Chapter 11 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, April 18, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Understanding Work and Kinetic Energy Learning Goal: To learn about the Work-Energy Theorem and its basic applications. In this problem, you will learn about the relationship between the work done on an object and the kinetic energy of that object. The kinetic energy of an object of mass moving at a speed is defined as . It seems reasonable to say that the speed of an object–and, therefore, its kinetic energy–can be changed by performing work on the object. In this problem, we will explore the mathematical relationship between the work done on an object and the change in the kinetic energy of that object. First, let us consider a sled of mass being pulled by a constant, horizontal force of magnitude along a rough, horizontal surface. The sled is speeding up. Part A How many forces are acting on the sled? ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C K m v K = (1/2)mv2 m F one two three four This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part I Typesetting math: 91% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part J This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part K This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Work-Energy Theorem Reviewed Learning Goal: Review the work-energy theorem and apply it to a simple problem. If you push a particle of mass in the direction in which it is already moving, you expect the particle’s speed to increase. If you push with a constant force , then the particle will accelerate with acceleration (from Newton’s 2nd law). Part A Enter a one- or two-word answer that correctly completes the following statement. If the constant force is applied for a fixed interval of time , then the _____ of the particle will increase by an amount . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: M F a = F/M t at Typesetting math: 91% Part B Enter a one- or two-word answer that correctly completes the following statement. If the constant force is applied over a given distance , along the path of the particle, then the _____ of the particle will increase by . ANSWER: Part C If the initial kinetic energy of the particle is , and its final kinetic energy is , express in terms of and the work done on the particle. ANSWER: Part D In general, the work done by a force is written as . Now, consider whether the following statements are true or false: The dot product assures that the integrand is always nonnegative. The dot product indicates that only the component of the force perpendicular to the path contributes to the integral. The dot product indicates that only the component of the force parallel to the path contributes to the integral. Enter t for true or f for false for each statement. Separate your responses with commas (e.g., t,f,t). ANSWER: D FD Ki Kf Kf Ki W Kf = F W =  ( ) d f i F r r Typesetting math: 91% Part E Assume that the particle has initial speed . Find its final kinetic energy in terms of , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part F What is the final speed of the particle? Express your answer in terms of and . ANSWER: ± The Work Done in Pulling a Supertanker Two tugboats pull a disabled supertanker. Each tug exerts a constant force of 2.20×106 , one at an angle 10.0 west of north, and the other at an angle 10.0 east of north, as they pull the tanker a distance 0.660 toward the north. Part A What is the total work done by the two tugboats on the supertanker? Express your answer in joules, to three significant figures. vi Kf vi M F D Kf = Kf M vf = N km Typesetting math: 91% You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Energy Required to Lift a Heavy Box As you are trying to move a heavy box of mass , you realize that it is too heavy for you to lift by yourself. There is no one around to help, so you attach an ideal pulley to the box and a massless rope to the ceiling, which you wrap around the pulley. You pull up on the rope to lift the box. Use for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity and neglect friction forces. Part A Once you have pulled hard enough to start the box moving upward, what is the magnitude of the upward force you must apply to the rope to start raising the box with constant velocity? Express the magnitude of the force in terms of , the mass of the box. J m g F m Typesetting math: 91% You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Pulling a Block on an Incline with Friction A block of weight sits on an inclined plane as shown. A force of magnitude is applied to pull the block up the incline at constant speed. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the plane and the block is . Part A F = mg F μ Typesetting math: 91% What is the total work done on the block by the force of friction as the block moves a distance up the incline? Express the work done by friction in terms of any or all of the variables , , , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is the total work done on the block by the applied force as the block moves a distance up the incline? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the variables , , , , , and . ANSWER: Now the applied force is changed so that instead of pulling the block up the incline, the force pulls the block down the incline at a constant speed. Wfric L μ m g  L F Wfric = WF F L μ m g  L F WF = Typesetting math: 91% Part C What is the total work done on the block by the force of friction as the block moves a distance down the incline? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the variables , , , , , and . ANSWER: Part D What is the total work done on the box by the appled force in this case? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the variables , , , , , and . ANSWER: When Push Comes to Shove Two forces, of magnitudes = 75.0 and = 25.0 , act in opposite directions on a block, which sits atop a frictionless surface, as shown in the figure. Initially, the center of the block is at position = -1.00 . At some later time, the block has moved to the right, and its center is at a new position, = 1.00 . Wfric L μ m g  L F Wfric = WF μ m g  L F WF = F1 N F2 N xi cm xf cm Typesetting math: 91% Part A Find the work done on the block by the force of magnitude = 75.0 as the block moves from = -1.00 to = 1.00 . Express your answer numerically, in joules. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Find the work done by the force of magnitude = 25.0 as the block moves from = -1.00 to = 1.00 . Express your answer numerically, in joules. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: W1 F1 N xi cm xf cm W1 = J W2 F2 N xi cm xf cm Typesetting math: 91% Part C What is the net work done on the block by the two forces? Express your answer numerically, in joules. ANSWER: Part D Determine the change in the kinetic energy of the block as it moves from = -1.00 to = 1.00 . Express your answer numerically, in joules. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Work from a Constant Force Learning Goal: W2 = J Wnet Wnet = J Kf − Ki xi cm xf cm Kf − Ki = J Typesetting math: 91% To understand how to compute the work done by a constant force acting on a particle that moves in a straight line. In this problem, you will calculate the work done by a constant force. A force is considered constant if is independent of . This is the most frequently encountered situation in elementary Newtonian mechanics. Part A Consider a particle moving in a straight line from initial point B to final point A, acted upon by a constant force . The force (think of it as a field, having a magnitude and direction at every position ) is indicated by a series of identical vectors pointing to the left, parallel to the horizontal axis. The vectors are all identical only because the force is constant along the path. The magnitude of the force is , and the displacement vector from point B to point A is (of magnitude , making and angle (radians) with the positive x axis). Find , the work that the force performs on the particle as it moves from point B to point A. Express the work in terms of , , and . Remember to use radians, not degrees, for any angles that appear in your answer. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Now consider the same force acting on a particle that travels from point A to point B. The displacement vector now points in the opposite direction as it did in Part A. Find the work done by in this case. Express your answer in terms of , , and . F( r) r F r F L L  WBA F L F  WBA = F L WAB F Typesetting math: 91% L F  You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: ± Vector Dot Product Let vectors , , and . Calculate the following: Part A You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: WAB = A = (2, 1,−4) B = (−3, 0, 1) C = (−1,−1, 2) Typesetting math: 91% Part B What is the angle between and ? Express your answer using one significant figure. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C ANSWER: Part D ANSWER: A B = AB A B AB = radians 2B 3C = Typesetting math: 91% Part E Which of the following can be computed? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: and are different vectors with lengths and respectively. Find the following: Part F Express your answer in terms of You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: 2(B 3C) = A B C A (B C) A (B + C) 3 A V 1 V 2 V1 V2 V1 Typesetting math: 91% Part G If and are perpendicular, You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part H If and are parallel, Express your answer in terms of and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: ± Tactics Box 11.1 Calculating the Work Done by a Constant Force V = 1 V 1 V 1 V 2 V = 1 V 2 V 1 V 2 V1 V2 V = 1 V 2 Typesetting math: 91% Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 11.1 Calculating the Work Done by a Constant Force. Recall that the work done by a constant force at an angle to the displacement is . The vector magnitudes and are always positive, so the sign of is determined entirely by the angle between the force and the displacement. W F  d W = Fd cos  F d W  Typesetting math: 91% TACTICS BOX 11.1 Calculating the work done by a constant force Force and displacement Work Sign of Energy transfer Energy is transferred into the system. The particle speeds up. increases. No energy is transferred. Speed and are constant. Energy is transferred out of the system. The particle slows down. decreases. A box has weight of magnitude = 2.00 accelerates down a rough plane that is inclined at an angle = 30.0 above the horizontal, as shown at left. The normal force acting on the box has a magnitude = 1.732 , the coefficient of kinetic friction between the box and the plane is = 0.300, and the displacement of the box is 1.80 down the inclined plane.  W W 0 F(“r) + K < 90 F("r) cos  + 90 0 0 K > 90 F(“r) cos  − K 180 −F(“r) − FG N  n N μk d m Typesetting math: 91% Part A What is the work done on the box by gravity? Express your answers in joules to two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Wgrav Wgrav = J Typesetting math: 91% Work and Potential Energy on a Sliding Block with Friction A block of weight sits on a plane inclined at an angle as shown. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the plane and the block is . A force is applied to push the block up the incline at constant speed. Part A What is the work done on the block by the force of friction as the block moves a distance up the incline? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the following: , , , . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: w  μ F Wf L μ w  L Wf = Typesetting math: 91% Part B What is the work done by the applied force of magnitude ? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the following: , , , . ANSWER: Part C What is the change in the potential energy of the block, , after it has been pushed a distance up the incline? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the following: , , , . ANSWER: Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). W F μ w  L W = “U L μ w  L “U = Typesetting math: 91% Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Where’s the Energy? Learning Goal: To understand how to apply the law of conservation of energy to situations with and without nonconservative forces acting. The law of conservation of energy states the following: In an isolated system the total energy remains constant. If the objects within the system interact through gravitational and elastic forces only, then the total mechanical energy is conserved. The mechanical energy of a system is defined as the sum of kinetic energy and potential energy . For such systems where no forces other than the gravitational and elastic forces do work, the law of conservation of energy can be written as , where the quantities with subscript “i” refer to the “initial” moment and those with subscript “f” refer to the final moment. A wise choice of initial and final moments, which is not always obvious, may significantly simplify the solution. The kinetic energy of an object that has mass \texttip{m}{m} and velocity \texttip{v}{v} is given by \large{K=\frac{1}{2}mv^2}. Potential energy, instead, has many forms. The two forms that you will be dealing with most often in this chapter are the gravitational and elastic potential energy. Gravitational potential energy is the energy possessed by elevated objects. For small heights, it can be found as U_{\rm g}=mgh, where \texttip{m}{m} is the mass of the object, \texttip{g}{g} is the acceleration due to gravity, and \texttip{h}{h} is the elevation of the object above the zero level. The zero level is the elevation at which the gravitational potential energy is assumed to be (you guessed it) zero. The choice of the zero level is dictated by convenience; typically (but not necessarily), it is selected to coincide with the lowest position of the object during the motion explored in the problem. Elastic potential energy is associated with stretched or compressed elastic objects such as springs. For a spring with a force constant \texttip{k}{k}, stretched or compressed a distance \texttip{x}{x}, the associated elastic potential energy is \large{U_{\rm e}=\frac{1}{2}kx^2}. When all three types of energy change, the law of conservation of energy for an object of mass \texttip{m}{m} can be written as K U Ki + Ui = Kf + Uf Typesetting math: 91% \large{\frac{1}{2}mv_{\rm i}^2+mgh_{\rm i}+\frac{1}{2}kx_{\rm i}^2=\frac{1}{2}mv_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}^2+mgh_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}+\frac{1}{2}kx_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}^2}. The gravitational force and the elastic force are two examples of conservative forces. What if nonconservative forces, such as friction, also act within the system? In that case, the total mechanical energy would change. The law of conservation of energy is then written as \large{\frac{1}{2}mv_{\rm i}^2+mgh_{\rm i}+\frac{1}{2}kx_{\rm i}^2+W_{\rm nc}=\frac{1}{2}mv_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}^2+mgh_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}+\frac{1}{2}kx_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}^2}, where \texttip{W_{\rm nc}}{W_nc} represents the work done by the nonconservative forces acting on the object between the initial and the final moments. The work \texttip{W_{\rm nc}}{W_nc} is usually negative; that is, the nonconservative forces tend to decrease, or dissipate, the mechanical energy of the system. In this problem, we will consider the following situation as depicted in the diagram : A block of mass \texttip{m}{m} slides at a speed \texttip{v}{v} along a horizontal, smooth table. It next slides down a smooth ramp, descending a height \texttip{h}{h}, and then slides along a horizontal rough floor, stopping eventually. Assume that the block slides slowly enough so that it does not lose contact with the supporting surfaces (table, ramp, or floor). You will analyze the motion of the block at different moments using the law of conservation of energy. Part A Which word in the statement of this problem allows you to assume that the table is frictionless? ANSWER: Part B straight smooth horizontal Typesetting math: 91% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H Typesetting math: 91% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part I This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part J This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part K This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Sliding In Socks Suppose that the coefficient of kinetic friction between Zak’s feet and the floor, while wearing socks, is 0.250. Knowing this, Zak decides to get a running start and then slide across the floor. Part A If Zak’s speed is 3.00 \rm m/s when he starts to slide, what distance \texttip{d}{d} will he slide before stopping? Express your answer in meters. ANSWER: Typesetting math: 91% Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. \rm m Typesetting math: 91%

Chapter 11 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, April 18, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Understanding Work and Kinetic Energy Learning Goal: To learn about the Work-Energy Theorem and its basic applications. In this problem, you will learn about the relationship between the work done on an object and the kinetic energy of that object. The kinetic energy of an object of mass moving at a speed is defined as . It seems reasonable to say that the speed of an object–and, therefore, its kinetic energy–can be changed by performing work on the object. In this problem, we will explore the mathematical relationship between the work done on an object and the change in the kinetic energy of that object. First, let us consider a sled of mass being pulled by a constant, horizontal force of magnitude along a rough, horizontal surface. The sled is speeding up. Part A How many forces are acting on the sled? ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C K m v K = (1/2)mv2 m F one two three four This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part I Typesetting math: 91% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part J This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part K This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Work-Energy Theorem Reviewed Learning Goal: Review the work-energy theorem and apply it to a simple problem. If you push a particle of mass in the direction in which it is already moving, you expect the particle’s speed to increase. If you push with a constant force , then the particle will accelerate with acceleration (from Newton’s 2nd law). Part A Enter a one- or two-word answer that correctly completes the following statement. If the constant force is applied for a fixed interval of time , then the _____ of the particle will increase by an amount . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: M F a = F/M t at Typesetting math: 91% Part B Enter a one- or two-word answer that correctly completes the following statement. If the constant force is applied over a given distance , along the path of the particle, then the _____ of the particle will increase by . ANSWER: Part C If the initial kinetic energy of the particle is , and its final kinetic energy is , express in terms of and the work done on the particle. ANSWER: Part D In general, the work done by a force is written as . Now, consider whether the following statements are true or false: The dot product assures that the integrand is always nonnegative. The dot product indicates that only the component of the force perpendicular to the path contributes to the integral. The dot product indicates that only the component of the force parallel to the path contributes to the integral. Enter t for true or f for false for each statement. Separate your responses with commas (e.g., t,f,t). ANSWER: D FD Ki Kf Kf Ki W Kf = F W =  ( ) d f i F r r Typesetting math: 91% Part E Assume that the particle has initial speed . Find its final kinetic energy in terms of , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part F What is the final speed of the particle? Express your answer in terms of and . ANSWER: ± The Work Done in Pulling a Supertanker Two tugboats pull a disabled supertanker. Each tug exerts a constant force of 2.20×106 , one at an angle 10.0 west of north, and the other at an angle 10.0 east of north, as they pull the tanker a distance 0.660 toward the north. Part A What is the total work done by the two tugboats on the supertanker? Express your answer in joules, to three significant figures. vi Kf vi M F D Kf = Kf M vf = N km Typesetting math: 91% You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Energy Required to Lift a Heavy Box As you are trying to move a heavy box of mass , you realize that it is too heavy for you to lift by yourself. There is no one around to help, so you attach an ideal pulley to the box and a massless rope to the ceiling, which you wrap around the pulley. You pull up on the rope to lift the box. Use for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity and neglect friction forces. Part A Once you have pulled hard enough to start the box moving upward, what is the magnitude of the upward force you must apply to the rope to start raising the box with constant velocity? Express the magnitude of the force in terms of , the mass of the box. J m g F m Typesetting math: 91% You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Pulling a Block on an Incline with Friction A block of weight sits on an inclined plane as shown. A force of magnitude is applied to pull the block up the incline at constant speed. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the plane and the block is . Part A F = mg F μ Typesetting math: 91% What is the total work done on the block by the force of friction as the block moves a distance up the incline? Express the work done by friction in terms of any or all of the variables , , , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is the total work done on the block by the applied force as the block moves a distance up the incline? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the variables , , , , , and . ANSWER: Now the applied force is changed so that instead of pulling the block up the incline, the force pulls the block down the incline at a constant speed. Wfric L μ m g  L F Wfric = WF F L μ m g  L F WF = Typesetting math: 91% Part C What is the total work done on the block by the force of friction as the block moves a distance down the incline? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the variables , , , , , and . ANSWER: Part D What is the total work done on the box by the appled force in this case? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the variables , , , , , and . ANSWER: When Push Comes to Shove Two forces, of magnitudes = 75.0 and = 25.0 , act in opposite directions on a block, which sits atop a frictionless surface, as shown in the figure. Initially, the center of the block is at position = -1.00 . At some later time, the block has moved to the right, and its center is at a new position, = 1.00 . Wfric L μ m g  L F Wfric = WF μ m g  L F WF = F1 N F2 N xi cm xf cm Typesetting math: 91% Part A Find the work done on the block by the force of magnitude = 75.0 as the block moves from = -1.00 to = 1.00 . Express your answer numerically, in joules. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Find the work done by the force of magnitude = 25.0 as the block moves from = -1.00 to = 1.00 . Express your answer numerically, in joules. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: W1 F1 N xi cm xf cm W1 = J W2 F2 N xi cm xf cm Typesetting math: 91% Part C What is the net work done on the block by the two forces? Express your answer numerically, in joules. ANSWER: Part D Determine the change in the kinetic energy of the block as it moves from = -1.00 to = 1.00 . Express your answer numerically, in joules. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Work from a Constant Force Learning Goal: W2 = J Wnet Wnet = J Kf − Ki xi cm xf cm Kf − Ki = J Typesetting math: 91% To understand how to compute the work done by a constant force acting on a particle that moves in a straight line. In this problem, you will calculate the work done by a constant force. A force is considered constant if is independent of . This is the most frequently encountered situation in elementary Newtonian mechanics. Part A Consider a particle moving in a straight line from initial point B to final point A, acted upon by a constant force . The force (think of it as a field, having a magnitude and direction at every position ) is indicated by a series of identical vectors pointing to the left, parallel to the horizontal axis. The vectors are all identical only because the force is constant along the path. The magnitude of the force is , and the displacement vector from point B to point A is (of magnitude , making and angle (radians) with the positive x axis). Find , the work that the force performs on the particle as it moves from point B to point A. Express the work in terms of , , and . Remember to use radians, not degrees, for any angles that appear in your answer. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Now consider the same force acting on a particle that travels from point A to point B. The displacement vector now points in the opposite direction as it did in Part A. Find the work done by in this case. Express your answer in terms of , , and . F( r) r F r F L L  WBA F L F  WBA = F L WAB F Typesetting math: 91% L F  You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: ± Vector Dot Product Let vectors , , and . Calculate the following: Part A You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: WAB = A = (2, 1,−4) B = (−3, 0, 1) C = (−1,−1, 2) Typesetting math: 91% Part B What is the angle between and ? Express your answer using one significant figure. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C ANSWER: Part D ANSWER: A B = AB A B AB = radians 2B 3C = Typesetting math: 91% Part E Which of the following can be computed? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: and are different vectors with lengths and respectively. Find the following: Part F Express your answer in terms of You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: 2(B 3C) = A B C A (B C) A (B + C) 3 A V 1 V 2 V1 V2 V1 Typesetting math: 91% Part G If and are perpendicular, You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part H If and are parallel, Express your answer in terms of and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: ± Tactics Box 11.1 Calculating the Work Done by a Constant Force V = 1 V 1 V 1 V 2 V = 1 V 2 V 1 V 2 V1 V2 V = 1 V 2 Typesetting math: 91% Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 11.1 Calculating the Work Done by a Constant Force. Recall that the work done by a constant force at an angle to the displacement is . The vector magnitudes and are always positive, so the sign of is determined entirely by the angle between the force and the displacement. W F  d W = Fd cos  F d W  Typesetting math: 91% TACTICS BOX 11.1 Calculating the work done by a constant force Force and displacement Work Sign of Energy transfer Energy is transferred into the system. The particle speeds up. increases. No energy is transferred. Speed and are constant. Energy is transferred out of the system. The particle slows down. decreases. A box has weight of magnitude = 2.00 accelerates down a rough plane that is inclined at an angle = 30.0 above the horizontal, as shown at left. The normal force acting on the box has a magnitude = 1.732 , the coefficient of kinetic friction between the box and the plane is = 0.300, and the displacement of the box is 1.80 down the inclined plane.  W W 0 F(“r) + K < 90 F("r) cos  + 90 0 0 K > 90 F(“r) cos  − K 180 −F(“r) − FG N  n N μk d m Typesetting math: 91% Part A What is the work done on the box by gravity? Express your answers in joules to two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Wgrav Wgrav = J Typesetting math: 91% Work and Potential Energy on a Sliding Block with Friction A block of weight sits on a plane inclined at an angle as shown. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the plane and the block is . A force is applied to push the block up the incline at constant speed. Part A What is the work done on the block by the force of friction as the block moves a distance up the incline? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the following: , , , . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: w  μ F Wf L μ w  L Wf = Typesetting math: 91% Part B What is the work done by the applied force of magnitude ? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the following: , , , . ANSWER: Part C What is the change in the potential energy of the block, , after it has been pushed a distance up the incline? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the following: , , , . ANSWER: Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). W F μ w  L W = “U L μ w  L “U = Typesetting math: 91% Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Where’s the Energy? Learning Goal: To understand how to apply the law of conservation of energy to situations with and without nonconservative forces acting. The law of conservation of energy states the following: In an isolated system the total energy remains constant. If the objects within the system interact through gravitational and elastic forces only, then the total mechanical energy is conserved. The mechanical energy of a system is defined as the sum of kinetic energy and potential energy . For such systems where no forces other than the gravitational and elastic forces do work, the law of conservation of energy can be written as , where the quantities with subscript “i” refer to the “initial” moment and those with subscript “f” refer to the final moment. A wise choice of initial and final moments, which is not always obvious, may significantly simplify the solution. The kinetic energy of an object that has mass \texttip{m}{m} and velocity \texttip{v}{v} is given by \large{K=\frac{1}{2}mv^2}. Potential energy, instead, has many forms. The two forms that you will be dealing with most often in this chapter are the gravitational and elastic potential energy. Gravitational potential energy is the energy possessed by elevated objects. For small heights, it can be found as U_{\rm g}=mgh, where \texttip{m}{m} is the mass of the object, \texttip{g}{g} is the acceleration due to gravity, and \texttip{h}{h} is the elevation of the object above the zero level. The zero level is the elevation at which the gravitational potential energy is assumed to be (you guessed it) zero. The choice of the zero level is dictated by convenience; typically (but not necessarily), it is selected to coincide with the lowest position of the object during the motion explored in the problem. Elastic potential energy is associated with stretched or compressed elastic objects such as springs. For a spring with a force constant \texttip{k}{k}, stretched or compressed a distance \texttip{x}{x}, the associated elastic potential energy is \large{U_{\rm e}=\frac{1}{2}kx^2}. When all three types of energy change, the law of conservation of energy for an object of mass \texttip{m}{m} can be written as K U Ki + Ui = Kf + Uf Typesetting math: 91% \large{\frac{1}{2}mv_{\rm i}^2+mgh_{\rm i}+\frac{1}{2}kx_{\rm i}^2=\frac{1}{2}mv_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}^2+mgh_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}+\frac{1}{2}kx_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}^2}. The gravitational force and the elastic force are two examples of conservative forces. What if nonconservative forces, such as friction, also act within the system? In that case, the total mechanical energy would change. The law of conservation of energy is then written as \large{\frac{1}{2}mv_{\rm i}^2+mgh_{\rm i}+\frac{1}{2}kx_{\rm i}^2+W_{\rm nc}=\frac{1}{2}mv_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}^2+mgh_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}+\frac{1}{2}kx_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}^2}, where \texttip{W_{\rm nc}}{W_nc} represents the work done by the nonconservative forces acting on the object between the initial and the final moments. The work \texttip{W_{\rm nc}}{W_nc} is usually negative; that is, the nonconservative forces tend to decrease, or dissipate, the mechanical energy of the system. In this problem, we will consider the following situation as depicted in the diagram : A block of mass \texttip{m}{m} slides at a speed \texttip{v}{v} along a horizontal, smooth table. It next slides down a smooth ramp, descending a height \texttip{h}{h}, and then slides along a horizontal rough floor, stopping eventually. Assume that the block slides slowly enough so that it does not lose contact with the supporting surfaces (table, ramp, or floor). You will analyze the motion of the block at different moments using the law of conservation of energy. Part A Which word in the statement of this problem allows you to assume that the table is frictionless? ANSWER: Part B straight smooth horizontal Typesetting math: 91% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H Typesetting math: 91% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part I This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part J This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part K This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Sliding In Socks Suppose that the coefficient of kinetic friction between Zak’s feet and the floor, while wearing socks, is 0.250. Knowing this, Zak decides to get a running start and then slide across the floor. Part A If Zak’s speed is 3.00 \rm m/s when he starts to slide, what distance \texttip{d}{d} will he slide before stopping? Express your answer in meters. ANSWER: Typesetting math: 91% Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. \rm m Typesetting math: 91%

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http://www.econlib.org/library/Smith/smWN1.html#B.I,%20Ch.1,%20Of%20the%20Division%20of%20Labor What does Smith mean by division of labor, and how does it affect production? A. He means that each person does their own work to benefit themselves by creating goods. This creates well-crafted goods. B. He argues that in order to become more efficient, we need to put everyone in the same workhouses and eliminate division. C. He says that the division of labor provides farmers with the opportunity to become involved in manufacturing. D. He means that each person makes one small part of a good very quickly, but this is bad for the quality of production overall. E. He means that by having each individual specialize in one thing, they can work together to create products more efficiently and effectively. Which of the following is NOT an example of the circumstances by which the division of labor improves efficiency? A. A doll-making company stops allowing each employee to make one whole doll each and instead appoints each employee to create one part of the doll. B. A family of rug makers buys a loom to speed up their production. C. A mechanic opens a new shop to be nearer to the market. D. A factory changes the responsibilities of its employees so that one group handles heavy boxes and the other group does precision sewing. E. A baker who used to make a dozen cookies at a time buys a giant mixer and oven that enable him to make 20 dozen cookies at a time. Considering the global system of states, what do you think the allegory of the pins has to offer? A. It suggests that there could be a natural harmony of interests among states because they can divide labor among themselves to the benefit of everyone. B. It suggests that states can never be secure enough to cooperate because every state is equally capable of producing the same things. C. It suggests that a central authority is necessary to help states cooperate, in the same way that a manager oversees operations at a factory. D. The allegory of the pins is a great way to think about how wars come about, because states won’t cooperate with each other like pin-makers do. E. The allegory of the pins shows us that there is no natural harmony of interests between states. Smith sees the development of industry, technology, and the division of labor as A. generally positive but not progressive. The lives of many people may improve, but the world will generally stay the same. B. generally positive and progressive. The world is improving because of these changes, and it will continue to improve. C. generally negative. The creation of new technologies and the division of labor are harmful to all humans, both the wealthy and the poor. D. generally negative. The creation of the division of labor only benefits the wealthy at the expense of the poor. E. both positive and negative. Smith thinks that technology hurts us, while the division of labor helps society progress and develop. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RUwS1uAdUcI What point is Hans Rosling trying to make when he describes the global health pre-test? A. He is trying to show how the average person has no idea of the true state of global health. B. He is trying to illustrate how we tend to carry around outdated notions about the state of global health. C. He is trying to make us see that the less-developed countries are far worse off than we ever thought. D. He is trying to drive home the idea that global health has not improved over time despite foreign aid and improvements in medicine. E. He is trying to warn us about the rapid growth in world population. Rosling shows us that we tend to think about global health in terms of “we and them.” Who are the “we” and who are the “them”? A. “We” refers to academics, students, and scholars; “them” refers to the uneducated. B. “We” refers to the average person; “them” refers to politicians and global leaders. C. “We” refers to the wealthy; “them” refers to the poor. D. “We” refers to the Western world; “them” refers to the Third World. E. “We” refers to students; “them” refers to professors. In the life expectancy and fertility rate demonstration, what do the statistics reveal? A. Over time, developed countries produced small families and long lives, whereas developing countries produced large families and short lives. B. The world today looks much like it did in 1962 despite our attempts to help poorer countries develop. C. All countries in the world, even the poorer ones, are trending toward longer lives and smaller families. D. Developed countries are trending toward smaller families but shorter lives. E. All countries tend to make gains and losses in fertility and lifespan, but in the long run there is no significant change. What point does Rosling make about life expectancy in Vietnam as compared to the United States? To what does he attribute the change? A. He indicates that economic change preceded social change. B. He suggests that markets and free trade resulted in the increase in life expectancy. C. He says that the data indicates that the Vietnam War contributed to the decrease in life expectancy during that time, but that it recovered shortly thereafter. D. He says that social change in Asia preceded economic change, and life expectancy in Vietnam increased despite the war. E. He indicates that Vietnam was equal to the United States in life expectancy before the war. According to Rosling, how are regional statistics about child survival rates and GDP potentially misleading? A. Countries have an incentive to lie about the actual survival rates because they want foreign assistance. B. Statistics for the individual countries in a region are often vastly different. C. Regional statistics give us a strong sense of how we can understand development within one region, but it does not allow us to compare across regions. D. The data available over time and from countries within regions is often poorly collected and incomplete. E. Child survival rates cannot be compared regionally, since each culture has a different sense of how important children are. What is Rosling’s main point about statistical databases? A. The data is available but not readily accessible, so we need to create networks to solve that problem. B. The data that comes from these databases is often flawed and unreliable. C. It doesn’t matter whether we have access to these databases because the data can’t be used in an interesting way. D. Statistics can’t tell us very much, but we should do our best to make use of the information we do have. E. The information that could be true is too hard to sort out from what isn’t true because we don’t know how strong the data really is. http://www.marxists.org/archive/lenin/works/1916/imp-hsc/ch10.htm#v22zz99h-298-GUESS Click the link at left to read Chapter 10 of Imperialism, The Highest Stage of Capitalism, then answer the questions below. According to Lenin, what is the fundamental source of a monopoly? A. It is a natural effect of human behavior. B. It is the result of governments and police systems. C. Its source is rooted in democracy. D. It comes from the concentration of production at a high stage. E. It is what follows a socialist system. What are the principal types or manifestations of monopoly capitalism? A. Monopolistic capitalist associations like cartels, syndicates and trusts; and monopolies as a result of colonial policy. B. Monopolization of raw materials and monopolization of finance capital. C. Monopolization of governing structures and monopolies of oligarchies. D. Monopolist capitalist associations like cartels, syndicates and trusts; and monopolies as a result of colonial policy AND monopolization of raw materials and monopolization of finance capital. E. Monopolization of raw materials and monopolization of finance capital AND monopolization of governing structures and monopolies of oligarchies. What is the definition of a rentier state according to Lenin? A. A state that colonizes other states. B. A state whose bourgeoisie live off the export of capital. C. A poor state. D. A wealthy state. E. A colonized state. Overall Lenin’s analysis of the state of capitalism is concerned with: A. The interactions between states. B. The interactions within states. C. The ownership of industry and organizations. D. The interactions within states AND the ownership of industry and organizations. E. All of these options. http://view.vzaar.com/1194665/flashplayer Watch the video at left, and then answer the questions below. The Marshall Plan was developed by the United States after World War II. What was its purpose? A. to feed the hungry of Europe B. to stem the spread of communism C. to maintain an American military presence in Europe D. to feed the hungry of Europe AND to stem the spread of communism E. to stem the spread of communism AND to maintain an American military presence in Europe What kind of aid was sent at first? A. foods, fertilizers, and machines for agriculture B. books, paper, and radios for education C. clothing, medical supplies, and construction equipment D. mostly cash in the form of loans and grants E. people with business expertise to help develop the economy What kind of aid did the United States send to Greece to help its farmers? A. tractors B. mules C. seeds D. fertilizer E. all of these options What was one way that the United States influenced public opinion in Italy during the elections described in the video? A. The United States provided significant food aid to Italy so that the Italians would be inclined to vote against the Communists. B. The Italians had been impressed by the strength and loyalty of the American soldiers, and were inclined to listen to them during the elections. C. There was a large number of young Italians who followed American fashion and culture. D. Italian immigrants in the United States wrote letters to their families in Italy urging them not to vote for Communists. E. The Greeks showed the Italians how much the Americans had helped them, warning that supporting a Communist candidate would mean sacrificing American aid. How did Pope Pius XII undermine the strength of the Communist Party in Italy? A. He encouraged Italians to go out and vote. B. He warned that the Communist Party would legalize abortion. C. He excommunicated many members of the Communist Party. D. He made a speech in support of capitalism. E. He declared that Communists should not be baptized. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KVhWqwnZ1eM Use the video at left to answer the questions below. Hans Rosling shares how his students discuss “we” versus “them.” To whom are his students referring? A. the United States and Mexico B. Christians and Muslims C. Democrats and Republicans D. Europe and Asia E. none of these options According to Rosling, what factors contribute to a better quality of life for people in developing countries? A. family planning B. soap and water C. investment D. vaccinations E. all of these options Using his data, Rosling demonstrates a great shift in Mexico. What change does his data demonstrate? A. a decrease in drug usage B. a decrease in the number of jobs available C. an increase in average life expenctancy D. an increase in the rate of violent crime E. all of these options Instead of “developing” and “developed,” Rosling divides countries into four categories. Which of the following is NOT one of them? A. high-income countries B. middle-income countries C. low-income countries D. no-income countries E. collapsing countries Rosling discusses the increased life expectancy in both China and the United States. How are the situations different? A. The U.S. and China are on different continents. B. The life expectancy in China rose much higher than it did in the U.S. C. China first expanded its life expectancy and then grew economically, whereas the U.S. did the reverse. D. Average income and life expectancy steadily increased in the U.S., but they steadily decreased in China. E. all of these options Rosling shows a chart that demonstrates the regional income distribution of the world from 1970 to 2015. During that time, what has happened in South and East Asia? A. Money has flowed out of Asia to developing countries in Africa. B. The average income of citizens of South and East Asia has increased over the last 30 years. C. The average income of citizens of South and East Asia has decreased over the last 30 years. D. The average income of citizens of South and East Asia has surpassed that of Europe and North America. E. There has been no change. Click here to access GapMinder, the data visualizer that Hans Rosling uses. In 2010, which of the following countries had both a higher per-capita GDP and a higher life expectancy than the United States? A. France B. Japan C. Denmark D. Singapore E. Kuwait http://www.garretthardinsociety.org/articles/art_tragedy_of_the_commons.html http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8a4S23uXIcM The Tragedy of the Commons What is the rough definition of the “commons” given in the article? A. any private property on which others trespass B. behavior that everyone considers to be normal C. a cow that lives in a herd D. government-administered benefits, like unemployment or Social Security E. a shared resource What does Hardin mean by describing pollution as a reverse tragedy of the commons? A. Rather than causing a problem, it resolves a problem. B. Pollution costs us money rather than making us money. C. We are putting something into the commons rather than removing something from it. D. It starts at the other end of the biological pyramid. E. Humans see less of it as time goes on. Hardin says “the air and waters surrounding us cannot readily be fenced, and so the tragedy of the commons as a cesspool must be prevented by different means.” What are those means? A. establishing more international treaties to protect the environment B. using laws or taxes to make the polluter pay for pollution C. punishing consumers for generating waste D. raising awareness about environmental issues E. developing greener products Pacific Garbage Dump According to the news report, what percent of the Gyre is made of plastic? A. 50 percent B. 60 percent C. 70 percent D. 80 percent E. 90 percent Where does the majority of the plastic in the Gyre come from? A. barges that dump trash in the ocean B. storm drains from land C. people throwing litter off boats into the ocean D. remnants from movie sets filmed at sea E. fishing boats processing their catch What does Charles Moore mean by the “throwaway concept”? A. the habitual use of disposable plastic packaging B. the mistaken view that marine ecosystems are infinitely renewable C. a general lack of interest in recycling D. the willingness to discard effective but small-scale environmental policies in deference to broader E. people throwing away their lives in pursuit of money In what way does the Great Pacific Gyre represent issues like global warming a tragedy of the commons? A. because all the plastic trash in it comes from the United States B. because it kills the albatross and makes it impossible for them to reproduce C. surbecause the countries rounding the Pacific Ocean are polluting the water in a way that affects the quality of the resource for all, but no one is specifically accountable for it D. because it causes marine life to compete for increasingly scarce nutrients in the ocean E. because nations in the region all collectively agreed to dump their trash in the Pacific http://www.npr.org/news/specials/climate/video/ http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/climateconnections/climate-map http://www.npr.org/news/specials/climate/video/wildchronicles.html Use the links provided at left to answer the questions below. Global Warming: It’s All About Carbon How does carbon give us fuel? A. When you burn things that contain carbon the bonds break, giving off energy. B. Burning things creates carbon out of other elements as a result of combustion. C. Carbon is created after oxygen and hydrogen get released. D. Carbon bonds are created thereby giving off energy. E. Carbon is made into fuel by refining oil. National Geographic Climate Map What geographic areas have seen the most significant changes in temperature? A. The African continent. B. The Pacific Ocean. C. The Atlantic Ocean. D. The Arctic Ocean. E. The Indian Ocean. Why does it matter that rain fall steadily rather than in downpours? A. For those countries accustomed to steady rain fall, downpours are actually more efficient ways to catch water. B. Downpours in regions accustomed to steady fall makes them more prone to flooding and damage. C. In general, as long as regions get either steady fall or downpours most things will stay the same. D. Downpours are always more beneficial to crop growth than steady rain. E. Steady rain is always more beneficial to crop growth than downpours. Climate Change Threatens Kona Coffee What is unique about the climate in Hawaii, making it a good place to grow coffee? A. The elevation is high, the nights are cool and the days are humid. B. The elevation is low, the nights are warm and the days are dry. C. The elevation is high, the nights are warm and the days are dry. D. The elevation is low, the nights are cool and the days are dry. E. The elevation is high, the nights are warm and the days are humid. What specific temperature pattern have experts noted about the region where Kona coffee is grown in Hawaii? A. There has been no significant change but the bean production has dropped. B. The nights have warmed up, even though the days have cooled. C. There has been an increase in bean production with the change in climate. D. The nights have cooled even more so than before. E. There has been universally hot days all the way around.

http://www.econlib.org/library/Smith/smWN1.html#B.I,%20Ch.1,%20Of%20the%20Division%20of%20Labor What does Smith mean by division of labor, and how does it affect production? A. He means that each person does their own work to benefit themselves by creating goods. This creates well-crafted goods. B. He argues that in order to become more efficient, we need to put everyone in the same workhouses and eliminate division. C. He says that the division of labor provides farmers with the opportunity to become involved in manufacturing. D. He means that each person makes one small part of a good very quickly, but this is bad for the quality of production overall. E. He means that by having each individual specialize in one thing, they can work together to create products more efficiently and effectively. Which of the following is NOT an example of the circumstances by which the division of labor improves efficiency? A. A doll-making company stops allowing each employee to make one whole doll each and instead appoints each employee to create one part of the doll. B. A family of rug makers buys a loom to speed up their production. C. A mechanic opens a new shop to be nearer to the market. D. A factory changes the responsibilities of its employees so that one group handles heavy boxes and the other group does precision sewing. E. A baker who used to make a dozen cookies at a time buys a giant mixer and oven that enable him to make 20 dozen cookies at a time. Considering the global system of states, what do you think the allegory of the pins has to offer? A. It suggests that there could be a natural harmony of interests among states because they can divide labor among themselves to the benefit of everyone. B. It suggests that states can never be secure enough to cooperate because every state is equally capable of producing the same things. C. It suggests that a central authority is necessary to help states cooperate, in the same way that a manager oversees operations at a factory. D. The allegory of the pins is a great way to think about how wars come about, because states won’t cooperate with each other like pin-makers do. E. The allegory of the pins shows us that there is no natural harmony of interests between states. Smith sees the development of industry, technology, and the division of labor as A. generally positive but not progressive. The lives of many people may improve, but the world will generally stay the same. B. generally positive and progressive. The world is improving because of these changes, and it will continue to improve. C. generally negative. The creation of new technologies and the division of labor are harmful to all humans, both the wealthy and the poor. D. generally negative. The creation of the division of labor only benefits the wealthy at the expense of the poor. E. both positive and negative. Smith thinks that technology hurts us, while the division of labor helps society progress and develop. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RUwS1uAdUcI What point is Hans Rosling trying to make when he describes the global health pre-test? A. He is trying to show how the average person has no idea of the true state of global health. B. He is trying to illustrate how we tend to carry around outdated notions about the state of global health. C. He is trying to make us see that the less-developed countries are far worse off than we ever thought. D. He is trying to drive home the idea that global health has not improved over time despite foreign aid and improvements in medicine. E. He is trying to warn us about the rapid growth in world population. Rosling shows us that we tend to think about global health in terms of “we and them.” Who are the “we” and who are the “them”? A. “We” refers to academics, students, and scholars; “them” refers to the uneducated. B. “We” refers to the average person; “them” refers to politicians and global leaders. C. “We” refers to the wealthy; “them” refers to the poor. D. “We” refers to the Western world; “them” refers to the Third World. E. “We” refers to students; “them” refers to professors. In the life expectancy and fertility rate demonstration, what do the statistics reveal? A. Over time, developed countries produced small families and long lives, whereas developing countries produced large families and short lives. B. The world today looks much like it did in 1962 despite our attempts to help poorer countries develop. C. All countries in the world, even the poorer ones, are trending toward longer lives and smaller families. D. Developed countries are trending toward smaller families but shorter lives. E. All countries tend to make gains and losses in fertility and lifespan, but in the long run there is no significant change. What point does Rosling make about life expectancy in Vietnam as compared to the United States? To what does he attribute the change? A. He indicates that economic change preceded social change. B. He suggests that markets and free trade resulted in the increase in life expectancy. C. He says that the data indicates that the Vietnam War contributed to the decrease in life expectancy during that time, but that it recovered shortly thereafter. D. He says that social change in Asia preceded economic change, and life expectancy in Vietnam increased despite the war. E. He indicates that Vietnam was equal to the United States in life expectancy before the war. According to Rosling, how are regional statistics about child survival rates and GDP potentially misleading? A. Countries have an incentive to lie about the actual survival rates because they want foreign assistance. B. Statistics for the individual countries in a region are often vastly different. C. Regional statistics give us a strong sense of how we can understand development within one region, but it does not allow us to compare across regions. D. The data available over time and from countries within regions is often poorly collected and incomplete. E. Child survival rates cannot be compared regionally, since each culture has a different sense of how important children are. What is Rosling’s main point about statistical databases? A. The data is available but not readily accessible, so we need to create networks to solve that problem. B. The data that comes from these databases is often flawed and unreliable. C. It doesn’t matter whether we have access to these databases because the data can’t be used in an interesting way. D. Statistics can’t tell us very much, but we should do our best to make use of the information we do have. E. The information that could be true is too hard to sort out from what isn’t true because we don’t know how strong the data really is. http://www.marxists.org/archive/lenin/works/1916/imp-hsc/ch10.htm#v22zz99h-298-GUESS Click the link at left to read Chapter 10 of Imperialism, The Highest Stage of Capitalism, then answer the questions below. According to Lenin, what is the fundamental source of a monopoly? A. It is a natural effect of human behavior. B. It is the result of governments and police systems. C. Its source is rooted in democracy. D. It comes from the concentration of production at a high stage. E. It is what follows a socialist system. What are the principal types or manifestations of monopoly capitalism? A. Monopolistic capitalist associations like cartels, syndicates and trusts; and monopolies as a result of colonial policy. B. Monopolization of raw materials and monopolization of finance capital. C. Monopolization of governing structures and monopolies of oligarchies. D. Monopolist capitalist associations like cartels, syndicates and trusts; and monopolies as a result of colonial policy AND monopolization of raw materials and monopolization of finance capital. E. Monopolization of raw materials and monopolization of finance capital AND monopolization of governing structures and monopolies of oligarchies. What is the definition of a rentier state according to Lenin? A. A state that colonizes other states. B. A state whose bourgeoisie live off the export of capital. C. A poor state. D. A wealthy state. E. A colonized state. Overall Lenin’s analysis of the state of capitalism is concerned with: A. The interactions between states. B. The interactions within states. C. The ownership of industry and organizations. D. The interactions within states AND the ownership of industry and organizations. E. All of these options. http://view.vzaar.com/1194665/flashplayer Watch the video at left, and then answer the questions below. The Marshall Plan was developed by the United States after World War II. What was its purpose? A. to feed the hungry of Europe B. to stem the spread of communism C. to maintain an American military presence in Europe D. to feed the hungry of Europe AND to stem the spread of communism E. to stem the spread of communism AND to maintain an American military presence in Europe What kind of aid was sent at first? A. foods, fertilizers, and machines for agriculture B. books, paper, and radios for education C. clothing, medical supplies, and construction equipment D. mostly cash in the form of loans and grants E. people with business expertise to help develop the economy What kind of aid did the United States send to Greece to help its farmers? A. tractors B. mules C. seeds D. fertilizer E. all of these options What was one way that the United States influenced public opinion in Italy during the elections described in the video? A. The United States provided significant food aid to Italy so that the Italians would be inclined to vote against the Communists. B. The Italians had been impressed by the strength and loyalty of the American soldiers, and were inclined to listen to them during the elections. C. There was a large number of young Italians who followed American fashion and culture. D. Italian immigrants in the United States wrote letters to their families in Italy urging them not to vote for Communists. E. The Greeks showed the Italians how much the Americans had helped them, warning that supporting a Communist candidate would mean sacrificing American aid. How did Pope Pius XII undermine the strength of the Communist Party in Italy? A. He encouraged Italians to go out and vote. B. He warned that the Communist Party would legalize abortion. C. He excommunicated many members of the Communist Party. D. He made a speech in support of capitalism. E. He declared that Communists should not be baptized. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KVhWqwnZ1eM Use the video at left to answer the questions below. Hans Rosling shares how his students discuss “we” versus “them.” To whom are his students referring? A. the United States and Mexico B. Christians and Muslims C. Democrats and Republicans D. Europe and Asia E. none of these options According to Rosling, what factors contribute to a better quality of life for people in developing countries? A. family planning B. soap and water C. investment D. vaccinations E. all of these options Using his data, Rosling demonstrates a great shift in Mexico. What change does his data demonstrate? A. a decrease in drug usage B. a decrease in the number of jobs available C. an increase in average life expenctancy D. an increase in the rate of violent crime E. all of these options Instead of “developing” and “developed,” Rosling divides countries into four categories. Which of the following is NOT one of them? A. high-income countries B. middle-income countries C. low-income countries D. no-income countries E. collapsing countries Rosling discusses the increased life expectancy in both China and the United States. How are the situations different? A. The U.S. and China are on different continents. B. The life expectancy in China rose much higher than it did in the U.S. C. China first expanded its life expectancy and then grew economically, whereas the U.S. did the reverse. D. Average income and life expectancy steadily increased in the U.S., but they steadily decreased in China. E. all of these options Rosling shows a chart that demonstrates the regional income distribution of the world from 1970 to 2015. During that time, what has happened in South and East Asia? A. Money has flowed out of Asia to developing countries in Africa. B. The average income of citizens of South and East Asia has increased over the last 30 years. C. The average income of citizens of South and East Asia has decreased over the last 30 years. D. The average income of citizens of South and East Asia has surpassed that of Europe and North America. E. There has been no change. Click here to access GapMinder, the data visualizer that Hans Rosling uses. In 2010, which of the following countries had both a higher per-capita GDP and a higher life expectancy than the United States? A. France B. Japan C. Denmark D. Singapore E. Kuwait http://www.garretthardinsociety.org/articles/art_tragedy_of_the_commons.html http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8a4S23uXIcM The Tragedy of the Commons What is the rough definition of the “commons” given in the article? A. any private property on which others trespass B. behavior that everyone considers to be normal C. a cow that lives in a herd D. government-administered benefits, like unemployment or Social Security E. a shared resource What does Hardin mean by describing pollution as a reverse tragedy of the commons? A. Rather than causing a problem, it resolves a problem. B. Pollution costs us money rather than making us money. C. We are putting something into the commons rather than removing something from it. D. It starts at the other end of the biological pyramid. E. Humans see less of it as time goes on. Hardin says “the air and waters surrounding us cannot readily be fenced, and so the tragedy of the commons as a cesspool must be prevented by different means.” What are those means? A. establishing more international treaties to protect the environment B. using laws or taxes to make the polluter pay for pollution C. punishing consumers for generating waste D. raising awareness about environmental issues E. developing greener products Pacific Garbage Dump According to the news report, what percent of the Gyre is made of plastic? A. 50 percent B. 60 percent C. 70 percent D. 80 percent E. 90 percent Where does the majority of the plastic in the Gyre come from? A. barges that dump trash in the ocean B. storm drains from land C. people throwing litter off boats into the ocean D. remnants from movie sets filmed at sea E. fishing boats processing their catch What does Charles Moore mean by the “throwaway concept”? A. the habitual use of disposable plastic packaging B. the mistaken view that marine ecosystems are infinitely renewable C. a general lack of interest in recycling D. the willingness to discard effective but small-scale environmental policies in deference to broader E. people throwing away their lives in pursuit of money In what way does the Great Pacific Gyre represent issues like global warming a tragedy of the commons? A. because all the plastic trash in it comes from the United States B. because it kills the albatross and makes it impossible for them to reproduce C. surbecause the countries rounding the Pacific Ocean are polluting the water in a way that affects the quality of the resource for all, but no one is specifically accountable for it D. because it causes marine life to compete for increasingly scarce nutrients in the ocean E. because nations in the region all collectively agreed to dump their trash in the Pacific http://www.npr.org/news/specials/climate/video/ http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/climateconnections/climate-map http://www.npr.org/news/specials/climate/video/wildchronicles.html Use the links provided at left to answer the questions below. Global Warming: It’s All About Carbon How does carbon give us fuel? A. When you burn things that contain carbon the bonds break, giving off energy. B. Burning things creates carbon out of other elements as a result of combustion. C. Carbon is created after oxygen and hydrogen get released. D. Carbon bonds are created thereby giving off energy. E. Carbon is made into fuel by refining oil. National Geographic Climate Map What geographic areas have seen the most significant changes in temperature? A. The African continent. B. The Pacific Ocean. C. The Atlantic Ocean. D. The Arctic Ocean. E. The Indian Ocean. Why does it matter that rain fall steadily rather than in downpours? A. For those countries accustomed to steady rain fall, downpours are actually more efficient ways to catch water. B. Downpours in regions accustomed to steady fall makes them more prone to flooding and damage. C. In general, as long as regions get either steady fall or downpours most things will stay the same. D. Downpours are always more beneficial to crop growth than steady rain. E. Steady rain is always more beneficial to crop growth than downpours. Climate Change Threatens Kona Coffee What is unique about the climate in Hawaii, making it a good place to grow coffee? A. The elevation is high, the nights are cool and the days are humid. B. The elevation is low, the nights are warm and the days are dry. C. The elevation is high, the nights are warm and the days are dry. D. The elevation is low, the nights are cool and the days are dry. E. The elevation is high, the nights are warm and the days are humid. What specific temperature pattern have experts noted about the region where Kona coffee is grown in Hawaii? A. There has been no significant change but the bean production has dropped. B. The nights have warmed up, even though the days have cooled. C. There has been an increase in bean production with the change in climate. D. The nights have cooled even more so than before. E. There has been universally hot days all the way around.

http://www.econlib.org/library/Smith/smWN1.html#B.I,%20Ch.1,%20Of%20the%20Division%20of%20Labor What does Smith mean by division of labor, and … Read More...
Problem 4: In the figure below, block A rests on a inclined surface and is connected to a rope. The rope passes over a fixed drum B and is connected to handle CDE. A vertical force, P, is applied to the handle at point E. The weight of block A is 200 lb. Handle CDE has a uniform cross section, is supported by a frictionless hinge at D, and weighs 50 lb. The coefficient of friction, μ, at all surface is 0.3. What is the minimum force, P, for impending motion of block A up the incline? Note: All free-body diagrams must be drawn separately from the figure provided below. No credit will be given for free-body diagrams drawn on top of the figure.

Problem 4: In the figure below, block A rests on a inclined surface and is connected to a rope. The rope passes over a fixed drum B and is connected to handle CDE. A vertical force, P, is applied to the handle at point E. The weight of block A is 200 lb. Handle CDE has a uniform cross section, is supported by a frictionless hinge at D, and weighs 50 lb. The coefficient of friction, μ, at all surface is 0.3. What is the minimum force, P, for impending motion of block A up the incline? Note: All free-body diagrams must be drawn separately from the figure provided below. No credit will be given for free-body diagrams drawn on top of the figure.

ΣM = T 5 − P 5 = 0 2 … Read More...
MAE 2600 (FS2015) Homework #15 (Section 15B-1) Name:_________________________ Due: Wednesday, 10/7/15 ID#: ( ) H15-1. The 1.5-kg ball A is thrown so that it travels horizontally at an unknown speed when it strikes the 8-kg block B as it is travelling down the inclined plane at 3 m/s. If the block B slides 1.2 m up the plane (before it momentarily stops) after the impact, determine the speed of the ball A just before and just after the impact. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the block and the plane is k = 0.24 and the coefficient of restitution between the ball and the block is e = 0.75. H15-2. Two smooth disks A and B each have a weight of 2-lb. If both disks are moving with the velocities shown when they collide and the disk B travels along a line,  = 40 clockwise from the x axis as shown after collision, determine the velocities of the disk A just before and just after collision. The coefficient of restitution is e = 0.7.

MAE 2600 (FS2015) Homework #15 (Section 15B-1) Name:_________________________ Due: Wednesday, 10/7/15 ID#: ( ) H15-1. The 1.5-kg ball A is thrown so that it travels horizontally at an unknown speed when it strikes the 8-kg block B as it is travelling down the inclined plane at 3 m/s. If the block B slides 1.2 m up the plane (before it momentarily stops) after the impact, determine the speed of the ball A just before and just after the impact. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the block and the plane is k = 0.24 and the coefficient of restitution between the ball and the block is e = 0.75. H15-2. Two smooth disks A and B each have a weight of 2-lb. If both disks are moving with the velocities shown when they collide and the disk B travels along a line,  = 40 clockwise from the x axis as shown after collision, determine the velocities of the disk A just before and just after collision. The coefficient of restitution is e = 0.7.

In case the body have to stay in lower temperature for extended time period (more than 1 hour), how does the body regulate its response?

In case the body have to stay in lower temperature for extended time period (more than 1 hour), how does the body regulate its response?

Arterioles transporting blood to external capillaries beneath the surface of … Read More...
The 20-kg homogeneous smooth sphere rests on the two inclined smooth surfaces as shown. Draw relevant free-body diagram(s), and determine the support forces on the sphere at A and B.

The 20-kg homogeneous smooth sphere rests on the two inclined smooth surfaces as shown. Draw relevant free-body diagram(s), and determine the support forces on the sphere at A and B.

The 20-kg homogeneous smooth sphere rests on the two inclined … Read More...
1 | P a g e Lecture #2: Abortion (Warren) While studying this topic, we will ask whether it is morally permissible to intentionally terminate a pregnancy and, if so, whether certain restrictions should be placed upon such practices. Even though we will most often be speaking of terminating a fetus, biologists make further classifications: the zygote is the single cell resulting from the fusion of the egg and the sperm; the morula is the cluster of cells that travels through the fallopian tubes; the blastocyte exists once an outer shell of cells has formed around an inner group of cells; the embryo exists once the cells begin to take on specific functions (around the 15th day); the fetus comes into existence in the 8th week when the embryo gains a basic structural resemblance to the adult. Given these distinctions, there are certain kinds of non-fetal abortion—such as usage of RU-486 (the morning-after “abortion pill”)—though most of the writers we will study refer to fetal abortions. So now let us consider the “Classical Argument against Abortion”, which has been very influential: P1) It is wrong to kill innocent persons. P2) A fetus is an innocent person. C) It is wrong to kill a fetus. (Note that this argument has received various formulations, including those from Warren and Thomson which differ from the above. For this course, we will refer to the above formulation as the “Classical Argument”.) Before evaluating this argument, we should talk about terminology: A person is a member of the moral community; i.e., someone who has rights and/or duties. ‘Persons’ is the plural of ‘person’. ‘Person’ can be contrasted with ‘human being’; a human being is anyone who is genetically human (i.e., a member of Homo sapiens). ‘People’ (or ‘human beings’) is the plural of ‘human being’. Why does this matter? First, not all persons are human beings. For example, consider an alien from another planet who mentally resembled us. If he were to visit Earth, it would be morally reprehensible to kick him or to set him on fire because of the pain and suffering that these acts would cause. And, similarly, the alien would be morally condemnable if he were to propagate such acts on us; he has a moral duty not to act in those ways (again, assuming a certain mental resemblance to us). So, even though this alien is not a human being, he is nevertheless a person with the associative rights and/or duties. 2 | P a g e And, more controversially, maybe not all human beings are persons. For example, anencephalic infants—i.e., ones born without cerebral cortexes and therefore with severely limited cognitive abilities—certainly do not have duties since they are not capable of rational thought and autonomous action. Some philosophers have even argued that they do not have rights. Now let us return to the Classical Argument. It is valid insofar as, if the premises are true, then the conclusion has to be true. But maybe it commits equivocation, which is to say that it uses the same word in multiple senses; equivocation is an informal fallacy (i.e., attaches to arguments that are formally valid but otherwise fallacious). Consider the following: P1) I put my money in the bank. P2) The bank borders the river. C) I put my money somewhere that borders the river. This argument equivocates since ‘bank’ is being used in two different senses: in P1 it is used to represent a financial institution and, in P2, it is used to represent a geological feature. Returning to the classical argument, it could be argued that ‘person’ is being used in two different senses: in P1 it is used in its appropriate moral sense and, in P2, it is inappropriately used instead of ‘human being’. The critic might suggest that a more accurate way to represent the argument would be as follows: P1) It is wrong to kill innocent persons. P2) A fetus is a human being. C) It is wrong to kill a fetus. This argument is obviously invalid. So one way to criticize the Classical Argument is to say that it conflates two different concepts—viz., ‘person’ and ‘human being’—and therefore commits equivocation. However, the more straightforward way to attack the Classical Argument is just to deny its second premise and thus contend that the argument is unsound. This is the approach that Mary Anne Warren takes in “On the Moral and Legal Status of Abortion”. Why does Warren think that the second premise is false? Remember that we defined a person as “a member of the moral community.” And we said that an alien, for example, could be afforded moral status even though it is not a human being. Why do we think that this alien should not be tortured or set on fire? Warren thinks that, intuitively, we think that membership in the moral community is based upon possession of the following traits: 3 | P a g e 1. Consciousness of objects and events external and/or internal to the being and especially the capacity to feel pain; 2. Reasoning or rationality (i.e., the developed capacity to solve new and relatively complex problems); 3. Self-motivated activity (i.e., activity which is relatively independent of either genetic or direct external control); 4. Capacity to communicate (not necessarily verbal or linguistic); and 5. Possession of self-concepts and self-awareness. Warren then admits that, though all of the items on this list look promising, we need not require that a person have all of the items on this list. (4) is perhaps the most expendable: imagine someone who is fully paralyzed as well as deaf, these incapacities, which preclude communication, are not sufficient to justify torture. Similarly, we might be able to imagine certain psychological afflictions that negate (5) without compromising personhood. Warren suspects that (1) and (2) are might be sufficient to confer personhood, and thinks that (1)-(3) “quite probably” are sufficient. Note that, if she is right, we would not be able to torture chimps, let us say, but we could set plants on fire (and most likely ants as well). However, given Warren’s aims, she does not need to specify which of these traits are necessary or sufficient for personhood; all that she wants to observe is that the fetus has none of them! Therefore, regardless of which traits we want to require, Warren thinks that the fetus is not a person. Therefore she thinks that the Classical Argument is unsound and should be rejected. Even if we accept Warren’s refutation of the second premise, we might be inclined to say that, while the fetus is not (now) a person, it is a potential person: the fetus will hopefully mature into a being that possesses all five of the traits on Warren’s list. We might then propose the following adjustment to the Classical Argument: P1) It is wrong to kill all innocent persons. P2) A fetus is a potential person. C) It is wrong to kill a fetus. However, this argument is invalid. Warren grants that potentiality might serve as a prima facie reason (i.e., a reason that has some moral weight but which might be outweighed by other considerations) not to abort a fetus, but potentiality alone is insufficient to grant the fetus a moral right against being terminated. By analogy, consider the following argument: 4 | P a g e P1) The President has the right to declare war. P2) Mary is a potential President. C) Mary has the right to declare war. This argument is invalid since the premises are both true and the conclusion is false. By parity, the following argument is also invalid: P1) A person has a right to life. P2) A fetus is a potential person. C) A fetus has a right to life. Thus Warren thinks that considerations of potentiality are insufficient to undermine her argument that fetuses—which are potential persons but, she thinks, not persons—do not have a right to life.

1 | P a g e Lecture #2: Abortion (Warren) While studying this topic, we will ask whether it is morally permissible to intentionally terminate a pregnancy and, if so, whether certain restrictions should be placed upon such practices. Even though we will most often be speaking of terminating a fetus, biologists make further classifications: the zygote is the single cell resulting from the fusion of the egg and the sperm; the morula is the cluster of cells that travels through the fallopian tubes; the blastocyte exists once an outer shell of cells has formed around an inner group of cells; the embryo exists once the cells begin to take on specific functions (around the 15th day); the fetus comes into existence in the 8th week when the embryo gains a basic structural resemblance to the adult. Given these distinctions, there are certain kinds of non-fetal abortion—such as usage of RU-486 (the morning-after “abortion pill”)—though most of the writers we will study refer to fetal abortions. So now let us consider the “Classical Argument against Abortion”, which has been very influential: P1) It is wrong to kill innocent persons. P2) A fetus is an innocent person. C) It is wrong to kill a fetus. (Note that this argument has received various formulations, including those from Warren and Thomson which differ from the above. For this course, we will refer to the above formulation as the “Classical Argument”.) Before evaluating this argument, we should talk about terminology: A person is a member of the moral community; i.e., someone who has rights and/or duties. ‘Persons’ is the plural of ‘person’. ‘Person’ can be contrasted with ‘human being’; a human being is anyone who is genetically human (i.e., a member of Homo sapiens). ‘People’ (or ‘human beings’) is the plural of ‘human being’. Why does this matter? First, not all persons are human beings. For example, consider an alien from another planet who mentally resembled us. If he were to visit Earth, it would be morally reprehensible to kick him or to set him on fire because of the pain and suffering that these acts would cause. And, similarly, the alien would be morally condemnable if he were to propagate such acts on us; he has a moral duty not to act in those ways (again, assuming a certain mental resemblance to us). So, even though this alien is not a human being, he is nevertheless a person with the associative rights and/or duties. 2 | P a g e And, more controversially, maybe not all human beings are persons. For example, anencephalic infants—i.e., ones born without cerebral cortexes and therefore with severely limited cognitive abilities—certainly do not have duties since they are not capable of rational thought and autonomous action. Some philosophers have even argued that they do not have rights. Now let us return to the Classical Argument. It is valid insofar as, if the premises are true, then the conclusion has to be true. But maybe it commits equivocation, which is to say that it uses the same word in multiple senses; equivocation is an informal fallacy (i.e., attaches to arguments that are formally valid but otherwise fallacious). Consider the following: P1) I put my money in the bank. P2) The bank borders the river. C) I put my money somewhere that borders the river. This argument equivocates since ‘bank’ is being used in two different senses: in P1 it is used to represent a financial institution and, in P2, it is used to represent a geological feature. Returning to the classical argument, it could be argued that ‘person’ is being used in two different senses: in P1 it is used in its appropriate moral sense and, in P2, it is inappropriately used instead of ‘human being’. The critic might suggest that a more accurate way to represent the argument would be as follows: P1) It is wrong to kill innocent persons. P2) A fetus is a human being. C) It is wrong to kill a fetus. This argument is obviously invalid. So one way to criticize the Classical Argument is to say that it conflates two different concepts—viz., ‘person’ and ‘human being’—and therefore commits equivocation. However, the more straightforward way to attack the Classical Argument is just to deny its second premise and thus contend that the argument is unsound. This is the approach that Mary Anne Warren takes in “On the Moral and Legal Status of Abortion”. Why does Warren think that the second premise is false? Remember that we defined a person as “a member of the moral community.” And we said that an alien, for example, could be afforded moral status even though it is not a human being. Why do we think that this alien should not be tortured or set on fire? Warren thinks that, intuitively, we think that membership in the moral community is based upon possession of the following traits: 3 | P a g e 1. Consciousness of objects and events external and/or internal to the being and especially the capacity to feel pain; 2. Reasoning or rationality (i.e., the developed capacity to solve new and relatively complex problems); 3. Self-motivated activity (i.e., activity which is relatively independent of either genetic or direct external control); 4. Capacity to communicate (not necessarily verbal or linguistic); and 5. Possession of self-concepts and self-awareness. Warren then admits that, though all of the items on this list look promising, we need not require that a person have all of the items on this list. (4) is perhaps the most expendable: imagine someone who is fully paralyzed as well as deaf, these incapacities, which preclude communication, are not sufficient to justify torture. Similarly, we might be able to imagine certain psychological afflictions that negate (5) without compromising personhood. Warren suspects that (1) and (2) are might be sufficient to confer personhood, and thinks that (1)-(3) “quite probably” are sufficient. Note that, if she is right, we would not be able to torture chimps, let us say, but we could set plants on fire (and most likely ants as well). However, given Warren’s aims, she does not need to specify which of these traits are necessary or sufficient for personhood; all that she wants to observe is that the fetus has none of them! Therefore, regardless of which traits we want to require, Warren thinks that the fetus is not a person. Therefore she thinks that the Classical Argument is unsound and should be rejected. Even if we accept Warren’s refutation of the second premise, we might be inclined to say that, while the fetus is not (now) a person, it is a potential person: the fetus will hopefully mature into a being that possesses all five of the traits on Warren’s list. We might then propose the following adjustment to the Classical Argument: P1) It is wrong to kill all innocent persons. P2) A fetus is a potential person. C) It is wrong to kill a fetus. However, this argument is invalid. Warren grants that potentiality might serve as a prima facie reason (i.e., a reason that has some moral weight but which might be outweighed by other considerations) not to abort a fetus, but potentiality alone is insufficient to grant the fetus a moral right against being terminated. By analogy, consider the following argument: 4 | P a g e P1) The President has the right to declare war. P2) Mary is a potential President. C) Mary has the right to declare war. This argument is invalid since the premises are both true and the conclusion is false. By parity, the following argument is also invalid: P1) A person has a right to life. P2) A fetus is a potential person. C) A fetus has a right to life. Thus Warren thinks that considerations of potentiality are insufficient to undermine her argument that fetuses—which are potential persons but, she thinks, not persons—do not have a right to life.

MAE 214 – Fall 2015 Homework 3 Due: October 1, 2015 – Thursday by 1:00 p.m. Total Problems: 4 (including Extra Credit), Total Points: 105 1. Make a solid works part model from the given figure below. All dimensions are in millimeters. All sketches must be fully defined. Also create a drawing sheet and dimension it as shown. You can use a hole call out option under annotation to dimension a counter bore hole. (30 points) Save your part files as follows: My Documents/Homework 3 Folder/Prob1_LastName.SLDPRT My Documents/ Homework 3 Folder/Prob1_LastName.SLDDRW 2. Make a solid works part of the given figure below and also make a drawing sheet – front, top and right side views using 3rd angle projection method. Dimension the views with appropriate dimension technique. All dimensions are in mm. (30 points) Save your part file and drawing sheet as follows: Documents/Homework 3 folder/Problem 2_Last Name.SLDPRT Documents/Homework 3 folder/Problem 2_Last Name.SLDDRW 3. Make a solid works part file for the given figure below. All sketches must be fully defined. Your design tree menu must have advanced features i.e. plane, mirror, and fillet. The spot facing (SF) must be defined in a problem. The inclined cut must be created with an offset sketch and extrude cut or a suitable sketch that uses “up to surface” option. (40 points) Your part model must stick to the isometric view as it is shown here. Save your part file into: My documents/Homework 3 Folder/Problem3_Last Name.SLDPRT Given: A = 76 B = 127 Unit: MMGS ALL ROUNDS (FILLET) EQUAL 6 MM 4. (Extra Credit) Make a solid works part from the given figure below. All sketches must be fully defined. Save your part file to Documents/Homework3 Folder/Prob#4_Last Name.SLDPRT All dimensions are in millimeters. (5 points)

MAE 214 – Fall 2015 Homework 3 Due: October 1, 2015 – Thursday by 1:00 p.m. Total Problems: 4 (including Extra Credit), Total Points: 105 1. Make a solid works part model from the given figure below. All dimensions are in millimeters. All sketches must be fully defined. Also create a drawing sheet and dimension it as shown. You can use a hole call out option under annotation to dimension a counter bore hole. (30 points) Save your part files as follows: My Documents/Homework 3 Folder/Prob1_LastName.SLDPRT My Documents/ Homework 3 Folder/Prob1_LastName.SLDDRW 2. Make a solid works part of the given figure below and also make a drawing sheet – front, top and right side views using 3rd angle projection method. Dimension the views with appropriate dimension technique. All dimensions are in mm. (30 points) Save your part file and drawing sheet as follows: Documents/Homework 3 folder/Problem 2_Last Name.SLDPRT Documents/Homework 3 folder/Problem 2_Last Name.SLDDRW 3. Make a solid works part file for the given figure below. All sketches must be fully defined. Your design tree menu must have advanced features i.e. plane, mirror, and fillet. The spot facing (SF) must be defined in a problem. The inclined cut must be created with an offset sketch and extrude cut or a suitable sketch that uses “up to surface” option. (40 points) Your part model must stick to the isometric view as it is shown here. Save your part file into: My documents/Homework 3 Folder/Problem3_Last Name.SLDPRT Given: A = 76 B = 127 Unit: MMGS ALL ROUNDS (FILLET) EQUAL 6 MM 4. (Extra Credit) Make a solid works part from the given figure below. All sketches must be fully defined. Save your part file to Documents/Homework3 Folder/Prob#4_Last Name.SLDPRT All dimensions are in millimeters. (5 points)

Chapter 5 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, March 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Tactics Box 5.1 Drawing Force Vectors Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 5.1 Drawing Force Vectors. To visualize how forces are exerted on objects, we can use simple diagrams such as vectors. This Tactics Box illustrates the process of drawing a force vector by using the particle model, in which objects are treated as points. TACTICS BOX 5.1 Drawing force vectors Represent the object 1. as a particle. 2. Place the tail of the force vector on the particle. 3. Draw the force vector as an arrow pointing in the proper direction and with a length proportional to the size of the force. 4. Give the vector an appropriate label. The resulting diagram for a force exerted on an object is shown in the drawing. Note that the object is represented as a black dot. Part A A book lies on a table. A pushing force parallel to the table top and directed to the right is exerted on the book. Follow the steps above to draw the force vector . Use the black dot as the particle representing the book. F  F push F push Draw the vector starting at the black dot. The location and orientation of the vector will be graded. The length of the vector will not be graded. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Tactics Box 5.2 Identifying Forces Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 5.2 Identifying Forces. The first basic step in solving force and motion problems generally involves identifying all of the forces acting on an object. This tactics box provides a step-by-step method for identifying each force in a problem. TACTICS BOX 5.2 Identifying forces Identify the object of interest. This is the object whose motion 1. you wish to study. 2. Draw a picture of the situation. Show the object of interest and all other objects—such as ropes, springs, or surfaces—that touch it. 3. Draw a closed curve around the object. Only the object of interest is inside the curve; everything else is outside. 4. Locate every point on the boundary of this curve where other objects touch the object of interest. These are the points where contact forces are exerted on the object. Name and label each contact force acting on the object. There is at least one force at each point of contact; there may be more than one. When necessary, use subscripts to distinguish forces of the same type. 5. 6. Name and label each long-range force acting on the object. For now, the only long-range force is the gravitational force. Apply these steps to the following problem: A crate is pulled up a rough inclined wood board by a tow rope. Identify the forces on the crate. Part A Which of the following objects are of interest? Check all that apply. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Conceptual Questions on Newton’s 1st and 2nd Laws Learning Goal: To understand the meaning and the basic applications of Newton’s 1st and 2nd laws. In this problem, you are given a diagram representing the motion of an object–a motion diagram. The dots represent the object’s position at moments separated by equal intervals of time. The dots are connected by arrows representing the object’s average velocity during the corresponding time interval. Your goal is to use this motion diagram to determine the direction of the net force acting on the object. You will then determine which force diagrams and which situations may correspond to such a motion. crate earth rope wood board Part A What is the direction of the net force acting on the object at position A? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D upward downward to the left to the right The net force is zero. This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part I This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part J This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Understanding Newton’s Laws Part A An object cannot remain at rest unless which of the following holds? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B If a block is moving to the left at a constant velocity, what can one conclude? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: The net force acting on it is zero. The net force acting on it is constant and nonzero. There are no forces at all acting on it. There is only one force acting on it. Part C A block of mass is acted upon by two forces: (directed to the left) and (directed to the right). What can you say about the block’s motion? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D A massive block is being pulled along a horizontal frictionless surface by a constant horizontal force. The block must be __________. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: There is exactly one force applied to the block. The net force applied to the block is directed to the left. The net force applied to the block is zero. There must be no forces at all applied to the block. 2 kg 3 N 4 N It must be moving to the left. It must be moving to the right. It must be at rest. It could be moving to the left, moving to the right, or be instantaneously at rest. Part E Two forces, of magnitude and , are applied to an object. The relative direction of the forces is unknown. The net force acting on the object __________. Check all that apply. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Tactics Box 5.3 Drawing a Free-Body Diagram Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 5.3 Drawing a Free-Body Diagram. A free-body diagram is a diagram that represents the object as a particle and shows all of the forces acting on the object. Learning how to draw such a diagram is a very important skill in solving physics problems. This tactics box explains the essential steps to construct a correct free-body diagram. TACTICS BOX 5.3 Drawing a free-body diagram Identify all forces acting on the object. This step was described 1. in Tactics Box 5.2. continuously changing direction moving at constant velocity moving with a constant nonzero acceleration moving with continuously increasing acceleration 4 N 10 N cannot have a magnitude equal to cannot have a magnitude equal to cannot have the same direction as the force with magnitude must have a magnitude greater than 5 N 10 N 10 N 10 N Draw a coordinate system. Use the axes defined in your pictorial representation. If those axes are tilted, for motion along an incline, then the axes of the free-body diagram should be similarly tilted. 2. Represent the object as a dot at the origin of the coordinate axes. This is 3. the particle model. 4. Draw vectors representing each of the identified forces. This was described in Tactics Box 5.1. Be sure to label each force vector. Draw and label the net force vector . Draw this vector beside the diagram, not on the particle. Or, if appropriate, write . Then, check that points in the same direction as the acceleration vector on your motion diagram. 5. Apply these steps to the following problem: Your physics book is sliding on the carpet. Draw a free-body diagram. Part A Which forces are acting on the book? Check all that apply. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: F  net F =  net 0 F  net a Part B Draw the most appropriate set of coordinate axes for this problem. The orientation of your vectors will be graded. ANSWER: gravity normal force drag static friction tension kinetic friction spring force Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points.

Chapter 5 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, March 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Tactics Box 5.1 Drawing Force Vectors Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 5.1 Drawing Force Vectors. To visualize how forces are exerted on objects, we can use simple diagrams such as vectors. This Tactics Box illustrates the process of drawing a force vector by using the particle model, in which objects are treated as points. TACTICS BOX 5.1 Drawing force vectors Represent the object 1. as a particle. 2. Place the tail of the force vector on the particle. 3. Draw the force vector as an arrow pointing in the proper direction and with a length proportional to the size of the force. 4. Give the vector an appropriate label. The resulting diagram for a force exerted on an object is shown in the drawing. Note that the object is represented as a black dot. Part A A book lies on a table. A pushing force parallel to the table top and directed to the right is exerted on the book. Follow the steps above to draw the force vector . Use the black dot as the particle representing the book. F  F push F push Draw the vector starting at the black dot. The location and orientation of the vector will be graded. The length of the vector will not be graded. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Tactics Box 5.2 Identifying Forces Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 5.2 Identifying Forces. The first basic step in solving force and motion problems generally involves identifying all of the forces acting on an object. This tactics box provides a step-by-step method for identifying each force in a problem. TACTICS BOX 5.2 Identifying forces Identify the object of interest. This is the object whose motion 1. you wish to study. 2. Draw a picture of the situation. Show the object of interest and all other objects—such as ropes, springs, or surfaces—that touch it. 3. Draw a closed curve around the object. Only the object of interest is inside the curve; everything else is outside. 4. Locate every point on the boundary of this curve where other objects touch the object of interest. These are the points where contact forces are exerted on the object. Name and label each contact force acting on the object. There is at least one force at each point of contact; there may be more than one. When necessary, use subscripts to distinguish forces of the same type. 5. 6. Name and label each long-range force acting on the object. For now, the only long-range force is the gravitational force. Apply these steps to the following problem: A crate is pulled up a rough inclined wood board by a tow rope. Identify the forces on the crate. Part A Which of the following objects are of interest? Check all that apply. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Conceptual Questions on Newton’s 1st and 2nd Laws Learning Goal: To understand the meaning and the basic applications of Newton’s 1st and 2nd laws. In this problem, you are given a diagram representing the motion of an object–a motion diagram. The dots represent the object’s position at moments separated by equal intervals of time. The dots are connected by arrows representing the object’s average velocity during the corresponding time interval. Your goal is to use this motion diagram to determine the direction of the net force acting on the object. You will then determine which force diagrams and which situations may correspond to such a motion. crate earth rope wood board Part A What is the direction of the net force acting on the object at position A? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D upward downward to the left to the right The net force is zero. This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part I This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part J This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Understanding Newton’s Laws Part A An object cannot remain at rest unless which of the following holds? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B If a block is moving to the left at a constant velocity, what can one conclude? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: The net force acting on it is zero. The net force acting on it is constant and nonzero. There are no forces at all acting on it. There is only one force acting on it. Part C A block of mass is acted upon by two forces: (directed to the left) and (directed to the right). What can you say about the block’s motion? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D A massive block is being pulled along a horizontal frictionless surface by a constant horizontal force. The block must be __________. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: There is exactly one force applied to the block. The net force applied to the block is directed to the left. The net force applied to the block is zero. There must be no forces at all applied to the block. 2 kg 3 N 4 N It must be moving to the left. It must be moving to the right. It must be at rest. It could be moving to the left, moving to the right, or be instantaneously at rest. Part E Two forces, of magnitude and , are applied to an object. The relative direction of the forces is unknown. The net force acting on the object __________. Check all that apply. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Tactics Box 5.3 Drawing a Free-Body Diagram Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 5.3 Drawing a Free-Body Diagram. A free-body diagram is a diagram that represents the object as a particle and shows all of the forces acting on the object. Learning how to draw such a diagram is a very important skill in solving physics problems. This tactics box explains the essential steps to construct a correct free-body diagram. TACTICS BOX 5.3 Drawing a free-body diagram Identify all forces acting on the object. This step was described 1. in Tactics Box 5.2. continuously changing direction moving at constant velocity moving with a constant nonzero acceleration moving with continuously increasing acceleration 4 N 10 N cannot have a magnitude equal to cannot have a magnitude equal to cannot have the same direction as the force with magnitude must have a magnitude greater than 5 N 10 N 10 N 10 N Draw a coordinate system. Use the axes defined in your pictorial representation. If those axes are tilted, for motion along an incline, then the axes of the free-body diagram should be similarly tilted. 2. Represent the object as a dot at the origin of the coordinate axes. This is 3. the particle model. 4. Draw vectors representing each of the identified forces. This was described in Tactics Box 5.1. Be sure to label each force vector. Draw and label the net force vector . Draw this vector beside the diagram, not on the particle. Or, if appropriate, write . Then, check that points in the same direction as the acceleration vector on your motion diagram. 5. Apply these steps to the following problem: Your physics book is sliding on the carpet. Draw a free-body diagram. Part A Which forces are acting on the book? Check all that apply. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: F  net F =  net 0 F  net a Part B Draw the most appropriate set of coordinate axes for this problem. The orientation of your vectors will be graded. ANSWER: gravity normal force drag static friction tension kinetic friction spring force Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points.

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