Watch this video and answer the multi choices: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D4lB4SowAQA PART 1 _______1. Sociologists obtained their knowledge of human behavior through _______, which is this process of systematically collecting information for the purpose of testing an existing theory or generating a new one. a. Common sense ideas b. Research c. Myths d. scientific laws _______2. With ____Research, the goal is scientific objectivity, and the focus is on data that can be measured numerically a. qualitative b. observational c. c. quantitative d. d. explanatory _______3. With _______research, interpretative description (words) rather than statistics (numbers) are used to analyze underlying meaning and patterns of social relationships. a. qualitative b. observational c. quantitative d. explanatory _______4. Researchers in one study systematically analyzed the contents of the notes of suicide victims to determine recurring themes, such as feeling of despair or failure. They hoped to determine if any patterns could be found that would help in understating why people might kill themselves. This is an example of __________. a. Qualitative research b. Explanatory research c. Quantitative research d. Descriptive research ______5. the first step in the research process is to: a. select and define the research problem b. review previous research. c. develop a research design d. formulate the hypothesis ______6. A_____sample is a selection from a larger population and has the essential characteristics of the total population. a. selective b. random c. representative d. longitudinal _______7. _________is the extent to which a study or research instrument accurately measures what it is supposed to measure;_________is the extent to which a study or research instrument yields consistent results. a. Validity; replication b. Replication; validity c. Validity; reliability d. Reliability; validity _______8. Researchers who use existing material and analyze data that originally was collected by others are engaged in: a. unethical conduct b. primary analysis. c. secondary analysis d. survey analysis _______9. In an experiment, the subjects in the control group a. are exposed to the independent variable. b. are not exposed to the independent variable. c. are exposed to the dependent variable. d. are not exposed to the dependent variable. _______10. A tentative statement that predicts the relationship between variable is called a. a hypothesis b. a research model. c. a probability sample. d. a generalization. ______11. John wants to test this idea: “people who attend church regularly are less likely to express prejudice toward other races than people who do not attend church regularly.’ This idea is John’s a. hypothesis. b. research model. c. conclusion. d. operational definition _______12. In a research project, which of the following steps would come after the other three? a. choosing a research design b. reviewing the literature c. formulating a hypothesis d. collecting the data ________13. The variable hypothesized to cause or influence another is called the a. dependent variable. b. hypothetical variable c. correlation variable d. independent variable ________14. An explanation of an abstract concept that is specific enough to allow a research to measure the concept is a a. Hypothesis b. correlation. c. operatonal definition. d. variable _____15. Observation, ethnography, and case studies are examples of: a. survey research b. experiments. c. Secondary analysis of existing data. d. Field research. ______16. Theory and research are interrelated because a. theory always precedes research. b. research always precedes theory c. both put limits on each other. d. they are parts of a constant cycle. ______17. A dependent variable is one that a. always occurs first. b. is influenced by another variable. c. Causes another variable to change. d. is the most important ______18. In a study designed to test the relationship between gender and voting behavior, the independent variable would be a. the age of the candidates b. voting behavior. c. The political party of the candidates. d. Gender ______19. Differences in age, sex, race, and social class are treated as ____________in sociological research. a. variables b. references c. causes d. controls ______20. Researchers in agriculture decided to test the effects of a new fertilizer on crop growth. In this study, crop growth is the a. independent variable b. dependent variable c. control variable d. correlation e. _____21. The ______is appropriate for studying the relationships among variables under carefully controlled conditions. a. experiment b. survey c. observational study d. in-depth study _____22. In every experiment, some subjects are exposed to an independent variable, and are then watched closely for their reactions. These subjects are known as the a. reference group b. experimental group c. control group d. survey group. ______23. A usual research method for learning the attitudes of a population would be a. an experiment. b. A survey. c. An observational study. d. Content analysis ______24. In survey research, the total group of people the researcher is interested in is called a. the population b. the sample, c. the control group d. the random sample ______25. In the experiment method, the subjects who are exposed to all the experimental conditions except the independent variable are referred to as the_________________group. a. peer b. alternate c. control d. experimental ______26. A__________Sample is one in which every member of the population in The population has an equal chance of being selected. a. defined b. random c. purposive d. convenience ______27. A sociologist is following the research model outlined in the text. After reviewing the literature, the next step will be to a. find a suitable subject b. formulate a hypothesis c. collect the data. d. Choose a research design. ______28. Sociologists use two approaches when answering important questions. a. Explanatory and descriptive Approaches b. Direct and systematic Approaches c. Normative and systematic Approaches d. Normative and Empirical Approaches ______29. Sociologists use types of empirical studies a. Research and Theoretical Studies b. Descriptive and Explanatory Studies c. Hypothesis and Correlations Studies d. Longitudinal and Cross-sectional Studies ______30. The deductive approach begin with the a. Collecting data b. Theory and uses research to test the theory. c. Hypothesis d. Observation ______31. The inductive approach begin with a a. Theory b. Data Collection c. Reviewing the Literature d. The Problem State ______32. Quantitative Research deals with a. Words b. Numbers c. Interpretive descriptive d. Use number to analyze underlying meanings and patterns of social relationships. ______33. ________is the study of social life in its natural setting: observing and interviewing people where they live, work, and play. a. The survey b. Secondary analysis c. Field research d. The experiment ______34. ________refers to the process of collecting data while being part of the activities of the group that the researcher is studying a. The experiment b. Survey research c. Participant observation d. Secondary analysis _______35. A/an________is a detailed study of the life and activities of a group of people by researchers who may live with that group over a period of years. a. Correlational study b. ethnography c. experiment d. content analysis _______36. A/an _________is a carefully designed situation in which the researcher studies the impact of certain variables on subjects’ attitudes or behavior. a. case study b. correlational study c. experiment d. Participant observation _______37. In an experiment, the_______contains the subjects who are exposed to an independent variable to study its effect on them. a. Experiment group b. Dependent group c. Control group d. Independent group _______38. In an experiment, the_________contains the subjects who are not exposed to the independent variable. a. Experimental group b. Independent group c. Dependent group d. Control group _______39. ________is the extent to which a study or research instrument accurately measures what it is supposed to measure a. Validity b. Reliability c. Predictability d. Variability ______40. ________is the extent to which a study or research instrument yields consistent results when applied to different individual at one time or to same individuals over time. a. Validity b. Reliability c. Predictability d. Variability TRUE/FALSE ______41. In social science research, individuals are the most typical units of analysis. ______42. With qualitative research, statistics are used to analyze patterns of social relationship. ______43. Reliability is when a study gives consistent results to different research over time.

Watch this video and answer the multi choices: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D4lB4SowAQA PART 1 _______1. Sociologists obtained their knowledge of human behavior through _______, which is this process of systematically collecting information for the purpose of testing an existing theory or generating a new one. a. Common sense ideas b. Research c. Myths d. scientific laws _______2. With ____Research, the goal is scientific objectivity, and the focus is on data that can be measured numerically a. qualitative b. observational c. c. quantitative d. d. explanatory _______3. With _______research, interpretative description (words) rather than statistics (numbers) are used to analyze underlying meaning and patterns of social relationships. a. qualitative b. observational c. quantitative d. explanatory _______4. Researchers in one study systematically analyzed the contents of the notes of suicide victims to determine recurring themes, such as feeling of despair or failure. They hoped to determine if any patterns could be found that would help in understating why people might kill themselves. This is an example of __________. a. Qualitative research b. Explanatory research c. Quantitative research d. Descriptive research ______5. the first step in the research process is to: a. select and define the research problem b. review previous research. c. develop a research design d. formulate the hypothesis ______6. A_____sample is a selection from a larger population and has the essential characteristics of the total population. a. selective b. random c. representative d. longitudinal _______7. _________is the extent to which a study or research instrument accurately measures what it is supposed to measure;_________is the extent to which a study or research instrument yields consistent results. a. Validity; replication b. Replication; validity c. Validity; reliability d. Reliability; validity _______8. Researchers who use existing material and analyze data that originally was collected by others are engaged in: a. unethical conduct b. primary analysis. c. secondary analysis d. survey analysis _______9. In an experiment, the subjects in the control group a. are exposed to the independent variable. b. are not exposed to the independent variable. c. are exposed to the dependent variable. d. are not exposed to the dependent variable. _______10. A tentative statement that predicts the relationship between variable is called a. a hypothesis b. a research model. c. a probability sample. d. a generalization. ______11. John wants to test this idea: “people who attend church regularly are less likely to express prejudice toward other races than people who do not attend church regularly.’ This idea is John’s a. hypothesis. b. research model. c. conclusion. d. operational definition _______12. In a research project, which of the following steps would come after the other three? a. choosing a research design b. reviewing the literature c. formulating a hypothesis d. collecting the data ________13. The variable hypothesized to cause or influence another is called the a. dependent variable. b. hypothetical variable c. correlation variable d. independent variable ________14. An explanation of an abstract concept that is specific enough to allow a research to measure the concept is a a. Hypothesis b. correlation. c. operatonal definition. d. variable _____15. Observation, ethnography, and case studies are examples of: a. survey research b. experiments. c. Secondary analysis of existing data. d. Field research. ______16. Theory and research are interrelated because a. theory always precedes research. b. research always precedes theory c. both put limits on each other. d. they are parts of a constant cycle. ______17. A dependent variable is one that a. always occurs first. b. is influenced by another variable. c. Causes another variable to change. d. is the most important ______18. In a study designed to test the relationship between gender and voting behavior, the independent variable would be a. the age of the candidates b. voting behavior. c. The political party of the candidates. d. Gender ______19. Differences in age, sex, race, and social class are treated as ____________in sociological research. a. variables b. references c. causes d. controls ______20. Researchers in agriculture decided to test the effects of a new fertilizer on crop growth. In this study, crop growth is the a. independent variable b. dependent variable c. control variable d. correlation e. _____21. The ______is appropriate for studying the relationships among variables under carefully controlled conditions. a. experiment b. survey c. observational study d. in-depth study _____22. In every experiment, some subjects are exposed to an independent variable, and are then watched closely for their reactions. These subjects are known as the a. reference group b. experimental group c. control group d. survey group. ______23. A usual research method for learning the attitudes of a population would be a. an experiment. b. A survey. c. An observational study. d. Content analysis ______24. In survey research, the total group of people the researcher is interested in is called a. the population b. the sample, c. the control group d. the random sample ______25. In the experiment method, the subjects who are exposed to all the experimental conditions except the independent variable are referred to as the_________________group. a. peer b. alternate c. control d. experimental ______26. A__________Sample is one in which every member of the population in The population has an equal chance of being selected. a. defined b. random c. purposive d. convenience ______27. A sociologist is following the research model outlined in the text. After reviewing the literature, the next step will be to a. find a suitable subject b. formulate a hypothesis c. collect the data. d. Choose a research design. ______28. Sociologists use two approaches when answering important questions. a. Explanatory and descriptive Approaches b. Direct and systematic Approaches c. Normative and systematic Approaches d. Normative and Empirical Approaches ______29. Sociologists use types of empirical studies a. Research and Theoretical Studies b. Descriptive and Explanatory Studies c. Hypothesis and Correlations Studies d. Longitudinal and Cross-sectional Studies ______30. The deductive approach begin with the a. Collecting data b. Theory and uses research to test the theory. c. Hypothesis d. Observation ______31. The inductive approach begin with a a. Theory b. Data Collection c. Reviewing the Literature d. The Problem State ______32. Quantitative Research deals with a. Words b. Numbers c. Interpretive descriptive d. Use number to analyze underlying meanings and patterns of social relationships. ______33. ________is the study of social life in its natural setting: observing and interviewing people where they live, work, and play. a. The survey b. Secondary analysis c. Field research d. The experiment ______34. ________refers to the process of collecting data while being part of the activities of the group that the researcher is studying a. The experiment b. Survey research c. Participant observation d. Secondary analysis _______35. A/an________is a detailed study of the life and activities of a group of people by researchers who may live with that group over a period of years. a. Correlational study b. ethnography c. experiment d. content analysis _______36. A/an _________is a carefully designed situation in which the researcher studies the impact of certain variables on subjects’ attitudes or behavior. a. case study b. correlational study c. experiment d. Participant observation _______37. In an experiment, the_______contains the subjects who are exposed to an independent variable to study its effect on them. a. Experiment group b. Dependent group c. Control group d. Independent group _______38. In an experiment, the_________contains the subjects who are not exposed to the independent variable. a. Experimental group b. Independent group c. Dependent group d. Control group _______39. ________is the extent to which a study or research instrument accurately measures what it is supposed to measure a. Validity b. Reliability c. Predictability d. Variability ______40. ________is the extent to which a study or research instrument yields consistent results when applied to different individual at one time or to same individuals over time. a. Validity b. Reliability c. Predictability d. Variability TRUE/FALSE ______41. In social science research, individuals are the most typical units of analysis. ______42. With qualitative research, statistics are used to analyze patterns of social relationship. ______43. Reliability is when a study gives consistent results to different research over time.

info@checkyourstudy.com Watch this video and answer the multi choices:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D4lB4SowAQA   … Read More...
Chapter 5 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, March 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Tactics Box 5.1 Drawing Force Vectors Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 5.1 Drawing Force Vectors. To visualize how forces are exerted on objects, we can use simple diagrams such as vectors. This Tactics Box illustrates the process of drawing a force vector by using the particle model, in which objects are treated as points. TACTICS BOX 5.1 Drawing force vectors Represent the object 1. as a particle. 2. Place the tail of the force vector on the particle. 3. Draw the force vector as an arrow pointing in the proper direction and with a length proportional to the size of the force. 4. Give the vector an appropriate label. The resulting diagram for a force exerted on an object is shown in the drawing. Note that the object is represented as a black dot. Part A A book lies on a table. A pushing force parallel to the table top and directed to the right is exerted on the book. Follow the steps above to draw the force vector . Use the black dot as the particle representing the book. F  F push F push Draw the vector starting at the black dot. The location and orientation of the vector will be graded. The length of the vector will not be graded. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Tactics Box 5.2 Identifying Forces Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 5.2 Identifying Forces. The first basic step in solving force and motion problems generally involves identifying all of the forces acting on an object. This tactics box provides a step-by-step method for identifying each force in a problem. TACTICS BOX 5.2 Identifying forces Identify the object of interest. This is the object whose motion 1. you wish to study. 2. Draw a picture of the situation. Show the object of interest and all other objects—such as ropes, springs, or surfaces—that touch it. 3. Draw a closed curve around the object. Only the object of interest is inside the curve; everything else is outside. 4. Locate every point on the boundary of this curve where other objects touch the object of interest. These are the points where contact forces are exerted on the object. Name and label each contact force acting on the object. There is at least one force at each point of contact; there may be more than one. When necessary, use subscripts to distinguish forces of the same type. 5. 6. Name and label each long-range force acting on the object. For now, the only long-range force is the gravitational force. Apply these steps to the following problem: A crate is pulled up a rough inclined wood board by a tow rope. Identify the forces on the crate. Part A Which of the following objects are of interest? Check all that apply. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Conceptual Questions on Newton’s 1st and 2nd Laws Learning Goal: To understand the meaning and the basic applications of Newton’s 1st and 2nd laws. In this problem, you are given a diagram representing the motion of an object–a motion diagram. The dots represent the object’s position at moments separated by equal intervals of time. The dots are connected by arrows representing the object’s average velocity during the corresponding time interval. Your goal is to use this motion diagram to determine the direction of the net force acting on the object. You will then determine which force diagrams and which situations may correspond to such a motion. crate earth rope wood board Part A What is the direction of the net force acting on the object at position A? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D upward downward to the left to the right The net force is zero. This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part I This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part J This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Understanding Newton’s Laws Part A An object cannot remain at rest unless which of the following holds? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B If a block is moving to the left at a constant velocity, what can one conclude? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: The net force acting on it is zero. The net force acting on it is constant and nonzero. There are no forces at all acting on it. There is only one force acting on it. Part C A block of mass is acted upon by two forces: (directed to the left) and (directed to the right). What can you say about the block’s motion? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D A massive block is being pulled along a horizontal frictionless surface by a constant horizontal force. The block must be __________. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: There is exactly one force applied to the block. The net force applied to the block is directed to the left. The net force applied to the block is zero. There must be no forces at all applied to the block. 2 kg 3 N 4 N It must be moving to the left. It must be moving to the right. It must be at rest. It could be moving to the left, moving to the right, or be instantaneously at rest. Part E Two forces, of magnitude and , are applied to an object. The relative direction of the forces is unknown. The net force acting on the object __________. Check all that apply. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Tactics Box 5.3 Drawing a Free-Body Diagram Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 5.3 Drawing a Free-Body Diagram. A free-body diagram is a diagram that represents the object as a particle and shows all of the forces acting on the object. Learning how to draw such a diagram is a very important skill in solving physics problems. This tactics box explains the essential steps to construct a correct free-body diagram. TACTICS BOX 5.3 Drawing a free-body diagram Identify all forces acting on the object. This step was described 1. in Tactics Box 5.2. continuously changing direction moving at constant velocity moving with a constant nonzero acceleration moving with continuously increasing acceleration 4 N 10 N cannot have a magnitude equal to cannot have a magnitude equal to cannot have the same direction as the force with magnitude must have a magnitude greater than 5 N 10 N 10 N 10 N Draw a coordinate system. Use the axes defined in your pictorial representation. If those axes are tilted, for motion along an incline, then the axes of the free-body diagram should be similarly tilted. 2. Represent the object as a dot at the origin of the coordinate axes. This is 3. the particle model. 4. Draw vectors representing each of the identified forces. This was described in Tactics Box 5.1. Be sure to label each force vector. Draw and label the net force vector . Draw this vector beside the diagram, not on the particle. Or, if appropriate, write . Then, check that points in the same direction as the acceleration vector on your motion diagram. 5. Apply these steps to the following problem: Your physics book is sliding on the carpet. Draw a free-body diagram. Part A Which forces are acting on the book? Check all that apply. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: F  net F =  net 0 F  net a Part B Draw the most appropriate set of coordinate axes for this problem. The orientation of your vectors will be graded. ANSWER: gravity normal force drag static friction tension kinetic friction spring force Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points.

Chapter 5 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, March 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Tactics Box 5.1 Drawing Force Vectors Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 5.1 Drawing Force Vectors. To visualize how forces are exerted on objects, we can use simple diagrams such as vectors. This Tactics Box illustrates the process of drawing a force vector by using the particle model, in which objects are treated as points. TACTICS BOX 5.1 Drawing force vectors Represent the object 1. as a particle. 2. Place the tail of the force vector on the particle. 3. Draw the force vector as an arrow pointing in the proper direction and with a length proportional to the size of the force. 4. Give the vector an appropriate label. The resulting diagram for a force exerted on an object is shown in the drawing. Note that the object is represented as a black dot. Part A A book lies on a table. A pushing force parallel to the table top and directed to the right is exerted on the book. Follow the steps above to draw the force vector . Use the black dot as the particle representing the book. F  F push F push Draw the vector starting at the black dot. The location and orientation of the vector will be graded. The length of the vector will not be graded. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Tactics Box 5.2 Identifying Forces Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 5.2 Identifying Forces. The first basic step in solving force and motion problems generally involves identifying all of the forces acting on an object. This tactics box provides a step-by-step method for identifying each force in a problem. TACTICS BOX 5.2 Identifying forces Identify the object of interest. This is the object whose motion 1. you wish to study. 2. Draw a picture of the situation. Show the object of interest and all other objects—such as ropes, springs, or surfaces—that touch it. 3. Draw a closed curve around the object. Only the object of interest is inside the curve; everything else is outside. 4. Locate every point on the boundary of this curve where other objects touch the object of interest. These are the points where contact forces are exerted on the object. Name and label each contact force acting on the object. There is at least one force at each point of contact; there may be more than one. When necessary, use subscripts to distinguish forces of the same type. 5. 6. Name and label each long-range force acting on the object. For now, the only long-range force is the gravitational force. Apply these steps to the following problem: A crate is pulled up a rough inclined wood board by a tow rope. Identify the forces on the crate. Part A Which of the following objects are of interest? Check all that apply. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Conceptual Questions on Newton’s 1st and 2nd Laws Learning Goal: To understand the meaning and the basic applications of Newton’s 1st and 2nd laws. In this problem, you are given a diagram representing the motion of an object–a motion diagram. The dots represent the object’s position at moments separated by equal intervals of time. The dots are connected by arrows representing the object’s average velocity during the corresponding time interval. Your goal is to use this motion diagram to determine the direction of the net force acting on the object. You will then determine which force diagrams and which situations may correspond to such a motion. crate earth rope wood board Part A What is the direction of the net force acting on the object at position A? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D upward downward to the left to the right The net force is zero. This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part I This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part J This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Understanding Newton’s Laws Part A An object cannot remain at rest unless which of the following holds? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B If a block is moving to the left at a constant velocity, what can one conclude? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: The net force acting on it is zero. The net force acting on it is constant and nonzero. There are no forces at all acting on it. There is only one force acting on it. Part C A block of mass is acted upon by two forces: (directed to the left) and (directed to the right). What can you say about the block’s motion? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D A massive block is being pulled along a horizontal frictionless surface by a constant horizontal force. The block must be __________. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: There is exactly one force applied to the block. The net force applied to the block is directed to the left. The net force applied to the block is zero. There must be no forces at all applied to the block. 2 kg 3 N 4 N It must be moving to the left. It must be moving to the right. It must be at rest. It could be moving to the left, moving to the right, or be instantaneously at rest. Part E Two forces, of magnitude and , are applied to an object. The relative direction of the forces is unknown. The net force acting on the object __________. Check all that apply. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Tactics Box 5.3 Drawing a Free-Body Diagram Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 5.3 Drawing a Free-Body Diagram. A free-body diagram is a diagram that represents the object as a particle and shows all of the forces acting on the object. Learning how to draw such a diagram is a very important skill in solving physics problems. This tactics box explains the essential steps to construct a correct free-body diagram. TACTICS BOX 5.3 Drawing a free-body diagram Identify all forces acting on the object. This step was described 1. in Tactics Box 5.2. continuously changing direction moving at constant velocity moving with a constant nonzero acceleration moving with continuously increasing acceleration 4 N 10 N cannot have a magnitude equal to cannot have a magnitude equal to cannot have the same direction as the force with magnitude must have a magnitude greater than 5 N 10 N 10 N 10 N Draw a coordinate system. Use the axes defined in your pictorial representation. If those axes are tilted, for motion along an incline, then the axes of the free-body diagram should be similarly tilted. 2. Represent the object as a dot at the origin of the coordinate axes. This is 3. the particle model. 4. Draw vectors representing each of the identified forces. This was described in Tactics Box 5.1. Be sure to label each force vector. Draw and label the net force vector . Draw this vector beside the diagram, not on the particle. Or, if appropriate, write . Then, check that points in the same direction as the acceleration vector on your motion diagram. 5. Apply these steps to the following problem: Your physics book is sliding on the carpet. Draw a free-body diagram. Part A Which forces are acting on the book? Check all that apply. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: F  net F =  net 0 F  net a Part B Draw the most appropriate set of coordinate axes for this problem. The orientation of your vectors will be graded. ANSWER: gravity normal force drag static friction tension kinetic friction spring force Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points.

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RMU Professional Workplace Communication/Talerico Questions for LA Reading 1: “Simplicity,” William Zinsser, 201-206 “The Maker’s Eye: Revising Your Own Manuscripts,” Donald M. Murray, 194-198 Please read the two articles—“Simplicity” and “The Maker’s Eye: Revising Your Own Manuscripts.” Then, answer the following questions in complete sentences, typed and double-spaced (every line); use 12-point type. The answers are due in class on Tuesday, September 8, when we will discuss them. “Simplicity,” William Zinsser, 201-206 1. What document or set of instructions have you read that you found wordy and difficult to read? How did you handle the situation? 2. What does Zinsser mean when he writes, “Our national tendency is to inflate and thereby sound important” (201)? Why is writing often like this? 3. What does the author say is the secret of good writing? Why is this secret important? 4. How can we, according to Zinsser, write clearly and simply? 5. Why is clear writing so important to today’s readers? 6. What two questions must the writer always ask? How might asking these questions during your writing—and when you are finished writing—improve your drafts? “The Maker’s Eye: Revising Your Own Manuscripts,” Donald M. Murray, 194-198.
 7. Murray lists many qualities of professional writers. What are three of them? 8. Why would science-fiction writer Ray Bradbury put away for one year a manuscript he has written, and then reread it “as a stranger” (195)? What would be the value of this? 9. For each of the following quotes by professional writers, write one sentence that summarizes the main point the writer is making: a) Nancy Hale: A writer “should be critical of everything that seems to him most delightful in his style. He should excise what he most admires because he wouldn’t thus admire it if he weren’t…in a sense protecting it from criticism” (195). b) John Ciardi: “The last act of the writing must be to become one’s own reader. It is, I suppose, a schizophrenic process, to begin passionately and to end critically, to begin hot and to end cold; and more important to be passion-hot and critic-cold at the same time” (195) c) Eleanor Estes: “The writer must survey his work critically, coolly, as though he were a stranger to it. He must be willing to prune, expertly and hard-heartedly. At the end of each revision, a manuscript may look…worked over, torn apart, pinned together, added to, deleted from, words changed and words changed back. Yet the book must maintain its orginal freshness and spontaneity” (195). d) Roald Dahl: “Good writing is essentially rewriting” (196). 10. Why do most readers, as Murray states, “underestimate the amount of rewriting it usually takes to produce spontaneous reading” (195)? Do you fit into this category? 11. List the 8 things the author says writers look for in creating their drafts. For each item on your list, write one sentence explaining what it means. 12. What are some of the things Murray says writers begin to learn by writing? Have you ever experienced any of these things when you were writing? Explain your answer. 13. What does Murray means when he states, “A piece of writing is never finished” (198)?

RMU Professional Workplace Communication/Talerico Questions for LA Reading 1: “Simplicity,” William Zinsser, 201-206 “The Maker’s Eye: Revising Your Own Manuscripts,” Donald M. Murray, 194-198 Please read the two articles—“Simplicity” and “The Maker’s Eye: Revising Your Own Manuscripts.” Then, answer the following questions in complete sentences, typed and double-spaced (every line); use 12-point type. The answers are due in class on Tuesday, September 8, when we will discuss them. “Simplicity,” William Zinsser, 201-206 1. What document or set of instructions have you read that you found wordy and difficult to read? How did you handle the situation? 2. What does Zinsser mean when he writes, “Our national tendency is to inflate and thereby sound important” (201)? Why is writing often like this? 3. What does the author say is the secret of good writing? Why is this secret important? 4. How can we, according to Zinsser, write clearly and simply? 5. Why is clear writing so important to today’s readers? 6. What two questions must the writer always ask? How might asking these questions during your writing—and when you are finished writing—improve your drafts? “The Maker’s Eye: Revising Your Own Manuscripts,” Donald M. Murray, 194-198.
 7. Murray lists many qualities of professional writers. What are three of them? 8. Why would science-fiction writer Ray Bradbury put away for one year a manuscript he has written, and then reread it “as a stranger” (195)? What would be the value of this? 9. For each of the following quotes by professional writers, write one sentence that summarizes the main point the writer is making: a) Nancy Hale: A writer “should be critical of everything that seems to him most delightful in his style. He should excise what he most admires because he wouldn’t thus admire it if he weren’t…in a sense protecting it from criticism” (195). b) John Ciardi: “The last act of the writing must be to become one’s own reader. It is, I suppose, a schizophrenic process, to begin passionately and to end critically, to begin hot and to end cold; and more important to be passion-hot and critic-cold at the same time” (195) c) Eleanor Estes: “The writer must survey his work critically, coolly, as though he were a stranger to it. He must be willing to prune, expertly and hard-heartedly. At the end of each revision, a manuscript may look…worked over, torn apart, pinned together, added to, deleted from, words changed and words changed back. Yet the book must maintain its orginal freshness and spontaneity” (195). d) Roald Dahl: “Good writing is essentially rewriting” (196). 10. Why do most readers, as Murray states, “underestimate the amount of rewriting it usually takes to produce spontaneous reading” (195)? Do you fit into this category? 11. List the 8 things the author says writers look for in creating their drafts. For each item on your list, write one sentence explaining what it means. 12. What are some of the things Murray says writers begin to learn by writing? Have you ever experienced any of these things when you were writing? Explain your answer. 13. What does Murray means when he states, “A piece of writing is never finished” (198)?

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IT 7358 – Human interface Technology Assignment 3 – Observation Exercise The purpose of this exercise is for you to begin learning how to make and record observations of people involved in an activity of some kind. To do this project you will need a pad of paper, a notebook or something else to write on, and a pen or pencil. To begin this exercise, you will be making an observation in a public space. Specifically, you will be observing a cafeteria setting, such as found in the basement of the IU main library, dorm cafeteria, Union cafeteria etc. Choose a time during which there is a good amount of activity. Be aware that too little activity will not give you enough data to work with, and might make people feel like they’re being watched. Once you have chosen the position from which you will make your observations, go through the following steps: • Record the date, day of week, time of day, weather, and other factors you think may have some bearing on what you are observing. • Describe the setting. Note features of the physical environment that seem to be significant. Write a brief and general description of what’s going on. This is mainly for background and context. • Also record your reactions and thoughts about what is going on, but you should keep these reactions distinct from description – perhaps in the margins, or on the back of the page. • Describe in detail the activity you are observing. At this point, you should strive for your description to be concrete, specific, and chronological. For example, it is better to record, “Six people standing single file in line, holding trays horizontal at waist height, advancing several steps in cascading fashion when the cashier says ‘next.’ On each tray is…” instead of “people waiting in line to pay for their food.” Your guiding question right now is ‘What’s going on here?’ Your notes for this part of the exercise should be event-by-event narrative, not generalizations. • Separately (again, in the margins or somewhere else) record the perceptions, motives, and values of the people you are watching. As you observe, begin to focus on something that seems interesting to you, such as a pattern that emerges or a particular aspect of what you are observing. Stop when you’ve done roughly 20 minutes of detailed go back over your notes and fill in any important but missing details from memory, adding questions that came up for you as you were observing, and ideas you could investigate in the future if you were going to do further study. You can also begin adding any of your own interpretations of what you observed.

IT 7358 – Human interface Technology Assignment 3 – Observation Exercise The purpose of this exercise is for you to begin learning how to make and record observations of people involved in an activity of some kind. To do this project you will need a pad of paper, a notebook or something else to write on, and a pen or pencil. To begin this exercise, you will be making an observation in a public space. Specifically, you will be observing a cafeteria setting, such as found in the basement of the IU main library, dorm cafeteria, Union cafeteria etc. Choose a time during which there is a good amount of activity. Be aware that too little activity will not give you enough data to work with, and might make people feel like they’re being watched. Once you have chosen the position from which you will make your observations, go through the following steps: • Record the date, day of week, time of day, weather, and other factors you think may have some bearing on what you are observing. • Describe the setting. Note features of the physical environment that seem to be significant. Write a brief and general description of what’s going on. This is mainly for background and context. • Also record your reactions and thoughts about what is going on, but you should keep these reactions distinct from description – perhaps in the margins, or on the back of the page. • Describe in detail the activity you are observing. At this point, you should strive for your description to be concrete, specific, and chronological. For example, it is better to record, “Six people standing single file in line, holding trays horizontal at waist height, advancing several steps in cascading fashion when the cashier says ‘next.’ On each tray is…” instead of “people waiting in line to pay for their food.” Your guiding question right now is ‘What’s going on here?’ Your notes for this part of the exercise should be event-by-event narrative, not generalizations. • Separately (again, in the margins or somewhere else) record the perceptions, motives, and values of the people you are watching. As you observe, begin to focus on something that seems interesting to you, such as a pattern that emerges or a particular aspect of what you are observing. Stop when you’ve done roughly 20 minutes of detailed go back over your notes and fill in any important but missing details from memory, adding questions that came up for you as you were observing, and ideas you could investigate in the future if you were going to do further study. You can also begin adding any of your own interpretations of what you observed.

Place: Cafeteria Date: 27/05/2013 Day of week: Monday Time of … Read More...
Elastic Collision Write up for TA Jessica Andersen The following pages include what is expected for the PHY 112 Elastic Collision lab. Below each section heading are general tips for lab writing that can be applied to any lab in the future. Point values associated with each section are stated, as well are the points associated for topics within that section. Read through completely before beginning. Introduction ( 20 pts total ) Tips for a good Introduction section: Be thorough but do not write a five paragraph essay! Concisely present the purpose and background material. You don’t need to number equations unless you will be referring back to them. Simply explain what they apply to as you introduce them. A 2pt bullet should not correspond to more than two lines of writing in your report. – Include a statement of purpose for the lab. (5pts) – Define the necessary conditions of an Elastic Collision (5pts) – Introduce the concept of conservation of linear momentum and derive the equation for calculating linear momentum in the x-direction and the y direction. (5pts) – Introduce the concept of conservation of energy and derive the equation for calculating kinetic energy of the system before and after the collision. (5pts) Methods (10 pts total) Tips for a good Methods section: Don’t spend too much time on this section! Be very quick and to the point. Write as if you are giving instructions to someone else. This will sound much more professional and you won’t have to worry about the use of “I” or “we”, which can tend to make a lab report sound very informal. – Briefly describe the setup of the lab and what precautions were taken to ensure something close to an elastic collision (5pts) – What frequency was the “zapper” set to? (5pts) Results (25 pts total) Tips for a good Results section: This is an important section. It should be organized and formatted in a way that makes it very easy to read. Your tables should have borders and bolded headings where you see appropriate. Always include a brief description of each table at the opening of the section. REMEMBER, the Results section is about conveying your data in a readable and easy to understand way. • do not divide tables across pages • do not include more than 3 decimal places unless they are legitimately important – Include a table that summarizes all of the values recorded from the collision path. (5pts) – Include a table that displays the Kinetic Energy before and after the collision (5pts) – Include a table that displays the Linear Momentum in both directions before and after the collision (10pts) – Include a summary table that calculates the percent error between before collision values and after collision values. Use the before collision values as your theoretical value. (5pts) Discussion (40 pts total) Tips for a good Discussion section: This section is worth almost half of your report! I want to see that you put legitimate thought into your data and how it relates to what you learn in lecture. Show me that you understand the things we talked about in class. Be thorough, but remember that long and drawn out does not necessary achieve this. • do not present data as one large paragraph, make them smaller and easier to read • do not refer back to tables, actually state the values when asked for • you may refer back to graphs when necessary • do not use math vocabulary wrong, if you are unsure of a definition, look it up!!! – Present the percent error values for both momentum and energy calculations. (10pts) – Why was the energy and momentum BEFORE collision used as the theoretical value? (hint: It has to do with us assuming we have an Elastic Collision) (10pts) – Present the frequency of the “zapper”. What does this mean about the time that passes between each dot on the collision path? (10pts) – Discuss sources of error in this lab and how they may have affected our final result. (10pts) Appendix (5pts total) – Just staple on whatever notes you took in class.

Elastic Collision Write up for TA Jessica Andersen The following pages include what is expected for the PHY 112 Elastic Collision lab. Below each section heading are general tips for lab writing that can be applied to any lab in the future. Point values associated with each section are stated, as well are the points associated for topics within that section. Read through completely before beginning. Introduction ( 20 pts total ) Tips for a good Introduction section: Be thorough but do not write a five paragraph essay! Concisely present the purpose and background material. You don’t need to number equations unless you will be referring back to them. Simply explain what they apply to as you introduce them. A 2pt bullet should not correspond to more than two lines of writing in your report. – Include a statement of purpose for the lab. (5pts) – Define the necessary conditions of an Elastic Collision (5pts) – Introduce the concept of conservation of linear momentum and derive the equation for calculating linear momentum in the x-direction and the y direction. (5pts) – Introduce the concept of conservation of energy and derive the equation for calculating kinetic energy of the system before and after the collision. (5pts) Methods (10 pts total) Tips for a good Methods section: Don’t spend too much time on this section! Be very quick and to the point. Write as if you are giving instructions to someone else. This will sound much more professional and you won’t have to worry about the use of “I” or “we”, which can tend to make a lab report sound very informal. – Briefly describe the setup of the lab and what precautions were taken to ensure something close to an elastic collision (5pts) – What frequency was the “zapper” set to? (5pts) Results (25 pts total) Tips for a good Results section: This is an important section. It should be organized and formatted in a way that makes it very easy to read. Your tables should have borders and bolded headings where you see appropriate. Always include a brief description of each table at the opening of the section. REMEMBER, the Results section is about conveying your data in a readable and easy to understand way. • do not divide tables across pages • do not include more than 3 decimal places unless they are legitimately important – Include a table that summarizes all of the values recorded from the collision path. (5pts) – Include a table that displays the Kinetic Energy before and after the collision (5pts) – Include a table that displays the Linear Momentum in both directions before and after the collision (10pts) – Include a summary table that calculates the percent error between before collision values and after collision values. Use the before collision values as your theoretical value. (5pts) Discussion (40 pts total) Tips for a good Discussion section: This section is worth almost half of your report! I want to see that you put legitimate thought into your data and how it relates to what you learn in lecture. Show me that you understand the things we talked about in class. Be thorough, but remember that long and drawn out does not necessary achieve this. • do not present data as one large paragraph, make them smaller and easier to read • do not refer back to tables, actually state the values when asked for • you may refer back to graphs when necessary • do not use math vocabulary wrong, if you are unsure of a definition, look it up!!! – Present the percent error values for both momentum and energy calculations. (10pts) – Why was the energy and momentum BEFORE collision used as the theoretical value? (hint: It has to do with us assuming we have an Elastic Collision) (10pts) – Present the frequency of the “zapper”. What does this mean about the time that passes between each dot on the collision path? (10pts) – Discuss sources of error in this lab and how they may have affected our final result. (10pts) Appendix (5pts total) – Just staple on whatever notes you took in class.

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Project 1: Particle Trajectory in Pleated Filters Due: 12:30 pm, Dec. 1, 2015, submission through blackboard Course: Numerical Methods Instructor: Dr. Hooman V. Tafreshi Most aerosol filters are made of pleated fibrous media. This is to accommodate as much filtration media as possible in a limited space available to an air filtration unit (e.g., the engine of a car). A variety of parameters contribute to the performance of a pleated filter. These parameters include, but are not limited to, geometry of the pleat (e.g., pleat height, width, and count), microscale properties of the fibrous media (e.g., fiber diameters, fiber orientation, and solid volume fraction), aerodynamic and thermal conditions of the flow (e.g., flow velocity, temperature, and operating pressure), and particle properties (e.g., diameter, density, and shape). Figure 1: Examples of pleated air filters [1‐2]. In this project you are asked to calculate the trajectory of aerosol particles as they travel inside a rectangular pleat channel. Due to the symmetry of the pleat geometry, you only need to simulate one half of the channel (see Figure 2). Figure 2: The simulation domain and boundary conditions (the figure’s aspect ratio is altered for illustration purposes). Trajectory of the aerosol particles can be calculated in a 2‐D domain by solving the Newton’s 2nd law written for the particles in the x‐ and y‐directions, v(h) inlet velocity fibrous media v(y) y tm l h x Ui u(l) u(x) 2 2 p 1 p 1 ( , ) d x dx u x y dt  dt    2 2 p 1 p 1 ( , ) d y dy v x y dt  dt    where 2 1/18 p p   d    is the particle relaxation time, 10 μm p d  is the particle diameter, 1000 kg/m3 p   is the particle density, and   1.85105 Pa.s is the air viscosity. Also, u(x, y) and v(x, y) represent the components of the air velocity in the x and y directions inside the pleat channel, respectively. The x and y positions of the particles are denoted by xp and yp, respectively. You may use the following expressions for u(x, y) and v(x, y) .     2 3 1 2 u x, y u x y h                  sin 2 v x,y v h π y h        where   i 1 u x U x l h          is the average air velocity inside the pleat channel in the x‐direction and Ui is the velocity at the pleat entrance (assume 1 m/s for this project). l = 0.0275 m and h =0.0011 m are the pleat length and height, respectively. Writing the conservation of mass for the air flowing into the channel, you can also obtain that   i v h U h l h         . These 2nd order ODEs can easily be solved using a 4th order Rung‐Kutta method. In order to obtain realistic particle trajectories, you also need to consider proper initial conditions for the velocity of the particles: x(t  0)  0 , ( 0) i p p y t   y , p ( 0) cos i i dx t U dt    , p ( 0) sin i i dy t U dt     . where i  is the angle with respect to the axial direction by which a particle enters the pleat channel (see Figure 3). The inlet angle can be obtained from the following equation: 2 75 0.78 +0.16 1.61St i i p p i y y e h h                    where   2 St 18 2 ρPdPUi μ h  is the particles Stokes number. Figure 3: An illustration of the required particle trajectory calculation inside a rectangular pleated filter. You are asked to calculate and plot the trajectories of particles released from the vertical positions of ?? ? ? 0.05?, ?? ? ? 0.25?, ?? ? ? 0.5?, ?? ? ? 0.75? , and ?? ? ? 0.95? in one single figure. To do so, you need to track the trajectories until they reach one of the channel walls (i.e., stop when xp  l or p y  h ). Use a time step of 0.00001 sec. For more information see Ref. [3]. For additional background information see Ref. [4] and references there. In submitting your project please stick to following guidelines: 1‐ In blackboard, submit all the Matlab files and report in one single zip file. For naming your zip file, adhere to the format as: Lastname_firstname_project1.zip For instance: Einstein_albert_project1.zip 2‐ The report should be in pdf format only with the name as Project1.pdf (NO word documents .docx or .doc will be graded). 3‐ Your zip file can contain as many Matlab files as you want to submit. Also please submit the main code which TA’s should run with the name as: Project1.m (You can name the function files as you desire). Summary of what you should submit: 1‐ Runge–Kutta 4th order implementation in MATLAB. 2‐ Plot 5 particle trajectories in one graph. 3‐ Report your output (the x‐y positions of the five particles at each time step) in the form of a table with 11 columns (one for time and two for the x and y of each particle). Make sure the units are second for time and meter for the x and y. 4‐ Write a short, but yet clean and professional report describing your work. Up to 25% of your grade will be based solely on the style and formatting of your report. Use proper heading for each section of your report. Be consistent in your font size. Use Times New Roman only. Make sure that figures have proper self‐explanatory captions and are cited in the body of the report. Make sure that your figures have legends as well as x and y labels with proper and consistent fonts. Don’t forget that any number presented in the report or on the figures has to have a proper unit. Equations and pages in your report should be numbered. Embed your figures in the text. Make sure they do not have unnecessary frames around them or are not plotted on a grey background (default setting of some software programs!). inlet angle Particle trajectory i p y i 0 p x  Important Note: It is possible to solve the above ODEs using built‐in solvers such as ode45 in MATLAB, and you are encouraged to consider that for validating your MATLAB program. However, the results that you submit for this project MUST be obtained from your own implementation of the 4th order Runge‐Kutta method. You will not receive full credit if your MATALB program does not work, even if your results are absolutely correct! References: 1. http://www.airexco.net/custom‐manufacturedbr12‐inch‐pleated‐filter‐c‐108_113_114/custommadebr12‐ inch‐pleated‐filter‐p‐786.html 2. http://www.ebay.com/itm/Air‐Compressor‐Air‐Filter‐Element‐CFE‐275‐Round‐Pleated‐Filter‐ /251081172328 3. A.M. Saleh and H.V. Tafreshi, A Simple Semi‐Analytical Model for Designing Pleated Air Filters under Loading, Separation and Purification Technology 137, 94 (2014) 4. A.M. Saleh, S. Fotovati, H.V. Tafreshi, and B. Pourdeyhimi, Modeling Service Life of Pleated Filters Exposed to Poly‐Dispersed Aerosols, Powder Technology 266, 79 (2014)

Project 1: Particle Trajectory in Pleated Filters Due: 12:30 pm, Dec. 1, 2015, submission through blackboard Course: Numerical Methods Instructor: Dr. Hooman V. Tafreshi Most aerosol filters are made of pleated fibrous media. This is to accommodate as much filtration media as possible in a limited space available to an air filtration unit (e.g., the engine of a car). A variety of parameters contribute to the performance of a pleated filter. These parameters include, but are not limited to, geometry of the pleat (e.g., pleat height, width, and count), microscale properties of the fibrous media (e.g., fiber diameters, fiber orientation, and solid volume fraction), aerodynamic and thermal conditions of the flow (e.g., flow velocity, temperature, and operating pressure), and particle properties (e.g., diameter, density, and shape). Figure 1: Examples of pleated air filters [1‐2]. In this project you are asked to calculate the trajectory of aerosol particles as they travel inside a rectangular pleat channel. Due to the symmetry of the pleat geometry, you only need to simulate one half of the channel (see Figure 2). Figure 2: The simulation domain and boundary conditions (the figure’s aspect ratio is altered for illustration purposes). Trajectory of the aerosol particles can be calculated in a 2‐D domain by solving the Newton’s 2nd law written for the particles in the x‐ and y‐directions, v(h) inlet velocity fibrous media v(y) y tm l h x Ui u(l) u(x) 2 2 p 1 p 1 ( , ) d x dx u x y dt  dt    2 2 p 1 p 1 ( , ) d y dy v x y dt  dt    where 2 1/18 p p   d    is the particle relaxation time, 10 μm p d  is the particle diameter, 1000 kg/m3 p   is the particle density, and   1.85105 Pa.s is the air viscosity. Also, u(x, y) and v(x, y) represent the components of the air velocity in the x and y directions inside the pleat channel, respectively. The x and y positions of the particles are denoted by xp and yp, respectively. You may use the following expressions for u(x, y) and v(x, y) .     2 3 1 2 u x, y u x y h                  sin 2 v x,y v h π y h        where   i 1 u x U x l h          is the average air velocity inside the pleat channel in the x‐direction and Ui is the velocity at the pleat entrance (assume 1 m/s for this project). l = 0.0275 m and h =0.0011 m are the pleat length and height, respectively. Writing the conservation of mass for the air flowing into the channel, you can also obtain that   i v h U h l h         . These 2nd order ODEs can easily be solved using a 4th order Rung‐Kutta method. In order to obtain realistic particle trajectories, you also need to consider proper initial conditions for the velocity of the particles: x(t  0)  0 , ( 0) i p p y t   y , p ( 0) cos i i dx t U dt    , p ( 0) sin i i dy t U dt     . where i  is the angle with respect to the axial direction by which a particle enters the pleat channel (see Figure 3). The inlet angle can be obtained from the following equation: 2 75 0.78 +0.16 1.61St i i p p i y y e h h                    where   2 St 18 2 ρPdPUi μ h  is the particles Stokes number. Figure 3: An illustration of the required particle trajectory calculation inside a rectangular pleated filter. You are asked to calculate and plot the trajectories of particles released from the vertical positions of ?? ? ? 0.05?, ?? ? ? 0.25?, ?? ? ? 0.5?, ?? ? ? 0.75? , and ?? ? ? 0.95? in one single figure. To do so, you need to track the trajectories until they reach one of the channel walls (i.e., stop when xp  l or p y  h ). Use a time step of 0.00001 sec. For more information see Ref. [3]. For additional background information see Ref. [4] and references there. In submitting your project please stick to following guidelines: 1‐ In blackboard, submit all the Matlab files and report in one single zip file. For naming your zip file, adhere to the format as: Lastname_firstname_project1.zip For instance: Einstein_albert_project1.zip 2‐ The report should be in pdf format only with the name as Project1.pdf (NO word documents .docx or .doc will be graded). 3‐ Your zip file can contain as many Matlab files as you want to submit. Also please submit the main code which TA’s should run with the name as: Project1.m (You can name the function files as you desire). Summary of what you should submit: 1‐ Runge–Kutta 4th order implementation in MATLAB. 2‐ Plot 5 particle trajectories in one graph. 3‐ Report your output (the x‐y positions of the five particles at each time step) in the form of a table with 11 columns (one for time and two for the x and y of each particle). Make sure the units are second for time and meter for the x and y. 4‐ Write a short, but yet clean and professional report describing your work. Up to 25% of your grade will be based solely on the style and formatting of your report. Use proper heading for each section of your report. Be consistent in your font size. Use Times New Roman only. Make sure that figures have proper self‐explanatory captions and are cited in the body of the report. Make sure that your figures have legends as well as x and y labels with proper and consistent fonts. Don’t forget that any number presented in the report or on the figures has to have a proper unit. Equations and pages in your report should be numbered. Embed your figures in the text. Make sure they do not have unnecessary frames around them or are not plotted on a grey background (default setting of some software programs!). inlet angle Particle trajectory i p y i 0 p x  Important Note: It is possible to solve the above ODEs using built‐in solvers such as ode45 in MATLAB, and you are encouraged to consider that for validating your MATLAB program. However, the results that you submit for this project MUST be obtained from your own implementation of the 4th order Runge‐Kutta method. You will not receive full credit if your MATALB program does not work, even if your results are absolutely correct! References: 1. http://www.airexco.net/custom‐manufacturedbr12‐inch‐pleated‐filter‐c‐108_113_114/custommadebr12‐ inch‐pleated‐filter‐p‐786.html 2. http://www.ebay.com/itm/Air‐Compressor‐Air‐Filter‐Element‐CFE‐275‐Round‐Pleated‐Filter‐ /251081172328 3. A.M. Saleh and H.V. Tafreshi, A Simple Semi‐Analytical Model for Designing Pleated Air Filters under Loading, Separation and Purification Technology 137, 94 (2014) 4. A.M. Saleh, S. Fotovati, H.V. Tafreshi, and B. Pourdeyhimi, Modeling Service Life of Pleated Filters Exposed to Poly‐Dispersed Aerosols, Powder Technology 266, 79 (2014)

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1 IN2009: Language Processors Coursework Part 3: The Interpreter Introduction This is the 3rd and final part of the coursework. In the second part of the coursework you created a parser for the Moopl grammar which, given a syntactically correct Moopl program as input, builds an AST representation of the program. In Part 3 you will develop an interpreter which executes Moopl programs by visiting their AST representations. For this part of the coursework we provide functional code (with limitations, see below) for parsing, building a symbol table, type checking and variable allocation. Marks This part of the coursework is worth 12 of the 30 coursework marks for the Language Processors module. This part of the coursework is marked out of 12. Submission deadline This part of the coursework should be handed in before 5pm on Sunday 9th April 2017. In line with school policy, late submissions will be awarded no marks. Return & Feedback Marks and feedback will be available as soon as possible, certainly on or before Wed 3rd May 2017. Plagiarism If you copy the work of others (either that of fellow students or of a third party), with or without their permission, you will score no marks and further disciplinary action will be taken against you. Group working You will be working in the same groups as for the previous parts of the coursework except where group changes have already been approved. Submission: Submit a zip archive (not a rar file) of all your source code (the src folder of your project). We do not want the other parts of your NetBeans project, only the source code. Note 1: Submissions which do not compile will get zero marks. Note 2: You must not change the names or types of any of the existing packages, classes or public methods. 2 Getting started Download either moopl-interp.zip or moopl-interp.tgz from Moodle and extract all files. Key contents to be aware of: • A fully implemented Moopl parser (also implements a parser for the interpreter command language; see below). • A partially implemented Moopl type checker. • Test harnesses for the type checker and interpreter. • A directory of a few example Moopl programs (see Testing below). • Folder interp containing prototype interpreter code. The type-checker is only partially implemented but a more complete implementation will be provided following Session 6. That version is still not fully complete because it doesn’t support inheritance. Part d) below asks you to remove this restriction. The VarAllocator visitor in the interp package uses a simple implementation which only works for methods in which all parameter and local variable names are different. Part e) below asks you to remove this restriction. The three parts below should be attempted in sequence. When you have completed one part you should make a back-up copy of the work and keep it safe, in case you break it in your attempt at the next part. Be sure to test old functionality as well as new (regression testing). We will not assess multiple versions so, if your attempt at part d) or e) breaks previously working code, you may gain a better mark by submitting the earlier version for assessment. c) [8 marks] The Basic Interpreter: complete the implementation of the Interpreter visitor in the interp package. d) [2 marks] Inheritance: extend the type-checker, variable allocator and interpreter to support inheritance. e) [2 marks] Variable Allocation: extend the variable allocator to fully support blockstructure and lexical scoping, removing the requirement that all parameter and local variable names are different. Aim to minimise the number of local variable slots allocated in a stack frame. Note: variable and parameter names declared at the same scope level are still required to be different from each other (a method cannot have two different parameters called x, for example) and this is enforced by the existing typechecking code. But variables declared in different blocks (even when nested) can have the same name. Exceptions Your interpreter will only ever be run on Moopl code which is type-correct (and free from uninitialised local variables). But it is still possible that the Moopl code contains logical errors which may cause runtime errors (such as null-reference or array-bound errors). Your interpreter should throw a MooplRunTimeException with an appropriate error message in these cases. The only kind of exception your interpreter should ever throw is a MooplRunTimeException. 3 Testing The examples folder does not contain a comprehensive test-suite. You need to invent and run your own tests. The document Moopl compared with Java gives a concise summary of how Moopl programs are supposed to behave. You can (and should) also compare the behaviour of your interpreter with that of the online tool: https://smcse.city.ac.uk/student/sj353/langproc/Moopl.html (Note: the online tool checks for uninitialised local variables. Your implementation is not expected to do this.) To test your work, run the top-level Interpret harness, providing the name of a Moopl source file as a command-line argument. When run on a type-correct Moopl source file, Interpret will pretty-print the Moopl program then display a command prompt (>) at which you can enter one of the following commands: :quit This will quit the interpreter. :call main() This will call the top-level proc main, interpreted in the context defined by the Moopl program. (Any top-level proc can be called this way). :eval Exp ; This will evaluate expression Exp, interpreted in the context defined by the Moopl program, and print the result. Note the required terminating semi-colon. Testing your Expression visitors To unit-test your Exp visit methods, run the top-level Interpret harness on a complete Moopl program (though it can be trivial) and use the :eval command. For example, to test your visit methods for the Boolean-literals (ExpTrue and ExpFalse), you would enter the commands > :eval true ; > :eval false ; which should output 1 and 0, respectively. For the most basic cases, the Moopl program is essentially irrelevant (a single top-level proc with empty body may be sufficient). For other cases you will need to write programs containing class definitions (in order, for example, to test object creation and method call). Testing your Statement visitors To unit-test your Stm visit methods, write very simple Moopl programs, each with a top-level proc main() containing just a few lines of code. Run the top-level Interpret harness on these simple programs and enter the command > :call main() You will find a few examples to get you started in the folder examples/unittests. As for the Exp tests, simple cases can be tested using Moopl programs with just a main proc but for the more complex tests you will need to write Moopl programs containing class definitions. 4 Grading criteria Solutions will be graded according to their functional correctness, and the elegance of their implementation. Below are criteria that guide the award of marks. 70 – 100 [1st class] Work that meets all the requirements in full, constructed and presented to a professional standard. Showing evidence of independent reading, thinking and analysis. 60 – 69 [2:1] Work that makes a good attempt to address the requirements, realising all to some extent and most well. Well-structured and well presented. 50 – 59 [2:2] Work that attempts to address requirements realising all to some extent and some well but perhaps also including irrelevant or underdeveloped material. Structure and presentation may not always be clear. 40 – 49 [3rd class] Work that attempts to address the requirements but only realises them to some extent and may not include important elements or be completely accurate. Structure and presentation may lack clarity. 0 – 39 [fail] Unsatisfactory work that does not adequately address the requirements. Structure and presentation may be confused or incoherent.

1 IN2009: Language Processors Coursework Part 3: The Interpreter Introduction This is the 3rd and final part of the coursework. In the second part of the coursework you created a parser for the Moopl grammar which, given a syntactically correct Moopl program as input, builds an AST representation of the program. In Part 3 you will develop an interpreter which executes Moopl programs by visiting their AST representations. For this part of the coursework we provide functional code (with limitations, see below) for parsing, building a symbol table, type checking and variable allocation. Marks This part of the coursework is worth 12 of the 30 coursework marks for the Language Processors module. This part of the coursework is marked out of 12. Submission deadline This part of the coursework should be handed in before 5pm on Sunday 9th April 2017. In line with school policy, late submissions will be awarded no marks. Return & Feedback Marks and feedback will be available as soon as possible, certainly on or before Wed 3rd May 2017. Plagiarism If you copy the work of others (either that of fellow students or of a third party), with or without their permission, you will score no marks and further disciplinary action will be taken against you. Group working You will be working in the same groups as for the previous parts of the coursework except where group changes have already been approved. Submission: Submit a zip archive (not a rar file) of all your source code (the src folder of your project). We do not want the other parts of your NetBeans project, only the source code. Note 1: Submissions which do not compile will get zero marks. Note 2: You must not change the names or types of any of the existing packages, classes or public methods. 2 Getting started Download either moopl-interp.zip or moopl-interp.tgz from Moodle and extract all files. Key contents to be aware of: • A fully implemented Moopl parser (also implements a parser for the interpreter command language; see below). • A partially implemented Moopl type checker. • Test harnesses for the type checker and interpreter. • A directory of a few example Moopl programs (see Testing below). • Folder interp containing prototype interpreter code. The type-checker is only partially implemented but a more complete implementation will be provided following Session 6. That version is still not fully complete because it doesn’t support inheritance. Part d) below asks you to remove this restriction. The VarAllocator visitor in the interp package uses a simple implementation which only works for methods in which all parameter and local variable names are different. Part e) below asks you to remove this restriction. The three parts below should be attempted in sequence. When you have completed one part you should make a back-up copy of the work and keep it safe, in case you break it in your attempt at the next part. Be sure to test old functionality as well as new (regression testing). We will not assess multiple versions so, if your attempt at part d) or e) breaks previously working code, you may gain a better mark by submitting the earlier version for assessment. c) [8 marks] The Basic Interpreter: complete the implementation of the Interpreter visitor in the interp package. d) [2 marks] Inheritance: extend the type-checker, variable allocator and interpreter to support inheritance. e) [2 marks] Variable Allocation: extend the variable allocator to fully support blockstructure and lexical scoping, removing the requirement that all parameter and local variable names are different. Aim to minimise the number of local variable slots allocated in a stack frame. Note: variable and parameter names declared at the same scope level are still required to be different from each other (a method cannot have two different parameters called x, for example) and this is enforced by the existing typechecking code. But variables declared in different blocks (even when nested) can have the same name. Exceptions Your interpreter will only ever be run on Moopl code which is type-correct (and free from uninitialised local variables). But it is still possible that the Moopl code contains logical errors which may cause runtime errors (such as null-reference or array-bound errors). Your interpreter should throw a MooplRunTimeException with an appropriate error message in these cases. The only kind of exception your interpreter should ever throw is a MooplRunTimeException. 3 Testing The examples folder does not contain a comprehensive test-suite. You need to invent and run your own tests. The document Moopl compared with Java gives a concise summary of how Moopl programs are supposed to behave. You can (and should) also compare the behaviour of your interpreter with that of the online tool: https://smcse.city.ac.uk/student/sj353/langproc/Moopl.html (Note: the online tool checks for uninitialised local variables. Your implementation is not expected to do this.) To test your work, run the top-level Interpret harness, providing the name of a Moopl source file as a command-line argument. When run on a type-correct Moopl source file, Interpret will pretty-print the Moopl program then display a command prompt (>) at which you can enter one of the following commands: :quit This will quit the interpreter. :call main() This will call the top-level proc main, interpreted in the context defined by the Moopl program. (Any top-level proc can be called this way). :eval Exp ; This will evaluate expression Exp, interpreted in the context defined by the Moopl program, and print the result. Note the required terminating semi-colon. Testing your Expression visitors To unit-test your Exp visit methods, run the top-level Interpret harness on a complete Moopl program (though it can be trivial) and use the :eval command. For example, to test your visit methods for the Boolean-literals (ExpTrue and ExpFalse), you would enter the commands > :eval true ; > :eval false ; which should output 1 and 0, respectively. For the most basic cases, the Moopl program is essentially irrelevant (a single top-level proc with empty body may be sufficient). For other cases you will need to write programs containing class definitions (in order, for example, to test object creation and method call). Testing your Statement visitors To unit-test your Stm visit methods, write very simple Moopl programs, each with a top-level proc main() containing just a few lines of code. Run the top-level Interpret harness on these simple programs and enter the command > :call main() You will find a few examples to get you started in the folder examples/unittests. As for the Exp tests, simple cases can be tested using Moopl programs with just a main proc but for the more complex tests you will need to write Moopl programs containing class definitions. 4 Grading criteria Solutions will be graded according to their functional correctness, and the elegance of their implementation. Below are criteria that guide the award of marks. 70 – 100 [1st class] Work that meets all the requirements in full, constructed and presented to a professional standard. Showing evidence of independent reading, thinking and analysis. 60 – 69 [2:1] Work that makes a good attempt to address the requirements, realising all to some extent and most well. Well-structured and well presented. 50 – 59 [2:2] Work that attempts to address requirements realising all to some extent and some well but perhaps also including irrelevant or underdeveloped material. Structure and presentation may not always be clear. 40 – 49 [3rd class] Work that attempts to address the requirements but only realises them to some extent and may not include important elements or be completely accurate. Structure and presentation may lack clarity. 0 – 39 [fail] Unsatisfactory work that does not adequately address the requirements. Structure and presentation may be confused or incoherent.

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Develop a 4 page-500 word précis on Chapter 7 “How to Monitor & Control a TPM Project” of the Wysocki 7th Ed. text.”

Develop a 4 page-500 word précis on Chapter 7 “How to Monitor & Control a TPM Project” of the Wysocki 7th Ed. text.”

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