Name ____________________________________ Motion in 2D Simulation Go to http://phet.colorado.edu/simulations/sims.php?sim=Motion_in_2D and click on Run Now. 1) Once the simulation opens, click on ‘Show Both’ for Velocity and Acceleration at the top of the page. Now click and drag the red ball around the screen. Make 3 observations about the blue and green arrows (also called vectors) as you drag the ball around. 2) Which color vector (arrow) represents velocity and which one represents acceleration? How can you tell? 3) Try dragging the ball around and around in a circular path. What do you notice about the lengths and directions of the blue and green vectors? Describe their behavior in detail below. 4) Now move the ball at a slow constant speed across the screen. What do you notice now about the vectors? Explain why this happens. 5) What happens to the vectors when you jerk the ball rapidly back and forth across the screen? Explain why this happens. 6) Now click on ‘Circular’ on the bottom. Describe the motion of the ball and the behavior of the two vectors. Is there a force on the ball? How can you tell? Be detailed in your explanations. 7) Click on ‘Simple Harmonic’ on the bottom. Based on the behavior of the ball and the vectors, write a definition of Simple Harmonic Motion.

Name ____________________________________ Motion in 2D Simulation Go to http://phet.colorado.edu/simulations/sims.php?sim=Motion_in_2D and click on Run Now. 1) Once the simulation opens, click on ‘Show Both’ for Velocity and Acceleration at the top of the page. Now click and drag the red ball around the screen. Make 3 observations about the blue and green arrows (also called vectors) as you drag the ball around. 2) Which color vector (arrow) represents velocity and which one represents acceleration? How can you tell? 3) Try dragging the ball around and around in a circular path. What do you notice about the lengths and directions of the blue and green vectors? Describe their behavior in detail below. 4) Now move the ball at a slow constant speed across the screen. What do you notice now about the vectors? Explain why this happens. 5) What happens to the vectors when you jerk the ball rapidly back and forth across the screen? Explain why this happens. 6) Now click on ‘Circular’ on the bottom. Describe the motion of the ball and the behavior of the two vectors. Is there a force on the ball? How can you tell? Be detailed in your explanations. 7) Click on ‘Simple Harmonic’ on the bottom. Based on the behavior of the ball and the vectors, write a definition of Simple Harmonic Motion.

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Use the links provided to answer the questions below. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9tt6BQDVKu0 http://assets.soomopublishing.com/courses/AG/Fragile_Superpower.pdf NIE Report Why does the report suggest that China and India may or may not become dominant powers in the near future? A. Both countries have high economic and social hurdles to overcome. B. Both countries are only somewhat democratic. C. Both countries lack the military strength and nuclear weaponry to challenge even smaller states. D. Neither country is a member of the UN Security Council. E. Neither country is concerned about global warming and is therefore unfit to become a great power player. According to the U.S. intelligence report discussed in the video, why will the use of nuclear weapons grow more likely? A. Irresponsible powerful countries will want to strike the United States to take over its dominant role in the world. B. There will be a tendency to forget just how dangerous they are as we over-emphasize the importance of international trade. C. Rogue states and terrorist groups may be able to gain greater access to these weapons. D. Since the United States and the Soviet Union are rapidly increasing their weapons building programs, the chances of a nuclear incident becomes higher. E. China is likely to produce nuclear weapons to use against the United States and the Soviet Union. According to the video, is the United States likely to lose its position in the world soon? A. Yes, given the rapid rise of China, we will be seeing a challenge from China in the next 5-10 years. B. Yes, China, in conjunction with India, will rise up against the United States. C. Yes, the Russians are working to undermine the U.S. position actively. D. No, although there appears to be decline, the replacement of the United States as the world leader is not likely to come in the next 10 years. E. No, the United States will actually lose its position after its departure from Iraq in 2012. The Rise of a Fierce Yet Fragile Superpower Why does Susan Shirk say that China is fragile? A. China is fragile because it isn’t a democratic country and will have a difficult time managing relations with other states because of this. B. China is fragile because it has a shrinking economy, so despite its size, China is actually very weak. C. China is fragile because its leaders tend to exacerbate the tensions between states like the Soviet Union and the United States. D. China is fragile because it cannot develop a strong sense of human rights and so its people may try to revolt against it. E. China is fragile because its rate of expansion has created gaps between the wealthy and poor and it has a problem of control with decentralized local governing structures. According to scholars, is a war between the rising power and the current power leader inevitable? A. No, while some scholars believe this is true, others suggest that a “peaceful rise” is possible. B. No, history indicates that all great power transitions have been peaceful. C. Yes, scholars indicate that all of our historical examples of great power transition have been through war. D. Yes, although there are examples of peaceful rise, there is too much cultural difference for that to occur with China. E. Yes, since tension between the United States and China is so strong, scholars agree that a war is coming.

Use the links provided to answer the questions below. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9tt6BQDVKu0 http://assets.soomopublishing.com/courses/AG/Fragile_Superpower.pdf NIE Report Why does the report suggest that China and India may or may not become dominant powers in the near future? A. Both countries have high economic and social hurdles to overcome. B. Both countries are only somewhat democratic. C. Both countries lack the military strength and nuclear weaponry to challenge even smaller states. D. Neither country is a member of the UN Security Council. E. Neither country is concerned about global warming and is therefore unfit to become a great power player. According to the U.S. intelligence report discussed in the video, why will the use of nuclear weapons grow more likely? A. Irresponsible powerful countries will want to strike the United States to take over its dominant role in the world. B. There will be a tendency to forget just how dangerous they are as we over-emphasize the importance of international trade. C. Rogue states and terrorist groups may be able to gain greater access to these weapons. D. Since the United States and the Soviet Union are rapidly increasing their weapons building programs, the chances of a nuclear incident becomes higher. E. China is likely to produce nuclear weapons to use against the United States and the Soviet Union. According to the video, is the United States likely to lose its position in the world soon? A. Yes, given the rapid rise of China, we will be seeing a challenge from China in the next 5-10 years. B. Yes, China, in conjunction with India, will rise up against the United States. C. Yes, the Russians are working to undermine the U.S. position actively. D. No, although there appears to be decline, the replacement of the United States as the world leader is not likely to come in the next 10 years. E. No, the United States will actually lose its position after its departure from Iraq in 2012. The Rise of a Fierce Yet Fragile Superpower Why does Susan Shirk say that China is fragile? A. China is fragile because it isn’t a democratic country and will have a difficult time managing relations with other states because of this. B. China is fragile because it has a shrinking economy, so despite its size, China is actually very weak. C. China is fragile because its leaders tend to exacerbate the tensions between states like the Soviet Union and the United States. D. China is fragile because it cannot develop a strong sense of human rights and so its people may try to revolt against it. E. China is fragile because its rate of expansion has created gaps between the wealthy and poor and it has a problem of control with decentralized local governing structures. According to scholars, is a war between the rising power and the current power leader inevitable? A. No, while some scholars believe this is true, others suggest that a “peaceful rise” is possible. B. No, history indicates that all great power transitions have been peaceful. C. Yes, scholars indicate that all of our historical examples of great power transition have been through war. D. Yes, although there are examples of peaceful rise, there is too much cultural difference for that to occur with China. E. Yes, since tension between the United States and China is so strong, scholars agree that a war is coming.

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Berkeley College International Economics Quiz 1 Student name: Class & Session (Type all your answers in the parenthesis) Multiple Choice Questions (75 points) 1. The person credited with the first systematic expression of the principle of comparative advantage was ( ) A. Alan Greenspan. B. John Maynard Keynes. C. David Ricardo. D. Adam Smith. 2. A regulation that sets the highest price at which it is legal to trade a good is a ( ) A. Production quota B. Price floor C. Price ceiling D. Tax ceiling 3. In Country J, it takes one hour to knit a pair of socks, and five hours to brew a gallon of cider. In Country K, it takes three hours to knit a pair of socks, and six hours to brew a gallon of cider. If trade were to open between the two countries, Ricardo would predict that ( ) A. Country J will export cider and Country K will export socks. B. Country J will export socks and Country K will export cider. C. Country J will export both socks and cider. D. Country K will export both socks and cider. 4. If Nation A can produce either 3x or 3y with one hour of labor, while nation B can produce either 1x or 1y with one hour of labor, and if labor is the only input, then ( ) A. Nation A has an absolute advantage in both goods. B. Nation B has an absolute advantage in both goods. C. Nation A has a comparative disadvantage in both goods. D. Nation A has a comparative advantage in both goods. 5. Mutually beneficial trade A. Allows both countries to consume a larger bundle of goods than before trade occurred.( ) B. Allows only the more productive country to consume a larger bundle of goods than before trade occurred. C. Allows only the less productive country to consume a larger bundle of goods than before trade occurred. D. Causes changes only in production, not consumption. 6. In the absence of trade, the consumption points available to a nation ( ) A. Are above the production possibility curve. B. Are on or inside the production possibility curve. C. Lie on the production possibility curve. D. Cannot be identified. 7. For Heckscher-Ohlin, the most important cause of the differences in relative commodity prices is the difference between countries in ( ) A. Factor endowments. B. National income. C. Technology. D. Tastes. 8. Country J has 1 million machines and 1 million workers, while country K has 2 million machines and 3 million workers. If computers are produced mostly by capital and beer is produced mostly by labor, the H-O model predicts that ( ) A. Country K will export computers in exchange for beer. B. Country J will export computers in exchange for beer. C. Country J is too small to be of economic interest to Country K. D. Computers and beer don’t mix, so trade cannot increase either country’s well-being. 9. Mexico is an unskilled labor abundant country, while the United States is a skilled labor abundant country. With the opening of trade, you would expect that, in the long run, wages for unskilled workers ( ) A. Decline in both countries. B. Decline in the United States and rise in Mexico. C. Rise in the United States and decline in Mexico. D. Rise in both countries 10. According to trade theory, if a nation has a comparative advantage in a capital-intensively produced good, and the rate of growth of capital is greater than the rate of growth of other inputs (e.g., labor), the pattern of growth which results will be ( ) A. Import replacing. B. Neutral as between capital intensive and other products. C. Export expanding. D. None of the above. 11. Arguments in favor of having developing countries focus on exporting manufactured goods include ( ) A. Strong support in industrialized countries for free trade in manufactured goods. B. Very low tariffs on manufactured textiles, apparel, and footwear in industrialized countries. C. Political preference for VERs among importing countries. D. A downward trend in the prices of primary products. 12. Which group definitely loses from international migration of labor? ( ) A. The migrants. B. The migrants’ new employers in the receiving country. C. The migrants’ old employers in the sending country. D. The migrants’ fellow workers who did not emigrate. 13. As technology advances, ( ) A. All opportunity cost decreases B. The PPF shift outward C. A country moves toward the midpoint along its PPF D. The PPF shift inward because unemployment occurs 14. If a country is operating at a point of production efficiency ( ) A. It enjoys growth when increasing production B. It produces on its production possibility frontier curve C. It must specialize in the production of a good D. It operates on its trade line 15. A cartel is ( ) A. Another name for a firm in an oligopoly B. A collusive agreement among a number of firms C. A government body that regulates an industry D. An antitrust law (Type and show your work) Practicum Question (25 points) Two countries, Haiti and the Dominican Republic, produce fruits and timber. Each island has a labor force of 1200 and the monthly productivity of each worker is as follow Basket of fruit Board feet of timber Haiti 10 5 Dominican Republic 30 10 a. Which county has an absolute advantage in the production of fruit? Timber? b. Which country has a comparative advantage in the production of fruit? Timber? c. Sketch the production possibility frontier (PPF) of both countries d. Both countries want to produce an equal amount of baskets of fruit and feet of timber. How should they allocate their workers to the two sectors? e. How can free trade move both countries beyond their respective PPF Extra credits (10 points) The demand and supply curves of the market for DVD at the local (US) market are as follow: P = 30 – Qd/2 and P= -1.5 + Qs/4 a. Find the equilibrium price and the equilibrium quantity when there is no international trade ( hint: solve for Qd and Qs And then make Qd=Qs to solve for Price and quantities) b. What are the equilibrium quantities when the nations trade freely at price of $15? Explain your rationale. c. How many units are exported? d. What is the resulting national gain? e. Do consumers and producers gain or lose from the free trade?

Berkeley College International Economics Quiz 1 Student name: Class & Session (Type all your answers in the parenthesis) Multiple Choice Questions (75 points) 1. The person credited with the first systematic expression of the principle of comparative advantage was ( ) A. Alan Greenspan. B. John Maynard Keynes. C. David Ricardo. D. Adam Smith. 2. A regulation that sets the highest price at which it is legal to trade a good is a ( ) A. Production quota B. Price floor C. Price ceiling D. Tax ceiling 3. In Country J, it takes one hour to knit a pair of socks, and five hours to brew a gallon of cider. In Country K, it takes three hours to knit a pair of socks, and six hours to brew a gallon of cider. If trade were to open between the two countries, Ricardo would predict that ( ) A. Country J will export cider and Country K will export socks. B. Country J will export socks and Country K will export cider. C. Country J will export both socks and cider. D. Country K will export both socks and cider. 4. If Nation A can produce either 3x or 3y with one hour of labor, while nation B can produce either 1x or 1y with one hour of labor, and if labor is the only input, then ( ) A. Nation A has an absolute advantage in both goods. B. Nation B has an absolute advantage in both goods. C. Nation A has a comparative disadvantage in both goods. D. Nation A has a comparative advantage in both goods. 5. Mutually beneficial trade A. Allows both countries to consume a larger bundle of goods than before trade occurred.( ) B. Allows only the more productive country to consume a larger bundle of goods than before trade occurred. C. Allows only the less productive country to consume a larger bundle of goods than before trade occurred. D. Causes changes only in production, not consumption. 6. In the absence of trade, the consumption points available to a nation ( ) A. Are above the production possibility curve. B. Are on or inside the production possibility curve. C. Lie on the production possibility curve. D. Cannot be identified. 7. For Heckscher-Ohlin, the most important cause of the differences in relative commodity prices is the difference between countries in ( ) A. Factor endowments. B. National income. C. Technology. D. Tastes. 8. Country J has 1 million machines and 1 million workers, while country K has 2 million machines and 3 million workers. If computers are produced mostly by capital and beer is produced mostly by labor, the H-O model predicts that ( ) A. Country K will export computers in exchange for beer. B. Country J will export computers in exchange for beer. C. Country J is too small to be of economic interest to Country K. D. Computers and beer don’t mix, so trade cannot increase either country’s well-being. 9. Mexico is an unskilled labor abundant country, while the United States is a skilled labor abundant country. With the opening of trade, you would expect that, in the long run, wages for unskilled workers ( ) A. Decline in both countries. B. Decline in the United States and rise in Mexico. C. Rise in the United States and decline in Mexico. D. Rise in both countries 10. According to trade theory, if a nation has a comparative advantage in a capital-intensively produced good, and the rate of growth of capital is greater than the rate of growth of other inputs (e.g., labor), the pattern of growth which results will be ( ) A. Import replacing. B. Neutral as between capital intensive and other products. C. Export expanding. D. None of the above. 11. Arguments in favor of having developing countries focus on exporting manufactured goods include ( ) A. Strong support in industrialized countries for free trade in manufactured goods. B. Very low tariffs on manufactured textiles, apparel, and footwear in industrialized countries. C. Political preference for VERs among importing countries. D. A downward trend in the prices of primary products. 12. Which group definitely loses from international migration of labor? ( ) A. The migrants. B. The migrants’ new employers in the receiving country. C. The migrants’ old employers in the sending country. D. The migrants’ fellow workers who did not emigrate. 13. As technology advances, ( ) A. All opportunity cost decreases B. The PPF shift outward C. A country moves toward the midpoint along its PPF D. The PPF shift inward because unemployment occurs 14. If a country is operating at a point of production efficiency ( ) A. It enjoys growth when increasing production B. It produces on its production possibility frontier curve C. It must specialize in the production of a good D. It operates on its trade line 15. A cartel is ( ) A. Another name for a firm in an oligopoly B. A collusive agreement among a number of firms C. A government body that regulates an industry D. An antitrust law (Type and show your work) Practicum Question (25 points) Two countries, Haiti and the Dominican Republic, produce fruits and timber. Each island has a labor force of 1200 and the monthly productivity of each worker is as follow Basket of fruit Board feet of timber Haiti 10 5 Dominican Republic 30 10 a. Which county has an absolute advantage in the production of fruit? Timber? b. Which country has a comparative advantage in the production of fruit? Timber? c. Sketch the production possibility frontier (PPF) of both countries d. Both countries want to produce an equal amount of baskets of fruit and feet of timber. How should they allocate their workers to the two sectors? e. How can free trade move both countries beyond their respective PPF Extra credits (10 points) The demand and supply curves of the market for DVD at the local (US) market are as follow: P = 30 – Qd/2 and P= -1.5 + Qs/4 a. Find the equilibrium price and the equilibrium quantity when there is no international trade ( hint: solve for Qd and Qs And then make Qd=Qs to solve for Price and quantities) b. What are the equilibrium quantities when the nations trade freely at price of $15? Explain your rationale. c. How many units are exported? d. What is the resulting national gain? e. Do consumers and producers gain or lose from the free trade?

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Construct a 2-4 page paper that fully explores each of the following areas: 1) Citing our textbook material, explain how the sociological approach toward social problems differs from other approaches. Why are certain problems considered significant and others are not? 2) Next, choose one social problem that exists in society that you think is particularly serious, and explain it in sociological terms. This social problem should be measurable in some statistical way. (Is it increasing, and if so, how? Among which groups of people, and for how long, etc.?) 3) What might be one important way in which the social problem is currently being addressed in society? 4) Please define and identify at least four concepts from our text relevant to your chosen social problem. 5) Analyze the way in which these concepts help us better understand the nature of the social problem you are discussing. Don’t forget to include proper APA-style citation and reference. Need inside citing for each paragraph and NO PLAGIARISM.. Everything should come from the book “Social Problems: Community, Policy, and Social Action, 4th Edition” By:Anna Leon-Guerrero

Construct a 2-4 page paper that fully explores each of the following areas: 1) Citing our textbook material, explain how the sociological approach toward social problems differs from other approaches. Why are certain problems considered significant and others are not? 2) Next, choose one social problem that exists in society that you think is particularly serious, and explain it in sociological terms. This social problem should be measurable in some statistical way. (Is it increasing, and if so, how? Among which groups of people, and for how long, etc.?) 3) What might be one important way in which the social problem is currently being addressed in society? 4) Please define and identify at least four concepts from our text relevant to your chosen social problem. 5) Analyze the way in which these concepts help us better understand the nature of the social problem you are discussing. Don’t forget to include proper APA-style citation and reference. Need inside citing for each paragraph and NO PLAGIARISM.. Everything should come from the book “Social Problems: Community, Policy, and Social Action, 4th Edition” By:Anna Leon-Guerrero

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Watch the videos, and then answer the questions below. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kt6SYhX_Ymo http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ka3yTfmyjAw Building Justice Which of the following is true of the International Criminal Court (ICC)? A. It was the first court to try individuals for crimes against humanity. B. It was founded to prosecute Nazi war criminals. C. It is a permanent court with universal jurisdiction. D. It was created by a treaty that has been signed by all of the world’s nations. E. none of these options What distinguishes a “crime against humanity” from other kinds of crimes? A. Crimes against humanity involve government officials as perpetrators. B. Crimes against humanity target particular ethnic groups. C. Crimes against humanity are punishable by the death penalty. D. Crimes against humanity involve attacks on civilians. E. all of these options An important goal of the ICC is to eliminate “impunity” for crimes, which means eliminating which of the following? A. the ability of perpetrators to obtain the weapons they need to commit the crimes B. the expectation of perpetrators that they can commit crimes without being punished C. the expectation of perpetrators that they can evade arrest by national authorities D. the ability of perpetrators to get a court-appointed lawyer if they are arrested and tried E. the ability of perpetrators to cross national boundaries and escape extradition Supporting a Strong International Justice System Which of the following is NOT a part of the emerging international justice system? A. local courts B. national courts C. regional courts D. international Courts E. United Nations tribunals Which of the following represents one of the major challenges faced by the ICC? A. increasing awareness of its cause B. obtaining more funding from the United Nations C. securing greater state cooperation with its activities D. apprehending and prosecuting Germain Katanga E. getting the United States to join

Watch the videos, and then answer the questions below. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kt6SYhX_Ymo http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ka3yTfmyjAw Building Justice Which of the following is true of the International Criminal Court (ICC)? A. It was the first court to try individuals for crimes against humanity. B. It was founded to prosecute Nazi war criminals. C. It is a permanent court with universal jurisdiction. D. It was created by a treaty that has been signed by all of the world’s nations. E. none of these options What distinguishes a “crime against humanity” from other kinds of crimes? A. Crimes against humanity involve government officials as perpetrators. B. Crimes against humanity target particular ethnic groups. C. Crimes against humanity are punishable by the death penalty. D. Crimes against humanity involve attacks on civilians. E. all of these options An important goal of the ICC is to eliminate “impunity” for crimes, which means eliminating which of the following? A. the ability of perpetrators to obtain the weapons they need to commit the crimes B. the expectation of perpetrators that they can commit crimes without being punished C. the expectation of perpetrators that they can evade arrest by national authorities D. the ability of perpetrators to get a court-appointed lawyer if they are arrested and tried E. the ability of perpetrators to cross national boundaries and escape extradition Supporting a Strong International Justice System Which of the following is NOT a part of the emerging international justice system? A. local courts B. national courts C. regional courts D. international Courts E. United Nations tribunals Which of the following represents one of the major challenges faced by the ICC? A. increasing awareness of its cause B. obtaining more funding from the United Nations C. securing greater state cooperation with its activities D. apprehending and prosecuting Germain Katanga E. getting the United States to join

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Which isoelectronic series is correctly arranged in order of increasing radius? A) K+ < Ca2+ < Ar < Cl- B) Cl- < Ar < K+ < Ca2+ C) Ca2+ < Ar < K+ < Cl- D) Ca2+ < K+ < Ar < Cl- E) Ca2+ < K+ < Cl- < Ar

Which isoelectronic series is correctly arranged in order of increasing radius? A) K+ < Ca2+ < Ar < Cl- B) Cl- < Ar < K+ < Ca2+ C) Ca2+ < Ar < K+ < Cl- D) Ca2+ < K+ < Ar < Cl- E) Ca2+ < K+ < Cl- < Ar

Assignment 10 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, April 23, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 12.3 Part A The figure shows three rotating disks, all of equal mass. Rank in order, from largest to smallest, their rotational kinetic energies to . Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. ANSWER: Ka Kc Correct Conceptual Question 12.6 You have two steel solid spheres. Sphere 2 has twice the radius of sphere 1. Part A By what factor does the moment of inertia of sphere 2 exceed the moment of inertia of sphere 1? ANSWER: I2 I1 Correct Problem 12.2 A high-speed drill reaches 2500 in 0.59 . Part A What is the drill’s angular acceleration? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B Through how many revolutions does it turn during this first 0.59 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct I2/I1 = 32 rpm s  = 440 rad s2 s  = 12 rev Constant Angular Acceleration in the Kitchen Dario, a prep cook at an Italian restaurant, spins a salad spinner and observes that it rotates 20.0 times in 5.00 seconds and then stops spinning it. The salad spinner rotates 6.00 more times before it comes to rest. Assume that the spinner slows down with constant angular acceleration. Part A What is the angular acceleration of the salad spinner as it slows down? Express your answer numerically in degrees per second per second. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Recall from your study of kinematics the three equations of motion derived for systems undergoing constant linear acceleration. You are now studying systems undergoing constant angular acceleration and will need to work with the three analogous equations of motion. Collect your known quantities and then determine which of the angular kinematic equations is appropriate to find the angular acceleration . Hint 2. Find the angular velocity of the salad spinner while Dario is spinning it What is the angular velocity of the salad spinner as Dario is spinning it? Express your answer numerically in degrees per second. Hint 1. Converting rotations to degrees When the salad spinner spins through one revolution, it turns through 360 degrees. ANSWER: Hint 3. Find the angular distance the salad spinner travels as it comes to rest Through how many degrees does the salad spinner rotate as it comes to rest? Express your answer numerically in degrees. Hint 1. Converting rotations to degrees  0 = 1440 degrees/s  =  − 0 One revolution is equivalent to 360 degrees. ANSWER: Hint 4. Determine which equation to use You know the initial and final velocities of the system and the angular distance through which the spinner rotates as it comes to a stop. Which equation should be used to solve for the unknown constant angular acceleration ? ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B How long does it take for the salad spinner to come to rest? Express your answer numerically in seconds.  = 2160 degrees   = 0 + 0t+  1 2 t2  = 0 + t = + 2( − ) 2 20 0  = -480 degrees/s2 Hint 1. How to approach the problem Again, you will need the equations of rotational kinematics that apply to situations of constant angular acceleration. Collect your known quantities and then determine which of the angular kinematic equations is appropriate to find . Hint 2. Determine which equation to use You have the initial and final velocities of the system and the angular acceleration, which you found in the previous part. Which is the best equation to use to solve for the unknown time ? ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct ± A Spinning Electric Fan An electric fan is turned off, and its angular velocity decreases uniformly from 540 to 250 in a time interval of length 4.40 . Part A Find the angular acceleration in revolutions per second per second. Hint 1. Average acceleration Recall that if the angular velocity decreases uniformly, the angular acceleration will remain constant. Therefore, the angular acceleration is just the total change in angular velocity divided by t t  = 0 + 0t+  1 2 t2  = 0 + t = + 2( − ) 2 20 0 t = 3.00 s rev/min rev/min s  the total change in time. Be careful of the sign of the angular acceleration. ANSWER: Correct Part B Find the number of revolutions made by the fan blades during the time that they are slowing down in Part A. Hint 1. Determine the correct kinematic equation Which of the following kinematic equations is best suited to this problem? Here and are the initial and final angular velocities, is the elapsed time, is the constant angular acceleration, and and are the initial and final angular displacements. Hint 1. How to chose the right equation Notice that you were given in the problem introduction the initial and final speeds, as well as the length of time between them. In this problem, you are asked to find the number of revolutions (which here is the change in angular displacement, ). If you already found the angular acceleration in Part A, you could use that as well, but you would end up using a more complex equation. Also, in general, it is somewhat favorable to use given quantities instead of quantities that you have calculated. ANSWER:  = -1.10 rev/s2 0  t  0   − 0  = 0 + t  = 0 + t+  1 2 t2 = + 2( − ) 2 20 0 − 0 = (+ )t 1 2 0 ANSWER: Correct Part C How many more seconds are required for the fan to come to rest if the angular acceleration remains constant at the value calculated in Part A? Hint 1. Finding the total time for spin down To find the total time for spin down, just calculate when the velocity will equal zero. This is accomplished by setting the initial velocity plus the acceleration multipled by the time equal to zero and then solving for the time. One can then just subtract the time it took to reach 250 from the total time. Be careful of your signs when you set up the equation. ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.8 A 100 ball and a 230 ball are connected by a 34- -long, massless, rigid rod. The balls rotate about their center of mass at 130 . Part A What is the speed of the 100 ball? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: 29.0 rev rev/min 3.79 s g g cm rpm g Correct Problem 12.10 A thin, 60.0 disk with a diameter of 9.00 rotates about an axis through its center with 0.200 of kinetic energy. Part A What is the speed of a point on the rim? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.12 A drum major twirls a 95- -long, 470 baton about its center of mass at 150 . Part A What is the baton’s rotational kinetic energy? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: v = 3.2 ms g cm J 3.65 ms cm g rpm K = 4.4 J Correct Net Torque on a Pulley The figure below shows two blocks suspended by a cord over a pulley. The mass of block B is twice the mass of block A, while the mass of the pulley is equal to the mass of block A. The blocks are let free to move and the cord moves on the pulley without slipping or stretching. There is no friction in the pulley axle, and the cord’s weight can be ignored. Part A Which of the following statements correctly describes the system shown in the figure? Check all that apply. Hint 1. Conditions for equilibrium If the blocks had the same mass, the system would be in equilibrium. The blocks would have zero acceleration and the tension in each part of the cord would equal the weight of each block. Both parts of the cord would then pull with equal force on the pulley, resulting in a zero net torque and no rotation of the pulley. Is this still the case in the current situation where block B has twice the mass of block A? Hint 2. Rotational analogue of Newton’s second law The net torque of all the forces acting on a rigid body is proportional to the angular acceleration of the body net  and is given by , where is the moment of inertia of the body. Hint 3. Relation between linear and angular acceleration A particle that rotates with angular acceleration has linear acceleration equal to , where is the distance of the particle from the axis of rotation. In the present case, where there is no slipping or stretching of the cord, the cord and the pulley must move together at the same speed. Therefore, if the cord moves with linear acceleration , the pulley must rotate with angular acceleration , where is the radius of the pulley. ANSWER: Correct Part B What happens when block B moves downward? Hint 1. How to approach the problem To determine whether the tensions in both parts of the cord are equal, it is convenient to write a mathematical expression for the net torque on the pulley. This will allow you to relate the tensions in the cord to the pulley’s angular acceleration. Hint 2. Find the net torque on the pulley Let’s assume that the tensions in both parts of the cord are different. Let be the tension in the right cord and the tension in the left cord. If is the radius of the pulley, what is the net torque acting on the pulley? Take the positive sense of rotation to be counterclockwise. Express your answer in terms of , , and . net = I I  a a = R R a  = a R R The acceleration of the blocks is zero. The net torque on the pulley is zero. The angular acceleration of the pulley is nonzero. T1 T2 R net T1 T2 R Hint 1. Torque The torque of a force with respect to a point is defined as the product of the magnitude times the perpendicular distance between the line of action of and the point . In other words, . ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Note that if the pulley were stationary (as in many systems where only linear motion is studied), then the tensions in both parts of the cord would be equal. However, if the pulley rotates with a certain angular acceleration, as in the present situation, the tensions must be different. If they were equal, the pulley could not have an angular acceleration. Problem 12.18 Part A In the figure , what is the magnitude of net torque about the axle? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units.  F  O F l F  O  = Fl net = R(T2 − T1 ) The left cord pulls on the pulley with greater force than the right cord. The left and right cord pull with equal force on the pulley. The right cord pulls on the pulley with greater force than the left cord. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the direction of net torque about the axle? ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.22 An athlete at the gym holds a 3.5 steel ball in his hand. His arm is 78 long and has a mass of 3.6 . Assume the center of mass of the arm is at the geometrical center of the arm. Part A What is the magnitude of the torque about his shoulder if he holds his arm straight out to his side, parallel to the floor? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units.  = 0.20 Nm Clockwise Counterclockwise kg cm kg ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the magnitude of the torque about his shoulder if he holds his arm straight, but below horizontal? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Parallel Axis Theorem The parallel axis theorem relates , the moment of inertia of an object about an axis passing through its center of mass, to , the moment of inertia of the same object about a parallel axis passing through point p. The mathematical statement of the theorem is , where is the perpendicular distance from the center of mass to the axis that passes through point p, and is the mass of the object. Part A Suppose a uniform slender rod has length and mass . The moment of inertia of the rod about about an axis that is perpendicular to the rod and that passes through its center of mass is given by . Find , the moment of inertia of the rod with respect to a parallel axis through one end of the rod. Express in terms of and . Use fractions rather than decimal numbers in your answer. Hint 1. Find the distance from the axis to the center of mass Find the distance appropriate to this problem. That is, find the perpendicular distance from the center of mass of the rod to the axis passing through one end of the rod.  = 41 Nm 45  = 29 Nm Icm Ip Ip = Icm + Md2 d M L m Icm = m 1 12 L2 Iend Iend m L d ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B Now consider a cube of mass with edges of length . The moment of inertia of the cube about an axis through its center of mass and perpendicular to one of its faces is given by . Find , the moment of inertia about an axis p through one of the edges of the cube Express in terms of and . Use fractions rather than decimal numbers in your answer. Hint 1. Find the distance from the axis to the axis Find the perpendicular distance from the center of mass axis to the new edge axis (axis labeled p in the figure). ANSWER: d = L 2 Iend = mL2 3 m a Icm Icm = m 1 6 a2 Iedge Iedge m a o p d ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.26 Starting from rest, a 12- -diameter compact disk takes 2.9 to reach its operating angular velocity of 2000 . Assume that the angular acceleration is constant. The disk’s moment of inertia is . Part A How much torque is applied to the disk? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How many revolutions does it make before reaching full speed? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: d = a 2 Iedge = 2ma2 3 cm s rpm 2.5 × 10−5 kg m2 = 1.8×10−3  Nm Correct Problem 12.23 An object’s moment of inertia is 2.20 . Its angular velocity is increasing at the rate of 3.70 . Part A What is the total torque on the object? ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.31 A 5.1 cat and a 2.5 bowl of tuna fish are at opposite ends of the 4.0- -long seesaw. N = 48 rev kgm2 rad/s2 8.14 N  m kg kg m Part A How far to the left of the pivot must a 3.8 cat stand to keep the seesaw balanced? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Static Equilibrium of the Arm You are able to hold out your arm in an outstretched horizontal position because of the action of the deltoid muscle. Assume the humerus bone has a mass , length and its center of mass is a distance from the scapula. (For this problem ignore the rest of the arm.) The deltoid muscle attaches to the humerus a distance from the scapula. The deltoid muscle makes an angle of with the horizontal, as shown. Use throughout the problem. Part A kg d = 1.4 m M1 = 3.6 kg L = 0.66 m L1 = 0.33 m L2 = 0.15 m  = 17 g = 9.8 m/s2 Find the tension in the deltoid muscle. Express the tension in newtons, to the nearest integer. Hint 1. Nature of the problem Remember that this is a statics problem, so all forces and torques are balanced (their sums equal zero). Hint 2. Origin of torque Calculate the torque about the point at which the arm attaches to the rest of the body. This allows one to balance the torques without having to worry about the undefined forces at this point. Hint 3. Adding up the torques Add up the torques about the point in which the humerus attaches to the body. Answer in terms of , , , , , and . Remember that counterclockwise torque is positive. ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B Using the conditions for static equilibrium, find the magnitude of the vertical component of the force exerted by the scapula on the humerus (where the humerus attaches to the rest of the body). Express your answer in newtons, to the nearest integer. T L1 L2 M1 g T  total = 0 = L1M1g − Tsin()L2 T = 265 N Fy Hint 1. Total forces involved Recall that there are three vertical forces in this problem: the force of gravity acting on the bone, the force from the vertical component of the muscle tension, and the force exerted by the scapula on the humerus (where it attaches to the rest of the body). ANSWER: Correct Part C Now find the magnitude of the horizontal component of the force exerted by the scapula on the humerus. Express your answer in newtons, to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Correct ± Moments around a Rod A rod is bent into an L shape and attached at one point to a pivot. The rod sits on a frictionless table and the diagram is a view from above. This means that gravity can be ignored for this problem. There are three forces that are applied to the rod at different points and angles: , , and . Note that the dimensions of the bent rod are in centimeters in the figure, although the answers are requested in SI units (kilograms, meters, seconds). |Fy| = 42 N Fx |Fx| = 254 N F 1 F  2 F  3 Part A If and , what does the magnitude of have to be for there to be rotational equilibrium? Answer numerically in newtons to two significant figures. Hint 1. Finding torque about pivot from What is the magnitude of the torque | | provided by around the pivot point? Give your answer numerically in newton-meters to two significant figures. ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B If the L-shaped rod has a moment of inertia , , , and again , how long a time would it take for the object to move through ( /4 radians)? Assume that as the object starts to move, each force moves with the object so as to retain its initial angle relative to the object. Express the time in seconds to two significant figures. F3 = 0 F1 = 12 N F 2 F 1   1 F  1 |  1 | = 0.36 N  m F2 = 4.5 N I = 9 kg m2 F1 = 12 N F2 = 27 N F3 = 0 t 45  Hint 1. Find the net torque about the pivot What is the magnitude of the total torque around the pivot point? Answer numerically in newton-meters to two significant figures. ANSWER: Hint 2. Calculate Given the total torque around the pivot point, what is , the magnitude of the angular acceleration? Express your answer numerically in radians per second squared to two significant figures. Hint 1. Equation for If you know the magnitude of the total torque ( ) and the rotational inertia ( ), you can then find the rotational acceleration ( ) from ANSWER: Hint 3. Description of angular kinematics Now that you know the angular acceleration, this is a problem in rotational kinematics; find the time needed to go through a given angle . For constant acceleration ( ) and starting with (where is angular speed) the relation is given by which is analogous to the expression for linear displacement ( ) with constant acceleration ( ) starting from rest, | p ivot| | p ivot| = 1.8 N  m    vot Ivot  pivot = Ipivot.  = 0.20 radians/s2    = 0   = 1  , 2 t2 x a . ANSWER: Correct Part C Now consider the situation in which and , but now a force with nonzero magnitude is acting on the rod. What does have to be to obtain equilibrium? Give a numerical answer, without trigonometric functions, in newtons, to two significant figures. Hint 1. Find the required component of Only the tangential (perpendicular) component of (call it ) provides a torque. What is ? Answer in terms of . You will need to evaluate any trigonometric functions. ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct x = 1 a 2 t2 t = 2.8 s F1 = 12 N F2 = 0 F3 F3 F 3 F  3 F3t F3t F3 F3t = 1 2 F3 F3 = 9.0 N Problem 12.32 A car tire is 55.0 in diameter. The car is traveling at a speed of 24.0 . Part A What is the tire’s rotation frequency, in rpm? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the speed of a point at the top edge of the tire? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the speed of a point at the bottom edge of the tire? Express your answer as an integer and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: cm m/s 833 rpm 48.0 ms 0 ms Correct Problem 12.33 A 460 , 8.00-cm-diameter solid cylinder rolls across the floor at 1.30 . Part A What is the can’s kinetic energy? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.45 Part A What is the magnitude of the angular momentum of the 780 rotating bar in the figure ? g m/s 0.583 J g ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the direction of the angular momentum of the bar ? ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.46 Part A What is the magnitude of the angular momentum of the 2.20 , 4.60-cm-diameter rotating disk in the figure ? 3.27 kgm2/s into the page out of the page kg ANSWER: Correct Part B What is its direction? ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.60 A 3.0- -long ladder, as shown in the following figure, leans against a frictionless wall. The coefficient of static friction between the ladder and the floor is 0.46. 3.66×10−2 kgm /s 2 x direction -x direction y direction -y direction z direction -z direction m Part A What is the minimum angle the ladder can make with the floor without slipping? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.61 The 3.0- -long, 90 rigid beam in the following figure is supported at each end. An 70 student stands 2.0 from support 1.  = 47 m kg kg m Part A How much upward force does the support 1 exert on the beam? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How much upward force does the support 2 exert on the beam? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 12.63 A 44 , 5.5- -long beam is supported, but not attached to, the two posts in the figure . A 22 boy starts walking along the beam. You may want to review ( pages 330 – 334) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: F1 = 670 N F2 = 900 N kg m kg The Vector Cross Product Part A How close can he get to the right end of the beam without it falling over? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Draw a picture of the four forces acting on the beam, indicating both their direction and the place on the beam that the forces are acting. Choose a coordinate system with a direction for the axis along the beam, and indicate the position of the boy. What is the net force on the beam if it is stationary? Just before the beam tips, the force of the left support on the beam is zero. Using the zero net force condition, what is the force due to the right support just before the beam tips? For the beam to remain stationary, what must be zero besides the net force on the beam? Choose a point on the beam, and compute the net torque on the beam about that point. Be sure to choose a positive direction for the rotation axis and therefore the torques. Using the zero torque condition, what is the position of the boy on the beam just prior to tipping? How far is this position from the right edge of the beam? ANSWER: Correct d = 2.0 m Problem 12.68 Flywheels are large, massive wheels used to store energy. They can be spun up slowly, then the wheel’s energy can be released quickly to accomplish a task that demands high power. An industrial flywheel has a 1.6 diameter and a mass of 270 . Its maximum angular velocity is 1500 . Part A A motor spins up the flywheel with a constant torque of 54 . How long does it take the flywheel to reach top speed? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How much energy is stored in the flywheel? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C The flywheel is disconnected from the motor and connected to a machine to which it will deliver energy. Half the energy stored in the flywheel is delivered in 2.2 . What is the average power delivered to the machine? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: m kg rpm N  m t = 250 s = 1.1×106 E J s Correct Part D How much torque does the flywheel exert on the machine? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.71 The 3.30 , 40.0-cm-diameter disk in the figure is spinning at 350 . Part A How much friction force must the brake apply to the rim to bring the disk to a halt in 2.10 ? P = 2.4×105 W  = 1800 Nm kg rpm s Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.74 A 5.0 , 60- -diameter cylinder rotates on an axle passing through one edge. The axle is parallel to the floor. The cylinder is held with the center of mass at the same height as the axle, then released. Part A What is the magnitude of the cylinder’s initial angular acceleration? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: 5.76 N kg cm  = 22 rad s2 Correct Part B What is the magnitude of the cylinder’s angular velocity when it is directly below the axle? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.82 A 45 figure skater is spinning on the toes of her skates at 0.90 . Her arms are outstretched as far as they will go. In this orientation, the skater can be modeled as a cylindrical torso (40 , 20 average diameter, 160 tall) plus two rod-like arms (2.5 each, 67 long) attached to the outside of the torso. The skater then raises her arms straight above her head, where she appears to be a 45 , 20- -diameter, 200- -tall cylinder. Part A What is her new rotation frequency, in revolutions per second? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Score Summary:  = 6.6 rad s kg rev/s kg cm cm kg cm kg cm cm 2 = Your score on this assignment is 95.7%. You received 189.42 out of a possible total of 198 points.

Assignment 10 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, April 23, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 12.3 Part A The figure shows three rotating disks, all of equal mass. Rank in order, from largest to smallest, their rotational kinetic energies to . Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. ANSWER: Ka Kc Correct Conceptual Question 12.6 You have two steel solid spheres. Sphere 2 has twice the radius of sphere 1. Part A By what factor does the moment of inertia of sphere 2 exceed the moment of inertia of sphere 1? ANSWER: I2 I1 Correct Problem 12.2 A high-speed drill reaches 2500 in 0.59 . Part A What is the drill’s angular acceleration? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B Through how many revolutions does it turn during this first 0.59 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct I2/I1 = 32 rpm s  = 440 rad s2 s  = 12 rev Constant Angular Acceleration in the Kitchen Dario, a prep cook at an Italian restaurant, spins a salad spinner and observes that it rotates 20.0 times in 5.00 seconds and then stops spinning it. The salad spinner rotates 6.00 more times before it comes to rest. Assume that the spinner slows down with constant angular acceleration. Part A What is the angular acceleration of the salad spinner as it slows down? Express your answer numerically in degrees per second per second. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Recall from your study of kinematics the three equations of motion derived for systems undergoing constant linear acceleration. You are now studying systems undergoing constant angular acceleration and will need to work with the three analogous equations of motion. Collect your known quantities and then determine which of the angular kinematic equations is appropriate to find the angular acceleration . Hint 2. Find the angular velocity of the salad spinner while Dario is spinning it What is the angular velocity of the salad spinner as Dario is spinning it? Express your answer numerically in degrees per second. Hint 1. Converting rotations to degrees When the salad spinner spins through one revolution, it turns through 360 degrees. ANSWER: Hint 3. Find the angular distance the salad spinner travels as it comes to rest Through how many degrees does the salad spinner rotate as it comes to rest? Express your answer numerically in degrees. Hint 1. Converting rotations to degrees  0 = 1440 degrees/s  =  − 0 One revolution is equivalent to 360 degrees. ANSWER: Hint 4. Determine which equation to use You know the initial and final velocities of the system and the angular distance through which the spinner rotates as it comes to a stop. Which equation should be used to solve for the unknown constant angular acceleration ? ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B How long does it take for the salad spinner to come to rest? Express your answer numerically in seconds.  = 2160 degrees   = 0 + 0t+  1 2 t2  = 0 + t = + 2( − ) 2 20 0  = -480 degrees/s2 Hint 1. How to approach the problem Again, you will need the equations of rotational kinematics that apply to situations of constant angular acceleration. Collect your known quantities and then determine which of the angular kinematic equations is appropriate to find . Hint 2. Determine which equation to use You have the initial and final velocities of the system and the angular acceleration, which you found in the previous part. Which is the best equation to use to solve for the unknown time ? ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct ± A Spinning Electric Fan An electric fan is turned off, and its angular velocity decreases uniformly from 540 to 250 in a time interval of length 4.40 . Part A Find the angular acceleration in revolutions per second per second. Hint 1. Average acceleration Recall that if the angular velocity decreases uniformly, the angular acceleration will remain constant. Therefore, the angular acceleration is just the total change in angular velocity divided by t t  = 0 + 0t+  1 2 t2  = 0 + t = + 2( − ) 2 20 0 t = 3.00 s rev/min rev/min s  the total change in time. Be careful of the sign of the angular acceleration. ANSWER: Correct Part B Find the number of revolutions made by the fan blades during the time that they are slowing down in Part A. Hint 1. Determine the correct kinematic equation Which of the following kinematic equations is best suited to this problem? Here and are the initial and final angular velocities, is the elapsed time, is the constant angular acceleration, and and are the initial and final angular displacements. Hint 1. How to chose the right equation Notice that you were given in the problem introduction the initial and final speeds, as well as the length of time between them. In this problem, you are asked to find the number of revolutions (which here is the change in angular displacement, ). If you already found the angular acceleration in Part A, you could use that as well, but you would end up using a more complex equation. Also, in general, it is somewhat favorable to use given quantities instead of quantities that you have calculated. ANSWER:  = -1.10 rev/s2 0  t  0   − 0  = 0 + t  = 0 + t+  1 2 t2 = + 2( − ) 2 20 0 − 0 = (+ )t 1 2 0 ANSWER: Correct Part C How many more seconds are required for the fan to come to rest if the angular acceleration remains constant at the value calculated in Part A? Hint 1. Finding the total time for spin down To find the total time for spin down, just calculate when the velocity will equal zero. This is accomplished by setting the initial velocity plus the acceleration multipled by the time equal to zero and then solving for the time. One can then just subtract the time it took to reach 250 from the total time. Be careful of your signs when you set up the equation. ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.8 A 100 ball and a 230 ball are connected by a 34- -long, massless, rigid rod. The balls rotate about their center of mass at 130 . Part A What is the speed of the 100 ball? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: 29.0 rev rev/min 3.79 s g g cm rpm g Correct Problem 12.10 A thin, 60.0 disk with a diameter of 9.00 rotates about an axis through its center with 0.200 of kinetic energy. Part A What is the speed of a point on the rim? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.12 A drum major twirls a 95- -long, 470 baton about its center of mass at 150 . Part A What is the baton’s rotational kinetic energy? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: v = 3.2 ms g cm J 3.65 ms cm g rpm K = 4.4 J Correct Net Torque on a Pulley The figure below shows two blocks suspended by a cord over a pulley. The mass of block B is twice the mass of block A, while the mass of the pulley is equal to the mass of block A. The blocks are let free to move and the cord moves on the pulley without slipping or stretching. There is no friction in the pulley axle, and the cord’s weight can be ignored. Part A Which of the following statements correctly describes the system shown in the figure? Check all that apply. Hint 1. Conditions for equilibrium If the blocks had the same mass, the system would be in equilibrium. The blocks would have zero acceleration and the tension in each part of the cord would equal the weight of each block. Both parts of the cord would then pull with equal force on the pulley, resulting in a zero net torque and no rotation of the pulley. Is this still the case in the current situation where block B has twice the mass of block A? Hint 2. Rotational analogue of Newton’s second law The net torque of all the forces acting on a rigid body is proportional to the angular acceleration of the body net  and is given by , where is the moment of inertia of the body. Hint 3. Relation between linear and angular acceleration A particle that rotates with angular acceleration has linear acceleration equal to , where is the distance of the particle from the axis of rotation. In the present case, where there is no slipping or stretching of the cord, the cord and the pulley must move together at the same speed. Therefore, if the cord moves with linear acceleration , the pulley must rotate with angular acceleration , where is the radius of the pulley. ANSWER: Correct Part B What happens when block B moves downward? Hint 1. How to approach the problem To determine whether the tensions in both parts of the cord are equal, it is convenient to write a mathematical expression for the net torque on the pulley. This will allow you to relate the tensions in the cord to the pulley’s angular acceleration. Hint 2. Find the net torque on the pulley Let’s assume that the tensions in both parts of the cord are different. Let be the tension in the right cord and the tension in the left cord. If is the radius of the pulley, what is the net torque acting on the pulley? Take the positive sense of rotation to be counterclockwise. Express your answer in terms of , , and . net = I I  a a = R R a  = a R R The acceleration of the blocks is zero. The net torque on the pulley is zero. The angular acceleration of the pulley is nonzero. T1 T2 R net T1 T2 R Hint 1. Torque The torque of a force with respect to a point is defined as the product of the magnitude times the perpendicular distance between the line of action of and the point . In other words, . ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Note that if the pulley were stationary (as in many systems where only linear motion is studied), then the tensions in both parts of the cord would be equal. However, if the pulley rotates with a certain angular acceleration, as in the present situation, the tensions must be different. If they were equal, the pulley could not have an angular acceleration. Problem 12.18 Part A In the figure , what is the magnitude of net torque about the axle? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units.  F  O F l F  O  = Fl net = R(T2 − T1 ) The left cord pulls on the pulley with greater force than the right cord. The left and right cord pull with equal force on the pulley. The right cord pulls on the pulley with greater force than the left cord. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the direction of net torque about the axle? ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.22 An athlete at the gym holds a 3.5 steel ball in his hand. His arm is 78 long and has a mass of 3.6 . Assume the center of mass of the arm is at the geometrical center of the arm. Part A What is the magnitude of the torque about his shoulder if he holds his arm straight out to his side, parallel to the floor? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units.  = 0.20 Nm Clockwise Counterclockwise kg cm kg ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the magnitude of the torque about his shoulder if he holds his arm straight, but below horizontal? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Parallel Axis Theorem The parallel axis theorem relates , the moment of inertia of an object about an axis passing through its center of mass, to , the moment of inertia of the same object about a parallel axis passing through point p. The mathematical statement of the theorem is , where is the perpendicular distance from the center of mass to the axis that passes through point p, and is the mass of the object. Part A Suppose a uniform slender rod has length and mass . The moment of inertia of the rod about about an axis that is perpendicular to the rod and that passes through its center of mass is given by . Find , the moment of inertia of the rod with respect to a parallel axis through one end of the rod. Express in terms of and . Use fractions rather than decimal numbers in your answer. Hint 1. Find the distance from the axis to the center of mass Find the distance appropriate to this problem. That is, find the perpendicular distance from the center of mass of the rod to the axis passing through one end of the rod.  = 41 Nm 45  = 29 Nm Icm Ip Ip = Icm + Md2 d M L m Icm = m 1 12 L2 Iend Iend m L d ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B Now consider a cube of mass with edges of length . The moment of inertia of the cube about an axis through its center of mass and perpendicular to one of its faces is given by . Find , the moment of inertia about an axis p through one of the edges of the cube Express in terms of and . Use fractions rather than decimal numbers in your answer. Hint 1. Find the distance from the axis to the axis Find the perpendicular distance from the center of mass axis to the new edge axis (axis labeled p in the figure). ANSWER: d = L 2 Iend = mL2 3 m a Icm Icm = m 1 6 a2 Iedge Iedge m a o p d ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.26 Starting from rest, a 12- -diameter compact disk takes 2.9 to reach its operating angular velocity of 2000 . Assume that the angular acceleration is constant. The disk’s moment of inertia is . Part A How much torque is applied to the disk? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How many revolutions does it make before reaching full speed? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: d = a 2 Iedge = 2ma2 3 cm s rpm 2.5 × 10−5 kg m2 = 1.8×10−3  Nm Correct Problem 12.23 An object’s moment of inertia is 2.20 . Its angular velocity is increasing at the rate of 3.70 . Part A What is the total torque on the object? ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.31 A 5.1 cat and a 2.5 bowl of tuna fish are at opposite ends of the 4.0- -long seesaw. N = 48 rev kgm2 rad/s2 8.14 N  m kg kg m Part A How far to the left of the pivot must a 3.8 cat stand to keep the seesaw balanced? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Static Equilibrium of the Arm You are able to hold out your arm in an outstretched horizontal position because of the action of the deltoid muscle. Assume the humerus bone has a mass , length and its center of mass is a distance from the scapula. (For this problem ignore the rest of the arm.) The deltoid muscle attaches to the humerus a distance from the scapula. The deltoid muscle makes an angle of with the horizontal, as shown. Use throughout the problem. Part A kg d = 1.4 m M1 = 3.6 kg L = 0.66 m L1 = 0.33 m L2 = 0.15 m  = 17 g = 9.8 m/s2 Find the tension in the deltoid muscle. Express the tension in newtons, to the nearest integer. Hint 1. Nature of the problem Remember that this is a statics problem, so all forces and torques are balanced (their sums equal zero). Hint 2. Origin of torque Calculate the torque about the point at which the arm attaches to the rest of the body. This allows one to balance the torques without having to worry about the undefined forces at this point. Hint 3. Adding up the torques Add up the torques about the point in which the humerus attaches to the body. Answer in terms of , , , , , and . Remember that counterclockwise torque is positive. ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B Using the conditions for static equilibrium, find the magnitude of the vertical component of the force exerted by the scapula on the humerus (where the humerus attaches to the rest of the body). Express your answer in newtons, to the nearest integer. T L1 L2 M1 g T  total = 0 = L1M1g − Tsin()L2 T = 265 N Fy Hint 1. Total forces involved Recall that there are three vertical forces in this problem: the force of gravity acting on the bone, the force from the vertical component of the muscle tension, and the force exerted by the scapula on the humerus (where it attaches to the rest of the body). ANSWER: Correct Part C Now find the magnitude of the horizontal component of the force exerted by the scapula on the humerus. Express your answer in newtons, to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Correct ± Moments around a Rod A rod is bent into an L shape and attached at one point to a pivot. The rod sits on a frictionless table and the diagram is a view from above. This means that gravity can be ignored for this problem. There are three forces that are applied to the rod at different points and angles: , , and . Note that the dimensions of the bent rod are in centimeters in the figure, although the answers are requested in SI units (kilograms, meters, seconds). |Fy| = 42 N Fx |Fx| = 254 N F 1 F  2 F  3 Part A If and , what does the magnitude of have to be for there to be rotational equilibrium? Answer numerically in newtons to two significant figures. Hint 1. Finding torque about pivot from What is the magnitude of the torque | | provided by around the pivot point? Give your answer numerically in newton-meters to two significant figures. ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B If the L-shaped rod has a moment of inertia , , , and again , how long a time would it take for the object to move through ( /4 radians)? Assume that as the object starts to move, each force moves with the object so as to retain its initial angle relative to the object. Express the time in seconds to two significant figures. F3 = 0 F1 = 12 N F 2 F 1   1 F  1 |  1 | = 0.36 N  m F2 = 4.5 N I = 9 kg m2 F1 = 12 N F2 = 27 N F3 = 0 t 45  Hint 1. Find the net torque about the pivot What is the magnitude of the total torque around the pivot point? Answer numerically in newton-meters to two significant figures. ANSWER: Hint 2. Calculate Given the total torque around the pivot point, what is , the magnitude of the angular acceleration? Express your answer numerically in radians per second squared to two significant figures. Hint 1. Equation for If you know the magnitude of the total torque ( ) and the rotational inertia ( ), you can then find the rotational acceleration ( ) from ANSWER: Hint 3. Description of angular kinematics Now that you know the angular acceleration, this is a problem in rotational kinematics; find the time needed to go through a given angle . For constant acceleration ( ) and starting with (where is angular speed) the relation is given by which is analogous to the expression for linear displacement ( ) with constant acceleration ( ) starting from rest, | p ivot| | p ivot| = 1.8 N  m    vot Ivot  pivot = Ipivot.  = 0.20 radians/s2    = 0   = 1  , 2 t2 x a . ANSWER: Correct Part C Now consider the situation in which and , but now a force with nonzero magnitude is acting on the rod. What does have to be to obtain equilibrium? Give a numerical answer, without trigonometric functions, in newtons, to two significant figures. Hint 1. Find the required component of Only the tangential (perpendicular) component of (call it ) provides a torque. What is ? Answer in terms of . You will need to evaluate any trigonometric functions. ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct x = 1 a 2 t2 t = 2.8 s F1 = 12 N F2 = 0 F3 F3 F 3 F  3 F3t F3t F3 F3t = 1 2 F3 F3 = 9.0 N Problem 12.32 A car tire is 55.0 in diameter. The car is traveling at a speed of 24.0 . Part A What is the tire’s rotation frequency, in rpm? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the speed of a point at the top edge of the tire? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the speed of a point at the bottom edge of the tire? Express your answer as an integer and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: cm m/s 833 rpm 48.0 ms 0 ms Correct Problem 12.33 A 460 , 8.00-cm-diameter solid cylinder rolls across the floor at 1.30 . Part A What is the can’s kinetic energy? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.45 Part A What is the magnitude of the angular momentum of the 780 rotating bar in the figure ? g m/s 0.583 J g ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the direction of the angular momentum of the bar ? ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.46 Part A What is the magnitude of the angular momentum of the 2.20 , 4.60-cm-diameter rotating disk in the figure ? 3.27 kgm2/s into the page out of the page kg ANSWER: Correct Part B What is its direction? ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.60 A 3.0- -long ladder, as shown in the following figure, leans against a frictionless wall. The coefficient of static friction between the ladder and the floor is 0.46. 3.66×10−2 kgm /s 2 x direction -x direction y direction -y direction z direction -z direction m Part A What is the minimum angle the ladder can make with the floor without slipping? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.61 The 3.0- -long, 90 rigid beam in the following figure is supported at each end. An 70 student stands 2.0 from support 1.  = 47 m kg kg m Part A How much upward force does the support 1 exert on the beam? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How much upward force does the support 2 exert on the beam? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 12.63 A 44 , 5.5- -long beam is supported, but not attached to, the two posts in the figure . A 22 boy starts walking along the beam. You may want to review ( pages 330 – 334) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: F1 = 670 N F2 = 900 N kg m kg The Vector Cross Product Part A How close can he get to the right end of the beam without it falling over? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Draw a picture of the four forces acting on the beam, indicating both their direction and the place on the beam that the forces are acting. Choose a coordinate system with a direction for the axis along the beam, and indicate the position of the boy. What is the net force on the beam if it is stationary? Just before the beam tips, the force of the left support on the beam is zero. Using the zero net force condition, what is the force due to the right support just before the beam tips? For the beam to remain stationary, what must be zero besides the net force on the beam? Choose a point on the beam, and compute the net torque on the beam about that point. Be sure to choose a positive direction for the rotation axis and therefore the torques. Using the zero torque condition, what is the position of the boy on the beam just prior to tipping? How far is this position from the right edge of the beam? ANSWER: Correct d = 2.0 m Problem 12.68 Flywheels are large, massive wheels used to store energy. They can be spun up slowly, then the wheel’s energy can be released quickly to accomplish a task that demands high power. An industrial flywheel has a 1.6 diameter and a mass of 270 . Its maximum angular velocity is 1500 . Part A A motor spins up the flywheel with a constant torque of 54 . How long does it take the flywheel to reach top speed? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How much energy is stored in the flywheel? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C The flywheel is disconnected from the motor and connected to a machine to which it will deliver energy. Half the energy stored in the flywheel is delivered in 2.2 . What is the average power delivered to the machine? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: m kg rpm N  m t = 250 s = 1.1×106 E J s Correct Part D How much torque does the flywheel exert on the machine? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.71 The 3.30 , 40.0-cm-diameter disk in the figure is spinning at 350 . Part A How much friction force must the brake apply to the rim to bring the disk to a halt in 2.10 ? P = 2.4×105 W  = 1800 Nm kg rpm s Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.74 A 5.0 , 60- -diameter cylinder rotates on an axle passing through one edge. The axle is parallel to the floor. The cylinder is held with the center of mass at the same height as the axle, then released. Part A What is the magnitude of the cylinder’s initial angular acceleration? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: 5.76 N kg cm  = 22 rad s2 Correct Part B What is the magnitude of the cylinder’s angular velocity when it is directly below the axle? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.82 A 45 figure skater is spinning on the toes of her skates at 0.90 . Her arms are outstretched as far as they will go. In this orientation, the skater can be modeled as a cylindrical torso (40 , 20 average diameter, 160 tall) plus two rod-like arms (2.5 each, 67 long) attached to the outside of the torso. The skater then raises her arms straight above her head, where she appears to be a 45 , 20- -diameter, 200- -tall cylinder. Part A What is her new rotation frequency, in revolutions per second? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Score Summary:  = 6.6 rad s kg rev/s kg cm cm kg cm kg cm cm 2 = Your score on this assignment is 95.7%. You received 189.42 out of a possible total of 198 points.

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Corporate Report Assignment Due April 17 Your final paper should include: -5 pages double-spaced narrative. Papers over 5 pages will receive point deduction. -Additional Pages: -Graph of stock performance 3 year price history of company (with article marked), S&P 500, and a benchmark company -Bibliography. But you still need to cite sources in the body of your paper. -Ratio Worksheets – fully completed. You will attach the same ratios that were graded; any corrections that were indicated in the initial grading should be made. -Headings and page numbers -Labels for the ratios (example: times, %, days) Format of Paper: COMPANY BACKGROUND (½-1 page) Include information like founding date, headquarters location, product or service provided, date when first traded in public markets, market on which it trades, and any other information that seems important for understanding the company. FINANCIAL ANALYSIS (2-3 pages) Discuss at least 8 ratios from the Ratio Worksheet that you feel explain the trends/changes within the company over the time period. You will need to choose at least one ratio from each of the overall categories (i.e. one from asset utilization, one from liquidity, etc.) Discuss all of the following for the ratios chosen: -Has it improved, deteriorated or stayed the same over the last 3 years? Do not use the words increasing/decreasing or higher/lower. Instead use better/worse or improving/deteriorating. Explain whether the change in the ratio was a good thing or a bad thing. -What is the reason behind the changes in the ratio? Not just what part of the ratio changed, but what was happening with the company that could have affected the ratio? If you can not find specific news, what do you think was affecting the ratio? -How does it compare to the industry? At least one ratio from each category should be discussed. As you write your paper think about (These were top reasons I docked points in the past): What are the ratios? This is a finance class give me numbers What does the ratio mean or measure? Discuss components (assets increasing but not as much as_____) Discuss company specific things that might impact the component Compare to industry or benchmark After talking about ratios in a specific category, state how the company is doing in that category of ratios. For example: Liquidity ratios measure the firm’s ability to meet short-term obligations. Are you confident your company can meet their short term obligations? Overall discussion of the company’s performance based upon the ratio analysis. Although you don’t have to tell me every number you looked at you should include plenty of numbers in your paper. STOCK GRAPH (1-2 pages) Analyze your company’s stock performance over the last 3 years. Comment on any patterns you notice for your company and how it moves with the S&P500. When and what was the high price/low price? Does this make sense with what you see overall in your financial analysis? Discuss if the Beta of your company makes sense with what you see on the graph (and your financial analysis.) If your company is too new that no beta has been calculated, you will have to estimate what you believe the beta would be based on the performance. What was the price trend throughout the semester? Why did it move this way? Discuss at least one news event found in an article from a business publication or journal (i.e. Wall Street Journal, Business Week, or any article from library website) that occurred in the 3 year time period you are evaluating. Summarize the article (more than one sentence) and tell me whether you thought the stock price would increase or decrease when investors heard this news; and then tell me what actually happened. Mark the date of the article on your graph. The news event should be about the company not just about the industry. CONCLUSION (¼-½ page) State what actions you think the company should take to become or remain financially strong. The paper should end with a statement about whether you would buy, hold or sell your stock in this company. BIBLIOGRAPHY All sources used should be referenced on the bibliography and throughout the paper.

Corporate Report Assignment Due April 17 Your final paper should include: -5 pages double-spaced narrative. Papers over 5 pages will receive point deduction. -Additional Pages: -Graph of stock performance 3 year price history of company (with article marked), S&P 500, and a benchmark company -Bibliography. But you still need to cite sources in the body of your paper. -Ratio Worksheets – fully completed. You will attach the same ratios that were graded; any corrections that were indicated in the initial grading should be made. -Headings and page numbers -Labels for the ratios (example: times, %, days) Format of Paper: COMPANY BACKGROUND (½-1 page) Include information like founding date, headquarters location, product or service provided, date when first traded in public markets, market on which it trades, and any other information that seems important for understanding the company. FINANCIAL ANALYSIS (2-3 pages) Discuss at least 8 ratios from the Ratio Worksheet that you feel explain the trends/changes within the company over the time period. You will need to choose at least one ratio from each of the overall categories (i.e. one from asset utilization, one from liquidity, etc.) Discuss all of the following for the ratios chosen: -Has it improved, deteriorated or stayed the same over the last 3 years? Do not use the words increasing/decreasing or higher/lower. Instead use better/worse or improving/deteriorating. Explain whether the change in the ratio was a good thing or a bad thing. -What is the reason behind the changes in the ratio? Not just what part of the ratio changed, but what was happening with the company that could have affected the ratio? If you can not find specific news, what do you think was affecting the ratio? -How does it compare to the industry? At least one ratio from each category should be discussed. As you write your paper think about (These were top reasons I docked points in the past): What are the ratios? This is a finance class give me numbers What does the ratio mean or measure? Discuss components (assets increasing but not as much as_____) Discuss company specific things that might impact the component Compare to industry or benchmark After talking about ratios in a specific category, state how the company is doing in that category of ratios. For example: Liquidity ratios measure the firm’s ability to meet short-term obligations. Are you confident your company can meet their short term obligations? Overall discussion of the company’s performance based upon the ratio analysis. Although you don’t have to tell me every number you looked at you should include plenty of numbers in your paper. STOCK GRAPH (1-2 pages) Analyze your company’s stock performance over the last 3 years. Comment on any patterns you notice for your company and how it moves with the S&P500. When and what was the high price/low price? Does this make sense with what you see overall in your financial analysis? Discuss if the Beta of your company makes sense with what you see on the graph (and your financial analysis.) If your company is too new that no beta has been calculated, you will have to estimate what you believe the beta would be based on the performance. What was the price trend throughout the semester? Why did it move this way? Discuss at least one news event found in an article from a business publication or journal (i.e. Wall Street Journal, Business Week, or any article from library website) that occurred in the 3 year time period you are evaluating. Summarize the article (more than one sentence) and tell me whether you thought the stock price would increase or decrease when investors heard this news; and then tell me what actually happened. Mark the date of the article on your graph. The news event should be about the company not just about the industry. CONCLUSION (¼-½ page) State what actions you think the company should take to become or remain financially strong. The paper should end with a statement about whether you would buy, hold or sell your stock in this company. BIBLIOGRAPHY All sources used should be referenced on the bibliography and throughout the paper.

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5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 Problem List 5.1 Total mass of a shell 5.2 Tunnel through the moon 5.3 Gravitational eld above the center of a thin hoop 5.4 Gravitational force near a metal-cored planet surrounded by a gaseous cloud 5.5 Sphere with linearly increasing mass density 5.6 Jumping o Vesta 5.7 Gravitational force between two massive rods 5.8 Potential energy { Check your answer! 5.9 Ways of solving gravitational problems 5.10 Rod with linearly increasing mass density 5.11 Sphere with constant internal gravitational eld 5.12 Throwing a rock o the moon These problems are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Un- ported License. Please share and/or modify. Back to Problem List 1 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.1 Total mass of a shell Given: Marino { Fall 2011 Consider a spherical shell that extends from r = R to r = 2R with a non-uniform density (r) = 0r. What is the total mass of the shell? Back to Problem List 2 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.2 Tunnel through the moon Given: Marino { Fall 2011 Imagine that NASA digs a straight tunnel through the center of the moon (see gure) to access the Moon’s 3He deposits. An astronaut places a rock in the tunnel at the surface of the moon, and releases it (from rest). Show that the rock obeys the force law for a mass connected to a spring. What is the spring constant? Find the oscillation period for this motion if you assume that Moon has a mass of 7.351022 kg and a radius of 1.74106 m. Assume the moon’s density is uniform throughout its volume, and ignore the moon’s rotation. Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 Imagine (in a parallel universe of unlimited budgets) that NASA digs a straight tunnel through the center of the moon (see gure). A robot place a rock in the tunnel at position r = r0 from the center of the moon, and releases it (from rest). Use Newton’s second law to write the equation of motion of the rock and solve for r(t). Explain in words the rock’s motion. Does the rock return to its initial position at any later time? If so, how long does it takes to return to it? (Give a formula, and a number.) Assume the moon’s density is uniform throughout its volume, and ignore the moon’s rotation. Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Now lets consider our (real) planet Earth, with total mass M and radius R which we will approximate as a uniform mass density, (r) = 0. (a) Neglecting rotational and frictional e ects, show that a particle dropped into a hole drilled straight through the center of the earth all the way to the far side will oscillate between the two endpoints. (Hint: you will need to set up, and solve, an ODE for the motion) (b) Find the period of the oscillation of this motion. Get a number (in minutes) as a nal result, using data for the earth’s size and mass. (How does that compare to ying to Perth and back?!) Extra Credit: OK, even with unlimited budgets, digging a tunnel through the center of the earth is preposterous. But, suppose instead that the tunnel is a straight-line \chord” through the earth, say directly from New York to Los Angeles. Show that your nal answer for the time taken does not depend on the location of that chord! This is rather remarkable – look again at the time for a free-fall trip (no energy required, except perhaps to compensate for friction) How long would that trip take? Could this work?! Back to Problem List 3 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.3 Gravitational eld above the center of a thin hoop Given: Pollock { Spring 2011, Spring 2012 Consider a very (in nitesimally!) thin but massive loop, radius R (total mass M), centered around the origin, sitting in the x-y plane. Assume it has a uniform linear mass density  (which has units of kg/m) all around it. (So, it’s like a skinny donut that is mostly hole, centered around the z-axis) (a) What is  in terms of M and R? What is the direction of the gravitational eld generated by this mass distribution at a point in space a distance z above the center of the donut, i.e. at (0; 0; z) Explain your reasoning for the direction carefully, try not to simply \wave your hands.” (The answer is extremely intuitive, but can you justify that it is correct?) (b) Compute the gravitational eld, ~g, at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating Newton’s law of gravity, summing over all in nitesimal \chunks” of mass along the loop. (c) Compute the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating ?Gdm=r, sum- ming over all in nitesimal \chunks” dm along the loop. Then, take the z-component of the gradient of this potential to check that you agree with your result from the previous part. (d) In the two separate limits z << R and z >> R, Taylor expand your g- eld (in the z-direction)out only to the rst non-zero term, and convince us that both limits make good physical sense. (e) Can you use Gauss’ law to gure out the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z)? (If so, do it and check your previous answers. If not, why not?) Extra credit: If you place a small mass a small distance z away from the center, use your Taylor limit for z << R above to write a simple ODE for the equation of motion. Solve it, and discuss the motion Back to Problem List 4 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.4 Gravitational force near a metal-cored planet surrounded by a gaseous cloud Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 Jupiter is composed of a dense spherical core (of liquid metallic hydrogen!) of radius Rc. It is sur- rounded by a spherical cloud of gaseous hydrogen of radius Rg, where Rg > Rc. Let’s assume that the core is of uniform density c and the gaseous cloud is also of uniform density g. What is the gravitational force on an object of mass m that is located at a radius r from the center of Jupiter? Note that you must consider the cases where the object is inside the core, within the gas layer, and outside of the planet. Back to Problem List 5 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.5 Sphere with linearly increasing mass density Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 A planet of mass M and radius R has a nonuniform density that varies with r, the distance from the center according to  = Ar for 0  r  R. (a) What is the constant A in terms of M and R? Does this density pro le strike you as physically plausible, or is just designed as a mathematical exercise? (Brie y, explain) (b) Determine the gravitational force on a satellite of mass m orbiting this planet. In words, please outline the method you plan to use for your solution. (Use the easiest method you can come up with!) In your calculation, you will need to argue that the magnitude of ~g(r; ; ) depends only on r. Be very explicit about this – how do you know that it doesn’t, in fact, depend on  or ? (c) Determine the gravitational force felt by a rock of mass m inside the planet, located at radius r < R. (If the method you use is di erent than in part b, explain why you switched. If not, just proceed!) Explicitly check your result for this part by considering the limits r ! 0 and r ! R. Back to Problem List 6 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.6 Jumping o Vesta Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 You are stranded on the surface of the asteroid Vesta. If the mass of the asteroid is M and its radius is R, how fast would you have to jump o its surface to be able to escape from its gravitational eld? (Your estimate should be based on parameters that characterize the asteroid, not parameters that describe your jumping ability.) Given your formula, look up the approximate mass and radius of the asteroid Vesta 3 and determine a numerical value of the escape velocity. Could you escape in this way? (Brie y, explain) If so, roughly how big in radius is the maximum the asteroid could be, for you to still escape this way? If not, estimate how much smaller an asteroid you would need, to escape from it in this way? Figure 1: Back to Problem List 7 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.7 Gravitational force between two massive rods Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 Consider two identical uniform rods of length L and mass m lying along the same line and having their closest points separated by a distance d as shown in the gure (a) Calculate the mutual force between these rods, both its direction and magnitude. (b) Now do several checks. First, make sure the units worked out (!) The, nd the magnitude of the force in the limit L ! 0. What do you expect? Brie y, discuss. Lastly, nd the magnitude of the force in the limit d ! 1 ? Again, is it what you expect? Brie y, discuss. Figure 2: Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Determining the gravitational force between two rods: (a) Consider a thin, uniform rod of mass m and length L (and negligible other dimensions) lying on the x axis (from x=-L to 0), as shown in g 1a. Derive a formula for the gravitational eld \g" at any arbitrary point x to the right of the origin (but still on the x-axis!) due to this rod. (b) Now suppose a second rod of length L and mass m sits on the x axis as shown in g 1b, with the left edge a distance \d" away. Calculate the mutual gravitational force between these rods. (c) Let's do some checks! Show that the units work out in parts a and b. Find the magnitude of the force in part a, in the limit x >> L: What do you expect? Brie y, discuss! Finally, verify that your answer to part b gives what you expect in the limit d >> L. ( Hint: This is a bit harder! You need to consistently expand everything to second order, not just rst, because of some interesting cancellations) Fig 1a Fig 1b L m +x x=0 L x=0 x=d m Fig 1a Fig 1b L m +x x=0 L +x x=0 x=d L m m Back to Problem List 8 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.8 Potential energy { Check your answer! Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 On the last exam, we had a problem with a at ring, uniform mass per unit area of , inner radius of R, outer radius of 2R. A satellite (mass m) sat a distance z above the center of the ring. We asked for the gravitational potential energy, and the answer was U(z) = ?2Gm( p 4R2 + z2 ? p R2 + z2) (1) (a) If you are far from the disk (on the z axis), what do you expect for the formula for U(z)? (Don’t say \0″ – as usual, we want the functional form of U(z) as you move far away. Also, explicitly state what we mean by \far away”. (Please don’t compare something with units to something without units!) (b) Show explicitly that the formula above does indeed give precisely the functional dependence you expect. Back to Problem List 9 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.9 Ways of solving gravitational problems Given: Pollock { Spring 2011, Spring 2012 Infinite cylinder ρ=cr x z (a) Half-infinite line mass, uniform linear mass density, λ x (b) R z  P Figure 3: (a) An in nite cylinder of radius R centered on the z-axis, with non-uniform volume mass density  = cr, where r is the radius in cylindrical coordinates. (b) A half-in nite line of mass on the x-axis extending from x = 0 to x = +1, with uniform linear mass density . There are two general methods we use to solve gravitational problems (i.e. nd ~g given some distribution of mass). (a) Describe these two methods. We claim one of these methods is easiest to solve for ~g of mass distribution (a) above, and the other method is easiest to solve for ~g of the mass distribution (b) above. Which method goes with which mass distribution? Please justify your answer. (b) Find ~g of the mass distribution (a) above for any arbitrary point outside the cylinder. (c) Find the x component of the gravitational acceleration, gx, generated by the mass distribution labeled (b) above, at a point P a given distance z up the positive z-axis (as shown). Back to Problem List 10 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.10 Rod with linearly increasing mass density Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Consider a very (in nitesimally!) thin but massive rod, length L (total mass M), centered around the origin, sitting along the x-axis. (So the left end is at (-L/2, 0,0) and the right end is at (+L/2,0,0) Assume the mass density  (which has units of kg/m)is not uniform, but instead varies linearly with distance from the origin, (x) = cjxj. (a) What is that constant \c” in terms of M and L? What is the direction of the gravitational eld generated by this mass distribution at a point in space a distance z above the center of the rod, i.e. at (0; 0; z) Explain your reasoning for the direction carefully, try not to simply \wave your hands.” (The answer is extremely intuitive, but can you justify that it is correct?) (b) Compute the gravitational eld, ~g, at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating Newton’s law of gravity, summing over all in nitesimal \chunks” of mass along the rod. (c) Compute the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating ?Gdm=r, sum- ming over all in nitesimal \chunks” dm along the rod. Then, take the z-component of the gradient of this potential to check that you agree with your result from the previous part. (d) In the limit of large z what do you expect for the functional form for gravitational potential? (Hint: Don’t just say it goes to zero! It’s a rod of mass M, when you’re far away what does it look like? How does it go to zero?) What does \large z” mean here? Use the binomial (or Taylor) expansion to verify that your formula does indeed give exactly what you expect. (Hint: you cannot Taylor expand in something BIG, you have to Taylor expand in something small.) (e) Can you use Gauss’ law to gure out the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z)? (If so, do it and check your previous answers. If not, why not?) Back to Problem List 11 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.11 Sphere with constant internal gravitational eld Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 (a) Imagine a planet of total mass M and radius R which has a nonuniform mass density that varies just with r, the distance from the center. For this (admittedly very unusual!) planet, suppose the gravitational eld strength inside the planet turns out to be independent of the radial distance within the sphere. Find the function describing the mass density  = (r) of this planet. (Your nal answer should be written in terms of the given constants.) (b) Now, determine the gravitational force on a satellite of mass m orbiting this planet at distance r > R. (Use the easiest method you can come up with!) Explain your work in words as well as formulas. For instance, in your calculation, you will need to argue that the magnitude of ~g(r; ; ) depends only on r. Be explicit about this – how do you know that it doesn’t, in fact, depend on  or ? (c) As a nal check, explicitly show that your solutions inside and outside the planet (parts a and b) are consistent when r = R. Please also comment on whether this density pro le strikes you as physically plausible, or is it just designed as a mathematical exercise? Defend your reasoning. Back to Problem List 12 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.12 Throwing a rock o the moon Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Assuming that asteroids have roughly the same mass density as the moon, make an estimate of the largest asteroid that an astronaut could be standing on, and still have a chance of throwing a small object (with their arms, no machinery!) so that it completely escapes the asteroid’s gravitational eld. (This minimum speed is called \escape velocity”) Is the size you computed typical for asteroids in our solar system? Back to Problem List 13

5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 Problem List 5.1 Total mass of a shell 5.2 Tunnel through the moon 5.3 Gravitational eld above the center of a thin hoop 5.4 Gravitational force near a metal-cored planet surrounded by a gaseous cloud 5.5 Sphere with linearly increasing mass density 5.6 Jumping o Vesta 5.7 Gravitational force between two massive rods 5.8 Potential energy { Check your answer! 5.9 Ways of solving gravitational problems 5.10 Rod with linearly increasing mass density 5.11 Sphere with constant internal gravitational eld 5.12 Throwing a rock o the moon These problems are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Un- ported License. Please share and/or modify. Back to Problem List 1 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.1 Total mass of a shell Given: Marino { Fall 2011 Consider a spherical shell that extends from r = R to r = 2R with a non-uniform density (r) = 0r. What is the total mass of the shell? Back to Problem List 2 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.2 Tunnel through the moon Given: Marino { Fall 2011 Imagine that NASA digs a straight tunnel through the center of the moon (see gure) to access the Moon’s 3He deposits. An astronaut places a rock in the tunnel at the surface of the moon, and releases it (from rest). Show that the rock obeys the force law for a mass connected to a spring. What is the spring constant? Find the oscillation period for this motion if you assume that Moon has a mass of 7.351022 kg and a radius of 1.74106 m. Assume the moon’s density is uniform throughout its volume, and ignore the moon’s rotation. Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 Imagine (in a parallel universe of unlimited budgets) that NASA digs a straight tunnel through the center of the moon (see gure). A robot place a rock in the tunnel at position r = r0 from the center of the moon, and releases it (from rest). Use Newton’s second law to write the equation of motion of the rock and solve for r(t). Explain in words the rock’s motion. Does the rock return to its initial position at any later time? If so, how long does it takes to return to it? (Give a formula, and a number.) Assume the moon’s density is uniform throughout its volume, and ignore the moon’s rotation. Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Now lets consider our (real) planet Earth, with total mass M and radius R which we will approximate as a uniform mass density, (r) = 0. (a) Neglecting rotational and frictional e ects, show that a particle dropped into a hole drilled straight through the center of the earth all the way to the far side will oscillate between the two endpoints. (Hint: you will need to set up, and solve, an ODE for the motion) (b) Find the period of the oscillation of this motion. Get a number (in minutes) as a nal result, using data for the earth’s size and mass. (How does that compare to ying to Perth and back?!) Extra Credit: OK, even with unlimited budgets, digging a tunnel through the center of the earth is preposterous. But, suppose instead that the tunnel is a straight-line \chord” through the earth, say directly from New York to Los Angeles. Show that your nal answer for the time taken does not depend on the location of that chord! This is rather remarkable – look again at the time for a free-fall trip (no energy required, except perhaps to compensate for friction) How long would that trip take? Could this work?! Back to Problem List 3 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.3 Gravitational eld above the center of a thin hoop Given: Pollock { Spring 2011, Spring 2012 Consider a very (in nitesimally!) thin but massive loop, radius R (total mass M), centered around the origin, sitting in the x-y plane. Assume it has a uniform linear mass density  (which has units of kg/m) all around it. (So, it’s like a skinny donut that is mostly hole, centered around the z-axis) (a) What is  in terms of M and R? What is the direction of the gravitational eld generated by this mass distribution at a point in space a distance z above the center of the donut, i.e. at (0; 0; z) Explain your reasoning for the direction carefully, try not to simply \wave your hands.” (The answer is extremely intuitive, but can you justify that it is correct?) (b) Compute the gravitational eld, ~g, at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating Newton’s law of gravity, summing over all in nitesimal \chunks” of mass along the loop. (c) Compute the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating ?Gdm=r, sum- ming over all in nitesimal \chunks” dm along the loop. Then, take the z-component of the gradient of this potential to check that you agree with your result from the previous part. (d) In the two separate limits z << R and z >> R, Taylor expand your g- eld (in the z-direction)out only to the rst non-zero term, and convince us that both limits make good physical sense. (e) Can you use Gauss’ law to gure out the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z)? (If so, do it and check your previous answers. If not, why not?) Extra credit: If you place a small mass a small distance z away from the center, use your Taylor limit for z << R above to write a simple ODE for the equation of motion. Solve it, and discuss the motion Back to Problem List 4 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.4 Gravitational force near a metal-cored planet surrounded by a gaseous cloud Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 Jupiter is composed of a dense spherical core (of liquid metallic hydrogen!) of radius Rc. It is sur- rounded by a spherical cloud of gaseous hydrogen of radius Rg, where Rg > Rc. Let’s assume that the core is of uniform density c and the gaseous cloud is also of uniform density g. What is the gravitational force on an object of mass m that is located at a radius r from the center of Jupiter? Note that you must consider the cases where the object is inside the core, within the gas layer, and outside of the planet. Back to Problem List 5 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.5 Sphere with linearly increasing mass density Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 A planet of mass M and radius R has a nonuniform density that varies with r, the distance from the center according to  = Ar for 0  r  R. (a) What is the constant A in terms of M and R? Does this density pro le strike you as physically plausible, or is just designed as a mathematical exercise? (Brie y, explain) (b) Determine the gravitational force on a satellite of mass m orbiting this planet. In words, please outline the method you plan to use for your solution. (Use the easiest method you can come up with!) In your calculation, you will need to argue that the magnitude of ~g(r; ; ) depends only on r. Be very explicit about this – how do you know that it doesn’t, in fact, depend on  or ? (c) Determine the gravitational force felt by a rock of mass m inside the planet, located at radius r < R. (If the method you use is di erent than in part b, explain why you switched. If not, just proceed!) Explicitly check your result for this part by considering the limits r ! 0 and r ! R. Back to Problem List 6 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.6 Jumping o Vesta Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 You are stranded on the surface of the asteroid Vesta. If the mass of the asteroid is M and its radius is R, how fast would you have to jump o its surface to be able to escape from its gravitational eld? (Your estimate should be based on parameters that characterize the asteroid, not parameters that describe your jumping ability.) Given your formula, look up the approximate mass and radius of the asteroid Vesta 3 and determine a numerical value of the escape velocity. Could you escape in this way? (Brie y, explain) If so, roughly how big in radius is the maximum the asteroid could be, for you to still escape this way? If not, estimate how much smaller an asteroid you would need, to escape from it in this way? Figure 1: Back to Problem List 7 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.7 Gravitational force between two massive rods Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 Consider two identical uniform rods of length L and mass m lying along the same line and having their closest points separated by a distance d as shown in the gure (a) Calculate the mutual force between these rods, both its direction and magnitude. (b) Now do several checks. First, make sure the units worked out (!) The, nd the magnitude of the force in the limit L ! 0. What do you expect? Brie y, discuss. Lastly, nd the magnitude of the force in the limit d ! 1 ? Again, is it what you expect? Brie y, discuss. Figure 2: Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Determining the gravitational force between two rods: (a) Consider a thin, uniform rod of mass m and length L (and negligible other dimensions) lying on the x axis (from x=-L to 0), as shown in g 1a. Derive a formula for the gravitational eld \g" at any arbitrary point x to the right of the origin (but still on the x-axis!) due to this rod. (b) Now suppose a second rod of length L and mass m sits on the x axis as shown in g 1b, with the left edge a distance \d" away. Calculate the mutual gravitational force between these rods. (c) Let's do some checks! Show that the units work out in parts a and b. Find the magnitude of the force in part a, in the limit x >> L: What do you expect? Brie y, discuss! Finally, verify that your answer to part b gives what you expect in the limit d >> L. ( Hint: This is a bit harder! You need to consistently expand everything to second order, not just rst, because of some interesting cancellations) Fig 1a Fig 1b L m +x x=0 L x=0 x=d m Fig 1a Fig 1b L m +x x=0 L +x x=0 x=d L m m Back to Problem List 8 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.8 Potential energy { Check your answer! Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 On the last exam, we had a problem with a at ring, uniform mass per unit area of , inner radius of R, outer radius of 2R. A satellite (mass m) sat a distance z above the center of the ring. We asked for the gravitational potential energy, and the answer was U(z) = ?2Gm( p 4R2 + z2 ? p R2 + z2) (1) (a) If you are far from the disk (on the z axis), what do you expect for the formula for U(z)? (Don’t say \0″ – as usual, we want the functional form of U(z) as you move far away. Also, explicitly state what we mean by \far away”. (Please don’t compare something with units to something without units!) (b) Show explicitly that the formula above does indeed give precisely the functional dependence you expect. Back to Problem List 9 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.9 Ways of solving gravitational problems Given: Pollock { Spring 2011, Spring 2012 Infinite cylinder ρ=cr x z (a) Half-infinite line mass, uniform linear mass density, λ x (b) R z  P Figure 3: (a) An in nite cylinder of radius R centered on the z-axis, with non-uniform volume mass density  = cr, where r is the radius in cylindrical coordinates. (b) A half-in nite line of mass on the x-axis extending from x = 0 to x = +1, with uniform linear mass density . There are two general methods we use to solve gravitational problems (i.e. nd ~g given some distribution of mass). (a) Describe these two methods. We claim one of these methods is easiest to solve for ~g of mass distribution (a) above, and the other method is easiest to solve for ~g of the mass distribution (b) above. Which method goes with which mass distribution? Please justify your answer. (b) Find ~g of the mass distribution (a) above for any arbitrary point outside the cylinder. (c) Find the x component of the gravitational acceleration, gx, generated by the mass distribution labeled (b) above, at a point P a given distance z up the positive z-axis (as shown). Back to Problem List 10 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.10 Rod with linearly increasing mass density Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Consider a very (in nitesimally!) thin but massive rod, length L (total mass M), centered around the origin, sitting along the x-axis. (So the left end is at (-L/2, 0,0) and the right end is at (+L/2,0,0) Assume the mass density  (which has units of kg/m)is not uniform, but instead varies linearly with distance from the origin, (x) = cjxj. (a) What is that constant \c” in terms of M and L? What is the direction of the gravitational eld generated by this mass distribution at a point in space a distance z above the center of the rod, i.e. at (0; 0; z) Explain your reasoning for the direction carefully, try not to simply \wave your hands.” (The answer is extremely intuitive, but can you justify that it is correct?) (b) Compute the gravitational eld, ~g, at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating Newton’s law of gravity, summing over all in nitesimal \chunks” of mass along the rod. (c) Compute the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating ?Gdm=r, sum- ming over all in nitesimal \chunks” dm along the rod. Then, take the z-component of the gradient of this potential to check that you agree with your result from the previous part. (d) In the limit of large z what do you expect for the functional form for gravitational potential? (Hint: Don’t just say it goes to zero! It’s a rod of mass M, when you’re far away what does it look like? How does it go to zero?) What does \large z” mean here? Use the binomial (or Taylor) expansion to verify that your formula does indeed give exactly what you expect. (Hint: you cannot Taylor expand in something BIG, you have to Taylor expand in something small.) (e) Can you use Gauss’ law to gure out the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z)? (If so, do it and check your previous answers. If not, why not?) Back to Problem List 11 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.11 Sphere with constant internal gravitational eld Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 (a) Imagine a planet of total mass M and radius R which has a nonuniform mass density that varies just with r, the distance from the center. For this (admittedly very unusual!) planet, suppose the gravitational eld strength inside the planet turns out to be independent of the radial distance within the sphere. Find the function describing the mass density  = (r) of this planet. (Your nal answer should be written in terms of the given constants.) (b) Now, determine the gravitational force on a satellite of mass m orbiting this planet at distance r > R. (Use the easiest method you can come up with!) Explain your work in words as well as formulas. For instance, in your calculation, you will need to argue that the magnitude of ~g(r; ; ) depends only on r. Be explicit about this – how do you know that it doesn’t, in fact, depend on  or ? (c) As a nal check, explicitly show that your solutions inside and outside the planet (parts a and b) are consistent when r = R. Please also comment on whether this density pro le strikes you as physically plausible, or is it just designed as a mathematical exercise? Defend your reasoning. Back to Problem List 12 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.12 Throwing a rock o the moon Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Assuming that asteroids have roughly the same mass density as the moon, make an estimate of the largest asteroid that an astronaut could be standing on, and still have a chance of throwing a small object (with their arms, no machinery!) so that it completely escapes the asteroid’s gravitational eld. (This minimum speed is called \escape velocity”) Is the size you computed typical for asteroids in our solar system? Back to Problem List 13