one page summary for osh (Occupational safety and health (OSH) also commonly referred to as occupational health and safety (OHS) or workplace health and safety (WHS) is an area concerned with the safety, health and welfare of people engaged in work or employment.) . The questions are 1. What happened? 2. Why it happened? 3. What could be done so it does not happen again?

one page summary for osh (Occupational safety and health (OSH) also commonly referred to as occupational health and safety (OHS) or workplace health and safety (WHS) is an area concerned with the safety, health and welfare of people engaged in work or employment.) . The questions are 1. What happened? 2. Why it happened? 3. What could be done so it does not happen again?

one page summary for osh (Occupational safety and health (OSH) … Read More...
Identify 3 frameworks used in information security

Identify 3 frameworks used in information security

Information security framework is a set of security framework model … Read More...
Use the links provided to answer the questions below. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9tt6BQDVKu0 http://assets.soomopublishing.com/courses/AG/Fragile_Superpower.pdf NIE Report Why does the report suggest that China and India may or may not become dominant powers in the near future? A. Both countries have high economic and social hurdles to overcome. B. Both countries are only somewhat democratic. C. Both countries lack the military strength and nuclear weaponry to challenge even smaller states. D. Neither country is a member of the UN Security Council. E. Neither country is concerned about global warming and is therefore unfit to become a great power player. According to the U.S. intelligence report discussed in the video, why will the use of nuclear weapons grow more likely? A. Irresponsible powerful countries will want to strike the United States to take over its dominant role in the world. B. There will be a tendency to forget just how dangerous they are as we over-emphasize the importance of international trade. C. Rogue states and terrorist groups may be able to gain greater access to these weapons. D. Since the United States and the Soviet Union are rapidly increasing their weapons building programs, the chances of a nuclear incident becomes higher. E. China is likely to produce nuclear weapons to use against the United States and the Soviet Union. According to the video, is the United States likely to lose its position in the world soon? A. Yes, given the rapid rise of China, we will be seeing a challenge from China in the next 5-10 years. B. Yes, China, in conjunction with India, will rise up against the United States. C. Yes, the Russians are working to undermine the U.S. position actively. D. No, although there appears to be decline, the replacement of the United States as the world leader is not likely to come in the next 10 years. E. No, the United States will actually lose its position after its departure from Iraq in 2012. The Rise of a Fierce Yet Fragile Superpower Why does Susan Shirk say that China is fragile? A. China is fragile because it isn’t a democratic country and will have a difficult time managing relations with other states because of this. B. China is fragile because it has a shrinking economy, so despite its size, China is actually very weak. C. China is fragile because its leaders tend to exacerbate the tensions between states like the Soviet Union and the United States. D. China is fragile because it cannot develop a strong sense of human rights and so its people may try to revolt against it. E. China is fragile because its rate of expansion has created gaps between the wealthy and poor and it has a problem of control with decentralized local governing structures. According to scholars, is a war between the rising power and the current power leader inevitable? A. No, while some scholars believe this is true, others suggest that a “peaceful rise” is possible. B. No, history indicates that all great power transitions have been peaceful. C. Yes, scholars indicate that all of our historical examples of great power transition have been through war. D. Yes, although there are examples of peaceful rise, there is too much cultural difference for that to occur with China. E. Yes, since tension between the United States and China is so strong, scholars agree that a war is coming.

Use the links provided to answer the questions below. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9tt6BQDVKu0 http://assets.soomopublishing.com/courses/AG/Fragile_Superpower.pdf NIE Report Why does the report suggest that China and India may or may not become dominant powers in the near future? A. Both countries have high economic and social hurdles to overcome. B. Both countries are only somewhat democratic. C. Both countries lack the military strength and nuclear weaponry to challenge even smaller states. D. Neither country is a member of the UN Security Council. E. Neither country is concerned about global warming and is therefore unfit to become a great power player. According to the U.S. intelligence report discussed in the video, why will the use of nuclear weapons grow more likely? A. Irresponsible powerful countries will want to strike the United States to take over its dominant role in the world. B. There will be a tendency to forget just how dangerous they are as we over-emphasize the importance of international trade. C. Rogue states and terrorist groups may be able to gain greater access to these weapons. D. Since the United States and the Soviet Union are rapidly increasing their weapons building programs, the chances of a nuclear incident becomes higher. E. China is likely to produce nuclear weapons to use against the United States and the Soviet Union. According to the video, is the United States likely to lose its position in the world soon? A. Yes, given the rapid rise of China, we will be seeing a challenge from China in the next 5-10 years. B. Yes, China, in conjunction with India, will rise up against the United States. C. Yes, the Russians are working to undermine the U.S. position actively. D. No, although there appears to be decline, the replacement of the United States as the world leader is not likely to come in the next 10 years. E. No, the United States will actually lose its position after its departure from Iraq in 2012. The Rise of a Fierce Yet Fragile Superpower Why does Susan Shirk say that China is fragile? A. China is fragile because it isn’t a democratic country and will have a difficult time managing relations with other states because of this. B. China is fragile because it has a shrinking economy, so despite its size, China is actually very weak. C. China is fragile because its leaders tend to exacerbate the tensions between states like the Soviet Union and the United States. D. China is fragile because it cannot develop a strong sense of human rights and so its people may try to revolt against it. E. China is fragile because its rate of expansion has created gaps between the wealthy and poor and it has a problem of control with decentralized local governing structures. According to scholars, is a war between the rising power and the current power leader inevitable? A. No, while some scholars believe this is true, others suggest that a “peaceful rise” is possible. B. No, history indicates that all great power transitions have been peaceful. C. Yes, scholars indicate that all of our historical examples of great power transition have been through war. D. Yes, although there are examples of peaceful rise, there is too much cultural difference for that to occur with China. E. Yes, since tension between the United States and China is so strong, scholars agree that a war is coming.

Use the links provided to answer the questions below. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9tt6BQDVKu0 … Read More...
Question 3 (1 point) In Rotter’s model, the behavior that is most likely to be performed in a given situation is Question 3 options: the one that has been reinforced. the one with the strongest behavior potential. the one for which a model has been reinforced. the one most consistent with the person’s self concept. Question 4 (1 point) Marlene’s desk becomes so messy that on occasion she cannot find an important paper she is looking for. After several incidents in which she suffered the consequences of not finding a paper she needed (such as a homework assignment), she learned to organize and straighten her desk. Marlene learned this new behavior through which operant conditioning procedure? Question 4 options: positive reinforcement negative reinforcement punishment extinction Question 5 (1 point) Colleen is trying to decide which of two events to enter in the school track meet. She thinks she would have a better chance of winning in the 100 meter race, but decides to enter the 10,000 meter race instead. According to Rotter’s theory, Question 5 options: her generalized expectancies determined this decision. the reinforcement value of winning the 10,000 meter race is greater than the reinforcement value of winning the 100 meter race. the decision illustrates that the behavior potential does not always determine behavior. she must have been reinforced for winning the 10,000 meter race in the past. Page 1 of 3 ________________________________________ . Question 6 (1 point) A woman complains to her therapist that lately she hasn’t “felt like herself.” The therapist plans to use a behavior modification treatment by altering the rewards and punishments in the woman’s environment. What is likely to be the first step the therapist takes in setting up this treatment? Question 6 options: Define the woman’s problem in terms of observable behaviors. Interview people the woman knows to determine the extent of the problem. Obtain baseline data for how often and when the problem occurs. Determine what in the woman’s past has been responsible for causing this problem. Question 7 (1 point) According to Bandura, we learn many behaviors by observing models. Whether or not we perform these behaviors depends on Question 7 options: our expectations for rewards and punishments. the reinforcement value of the rewards. generalized expectancies. whether we are children or adults. Question 8 (1 point) According to Bandura, people are most likely to change their behavior when they believe Question 8 options: the therapist has the ability to change them. following the treatment program can lead to the desired outcome. they are capable of engaging in the behaviors needed to bring about the desired outcome. they have chosen the type of treatment themselves. Question 9 (1 point) From his observations of cats escaping from a “puzzle box” to obtain a piece of fish, Thorndike developed a theory that is known as Question 9 options: the law of operant conditioning. the law of effect. the law of consequences. the law of association. Question 10 (1 point) Edward Thorndike observed cats learning to escape from boxes to obtain a piece of fish. He derived from these observations the “law of effect.” This was an early statement of Question 10 options: classical conditioning. operant conditioning. shaping. stimulus generalization. ________________________________________ . Question 11 (1 point) According to the behaviorist position, why don’t classically conditioned phobias extinguish after the pairing is removed? Question 11 options: People expect that the feared object will continue to hurt them. The fear and associated behaviors, such as running away from the feared object, often are reinforced. The fear of the original object generalizes to additional objects. The feared object has lost all of its reinforcement value. Question 12 (1 point) John’s mother wants her son to stop crying every time something goes wrong. Following a psychologist’s advice, she stops running to comfort John whenever the boy starts crying over some minor incident. After a few weeks, she notices that John cries much less often than he used to. This is an example of Question 12 options: positive reinforcement. negative reinforcement. punishment. extinction. Question 13 (1 point) According to Bandura, behavior modification procedures Question 13 options: are most effective when used in conjunction with other types of treatments. provide people with a method to change themselves once they have decided to do so. are not as effective as behavior therapists claim. are no more effective than providing clients with no treatment. Question 14 (1 point) The behavioral approach to personality postulates that personality is Question 14 options: the combination of environmental circumstances and unconscious impulses. a function of how we feel about conditions in the environment. the consistent patterns of behavior we engage in. the result of inherited predispositions to behave in certain ways. Question 15 (1 point) A woman shows no interest in socializing with other people. How might a behaviorist explain this behavior? Question 15 options: The woman does not believe that she can interact effectively with other people. The woman has not been reinforced enough for engaging in social behavior. The woman experiences anxiety in social situations and uses her asocial style as a defense against this anxiety. The woman is either high in social anxiety or low in sociability.

Question 3 (1 point) In Rotter’s model, the behavior that is most likely to be performed in a given situation is Question 3 options: the one that has been reinforced. the one with the strongest behavior potential. the one for which a model has been reinforced. the one most consistent with the person’s self concept. Question 4 (1 point) Marlene’s desk becomes so messy that on occasion she cannot find an important paper she is looking for. After several incidents in which she suffered the consequences of not finding a paper she needed (such as a homework assignment), she learned to organize and straighten her desk. Marlene learned this new behavior through which operant conditioning procedure? Question 4 options: positive reinforcement negative reinforcement punishment extinction Question 5 (1 point) Colleen is trying to decide which of two events to enter in the school track meet. She thinks she would have a better chance of winning in the 100 meter race, but decides to enter the 10,000 meter race instead. According to Rotter’s theory, Question 5 options: her generalized expectancies determined this decision. the reinforcement value of winning the 10,000 meter race is greater than the reinforcement value of winning the 100 meter race. the decision illustrates that the behavior potential does not always determine behavior. she must have been reinforced for winning the 10,000 meter race in the past. Page 1 of 3 ________________________________________ . Question 6 (1 point) A woman complains to her therapist that lately she hasn’t “felt like herself.” The therapist plans to use a behavior modification treatment by altering the rewards and punishments in the woman’s environment. What is likely to be the first step the therapist takes in setting up this treatment? Question 6 options: Define the woman’s problem in terms of observable behaviors. Interview people the woman knows to determine the extent of the problem. Obtain baseline data for how often and when the problem occurs. Determine what in the woman’s past has been responsible for causing this problem. Question 7 (1 point) According to Bandura, we learn many behaviors by observing models. Whether or not we perform these behaviors depends on Question 7 options: our expectations for rewards and punishments. the reinforcement value of the rewards. generalized expectancies. whether we are children or adults. Question 8 (1 point) According to Bandura, people are most likely to change their behavior when they believe Question 8 options: the therapist has the ability to change them. following the treatment program can lead to the desired outcome. they are capable of engaging in the behaviors needed to bring about the desired outcome. they have chosen the type of treatment themselves. Question 9 (1 point) From his observations of cats escaping from a “puzzle box” to obtain a piece of fish, Thorndike developed a theory that is known as Question 9 options: the law of operant conditioning. the law of effect. the law of consequences. the law of association. Question 10 (1 point) Edward Thorndike observed cats learning to escape from boxes to obtain a piece of fish. He derived from these observations the “law of effect.” This was an early statement of Question 10 options: classical conditioning. operant conditioning. shaping. stimulus generalization. ________________________________________ . Question 11 (1 point) According to the behaviorist position, why don’t classically conditioned phobias extinguish after the pairing is removed? Question 11 options: People expect that the feared object will continue to hurt them. The fear and associated behaviors, such as running away from the feared object, often are reinforced. The fear of the original object generalizes to additional objects. The feared object has lost all of its reinforcement value. Question 12 (1 point) John’s mother wants her son to stop crying every time something goes wrong. Following a psychologist’s advice, she stops running to comfort John whenever the boy starts crying over some minor incident. After a few weeks, she notices that John cries much less often than he used to. This is an example of Question 12 options: positive reinforcement. negative reinforcement. punishment. extinction. Question 13 (1 point) According to Bandura, behavior modification procedures Question 13 options: are most effective when used in conjunction with other types of treatments. provide people with a method to change themselves once they have decided to do so. are not as effective as behavior therapists claim. are no more effective than providing clients with no treatment. Question 14 (1 point) The behavioral approach to personality postulates that personality is Question 14 options: the combination of environmental circumstances and unconscious impulses. a function of how we feel about conditions in the environment. the consistent patterns of behavior we engage in. the result of inherited predispositions to behave in certain ways. Question 15 (1 point) A woman shows no interest in socializing with other people. How might a behaviorist explain this behavior? Question 15 options: The woman does not believe that she can interact effectively with other people. The woman has not been reinforced enough for engaging in social behavior. The woman experiences anxiety in social situations and uses her asocial style as a defense against this anxiety. The woman is either high in social anxiety or low in sociability.

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Define: 41 Things Philosophy is: 1. Ignorant 2. Selfish 3. Ironic 4. Plain 5. Misunderstood 6. A failure 7. Poor 8. Unscientific 9. Unteachable 10. Foolish 11. Abnormal 12. Divine trickery 13. Egalitarian 14. A divine calling 15. Laborious 16. Countercultural 17. Uncomfortable 18. Virtuous 19. Dangerous 20. Simplistic<br />21. Polemical 22. Therapeutic 23. “conformist” 24. Embarrassi ng 25. Invulnerable 26. Annoying 27. Pneumatic 28. Apolitic al 29. Docile/teachable 30. Messianic 31. Pious 32. Impract ical 33. Happy 34. Necessary 35. Death-defying 36. Fallible 37. Immortal 38. Confident 39. Painful 40. agnostic</br

Define: 41 Things Philosophy is: 1. Ignorant 2. Selfish 3. Ironic 4. Plain 5. Misunderstood 6. A failure 7. Poor 8. Unscientific 9. Unteachable 10. Foolish 11. Abnormal 12. Divine trickery 13. Egalitarian 14. A divine calling 15. Laborious 16. Countercultural 17. Uncomfortable 18. Virtuous 19. Dangerous 20. Simplistic
21. Polemical 22. Therapeutic 23. “conformist” 24. Embarrassi ng 25. Invulnerable 26. Annoying 27. Pneumatic 28. Apolitic al 29. Docile/teachable 30. Messianic 31. Pious 32. Impract ical 33. Happy 34. Necessary 35. Death-defying 36. Fallible 37. Immortal 38. Confident 39. Painful 40. agnostic

Ignorant- A person is said to be ignorant if he … Read More...
Essay list

Essay list

      Some students have a background or story … Read More...
This assignment provides you the opportunity to reflect on the topics ethics and how one might experience ethical challenges early in one’s career. The attached scenario is based on actual events and used with permission of ASCE. Using the attached scenario and American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) code of ethics, develop a response to the questions that are included within the scenario. Your deliverable must be in the form of a memorandum, which could be used as a reference or guideline when discussing the importance of ethics colleagues. When answering the questions you should be specific in identifying the components of the code of ethics you use to reflect on the questions posed and how they would be used to assist someone facing the same scenario. Ethics Scenario and Questions: Last month, Sara was reported to her State’s Engineer’s Board for a possible ethics violation. Tomorrow morning she would meet with the Board and though she felt she had done nothing unethical, Sara’s eyes had been opened to the complexity and gravity of ethical dilemmas in engineering practice. She wished she had sought and/or received better guidance regarding ethical issues earlier in her career. Sara reflected on how she got to this point in her career. When Sara had been a senior Civil Engineering student in an ABET-accredited program at the State University, she immersed herself in her course work. Graduating at the top of her class assured Sara that she would have some choice in her career direction. Knowing that she wanted to become a licensed engineer, Sara took and passed the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam during her senior year and after graduation, went to work as an Engineer Intern (EI) for a company that would allow her to achieve that goal. Sara was excited about her new job — she worked diligently for four years under licensed engineers and was assigned increasing responsibilities. She was now ready to take the Professional Engineer (PE) exam and become licensed. Just before taking the PE licensing exam, Sara’s firm was retained to investigate the structural integrity of an apartment complex that the firm’s client planned to sell. Sara’s supervisor informed her in no uncertain terms that the client required that the structural report remain confidential. Later, the client informed Sara that he planned to sell the occupied property “as is.” During Sara’s investigation she found no significant structural problems with the apartment complex. However, she did observe some electrical deficiencies that she believed violated city codes and could pose a safety hazard to the occupants. Realizing that electrical matters were, in a manner of speaking, not her direct area of expertise, Sara discussed possible approaches with her colleague and friend, Tom. Also an Engineer Intern, Tom had been an officer in the student chapter of ASCE during their college years. During their conversation, Tom commented that based on the ASCE Code of Ethics, he believed Sara had an ethical obligation to disclose this health-safety problem. Sara felt Tom did not appreciate the fact that she had been clearly instructed to keep such information confidential, and she certainly did not want to damage the client relationship. Nevertheless, with reluctance, Sara verbally informed the client about the problem and made an oblique reference to the electrical deficiencies in her report, which her supervisor signed and sealed. Several weeks later, Sara learned that her client did not inform either the residents of the apartment complex or the prospective buyer about her concerns. Although Sara felt confident and pleased with her work on the project, the situation about the electrical deficiencies continued to bother her. She wondered if she had an ethical obligation to do more than just tell the client and state her concerns in her report. The thought of informing the proper authorities occurred to her, especially since the client was not disclosing the potential safety concerns to either the occupants or the buyer. She toyed with the idea of discussing the situation with her immediate supervisor but since everyone seemed satisfied, Sara moved onto other projects and eventually put it out of her mind. Questions to consider (What were the main issues Sara was wrestling with in this situation? ; Do you think Sara had a “right” or an “obligation” to report the deficiency to the proper authorities? ;Who might Sara have spoken with about the dilemma? ; Who should be responsible for what happened – Sara, Sara’s employer, the client, or someone else? ; How does this situation conflict with Sara’s obligation to be faithful to her client? ; Is it wise practice to ignore “gut feelings” that arise? These and other questions will surface again later and most will be considered at that point, but let’s continue for now with Sara’s story. During her first few years with the company, and under the supervision of several managers, Sara was encouraged to become active in technical and professional societies (which was the policy of the company). But then she found her involvement with those groups diminishing as her current supervisor opposed Sara’s participation in meetings and conferences unless she used vacation time. Sara was very frustrated but did not really know how to rectify the situation. In the course of time, Sara attended a meeting with the CEO on a different matter and she took the opportunity to inquire about attending technical and professional society meetings. The CEO reaffirmed that the company thought it important and that he wanted Sara to participate in such meetings. Sara informed her supervisor and though he did begin approving Sara’s requests for leave to participate in society meetings, their relationship was strained. Questions to consider: What might Sara have done differently to seek a remedy and yet preserve her relationship with her supervisor? ; Where could Sara have found guidance in the ASCE Code of Ethics, appropriate to this situation? The story continues….. As Christmas approached the following year, Sara discovered a gift bag on her desk. Inside the gift bag was an expensive honey-glazed spiral cut ham and a Christmas greeting card from a vendor who called on Sara from time to time. This concerned Sara as she felt it might cast doubt on the integrity of their business relationship. She asked around and found that several others received gifts from the vendor as well. After sleeping on it, Sara sent a polite note to the vendor returning the ham. Questions to consider: Was Sara really obligated to return the ham? Or was this taking ethics too far? ; On the other hand, could Sara be obligated to pursue the matter further than just returning the gift she had received? A few years later, friends and colleagues urged Sara, now a highly successful principal in a respected engineering firm, to run for public office. Sara carefully considered this step, realizing it would be a challenge to juggle work, family, and such intense community involvement. Ultimately, she agreed to run and soon found herself immersed in the campaign. A draft political advertisement was prepared that included her photograph, her engineering seal, and the following text: “Vote for Sara! We need an engineer on the City Council. That is simple common sense, isn’t it? Sara is an experienced licensed engineer with years of rich accomplishments, who disdains delays and takes action now!” Questions to consider: Should Sara’s engineering seal be included in the advertisement? ; Should she ask someone in ASCE his or her opinion before deciding? As fate would have it, a few days later, just after announcing her candidacy for City Council, the matter of Sara’s investigation of the apartment complex so many years ago resurfaced. Sara learned that the apartment complex caught on fire, and people had been seriously injured. During the investigation of the cause of the fire, Sara’s report was reviewed, and somehow the cause of the fire was traced to the electrical deficiencies, which she had briefly mentioned. Immediately this hit the local newspapers, attorneys became involved, and subsequently the Licensing Board was asked to look into the ethical responsibilities related to the report. Now, sitting alone by the shore of the lake, Sara pondered her situation. Legally, she felt she might claim some immunity since she was not a licensed engineer at the time of her work on the apartment complex. But professionally, she keenly felt she had let the public down, and she could not get this, or those who had been hurt in the fire, out of her mind. Question to consider: Occasionally, are some elements of the code in conflict with other elements In the backseat of the taxi on the way to the airport, Sara thumbed through her hometown newspaper that she had purchased at a newsstand. She stopped when she saw an editorial about her City Council campaign. The article claimed that, as a result of the allegations against her, she was no longer fit for public office. Could this be true? Question to consider: How should she respond to such claims?

This assignment provides you the opportunity to reflect on the topics ethics and how one might experience ethical challenges early in one’s career. The attached scenario is based on actual events and used with permission of ASCE. Using the attached scenario and American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) code of ethics, develop a response to the questions that are included within the scenario. Your deliverable must be in the form of a memorandum, which could be used as a reference or guideline when discussing the importance of ethics colleagues. When answering the questions you should be specific in identifying the components of the code of ethics you use to reflect on the questions posed and how they would be used to assist someone facing the same scenario. Ethics Scenario and Questions: Last month, Sara was reported to her State’s Engineer’s Board for a possible ethics violation. Tomorrow morning she would meet with the Board and though she felt she had done nothing unethical, Sara’s eyes had been opened to the complexity and gravity of ethical dilemmas in engineering practice. She wished she had sought and/or received better guidance regarding ethical issues earlier in her career. Sara reflected on how she got to this point in her career. When Sara had been a senior Civil Engineering student in an ABET-accredited program at the State University, she immersed herself in her course work. Graduating at the top of her class assured Sara that she would have some choice in her career direction. Knowing that she wanted to become a licensed engineer, Sara took and passed the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam during her senior year and after graduation, went to work as an Engineer Intern (EI) for a company that would allow her to achieve that goal. Sara was excited about her new job — she worked diligently for four years under licensed engineers and was assigned increasing responsibilities. She was now ready to take the Professional Engineer (PE) exam and become licensed. Just before taking the PE licensing exam, Sara’s firm was retained to investigate the structural integrity of an apartment complex that the firm’s client planned to sell. Sara’s supervisor informed her in no uncertain terms that the client required that the structural report remain confidential. Later, the client informed Sara that he planned to sell the occupied property “as is.” During Sara’s investigation she found no significant structural problems with the apartment complex. However, she did observe some electrical deficiencies that she believed violated city codes and could pose a safety hazard to the occupants. Realizing that electrical matters were, in a manner of speaking, not her direct area of expertise, Sara discussed possible approaches with her colleague and friend, Tom. Also an Engineer Intern, Tom had been an officer in the student chapter of ASCE during their college years. During their conversation, Tom commented that based on the ASCE Code of Ethics, he believed Sara had an ethical obligation to disclose this health-safety problem. Sara felt Tom did not appreciate the fact that she had been clearly instructed to keep such information confidential, and she certainly did not want to damage the client relationship. Nevertheless, with reluctance, Sara verbally informed the client about the problem and made an oblique reference to the electrical deficiencies in her report, which her supervisor signed and sealed. Several weeks later, Sara learned that her client did not inform either the residents of the apartment complex or the prospective buyer about her concerns. Although Sara felt confident and pleased with her work on the project, the situation about the electrical deficiencies continued to bother her. She wondered if she had an ethical obligation to do more than just tell the client and state her concerns in her report. The thought of informing the proper authorities occurred to her, especially since the client was not disclosing the potential safety concerns to either the occupants or the buyer. She toyed with the idea of discussing the situation with her immediate supervisor but since everyone seemed satisfied, Sara moved onto other projects and eventually put it out of her mind. Questions to consider (What were the main issues Sara was wrestling with in this situation? ; Do you think Sara had a “right” or an “obligation” to report the deficiency to the proper authorities? ;Who might Sara have spoken with about the dilemma? ; Who should be responsible for what happened – Sara, Sara’s employer, the client, or someone else? ; How does this situation conflict with Sara’s obligation to be faithful to her client? ; Is it wise practice to ignore “gut feelings” that arise? These and other questions will surface again later and most will be considered at that point, but let’s continue for now with Sara’s story. During her first few years with the company, and under the supervision of several managers, Sara was encouraged to become active in technical and professional societies (which was the policy of the company). But then she found her involvement with those groups diminishing as her current supervisor opposed Sara’s participation in meetings and conferences unless she used vacation time. Sara was very frustrated but did not really know how to rectify the situation. In the course of time, Sara attended a meeting with the CEO on a different matter and she took the opportunity to inquire about attending technical and professional society meetings. The CEO reaffirmed that the company thought it important and that he wanted Sara to participate in such meetings. Sara informed her supervisor and though he did begin approving Sara’s requests for leave to participate in society meetings, their relationship was strained. Questions to consider: What might Sara have done differently to seek a remedy and yet preserve her relationship with her supervisor? ; Where could Sara have found guidance in the ASCE Code of Ethics, appropriate to this situation? The story continues….. As Christmas approached the following year, Sara discovered a gift bag on her desk. Inside the gift bag was an expensive honey-glazed spiral cut ham and a Christmas greeting card from a vendor who called on Sara from time to time. This concerned Sara as she felt it might cast doubt on the integrity of their business relationship. She asked around and found that several others received gifts from the vendor as well. After sleeping on it, Sara sent a polite note to the vendor returning the ham. Questions to consider: Was Sara really obligated to return the ham? Or was this taking ethics too far? ; On the other hand, could Sara be obligated to pursue the matter further than just returning the gift she had received? A few years later, friends and colleagues urged Sara, now a highly successful principal in a respected engineering firm, to run for public office. Sara carefully considered this step, realizing it would be a challenge to juggle work, family, and such intense community involvement. Ultimately, she agreed to run and soon found herself immersed in the campaign. A draft political advertisement was prepared that included her photograph, her engineering seal, and the following text: “Vote for Sara! We need an engineer on the City Council. That is simple common sense, isn’t it? Sara is an experienced licensed engineer with years of rich accomplishments, who disdains delays and takes action now!” Questions to consider: Should Sara’s engineering seal be included in the advertisement? ; Should she ask someone in ASCE his or her opinion before deciding? As fate would have it, a few days later, just after announcing her candidacy for City Council, the matter of Sara’s investigation of the apartment complex so many years ago resurfaced. Sara learned that the apartment complex caught on fire, and people had been seriously injured. During the investigation of the cause of the fire, Sara’s report was reviewed, and somehow the cause of the fire was traced to the electrical deficiencies, which she had briefly mentioned. Immediately this hit the local newspapers, attorneys became involved, and subsequently the Licensing Board was asked to look into the ethical responsibilities related to the report. Now, sitting alone by the shore of the lake, Sara pondered her situation. Legally, she felt she might claim some immunity since she was not a licensed engineer at the time of her work on the apartment complex. But professionally, she keenly felt she had let the public down, and she could not get this, or those who had been hurt in the fire, out of her mind. Question to consider: Occasionally, are some elements of the code in conflict with other elements In the backseat of the taxi on the way to the airport, Sara thumbed through her hometown newspaper that she had purchased at a newsstand. She stopped when she saw an editorial about her City Council campaign. The article claimed that, as a result of the allegations against her, she was no longer fit for public office. Could this be true? Question to consider: How should she respond to such claims?

MEMO       To: Ms. Sara From: Ethics Monitoring … Read More...