ecology ANSWER: Both exponential growth and logistic growth. Population crashes. Exponential growth. Logistic growth. Neither exponential growth nor logistic growth. Logistic growth. Death rate. Birth rate. Carrying capacity. Exponential growth. A population crash. Population growth continuing forever. Population growth reaching carrying capacity and then speeding up. Population size decreasing to zero. Population growth slowing down as the population approaches carrying capacity. Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 3 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Correct Part D In exponential growth Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for Population Ecology ANSWER: Correct Part E Which of the following would NOT cause population size to decrease? Hint 1. Review the animation. ANSWER: Correct An increased birth rate would cause population size to increase. BioFlix Activity: Photosynthesis — Inputs and Outputs Can you fill in the photosynthesis equation? To review photosynthesis, watch this BioFlix animation: Photosynthesis. Part A – Photosynthesis equation Drag the labels onto the equation to identify the inputs and outputs of photosynthesis. ANSWER: Population size grows more and more slowly as the population gets bigger. Population size grows faster and faster as the population gets bigger. Population size stays constant. Population growth slows as the population gets close to its carrying capacity. None of these are correct. Increased death rate A exponentially growing population outgrowing its food supply and crashing Poor weather, resulting in less food being available Increase in the number of predators Increased birth rate Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 4 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM BioFlix Activity: Cellular Respiration and Photosynthesis — Energy Flow Can you identify how energy flows through an ecosystem? To review energy flow in cellular respiration and photosynthesis, watch these BioFlix animations: Cellular Respiration and Photosynthesis. Part A – Energy flow through an ecosystem Drag the labels onto the diagram to identify how energy flows through an ecosystem. ANSWER: BioFlix Activity: Cellular Respiration and Photosynthesis — Chemical Cycling Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 5 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Can you identify how chemicals cycle in an ecosystem? To review the chemical inputs and outputs of cellular respiration and photosynthesis, watch these BioFlix animations: Cellular Respiration and Photosynthesis. Part A – Chemical cycling in an ecosystem Drag the labels onto the diagram to identify how chemicals cycle in an ecosystem. ANSWER: BioFlix Activity: Cellular Respiration — Inputs and Outputs Can you fill in the cellular respiration equation? To review cellular respiration, watch this BioFlix animation: Cellular Respiration. Part A – Cellular respiration equation Drag the labels onto the equation to identify the inputs and outputs of cellular respiration. ANSWER: Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 6 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM BioFlix Activity: Population Ecology — Types of Population Growth Can you identify the different ways in which populations grow? To review types of population growth, watch this BioFlix animation: Population Ecology. Part A – Types of population growth Drag the correct label under each graph to identify the type of population growth shown. ANSWER: Concept Review: Calculating Doubling Time Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 7 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Can you calculate doubling times and growth rates for exponentially growing populations? Remember that the doubling time (in years) for an exponentially growing population is estimated by dividing 70 by the growth rate of the population (as a percentage): Doubling time (in years) = 70 / annual growth rate (%) Part A Drag the values on the left to the appropriate blanks on the right to complete the sentences. Not all values will be used. ANSWER: Concept Review: Calculating Population Growth Rates Populations grow larger from births and immigration and grow smaller from deaths and emigration. The growth rate for a population is determined by adding the birth rate and the immigration rate, and then subtracting the death rate and the emigration rate (all rates expressed as the number per 1,000 individuals per year): (birth rate + immigration rate) (death rate + emigration rate) = growth rate Positive population growth rates lead to population increases, and negative population growth rates lead to population declines. Part A Suppose you are studying a population with the following characteristics: Birth rate = 14 per 1,000/year Death rate = 6 per 1,000/year Immigration rate = 5 per 1,000/year Emigration rate = 1 per 1,000/year What is the growth rate for this population? ANSWER: Part B Suppose you are studying a population with the following characteristics: 4 per 1,000/year 12 per 1,000/year 14 per 1,000/year 26 per 1,000/year Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 8 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Birth rate = 11 per 1,000/year Death rate = 10 per 1,000/year Immigration rate = 4 per 1,000/year Emigration rate = 3 per 1,000/year What is the growth rate for this population? ANSWER: Part C Suppose you are studying a population with the following characteristics: Birth rate = 10 per 1,000/year Death rate = 12 per 1,000/year Immigration rate = 2 per 1,000/year Emigration rate = 3 per 1,000/year What is the growth rate for this population? ANSWER: Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Concept Review: Levels of Ecological Organization Can you identify the example that corresponds to each level of ecological organization? Part A Drag the labels to the appropriate targets in the table. ANSWER: 0 per 1,000/year 2 per 1,000/year 14 per 1,000/year 28 per 1,000/year 3 per 1,000/year 1 per 1,000/year 17 per 1,000/year 27 per 1,000/year Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 9 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM BioFlix Activity: Mechanisms of Evolution — Natural Selection: Pesticides Can you identify the process by which natural selection acts on an insect population exposed to pesticides? To review the process of natural selection, watch this BioFlix animation: Mechanisms of Evolution: Natural Selection. Part A – Natural selection: Pesticides Drag the labels onto the flowchart to place them in the correct sequence. ANSWER: Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 10 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM ABC News Video: Protecting the Galapagos Islands Watch the ABC News video (2:07 minutes). Then answer the questions below. Part A Where are the Galapagos Islands located? ANSWER: Part B Which of the following sets of animals are likely to be found on the Galapagos Islands? ANSWER: near the tip of South Africa northeast of Australia along the Great Barrier Reef 600 miles west of Ecuador, near the equator in the Mediterranean Sea, as part of the Greek Islands frogs, lungfish, mountain goats tortoises, finches, blue-footed boobies ostriches, cougars, porcupines beaver, snakes, armadillos Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 11 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Part C Which species is threatening the natural wildlife on the Galapagos Islands? ANSWER: Part D The Galapagos Islands were the first place on Earth to _____. ANSWER: Part E Tourism on the Galapagos Islands is being restricted by requiring tourists to _____. ANSWER: Current Events: A Surplus Washington Could Do Without: A Capital Park’s Rapacious Deer (New York Times, 2/28/2012) Read this New York Times article and then answer the questions. A Surplus Washington Could Do Without: A Capital Park’s Rapacious Deer (2/28/2012) Registration with The New York Times provides instant access to breaking news on NYTimes.com. To register, go to http://www.nytimes.com/register. Visit http://www.nytimes.com/content/help/rights/terms/terms-of-service.html to review the current NYT Terms of Service. Part A Which of the following is true? ANSWER: Part B What predator currently feeds on deer in Rock Creek Park? humans zebra mussels Asian carp mountain lions suffer the complete extinction of all native species be declared off-limits to all humans be declared a world heritage site be invaded by human-introduced species visit each island in groups of only ten individuals at a time view the islands only from the water be escorted by trained guides at all times stay at least 100 feet away from all animals on the islands Deer have always been a problem in Rock Creek Park. Deer are not a problem in Rock Creek Park. Deer are not native to Rock Creek Park, and have been a problem since they were introduced in 1952. Deer were once absent from Rock Creek Park, and have only become a problem in the last 20 years. Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 12 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM ANSWER: Part C Why isn’t the deer population controlled by hunting in Rock Creek Park? ANSWER: Part D It is hoped that the deer herd can be reduced by how much? ANSWER: Part E Which of the following is true? ANSWER: Part F Because the park is changing in response to the increasing deer population, this is an example of ______________. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 21.2%. You received 9.1 out of a possible total of 43 points. There are no predators of deer in Rock Creek Park. mountain lion coyote wolf Hunting has been attempted in the park, but the trees are too thick. Hunting is prohibited in the park. There is no public interest in hunting in the park. Deer are a protected species. one-quarter one-half three-quarters the entire herd Animals cannot be killed on federally managed public lands. Only Congress can decide to have animals killed on federally managed public lands. The federal agency in charge of management of the land in question decides if animals should be killed. Only the National Park Service can decide to have animals killed on federally managed public lands. succession artificial selection recession progression Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 13 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM

Chapter 04 Homework Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 23, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Activity: Investigating Survivorship Curves Click here to complete this activity. Then answer the questions. Part A Which of these species typically has a mortality rate that remains fairly constant over an individual’s life span? ANSWER: Correct The mortality rate of robins remains relatively constant throughout their life span. Part B Oyster populations are primarily, if not exclusively, composed of _____. ANSWER: Correct Young oysters have a very high mortality rate; older oysters have a much lower mortality rate. Thus, most oyster populations consist primarily of older individuals. Part C Which of these organisms has a survivorship curve similar to that of oysters? ANSWER: grasses oysters elephants robins humans juveniles adults prereproductive oysters larval and juvenile oysters larvae Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 1 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Correct Grasses, like oysters, have a relatively high mortality rate early in their life span, after which the mortality rate decreases. Part D Which of these organisms has a survivorship curve similar to that of humans? ANSWER: Correct The mortality rate of elephants, like that of humans, remains relatively low for much of their life span and then dramatically increases for older individuals. BioFlix Quiz: Population Ecology Watch the animation at left before answering the questions below. cats robins elephants grasses humans cats oysters grasses robins elephants Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 2 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Part A An ideal habitat with unlimited resources is associated with Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for Population Ecology ANSWER: Correct Populations grow exponentially with unlimited resources. Part B The maximum population a habitat can support is its Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for Population Ecology ANSWER: Correct Part C Logistic growth involves Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for Population Ecology ANSWER: Both exponential growth and logistic growth. Population crashes. Exponential growth. Logistic growth. Neither exponential growth nor logistic growth. Logistic growth. Death rate. Birth rate. Carrying capacity. Exponential growth. A population crash. Population growth continuing forever. Population growth reaching carrying capacity and then speeding up. Population size decreasing to zero. Population growth slowing down as the population approaches carrying capacity. Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 3 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Correct Part D In exponential growth Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for Population Ecology ANSWER: Correct Part E Which of the following would NOT cause population size to decrease? Hint 1. Review the animation. ANSWER: Correct An increased birth rate would cause population size to increase. BioFlix Activity: Photosynthesis — Inputs and Outputs Can you fill in the photosynthesis equation? To review photosynthesis, watch this BioFlix animation: Photosynthesis. Part A – Photosynthesis equation Drag the labels onto the equation to identify the inputs and outputs of photosynthesis. ANSWER: Population size grows more and more slowly as the population gets bigger. Population size grows faster and faster as the population gets bigger. Population size stays constant. Population growth slows as the population gets close to its carrying capacity. None of these are correct. Increased death rate A exponentially growing population outgrowing its food supply and crashing Poor weather, resulting in less food being available Increase in the number of predators Increased birth rate Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 4 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM BioFlix Activity: Cellular Respiration and Photosynthesis — Energy Flow Can you identify how energy flows through an ecosystem? To review energy flow in cellular respiration and photosynthesis, watch these BioFlix animations: Cellular Respiration and Photosynthesis. Part A – Energy flow through an ecosystem Drag the labels onto the diagram to identify how energy flows through an ecosystem. ANSWER: BioFlix Activity: Cellular Respiration and Photosynthesis — Chemical Cycling Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 5 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Can you identify how chemicals cycle in an ecosystem? To review the chemical inputs and outputs of cellular respiration and photosynthesis, watch these BioFlix animations: Cellular Respiration and Photosynthesis. Part A – Chemical cycling in an ecosystem Drag the labels onto the diagram to identify how chemicals cycle in an ecosystem. ANSWER: BioFlix Activity: Cellular Respiration — Inputs and Outputs Can you fill in the cellular respiration equation? To review cellular respiration, watch this BioFlix animation: Cellular Respiration. Part A – Cellular respiration equation Drag the labels onto the equation to identify the inputs and outputs of cellular respiration. ANSWER: Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 6 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM BioFlix Activity: Population Ecology — Types of Population Growth Can you identify the different ways in which populations grow? To review types of population growth, watch this BioFlix animation: Population Ecology. Part A – Types of population growth Drag the correct label under each graph to identify the type of population growth shown. ANSWER: Concept Review: Calculating Doubling Time Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 7 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Can you calculate doubling times and growth rates for exponentially growing populations? Remember that the doubling time (in years) for an exponentially growing population is estimated by dividing 70 by the growth rate of the population (as a percentage): Doubling time (in years) = 70 / annual growth rate (%) Part A Drag the values on the left to the appropriate blanks on the right to complete the sentences. Not all values will be used. ANSWER: Concept Review: Calculating Population Growth Rates Populations grow larger from births and immigration and grow smaller from deaths and emigration. The growth rate for a population is determined by adding the birth rate and the immigration rate, and then subtracting the death rate and the emigration rate (all rates expressed as the number per 1,000 individuals per year): (birth rate + immigration rate) (death rate + emigration rate) = growth rate Positive population growth rates lead to population increases, and negative population growth rates lead to population declines. Part A Suppose you are studying a population with the following characteristics: Birth rate = 14 per 1,000/year Death rate = 6 per 1,000/year Immigration rate = 5 per 1,000/year Emigration rate = 1 per 1,000/year What is the growth rate for this population? ANSWER: Part B Suppose you are studying a population with the following characteristics: 4 per 1,000/year 12 per 1,000/year 14 per 1,000/year 26 per 1,000/year Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 8 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Birth rate = 11 per 1,000/year Death rate = 10 per 1,000/year Immigration rate = 4 per 1,000/year Emigration rate = 3 per 1,000/year What is the growth rate for this population? ANSWER: Part C Suppose you are studying a population with the following characteristics: Birth rate = 10 per 1,000/year Death rate = 12 per 1,000/year Immigration rate = 2 per 1,000/year Emigration rate = 3 per 1,000/year What is the growth rate for this population? ANSWER: Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Concept Review: Levels of Ecological Organization Can you identify the example that corresponds to each level of ecological organization? Part A Drag the labels to the appropriate targets in the table. ANSWER: 0 per 1,000/year 2 per 1,000/year 14 per 1,000/year 28 per 1,000/year 3 per 1,000/year 1 per 1,000/year 17 per 1,000/year 27 per 1,000/year Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 9 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM BioFlix Activity: Mechanisms of Evolution — Natural Selection: Pesticides Can you identify the process by which natural selection acts on an insect population exposed to pesticides? To review the process of natural selection, watch this BioFlix animation: Mechanisms of Evolution: Natural Selection. Part A – Natural selection: Pesticides Drag the labels onto the flowchart to place them in the correct sequence. ANSWER: Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 10 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM ABC News Video: Protecting the Galapagos Islands Watch the ABC News video (2:07 minutes). Then answer the questions below. Part A Where are the Galapagos Islands located? ANSWER: Part B Which of the following sets of animals are likely to be found on the Galapagos Islands? ANSWER: near the tip of South Africa northeast of Australia along the Great Barrier Reef 600 miles west of Ecuador, near the equator in the Mediterranean Sea, as part of the Greek Islands frogs, lungfish, mountain goats tortoises, finches, blue-footed boobies ostriches, cougars, porcupines beaver, snakes, armadillos Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 11 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Part C Which species is threatening the natural wildlife on the Galapagos Islands? ANSWER: Part D The Galapagos Islands were the first place on Earth to _____. ANSWER: Part E Tourism on the Galapagos Islands is being restricted by requiring tourists to _____. ANSWER: Current Events: A Surplus Washington Could Do Without: A Capital Park’s Rapacious Deer (New York Times, 2/28/2012) Read this New York Times article and then answer the questions. A Surplus Washington Could Do Without: A Capital Park’s Rapacious Deer (2/28/2012) Registration with The New York Times provides instant access to breaking news on NYTimes.com. To register, go to http://www.nytimes.com/register. Visit http://www.nytimes.com/content/help/rights/terms/terms-of-service.html to review the current NYT Terms of Service. Part A Which of the following is true? ANSWER: Part B What predator currently feeds on deer in Rock Creek Park? humans zebra mussels Asian carp mountain lions suffer the complete extinction of all native species be declared off-limits to all humans be declared a world heritage site be invaded by human-introduced species visit each island in groups of only ten individuals at a time view the islands only from the water be escorted by trained guides at all times stay at least 100 feet away from all animals on the islands Deer have always been a problem in Rock Creek Park. Deer are not a problem in Rock Creek Park. Deer are not native to Rock Creek Park, and have been a problem since they were introduced in 1952. Deer were once absent from Rock Creek Park, and have only become a problem in the last 20 years. Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 12 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM ANSWER: Part C Why isn’t the deer population controlled by hunting in Rock Creek Park? ANSWER: Part D It is hoped that the deer herd can be reduced by how much? ANSWER: Part E Which of the following is true? ANSWER: Part F Because the park is changing in response to the increasing deer population, this is an example of ______________. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 21.2%. You received 9.1 out of a possible total of 43 points. There are no predators of deer in Rock Creek Park. mountain lion coyote wolf Hunting has been attempted in the park, but the trees are too thick. Hunting is prohibited in the park. There is no public interest in hunting in the park. Deer are a protected species. one-quarter one-half three-quarters the entire herd Animals cannot be killed on federally managed public lands. Only Congress can decide to have animals killed on federally managed public lands. The federal agency in charge of management of the land in question decides if animals should be killed. Only the National Park Service can decide to have animals killed on federally managed public lands. succession artificial selection recession progression Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 13 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM

info@checkyourstudy.com
Statistical Methods (STAT 4303) Review for Final Comprehensive Exam Measures of Central Tendency, Dispersion Q.1. The data below represents the test scores obtained by students in college algebra class. 10,12,15,20,13,16,14 Calculate (a) Mean (b) Median (c) Mode (d) Variance, s2 (e) Coefficient of variation (CV) Q.2. The data below represents the test scores obtained by students in English class. 12,15,16,18,13,10,17,20 Calculate (a) Mean (b) Median (c) Mode (d) Variance, s2 (e) Coefficient of variation (CV) (f) Compare the results of Q.1 and Q.2, Which scores College Algebra or English do you think is more precise (less spread)? Q.3 Following data represents the score obtained by students in one of the exams 9, 13, 14, 15, 16, 16, 17, 19, 20, 21, 21, 22, 25, 25, 26 Create a frequency table to calculate the following descriptive statistics (a) mean (b) median (c) mode (d) first and third quartiles (e) Construct Box and Whisker plot. (f) Comment on the shape of the distribution. (g) Find inter quartile range (IQR). (h) Are there any outliers (based on IQR technique)? In the above problem, if the score 26 is replaced by 37 (i) What will happen to the mean? Will it increase, decrease or remains the same? (j) What will be the new median? (k) What can you say about the effect of outliers on mean and median? Q.4 Following data represents the score obtained by students in one of the exams 19, 14, 14, 15, 17, 16, 17, 20, 20, 21, 21, 22, 25, 25, 26, 27, 28 Create a frequency table to calculate the following descriptive statistics a) mean b) median c) mode d) first and third quartiles e) Construct Box and Whisker plot. f) Comment on the shape of the distribution. g) Find inter quartile range (IQR). h) Are there any outliers (based on IQR technique)? In the above problem, if the score 28 is replaced by 48 i) What will happen to the mean? Will it increase, decrease or remains the same? j) What will be the new median? k) What can you say about the effect of outliers on mean and median? Q.5 Consider the following data of height (in inch) and weight(in lbs). Height(x) Frequency 50 2 52 3 55 2 60 4 62 3  Find the mean height.  What is the variance of height? Also, find the standard deviation. (c) Find the coefficient of variation (CV). Q.6. The following table shows the number of miles run during one week for a sample of 20 runners: Miles Mid-value (x) Frequency (f) 5.5-10.5 1 10.5-15.5 2 15.5-20.5 3 20.5-25.5 5 25.5-30.5 4 (a) Find the average (mean) miles run. (Hint: Find mid-value of mile range first) (b) What is the variance of miles run? Also, find the standard deviation. (c) Find the coefficient of variation (CV). Q.7. (a) If the mean of 20 observations is 20.5, find the sum of all observations? (b) If the mean of 30 observations is 40, find the sum of all observations? Probability Q.8 Out of forty students, 14 are taking English Composition and 29 are taking Chemistry. a) How many students are in both classes? b) What is the probability that a randomly-chosen student from this group is taking only the Chemistry class? Q.9 A drawer contains 4 red balls, 5 green balls, and 5 blue balls. One ball is taken from the drawer and then replaced. Another ball is taken from the drawer. What is the probability that (Draw tree diagram to facilitate your calculation). (a) both balls are red (b) first ball is red (c) both balls are of same colors (d) both balls are of different colors (e) first ball is red and second ball is blue (f) first ball is red or blue Q.10 A drawer contains 3 red balls, 5 green balls, and 5 blue balls. One ball is taken from the drawer and not replaced. Another ball is then taken from the drawer. Draw tree diagram to facilitate your calculation. What is the probability that (a) both balls are red (b) first ball is red (c) both balls are of same colors (d) both balls are of different colors (e) first ball is red and second ball is blue (f) first ball is red or blue Q. 11 Missile A has 45% chance of hitting target. Missile B has 55% chance of hitting a target. What is the probability that (i) both miss the target. (ii) at least one will hit the target. (iii) exactly one will hit the target. Q. 12 A politician from D party speaks truth 65% of times; another politician from rival party speaks truth 75% of times. Both politicians were asked about their personal love affair with their own office secretary, what is the probability that (i) both lie the actual fact . (ii) at least one will speak truth. (iii) exactly one speaks the truth. (iv) both speak the truth. Q.13 The question, “Do you drink alcohol?” was asked to 220 people. Results are shown in the table. . Yes No Total Male 48 82 Female 24 66 Total (a) What is the probability of a randomly selected individual being a male also drinks? (b) What is the probability of a randomly selected individual being a female? (c) What is the probability that a randomly selected individual drinks? (d) A person is selected at random and if the person is female, what is the probability that she drinks? (e) What is the probability that a randomly selected alcoholic person is a male? Q.14 A professor, Dr. Drakula, taught courses that included statements from across the five colleges abbreviated as AH, AS, BA, ED and EN. He taught at Texas A&M University – Kingsville (TAMUK) during the span of five academic years AY09 to AY13. The following table shows the total number of graduates during AY09 to AY13. One day, he was running late to his class. He was so focused on the class that he did not stop for a red light. As soon as he crossed through the intersection, a police officer Asked him to stop. ( a ) It is turned out that the police officer was TAMUK graduate during the past five years. What is the probability that the Police Officer was from ED College? ( b ) What is the probability that the Police Officer graduated in the academic year of 2011? ( c ) If the traffic officer graduated from TAMUK in the academic year of 2011(AY11). What is the conditional probability that he graduated from the ED college? ( d ) Are the events the academic year “AY 11” and the college of Education “ED” independent? Yes or no , why? Discrete Distribution Q.15 Find k and probability for X=2 and X=4. X 1 2 3 4 5 P(X=x) 0.1 3k 0.2 2k 0.2 (Hint: First find k, and then plug in) Also, calculate the expected value of X, E(X) and variance V(X). A game plan is derived based on above table, a player wins $5 if he can blindly choose 3 and loses $1 if he chooses other numbers.What is his expected win or loss per game? If he plays this game for 20 times, what is total win or lose? Q.16 Find k. X 3 4 5 6 7 P(X=x) k 2k 2k k 2k (Hint: First find k, and then plug in) Also, calculate the expected value of X, E(X) and variance V(X). A game plan is derived based on above table, a player wins $5 if he can blindly choose 3 and loses $1 if he chooses other numbers. What is his expected win or loss per game? If he plays this game for 20 times, what is total win or lose? Binomial Distribution: Q.17 (a) Hospital records show that of patients suffering from a certain disease, 75% die of it. What is the probability that of 6 randomly selected patients, 4 will recover? (b) A (blindfolded) marksman finds that on the average he hits the target 4 times out of 5. If he fires 4 shots, what is the probability of (i) more than 2 hits? (ii) at least 3 misses? (c) which of the following are binomial experiments? Explain the reason. i. Telephone surveying a group of 200 people to ask if they voted for George Bush. ii. Counting the average number of dogs seen at a veterinarian’s office daily. iii. You take a survey of 50 traffic lights in a certain city, at 3 p.m., recording whether the light was red, green, or yellow at that time. iv. You are at a fair, playing “pop the balloon” with 6 darts. There are 20 balloons. 10 of the balloons have a ticket inside that say “win,” and 10 have a ticket that says “lose.” Normal Distribution Q.18 Use standard normal distribution table to find the following probabilities: (a) P(Z<2.5) (b) P(Z< -1.3) (c) P(Z>0.12) (d) P(Z> -2.15) (e) P(0.11<Z<0.22) (f) P(-0.11<Z<0.5) Q.19. Use normal distribution table to find the missing values (?). (a) P(Z< ?)=0.40 (b) P(Z< ?)=0.76 (c) P(Z> ?)=0.87 (d) P(Z> ?)=0.34 Q.20. The length of life of certain type of light bulb is normally distributed with mean=220hrs and standard deviation=20hrs. (a) Define a random variable, X A light bulb is randomly selected, what is the probability that (b) it will last will last more than 207 hrs. ? (c) it will last less than 214 hrs. (d) it will last in between 199 to 207 hrs. Q.21. The length of life of an instrument produced by a machine has a normal distribution with a mean of 22 months and standard deviation of 4 months. Find the probability that an instrument produced by this machine will last (a) less than 10 months. (b) more than 28 months (c) between 10 and 28 months. Distribution of sample mean and Central Limit Theorem (CLT) Q.22 It is assumed that weight of teenage student is normally distributed with mean=140 lbs. and standard deviation =15 lbs. A simple random sample of 40 teenage students is taken and sample mean is calculated. If several such samples of same size are taken (i) what could be the mean of all sample means. (ii) what could be the standard deviation of all sample means. (iii) will the distribution of sample means be normal ? (iv) What is CLT? Write down the distribution of sample mean in the form of ~ ( , ) 2 n X N   . Q.23 The time it takes students in a cooking school to learn to prepare seafood gumbo is a random variable with a normal distribution where the average is 3.2 hours and a standard deviation of 1.8 hours. A sample of 40 students was investigated. What is the distribution of sample mean (express in numbers)? Hypothesis Testing Q.24 The NCHS reported that the mean total cholesterol level in 2002 for all adults was 203 with standard deviation of 37. Total cholesterol levels in participants who attended the seventh examination of the Offspring in the Framingham Heart Study are summarized as follows: n=3,00, =200.3. Is there statistical evidence of a difference in mean cholesterol levels in the Framingham Offspring (means does the result form current examination differs from 2002 report)?? (Follow the steps below to reach the conclusion) (i) Define null and alternate hypothesis (Also write what is  , and x in words at the beginning) (ii) Identify the significance level ,  and check whether it is one sided or two sided test. (iii) Calculate test statistics, Z. (iv) Use standard normal table to find the p-value and state whether you reject or accept (fail to reject) the null hypothesis. (v) what is the critical value, do you reject or accept the H0. (vi) Write down the conclusion based on part (iv). Q.25 A sample of 145 boxes of Kellogg’s Raisin Bran contain in average 1.95 scoops of raisins. It is known from past experiments that the standard deviation for the number of scoops of raisins is 0.25. The manufacturer of Kellogg’s Raisin Bran claimed that in average their product contains more than 2 scoops of raisins, do you reject or accept the manufacturers claim (follow all five steps)? Q.26 It is assumed that the mean systolic blood pressure is μ = 120 mm Hg. In the Honolulu Heart Study, a sample of n = 100 people had an average systolic blood pressure of 130.1 mm Hg. The standard deviation from the population is 21.21 mm Hg. Is the group significantly different (with respect to systolic blood pressure!) from the regular population? Use 10% level of significance. Q.27 A CEO claims that at least 80 percent of the company’s 1,000,000 customers are very satisfied. Again, 100 customers are surveyed using simple random sampling. The result: 73 percent are very satisfied. Based on these results, should we accept or reject the CEO’s hypothesis? Assume a significance level of 0.05. Q.28 True/False questions (These questions are collected from previous HW, review and exam problems, see the previous solutions for answers) (a) Total sum of probability can exceed 1. (b) If you throw a die, getting 2 or any even number are independent events. (c) If you roll a die for 20 times, the probability of getting 5 in 15th roll is 20 15 . (d) A student is taking a 5 question True-False quiz but he has not been doing any work in the course and does not know the material so he randomly guesses at all the answers. Probability that he gets the first question right is 2 1 . (e) Typing in laptop and writing emails using the same laptop are independent events. (f) Normal distribution is right skewed. (g) Mean is more robust to outliers. So mean is used for data with extreme values. (h) It is possible to have no mode in the data. (i) Standard normal variable, Z has some unit. (j) Only two parameters are required to describe the entire normal distribution. (k) Mean of standard normal variable, Z is 1. (l) If p-value of more than level of significance (alpha), we reject the H0. (m) Very small p-value indicates rejection of H0. (n) H0 always contains equality sign. (o) CLT indicates that distribution of sample mean can be anything, not just normal. (p) Sample mean is always equal to population mean. (q) Variance of sample mean is less than population mean. (r) Variance of sample mean does not depend on sample size. (s) Mr. A has cancer but a medical doctor diagnosed him as “no cancer”. It is a type I error. (t) Level of significance is probability of making type II error. (u) Type II error can be controlled. (v) Type I error is more serious than type II error. (w) Type I and Type II errors are based on null hypothesis. Q.29 Type I and Type II Errors : Make statements about Type I (False Positive) and Type II errors (False Negative). (a) The Alpha-Fetoprotein (AFP) Test has both Type I and Type II error possibilities. This test screens the mother’s blood during pregnancy for AFP and determines risk. Abnormally high or low levels may indicate Down syndrome. (Hint: Take actual status as down syndrome or not) Ho: patient is healthy Ha: patient is unhealthy (b) The mechanic inspects the brake pads for the minimum allowable thickness. Ho: Vehicles breaks meet the standard for the minimum allowable thickness. Ha: Vehicles brakes do not meet the standard for the minimum allowable thickness. (c) Celiac disease is one of the diseases which can be misdiagnosed or have less diagnosis. Following table shows the actual celiac patients and their diagnosis status by medical doctors: Actual Status Yes No Diagnosed as celiac Yes 85 5 No 25 105 I. Calculate the probability of making type I and type II error rates. II. Calculate the power of the test. (Power of the test= 1- P(type II error) Answers: USEFUL FORMULAE: Descriptive Statistics Possible Outliers, any value beyond the range of Q 1.5( ) and Q 1.5( ) Range = Maximum value -Minimum value 100 where 1 ( ) (Preferred) 1 and , n fx x For data with repeats, 1 ( ) (Preferred ) OR 1 and n x x For data without repeats, 1 3 1 3 3 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 Q Q Q Q x s CV n f n f x x OR s n fx nx s n x x s n x nx s                             Discrete Distribution         ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) { ( )} ( ) ( ) 2 2 2 2 E X x P X x V X E X E X E X xP X x Binomial Distribution Probability mass function, P(X=x)= x n x n x C p q  for x=0,1,2,…,n. E(X)=np, Var(X)=npq Hypothesis Testing based on Normal Distribution      X std X mean Z Standard Normal Variable, Probability Bayes Rule, ( ) ( and ) ( ) ( ) ( | ) P B P A B P B P A B P A B    Central Limit Theorem For large n (n>30), ~ ( , ) 2 n X N   and ˆ ~ ( , ) n pq p N p For hypothesis testing of μ, σ known           n x Z   For hypothesis testing of p n pq p p Z   ˆ ANSWERS: Q.1 (a) 14.286 (b) 14 (c) none (d) 10.24 (e) 22.40 Q.2 (a) 15.125 (b) 15.5 (c) No (d) 10.98 (e) 21.9 (f) English Q.3 (a) 18.6 (b)19 (c) 16, 21, and 25 (d) 15, 22 (f) slightly left (g) 7 (h) no outliers (i) increase (j) same Q.4 (a) 0.41 (b) 20 (c)14, 17, 20, 21,25 (d) 16.5, 25 (f) slightly right (g) 8.5 (h) no (i) increase (j) same Q.5 (a)56.57 (b) 22.26 (c) 8.34 Q.6 (a) 21 (b) 38.57 (c) 29.57 Q.7 (a) 410 (b) 1200 Q.8 (a)3 (b) 0.65 Q.9 (a) 0.082 (b) 0.29 (c)0.34 (d) 0.66 (e)0.10 (f) 0.64 Q.10 (a) 0.038 (b)0.23 (c) 0.71 (d) 0.29 (e)0.096 (f) 0.62 Q.11 (i)0.248 (ii)0.752 (iii)0.505 Q.12 (i)0.0875 (ii)0.913 (iii)0.425 (iii)0.488 Q.13 (a)0.22 (b)0.41 (c)0.33 (d)0.27 (e) 0.67 Q.14 (a) 0.13 (b) 0.18 (c)0.12 Q.15 E(X)=3.1 , V(X)=1.69, $0.2 per game, $ 4 win. Q.16 E(X)=5.125, V(X)=1.86, $0.25 loss per game, $5 loss. Q.17 (a)0.201 (b) 0.819, 0.027 Q.18 (a)0.9938 (b)0.0968 (c)0.452 (d)0.984 (e) 0.0433 (f)0.2353 Q.19 (a) -0.25 (b)0.71 (c) -1.13 (d)0.41 Q.20 (b) 0.7422 (c) 0.3821 (d) 0.1109 Q.21 (a)0.0014 (b) 0.0668 (c) 0.9318 Q.22 (a) 140 (b)2.37 Q.24 Z=-1.26, Accept null. Q.25 Z=-2.41, accept null Q.26 Z=4.76, reject H0 Q.27 Z=-1.75, reject H0 Q.28 F, F, F, T , F, F, F, T, F, T, F, F, T, T, F, F, T, F, T, F, F, T, T Q.29 (c)0.113 , 0.022 , 0.977 (or 98%)

Statistical Methods (STAT 4303) Review for Final Comprehensive Exam Measures of Central Tendency, Dispersion Q.1. The data below represents the test scores obtained by students in college algebra class. 10,12,15,20,13,16,14 Calculate (a) Mean (b) Median (c) Mode (d) Variance, s2 (e) Coefficient of variation (CV) Q.2. The data below represents the test scores obtained by students in English class. 12,15,16,18,13,10,17,20 Calculate (a) Mean (b) Median (c) Mode (d) Variance, s2 (e) Coefficient of variation (CV) (f) Compare the results of Q.1 and Q.2, Which scores College Algebra or English do you think is more precise (less spread)? Q.3 Following data represents the score obtained by students in one of the exams 9, 13, 14, 15, 16, 16, 17, 19, 20, 21, 21, 22, 25, 25, 26 Create a frequency table to calculate the following descriptive statistics (a) mean (b) median (c) mode (d) first and third quartiles (e) Construct Box and Whisker plot. (f) Comment on the shape of the distribution. (g) Find inter quartile range (IQR). (h) Are there any outliers (based on IQR technique)? In the above problem, if the score 26 is replaced by 37 (i) What will happen to the mean? Will it increase, decrease or remains the same? (j) What will be the new median? (k) What can you say about the effect of outliers on mean and median? Q.4 Following data represents the score obtained by students in one of the exams 19, 14, 14, 15, 17, 16, 17, 20, 20, 21, 21, 22, 25, 25, 26, 27, 28 Create a frequency table to calculate the following descriptive statistics a) mean b) median c) mode d) first and third quartiles e) Construct Box and Whisker plot. f) Comment on the shape of the distribution. g) Find inter quartile range (IQR). h) Are there any outliers (based on IQR technique)? In the above problem, if the score 28 is replaced by 48 i) What will happen to the mean? Will it increase, decrease or remains the same? j) What will be the new median? k) What can you say about the effect of outliers on mean and median? Q.5 Consider the following data of height (in inch) and weight(in lbs). Height(x) Frequency 50 2 52 3 55 2 60 4 62 3  Find the mean height.  What is the variance of height? Also, find the standard deviation. (c) Find the coefficient of variation (CV). Q.6. The following table shows the number of miles run during one week for a sample of 20 runners: Miles Mid-value (x) Frequency (f) 5.5-10.5 1 10.5-15.5 2 15.5-20.5 3 20.5-25.5 5 25.5-30.5 4 (a) Find the average (mean) miles run. (Hint: Find mid-value of mile range first) (b) What is the variance of miles run? Also, find the standard deviation. (c) Find the coefficient of variation (CV). Q.7. (a) If the mean of 20 observations is 20.5, find the sum of all observations? (b) If the mean of 30 observations is 40, find the sum of all observations? Probability Q.8 Out of forty students, 14 are taking English Composition and 29 are taking Chemistry. a) How many students are in both classes? b) What is the probability that a randomly-chosen student from this group is taking only the Chemistry class? Q.9 A drawer contains 4 red balls, 5 green balls, and 5 blue balls. One ball is taken from the drawer and then replaced. Another ball is taken from the drawer. What is the probability that (Draw tree diagram to facilitate your calculation). (a) both balls are red (b) first ball is red (c) both balls are of same colors (d) both balls are of different colors (e) first ball is red and second ball is blue (f) first ball is red or blue Q.10 A drawer contains 3 red balls, 5 green balls, and 5 blue balls. One ball is taken from the drawer and not replaced. Another ball is then taken from the drawer. Draw tree diagram to facilitate your calculation. What is the probability that (a) both balls are red (b) first ball is red (c) both balls are of same colors (d) both balls are of different colors (e) first ball is red and second ball is blue (f) first ball is red or blue Q. 11 Missile A has 45% chance of hitting target. Missile B has 55% chance of hitting a target. What is the probability that (i) both miss the target. (ii) at least one will hit the target. (iii) exactly one will hit the target. Q. 12 A politician from D party speaks truth 65% of times; another politician from rival party speaks truth 75% of times. Both politicians were asked about their personal love affair with their own office secretary, what is the probability that (i) both lie the actual fact . (ii) at least one will speak truth. (iii) exactly one speaks the truth. (iv) both speak the truth. Q.13 The question, “Do you drink alcohol?” was asked to 220 people. Results are shown in the table. . Yes No Total Male 48 82 Female 24 66 Total (a) What is the probability of a randomly selected individual being a male also drinks? (b) What is the probability of a randomly selected individual being a female? (c) What is the probability that a randomly selected individual drinks? (d) A person is selected at random and if the person is female, what is the probability that she drinks? (e) What is the probability that a randomly selected alcoholic person is a male? Q.14 A professor, Dr. Drakula, taught courses that included statements from across the five colleges abbreviated as AH, AS, BA, ED and EN. He taught at Texas A&M University – Kingsville (TAMUK) during the span of five academic years AY09 to AY13. The following table shows the total number of graduates during AY09 to AY13. One day, he was running late to his class. He was so focused on the class that he did not stop for a red light. As soon as he crossed through the intersection, a police officer Asked him to stop. ( a ) It is turned out that the police officer was TAMUK graduate during the past five years. What is the probability that the Police Officer was from ED College? ( b ) What is the probability that the Police Officer graduated in the academic year of 2011? ( c ) If the traffic officer graduated from TAMUK in the academic year of 2011(AY11). What is the conditional probability that he graduated from the ED college? ( d ) Are the events the academic year “AY 11” and the college of Education “ED” independent? Yes or no , why? Discrete Distribution Q.15 Find k and probability for X=2 and X=4. X 1 2 3 4 5 P(X=x) 0.1 3k 0.2 2k 0.2 (Hint: First find k, and then plug in) Also, calculate the expected value of X, E(X) and variance V(X). A game plan is derived based on above table, a player wins $5 if he can blindly choose 3 and loses $1 if he chooses other numbers.What is his expected win or loss per game? If he plays this game for 20 times, what is total win or lose? Q.16 Find k. X 3 4 5 6 7 P(X=x) k 2k 2k k 2k (Hint: First find k, and then plug in) Also, calculate the expected value of X, E(X) and variance V(X). A game plan is derived based on above table, a player wins $5 if he can blindly choose 3 and loses $1 if he chooses other numbers. What is his expected win or loss per game? If he plays this game for 20 times, what is total win or lose? Binomial Distribution: Q.17 (a) Hospital records show that of patients suffering from a certain disease, 75% die of it. What is the probability that of 6 randomly selected patients, 4 will recover? (b) A (blindfolded) marksman finds that on the average he hits the target 4 times out of 5. If he fires 4 shots, what is the probability of (i) more than 2 hits? (ii) at least 3 misses? (c) which of the following are binomial experiments? Explain the reason. i. Telephone surveying a group of 200 people to ask if they voted for George Bush. ii. Counting the average number of dogs seen at a veterinarian’s office daily. iii. You take a survey of 50 traffic lights in a certain city, at 3 p.m., recording whether the light was red, green, or yellow at that time. iv. You are at a fair, playing “pop the balloon” with 6 darts. There are 20 balloons. 10 of the balloons have a ticket inside that say “win,” and 10 have a ticket that says “lose.” Normal Distribution Q.18 Use standard normal distribution table to find the following probabilities: (a) P(Z<2.5) (b) P(Z< -1.3) (c) P(Z>0.12) (d) P(Z> -2.15) (e) P(0.11 ?)=0.87 (d) P(Z> ?)=0.34 Q.20. The length of life of certain type of light bulb is normally distributed with mean=220hrs and standard deviation=20hrs. (a) Define a random variable, X A light bulb is randomly selected, what is the probability that (b) it will last will last more than 207 hrs. ? (c) it will last less than 214 hrs. (d) it will last in between 199 to 207 hrs. Q.21. The length of life of an instrument produced by a machine has a normal distribution with a mean of 22 months and standard deviation of 4 months. Find the probability that an instrument produced by this machine will last (a) less than 10 months. (b) more than 28 months (c) between 10 and 28 months. Distribution of sample mean and Central Limit Theorem (CLT) Q.22 It is assumed that weight of teenage student is normally distributed with mean=140 lbs. and standard deviation =15 lbs. A simple random sample of 40 teenage students is taken and sample mean is calculated. If several such samples of same size are taken (i) what could be the mean of all sample means. (ii) what could be the standard deviation of all sample means. (iii) will the distribution of sample means be normal ? (iv) What is CLT? Write down the distribution of sample mean in the form of ~ ( , ) 2 n X N   . Q.23 The time it takes students in a cooking school to learn to prepare seafood gumbo is a random variable with a normal distribution where the average is 3.2 hours and a standard deviation of 1.8 hours. A sample of 40 students was investigated. What is the distribution of sample mean (express in numbers)? Hypothesis Testing Q.24 The NCHS reported that the mean total cholesterol level in 2002 for all adults was 203 with standard deviation of 37. Total cholesterol levels in participants who attended the seventh examination of the Offspring in the Framingham Heart Study are summarized as follows: n=3,00, =200.3. Is there statistical evidence of a difference in mean cholesterol levels in the Framingham Offspring (means does the result form current examination differs from 2002 report)?? (Follow the steps below to reach the conclusion) (i) Define null and alternate hypothesis (Also write what is  , and x in words at the beginning) (ii) Identify the significance level ,  and check whether it is one sided or two sided test. (iii) Calculate test statistics, Z. (iv) Use standard normal table to find the p-value and state whether you reject or accept (fail to reject) the null hypothesis. (v) what is the critical value, do you reject or accept the H0. (vi) Write down the conclusion based on part (iv). Q.25 A sample of 145 boxes of Kellogg’s Raisin Bran contain in average 1.95 scoops of raisins. It is known from past experiments that the standard deviation for the number of scoops of raisins is 0.25. The manufacturer of Kellogg’s Raisin Bran claimed that in average their product contains more than 2 scoops of raisins, do you reject or accept the manufacturers claim (follow all five steps)? Q.26 It is assumed that the mean systolic blood pressure is μ = 120 mm Hg. In the Honolulu Heart Study, a sample of n = 100 people had an average systolic blood pressure of 130.1 mm Hg. The standard deviation from the population is 21.21 mm Hg. Is the group significantly different (with respect to systolic blood pressure!) from the regular population? Use 10% level of significance. Q.27 A CEO claims that at least 80 percent of the company’s 1,000,000 customers are very satisfied. Again, 100 customers are surveyed using simple random sampling. The result: 73 percent are very satisfied. Based on these results, should we accept or reject the CEO’s hypothesis? Assume a significance level of 0.05. Q.28 True/False questions (These questions are collected from previous HW, review and exam problems, see the previous solutions for answers) (a) Total sum of probability can exceed 1. (b) If you throw a die, getting 2 or any even number are independent events. (c) If you roll a die for 20 times, the probability of getting 5 in 15th roll is 20 15 . (d) A student is taking a 5 question True-False quiz but he has not been doing any work in the course and does not know the material so he randomly guesses at all the answers. Probability that he gets the first question right is 2 1 . (e) Typing in laptop and writing emails using the same laptop are independent events. (f) Normal distribution is right skewed. (g) Mean is more robust to outliers. So mean is used for data with extreme values. (h) It is possible to have no mode in the data. (i) Standard normal variable, Z has some unit. (j) Only two parameters are required to describe the entire normal distribution. (k) Mean of standard normal variable, Z is 1. (l) If p-value of more than level of significance (alpha), we reject the H0. (m) Very small p-value indicates rejection of H0. (n) H0 always contains equality sign. (o) CLT indicates that distribution of sample mean can be anything, not just normal. (p) Sample mean is always equal to population mean. (q) Variance of sample mean is less than population mean. (r) Variance of sample mean does not depend on sample size. (s) Mr. A has cancer but a medical doctor diagnosed him as “no cancer”. It is a type I error. (t) Level of significance is probability of making type II error. (u) Type II error can be controlled. (v) Type I error is more serious than type II error. (w) Type I and Type II errors are based on null hypothesis. Q.29 Type I and Type II Errors : Make statements about Type I (False Positive) and Type II errors (False Negative). (a) The Alpha-Fetoprotein (AFP) Test has both Type I and Type II error possibilities. This test screens the mother’s blood during pregnancy for AFP and determines risk. Abnormally high or low levels may indicate Down syndrome. (Hint: Take actual status as down syndrome or not) Ho: patient is healthy Ha: patient is unhealthy (b) The mechanic inspects the brake pads for the minimum allowable thickness. Ho: Vehicles breaks meet the standard for the minimum allowable thickness. Ha: Vehicles brakes do not meet the standard for the minimum allowable thickness. (c) Celiac disease is one of the diseases which can be misdiagnosed or have less diagnosis. Following table shows the actual celiac patients and their diagnosis status by medical doctors: Actual Status Yes No Diagnosed as celiac Yes 85 5 No 25 105 I. Calculate the probability of making type I and type II error rates. II. Calculate the power of the test. (Power of the test= 1- P(type II error) Answers: USEFUL FORMULAE: Descriptive Statistics Possible Outliers, any value beyond the range of Q 1.5( ) and Q 1.5( ) Range = Maximum value -Minimum value 100 where 1 ( ) (Preferred) 1 and , n fx x For data with repeats, 1 ( ) (Preferred ) OR 1 and n x x For data without repeats, 1 3 1 3 3 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 Q Q Q Q x s CV n f n f x x OR s n fx nx s n x x s n x nx s                             Discrete Distribution         ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) { ( )} ( ) ( ) 2 2 2 2 E X x P X x V X E X E X E X xP X x Binomial Distribution Probability mass function, P(X=x)= x n x n x C p q  for x=0,1,2,…,n. E(X)=np, Var(X)=npq Hypothesis Testing based on Normal Distribution      X std X mean Z Standard Normal Variable, Probability Bayes Rule, ( ) ( and ) ( ) ( ) ( | ) P B P A B P B P A B P A B    Central Limit Theorem For large n (n>30), ~ ( , ) 2 n X N   and ˆ ~ ( , ) n pq p N p For hypothesis testing of μ, σ known           n x Z   For hypothesis testing of p n pq p p Z   ˆ ANSWERS: Q.1 (a) 14.286 (b) 14 (c) none (d) 10.24 (e) 22.40 Q.2 (a) 15.125 (b) 15.5 (c) No (d) 10.98 (e) 21.9 (f) English Q.3 (a) 18.6 (b)19 (c) 16, 21, and 25 (d) 15, 22 (f) slightly left (g) 7 (h) no outliers (i) increase (j) same Q.4 (a) 0.41 (b) 20 (c)14, 17, 20, 21,25 (d) 16.5, 25 (f) slightly right (g) 8.5 (h) no (i) increase (j) same Q.5 (a)56.57 (b) 22.26 (c) 8.34 Q.6 (a) 21 (b) 38.57 (c) 29.57 Q.7 (a) 410 (b) 1200 Q.8 (a)3 (b) 0.65 Q.9 (a) 0.082 (b) 0.29 (c)0.34 (d) 0.66 (e)0.10 (f) 0.64 Q.10 (a) 0.038 (b)0.23 (c) 0.71 (d) 0.29 (e)0.096 (f) 0.62 Q.11 (i)0.248 (ii)0.752 (iii)0.505 Q.12 (i)0.0875 (ii)0.913 (iii)0.425 (iii)0.488 Q.13 (a)0.22 (b)0.41 (c)0.33 (d)0.27 (e) 0.67 Q.14 (a) 0.13 (b) 0.18 (c)0.12 Q.15 E(X)=3.1 , V(X)=1.69, $0.2 per game, $ 4 win. Q.16 E(X)=5.125, V(X)=1.86, $0.25 loss per game, $5 loss. Q.17 (a)0.201 (b) 0.819, 0.027 Q.18 (a)0.9938 (b)0.0968 (c)0.452 (d)0.984 (e) 0.0433 (f)0.2353 Q.19 (a) -0.25 (b)0.71 (c) -1.13 (d)0.41 Q.20 (b) 0.7422 (c) 0.3821 (d) 0.1109 Q.21 (a)0.0014 (b) 0.0668 (c) 0.9318 Q.22 (a) 140 (b)2.37 Q.24 Z=-1.26, Accept null. Q.25 Z=-2.41, accept null Q.26 Z=4.76, reject H0 Q.27 Z=-1.75, reject H0 Q.28 F, F, F, T , F, F, F, T, F, T, F, F, T, T, F, F, T, F, T, F, F, T, T Q.29 (c)0.113 , 0.022 , 0.977 (or 98%)

No expert has answered this question yet. You can browse … Read More...