Biologists, researching the effects of adding limestone sand as buffer for acid rain effects in streams, monitored the pH levels of two streams each month for 36 months. The first stream had a mean pH level of 6.8 with a standard deviation of 2.3. The control stream had a mean pH level of 9.2 with a standard deviation of 1.5. Assume a .05 significance level for testing the claim that the mean pH of the first stream was less (more acidic) than the mean pH of the control stream. Also, assume the two samples are independent simple random samples selected from normally distributed populations, but do not assume that the population standard deviations are equal.

Biologists, researching the effects of adding limestone sand as buffer for acid rain effects in streams, monitored the pH levels of two streams each month for 36 months. The first stream had a mean pH level of 6.8 with a standard deviation of 2.3. The control stream had a mean pH level of 9.2 with a standard deviation of 1.5. Assume a .05 significance level for testing the claim that the mean pH of the first stream was less (more acidic) than the mean pH of the control stream. Also, assume the two samples are independent simple random samples selected from normally distributed populations, but do not assume that the population standard deviations are equal.

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Chapter 13 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 16, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy A Matter of Some Gravity Learning Goal: To understand Newton’s law of gravitation and the distinction between inertial and gravitational masses. In this problem, you will practice using Newton’s law of gravitation. According to that law, the magnitude of the gravitational force between two small particles of masses and , separated by a distance , is given by , where is the universal gravitational constant, whose numerical value (in SI units) is . This formula applies not only to small particles, but also to spherical objects. In fact, the gravitational force between two uniform spheres is the same as if we concentrated all the mass of each sphere at its center. Thus, by modeling the Earth and the Moon as uniform spheres, you can use the particle approximation when calculating the force of gravity between them. Be careful in using Newton’s law to choose the correct value for . To calculate the force of gravitational attraction between two uniform spheres, the distance in the equation for Newton’s law of gravitation is the distance between the centers of the spheres. For instance, if a small object such as an elephant is located on the surface of the Earth, the radius of the Earth would be used in the equation. Note that the force of gravity acting on an object located near the surface of a planet is often called weight. Also note that in situations involving satellites, you are often given the altitude of the satellite, that is, the distance from the satellite to the surface of the planet; this is not the distance to be used in the formula for the law of gravitation. There is a potentially confusing issue involving mass. Mass is defined as a measure of an object’s inertia, that is, its ability to resist acceleration. Newton’s second law demonstrates the relationship between mass, acceleration, and the net force acting on an object: . We can now refer to this measure of inertia more precisely as the inertial mass. On the other hand, the masses of the particles that appear in the expression for the law of gravity seem to have nothing to do with inertia: Rather, they serve as a measure of the strength of gravitational interactions. It would be reasonable to call such a property gravitational mass. Does this mean that every object has two different masses? Generally speaking, yes. However, the good news is that according to the latest, highly precise, measurements, the inertial and the gravitational mass of an object are, in fact, equal to each other; it is an established consensus among physicists that there is only one mass after all, which is a measure of both the object’s inertia and its ability to engage in gravitational interactions. Note that this consensus, like everything else in science, is open to possible amendments in the future. In this problem, you will answer several questions that require the use of Newton’s law of gravitation. Part A Two particles are separated by a certain distance. The force of gravitational interaction between them is . Now the separation between the particles is tripled. Find the new force of gravitational Fg m1 m2 r Fg = G m1m2 r2 G 6.67 × 10−11 N m2 kg2 r r rEarth F  = m net a F0 interaction . Express your answer in terms of . ANSWER: Part B A satellite revolves around a planet at an altitude equal to the radius of the planet. The force of gravitational interaction between the satellite and the planet is . Then the satellite moves to a different orbit, so that its altitude is tripled. Find the new force of gravitational interaction . Express your answer in terms of . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C A satellite revolves around a planet at an altitude equal to the radius of the planet. The force of gravitational interaction between the satellite and the planet is . Then the satellite is brought back to the surface of the planet. Find the new force of gravitational interaction . Express your answer in terms of . ANSWER: F1 F0 F1 = F0 F2 F0 F2 = F0 F4 F0 Typesetting math: 81% Part D Two satellites revolve around the Earth. Satellite A has mass and has an orbit of radius . Satellite B has mass and an orbit of unknown radius . The forces of gravitational attraction between each satellite and the Earth is the same. Find . Express your answer in terms of . ANSWER: Part E An adult elephant has a mass of about 5.0 tons. An adult elephant shrew has a mass of about 50 grams. How far from the center of the Earth should an elephant be placed so that its weight equals that of the elephant shrew on the surface of the Earth? The radius of the Earth is 6400 . ( .) Express your answer in kilometers. ANSWER: The table below gives the masses of the Earth, the Moon, and the Sun. Name Mass (kg) Earth Moon Sun F4 = m r 6m rb rb r rb = r km 1 ton = 103 kg r = km 5.97 × 1024 7.35 × 1022 1.99 × 1030 Typesetting math: 81% The average distance between the Earth and the Moon is . The average distance between the Earth and the Sun is . Use this information to answer the following questions. Part F Find the net gravitational force acting on the Earth in the Sun-Earth-Moon system during the new moon (when the moon is located directly between the Earth and the Sun). Express your answer in newtons to three significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part G Find the net gravitational force acting on the Earth in the Sun-Earth-Moon system during the full moon (when the Earth is located directly between the moon and the sun). Express your answer in newtons to three significant figures. ANSWER: ± Understanding Newton’s Law of Universal Gravitation Learning Goal: To understand Newton’s law of universal gravitation and be able to apply it in two-object situations and (collinear) three-object situations; to distinguish between the use of and . 3.84 × 108 m 1.50 × 1011 m Fnet Fnet = N Fnet Fnet = N Typesetting math: 81% G g In the late 1600s, Isaac Newton proposed a rule to quantify the attractive force known as gravity between objects that have mass, such as those shown in the figure. Newton’s law of universal gravitation describes the magnitude of the attractive gravitational force between two objects with masses and as , where is the distance between the centers of the two objects and is the gravitational constant. The gravitational force is attractive, so in the figure it pulls to the right on (toward ) and toward the left on (toward ). The gravitational force acting on is equal in size to, but exactly opposite in direction from, the gravitational force acting on , as required by Newton’s third law. The magnitude of both forces is calculated with the equation given above. The gravitational constant has the value and should not be confused with the magnitude of the gravitational free-fall acceleration constant, denoted by , which equals 9.80 near the surface of the earth. The size of in SI units is tiny. This means that gravitational forces are sizeable only in the vicinity of very massive objects, such as the earth. You are in fact gravitationally attracted toward all the objects around you, such as the computer you are using, but the size of that force is too small to be noticed without extremely sensitive equipment. Consider the earth following its nearly circular orbit (dashed curve) about the sun. The earth has mass and the sun has mass . They are separated, center to center, by . Part A What is the size of the gravitational force acting on the earth due to the sun? Express your answer in newtons. F  g m1 m2 Fg = G( ) m1m2 r2 r G m1 m2 m2 m1 m1 m2 G G = 6.67 × 10−11 N m2/kg2 g m/s2 G mearth = 5.98 × 1024 kg msun = 1.99 × 1030 kg r = 93 million miles = 150 million km Typesetting math: 81% You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F N Typesetting math: 81% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Understanding Mass and Weight Learning Goal: To understand the distinction between mass and weight and to be able to calculate the weight of an object from its mass and Newton’s law of gravitation. The concepts of mass and weight are often confused. In fact, in everyday conversations, the word “weight” often replaces “mass,” as in “My weight is seventy-five kilograms” or “I need to lose some weight.” Of course, mass and weight are related; however, they are also very different. Mass, as you recall, is a measure of an object’s inertia (ability to resist acceleration). Newton’s 2nd law demonstrates the relationship among an object’s mass, its acceleration, and the net force acting on it: . Mass is an intrinsic property of an object and is independent of the object’s location. Weight, in contrast, is defined as the force due to gravity acting on the object. That force depends on the strength of the gravitational field of the planet: , where is the weight of an object, is the mass of that object, and is the local acceleration due to gravity (in other words, the strength of the gravitational field at the location of the object). Weight, unlike mass, is not an intrinsic property of the object; it is determined by both the object and its location. Part A Which of the following quantities represent mass? Check all that apply. ANSWER: Fnet = ma w = mg w m g 12.0 lbs 0.34 g 120 kg 1600 kN 0.34 m 411 cm 899 MN Typesetting math: 81% Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Using the universal law of gravity, we can find the weight of an object feeling the gravitational pull of a nearby planet. We can write an expression , where is the weight of the object, is the gravitational constant, is the mass of that object, is mass of the planet, and is the distance from the center of the planet to the object. If the object is on the surface of the planet, is simply the radius of the planet. Part C The gravitational field on the surface of the earth is stronger than that on the surface of the moon. If a rock is transported from the moon to the earth, which properties of the rock change? ANSWER: Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E If acceleration due to gravity on the earth is , which formula gives the acceleration due to gravity on Loput? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: w = GmM/r2 w G m M r r mass only weight only both mass and weight neither mass nor weight g Typesetting math: 81% Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). ± Weight on a Neutron Star Neutron stars, such as the one at the center of the Crab Nebula, have about the same mass as our sun but a much smaller diameter. g 1.7 5.6 g 1.72 5.6 g 1.72 5.62 g 5.6 1.7 g 5.62 1.72 g 5.6 1.72 Typesetting math: 81% Part A If you weigh 655 on the earth, what would be your weight on the surface of a neutron star that has the same mass as our sun and a diameter of 19.0 ? Take the mass of the sun to be = 1.99×1030 , the gravitational constant to be = 6.67×10−11 , and the acceleration due to gravity at the earth’s surface to be = 9.810 . Express your weight in newtons. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: ± Escape Velocity Learning Goal: To introduce you to the concept of escape velocity for a rocket. The escape velocity is defined to be the minimum speed with which an object of mass must move to escape from the gravitational attraction of a much larger body, such as a planet of total mass . The escape velocity is a function of the distance of the object from the center of the planet , but unless otherwise specified this distance is taken to be the radius of the planet because it addresses the question “How fast does my rocket have to go to escape from the surface of the planet?” Part A The key to making a concise mathematical definition of escape velocity is to consider the energy. If an object is launched at its escape velocity, what is the total mechanical energy of the object at a very large (i.e., infinite) distance from the planet? Follow the usual convention and take the gravitational potential energy to be zero at very large distances. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: N km ms kg G N m2/kg2 g m/s2 wstar wstar = N m M R Etotal Typesetting math: 81% Consider the motion of an object between a point close to the planet and a point very very far from the planet. Indicate whether the following statements are true or false. Part B Angular momentum about the center of the planet is conserved. ANSWER: Part C Total mechanical energy is conserved. ANSWER: Part D Kinetic energy is conserved. ANSWER: Etotal = true false true false Typesetting math: 81% Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). A Satellite in a Circular Orbit Consider a satellite of mass that orbits a planet of mass in a circle a distance from the center of the planet. The satellite’s mass is negligible compared with that of the planet. Indicate whether each of the statements in this problem is true or false. Part A The information given is sufficient to uniquely specify the speed, potential energy, and angular momentum of the satellite. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: true false m1 m2 r true false Typesetting math: 81% Part B The total mechanical energy of the satellite is conserved. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C The linear momentum vector of the satellite is conserved. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D The angular momentum of the satellite about the center of the planet is conserved. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: true false true false Typesetting math: 81% Part E The equations that express the conservation laws of total mechanical energy and linear momentum are sufficient to solve for the speed necessary to maintain a circular orbit at without using . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: At the Galaxy’s Core Astronomers have observed a small, massive object at the center of our Milky Way galaxy. A ring of material orbits this massive object; the ring has a diameter of about 15 light years and an orbital speed of about 200 . Part A Determine the mass of the massive object at the center of the Milky Way galaxy. Take the distance of one light year to be . Express your answer in kilograms. You did not open hints for this part. true false R F = ma true false km/s M 9.461 × 1015 m Typesetting math: 81% ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Properties of Circular Orbits Learning Goal: To teach you how to find the parameters characterizing an object in a circular orbit around a much heavier body like the earth. M = kg Typesetting math: 81% The motivation for Isaac Newton to discover his laws of motion was to explain the properties of planetary orbits that were observed by Tycho Brahe and analyzed by Johannes Kepler. A good starting point for understanding this (as well as the speed of the space shuttle and the height of geostationary satellites) is the simplest orbit–a circular one. This problem concerns the properties of circular orbits for a satellite orbiting a planet of mass . For all parts of this problem, where appropriate, use for the universal gravitational constant. Part A Find the orbital speed for a satellite in a circular orbit of radius . Express the orbital speed in terms of , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Find the kinetic energy of a satellite with mass in a circular orbit with radius . Express your answer in terms of \texttip{m}{m}, \texttip{M}{M}, \texttip{G}{G}, and \texttip{R}{R}. ANSWER: Part C M G v R G M R v = K m R \texttip{K}{K} = Typesetting math: 81% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D Find the orbital period \texttip{T}{T}. Express your answer in terms of \texttip{G}{G}, \texttip{M}{M}, \texttip{R}{R}, and \texttip{\pi }{pi}. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F Find \texttip{L}{L}, the magnitude of the angular momentum of the satellite with respect to the center of the planet. Express your answer in terms of \texttip{m}{m}, \texttip{M}{M}, \texttip{G}{G}, and \texttip{R}{R}. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: \texttip{T}{T} = Typesetting math: 81% Part G The quantities \texttip{v}{v}, \texttip{K}{K}, \texttip{U}{U}, and \texttip{L}{L} all represent physical quantities characterizing the orbit that depend on radius \texttip{R}{R}. Indicate the exponent (power) of the radial dependence of the absolute value of each. Express your answer as a comma-separated list of exponents corresponding to \texttip{v}{v}, \texttip{K}{K}, \texttip{U}{U}, and \texttip{L}{L}, in that order. For example, -1,-1/2,-0.5,-3/2 would mean v \propto R^{-1}, K \propto R^{-1/2}, and so forth. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. \texttip{L}{L} = Typesetting math: 81%

Chapter 13 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 16, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy A Matter of Some Gravity Learning Goal: To understand Newton’s law of gravitation and the distinction between inertial and gravitational masses. In this problem, you will practice using Newton’s law of gravitation. According to that law, the magnitude of the gravitational force between two small particles of masses and , separated by a distance , is given by , where is the universal gravitational constant, whose numerical value (in SI units) is . This formula applies not only to small particles, but also to spherical objects. In fact, the gravitational force between two uniform spheres is the same as if we concentrated all the mass of each sphere at its center. Thus, by modeling the Earth and the Moon as uniform spheres, you can use the particle approximation when calculating the force of gravity between them. Be careful in using Newton’s law to choose the correct value for . To calculate the force of gravitational attraction between two uniform spheres, the distance in the equation for Newton’s law of gravitation is the distance between the centers of the spheres. For instance, if a small object such as an elephant is located on the surface of the Earth, the radius of the Earth would be used in the equation. Note that the force of gravity acting on an object located near the surface of a planet is often called weight. Also note that in situations involving satellites, you are often given the altitude of the satellite, that is, the distance from the satellite to the surface of the planet; this is not the distance to be used in the formula for the law of gravitation. There is a potentially confusing issue involving mass. Mass is defined as a measure of an object’s inertia, that is, its ability to resist acceleration. Newton’s second law demonstrates the relationship between mass, acceleration, and the net force acting on an object: . We can now refer to this measure of inertia more precisely as the inertial mass. On the other hand, the masses of the particles that appear in the expression for the law of gravity seem to have nothing to do with inertia: Rather, they serve as a measure of the strength of gravitational interactions. It would be reasonable to call such a property gravitational mass. Does this mean that every object has two different masses? Generally speaking, yes. However, the good news is that according to the latest, highly precise, measurements, the inertial and the gravitational mass of an object are, in fact, equal to each other; it is an established consensus among physicists that there is only one mass after all, which is a measure of both the object’s inertia and its ability to engage in gravitational interactions. Note that this consensus, like everything else in science, is open to possible amendments in the future. In this problem, you will answer several questions that require the use of Newton’s law of gravitation. Part A Two particles are separated by a certain distance. The force of gravitational interaction between them is . Now the separation between the particles is tripled. Find the new force of gravitational Fg m1 m2 r Fg = G m1m2 r2 G 6.67 × 10−11 N m2 kg2 r r rEarth F  = m net a F0 interaction . Express your answer in terms of . ANSWER: Part B A satellite revolves around a planet at an altitude equal to the radius of the planet. The force of gravitational interaction between the satellite and the planet is . Then the satellite moves to a different orbit, so that its altitude is tripled. Find the new force of gravitational interaction . Express your answer in terms of . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C A satellite revolves around a planet at an altitude equal to the radius of the planet. The force of gravitational interaction between the satellite and the planet is . Then the satellite is brought back to the surface of the planet. Find the new force of gravitational interaction . Express your answer in terms of . ANSWER: F1 F0 F1 = F0 F2 F0 F2 = F0 F4 F0 Typesetting math: 81% Part D Two satellites revolve around the Earth. Satellite A has mass and has an orbit of radius . Satellite B has mass and an orbit of unknown radius . The forces of gravitational attraction between each satellite and the Earth is the same. Find . Express your answer in terms of . ANSWER: Part E An adult elephant has a mass of about 5.0 tons. An adult elephant shrew has a mass of about 50 grams. How far from the center of the Earth should an elephant be placed so that its weight equals that of the elephant shrew on the surface of the Earth? The radius of the Earth is 6400 . ( .) Express your answer in kilometers. ANSWER: The table below gives the masses of the Earth, the Moon, and the Sun. Name Mass (kg) Earth Moon Sun F4 = m r 6m rb rb r rb = r km 1 ton = 103 kg r = km 5.97 × 1024 7.35 × 1022 1.99 × 1030 Typesetting math: 81% The average distance between the Earth and the Moon is . The average distance between the Earth and the Sun is . Use this information to answer the following questions. Part F Find the net gravitational force acting on the Earth in the Sun-Earth-Moon system during the new moon (when the moon is located directly between the Earth and the Sun). Express your answer in newtons to three significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part G Find the net gravitational force acting on the Earth in the Sun-Earth-Moon system during the full moon (when the Earth is located directly between the moon and the sun). Express your answer in newtons to three significant figures. ANSWER: ± Understanding Newton’s Law of Universal Gravitation Learning Goal: To understand Newton’s law of universal gravitation and be able to apply it in two-object situations and (collinear) three-object situations; to distinguish between the use of and . 3.84 × 108 m 1.50 × 1011 m Fnet Fnet = N Fnet Fnet = N Typesetting math: 81% G g In the late 1600s, Isaac Newton proposed a rule to quantify the attractive force known as gravity between objects that have mass, such as those shown in the figure. Newton’s law of universal gravitation describes the magnitude of the attractive gravitational force between two objects with masses and as , where is the distance between the centers of the two objects and is the gravitational constant. The gravitational force is attractive, so in the figure it pulls to the right on (toward ) and toward the left on (toward ). The gravitational force acting on is equal in size to, but exactly opposite in direction from, the gravitational force acting on , as required by Newton’s third law. The magnitude of both forces is calculated with the equation given above. The gravitational constant has the value and should not be confused with the magnitude of the gravitational free-fall acceleration constant, denoted by , which equals 9.80 near the surface of the earth. The size of in SI units is tiny. This means that gravitational forces are sizeable only in the vicinity of very massive objects, such as the earth. You are in fact gravitationally attracted toward all the objects around you, such as the computer you are using, but the size of that force is too small to be noticed without extremely sensitive equipment. Consider the earth following its nearly circular orbit (dashed curve) about the sun. The earth has mass and the sun has mass . They are separated, center to center, by . Part A What is the size of the gravitational force acting on the earth due to the sun? Express your answer in newtons. F  g m1 m2 Fg = G( ) m1m2 r2 r G m1 m2 m2 m1 m1 m2 G G = 6.67 × 10−11 N m2/kg2 g m/s2 G mearth = 5.98 × 1024 kg msun = 1.99 × 1030 kg r = 93 million miles = 150 million km Typesetting math: 81% You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F N Typesetting math: 81% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Understanding Mass and Weight Learning Goal: To understand the distinction between mass and weight and to be able to calculate the weight of an object from its mass and Newton’s law of gravitation. The concepts of mass and weight are often confused. In fact, in everyday conversations, the word “weight” often replaces “mass,” as in “My weight is seventy-five kilograms” or “I need to lose some weight.” Of course, mass and weight are related; however, they are also very different. Mass, as you recall, is a measure of an object’s inertia (ability to resist acceleration). Newton’s 2nd law demonstrates the relationship among an object’s mass, its acceleration, and the net force acting on it: . Mass is an intrinsic property of an object and is independent of the object’s location. Weight, in contrast, is defined as the force due to gravity acting on the object. That force depends on the strength of the gravitational field of the planet: , where is the weight of an object, is the mass of that object, and is the local acceleration due to gravity (in other words, the strength of the gravitational field at the location of the object). Weight, unlike mass, is not an intrinsic property of the object; it is determined by both the object and its location. Part A Which of the following quantities represent mass? Check all that apply. ANSWER: Fnet = ma w = mg w m g 12.0 lbs 0.34 g 120 kg 1600 kN 0.34 m 411 cm 899 MN Typesetting math: 81% Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Using the universal law of gravity, we can find the weight of an object feeling the gravitational pull of a nearby planet. We can write an expression , where is the weight of the object, is the gravitational constant, is the mass of that object, is mass of the planet, and is the distance from the center of the planet to the object. If the object is on the surface of the planet, is simply the radius of the planet. Part C The gravitational field on the surface of the earth is stronger than that on the surface of the moon. If a rock is transported from the moon to the earth, which properties of the rock change? ANSWER: Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E If acceleration due to gravity on the earth is , which formula gives the acceleration due to gravity on Loput? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: w = GmM/r2 w G m M r r mass only weight only both mass and weight neither mass nor weight g Typesetting math: 81% Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). ± Weight on a Neutron Star Neutron stars, such as the one at the center of the Crab Nebula, have about the same mass as our sun but a much smaller diameter. g 1.7 5.6 g 1.72 5.6 g 1.72 5.62 g 5.6 1.7 g 5.62 1.72 g 5.6 1.72 Typesetting math: 81% Part A If you weigh 655 on the earth, what would be your weight on the surface of a neutron star that has the same mass as our sun and a diameter of 19.0 ? Take the mass of the sun to be = 1.99×1030 , the gravitational constant to be = 6.67×10−11 , and the acceleration due to gravity at the earth’s surface to be = 9.810 . Express your weight in newtons. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: ± Escape Velocity Learning Goal: To introduce you to the concept of escape velocity for a rocket. The escape velocity is defined to be the minimum speed with which an object of mass must move to escape from the gravitational attraction of a much larger body, such as a planet of total mass . The escape velocity is a function of the distance of the object from the center of the planet , but unless otherwise specified this distance is taken to be the radius of the planet because it addresses the question “How fast does my rocket have to go to escape from the surface of the planet?” Part A The key to making a concise mathematical definition of escape velocity is to consider the energy. If an object is launched at its escape velocity, what is the total mechanical energy of the object at a very large (i.e., infinite) distance from the planet? Follow the usual convention and take the gravitational potential energy to be zero at very large distances. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: N km ms kg G N m2/kg2 g m/s2 wstar wstar = N m M R Etotal Typesetting math: 81% Consider the motion of an object between a point close to the planet and a point very very far from the planet. Indicate whether the following statements are true or false. Part B Angular momentum about the center of the planet is conserved. ANSWER: Part C Total mechanical energy is conserved. ANSWER: Part D Kinetic energy is conserved. ANSWER: Etotal = true false true false Typesetting math: 81% Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). A Satellite in a Circular Orbit Consider a satellite of mass that orbits a planet of mass in a circle a distance from the center of the planet. The satellite’s mass is negligible compared with that of the planet. Indicate whether each of the statements in this problem is true or false. Part A The information given is sufficient to uniquely specify the speed, potential energy, and angular momentum of the satellite. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: true false m1 m2 r true false Typesetting math: 81% Part B The total mechanical energy of the satellite is conserved. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C The linear momentum vector of the satellite is conserved. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D The angular momentum of the satellite about the center of the planet is conserved. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: true false true false Typesetting math: 81% Part E The equations that express the conservation laws of total mechanical energy and linear momentum are sufficient to solve for the speed necessary to maintain a circular orbit at without using . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: At the Galaxy’s Core Astronomers have observed a small, massive object at the center of our Milky Way galaxy. A ring of material orbits this massive object; the ring has a diameter of about 15 light years and an orbital speed of about 200 . Part A Determine the mass of the massive object at the center of the Milky Way galaxy. Take the distance of one light year to be . Express your answer in kilograms. You did not open hints for this part. true false R F = ma true false km/s M 9.461 × 1015 m Typesetting math: 81% ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Properties of Circular Orbits Learning Goal: To teach you how to find the parameters characterizing an object in a circular orbit around a much heavier body like the earth. M = kg Typesetting math: 81% The motivation for Isaac Newton to discover his laws of motion was to explain the properties of planetary orbits that were observed by Tycho Brahe and analyzed by Johannes Kepler. A good starting point for understanding this (as well as the speed of the space shuttle and the height of geostationary satellites) is the simplest orbit–a circular one. This problem concerns the properties of circular orbits for a satellite orbiting a planet of mass . For all parts of this problem, where appropriate, use for the universal gravitational constant. Part A Find the orbital speed for a satellite in a circular orbit of radius . Express the orbital speed in terms of , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Find the kinetic energy of a satellite with mass in a circular orbit with radius . Express your answer in terms of \texttip{m}{m}, \texttip{M}{M}, \texttip{G}{G}, and \texttip{R}{R}. ANSWER: Part C M G v R G M R v = K m R \texttip{K}{K} = Typesetting math: 81% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D Find the orbital period \texttip{T}{T}. Express your answer in terms of \texttip{G}{G}, \texttip{M}{M}, \texttip{R}{R}, and \texttip{\pi }{pi}. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F Find \texttip{L}{L}, the magnitude of the angular momentum of the satellite with respect to the center of the planet. Express your answer in terms of \texttip{m}{m}, \texttip{M}{M}, \texttip{G}{G}, and \texttip{R}{R}. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: \texttip{T}{T} = Typesetting math: 81% Part G The quantities \texttip{v}{v}, \texttip{K}{K}, \texttip{U}{U}, and \texttip{L}{L} all represent physical quantities characterizing the orbit that depend on radius \texttip{R}{R}. Indicate the exponent (power) of the radial dependence of the absolute value of each. Express your answer as a comma-separated list of exponents corresponding to \texttip{v}{v}, \texttip{K}{K}, \texttip{U}{U}, and \texttip{L}{L}, in that order. For example, -1,-1/2,-0.5,-3/2 would mean v \propto R^{-1}, K \propto R^{-1/2}, and so forth. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. \texttip{L}{L} = Typesetting math: 81%

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1 | P a g e Lecture #2: Abortion (Warren) While studying this topic, we will ask whether it is morally permissible to intentionally terminate a pregnancy and, if so, whether certain restrictions should be placed upon such practices. Even though we will most often be speaking of terminating a fetus, biologists make further classifications: the zygote is the single cell resulting from the fusion of the egg and the sperm; the morula is the cluster of cells that travels through the fallopian tubes; the blastocyte exists once an outer shell of cells has formed around an inner group of cells; the embryo exists once the cells begin to take on specific functions (around the 15th day); the fetus comes into existence in the 8th week when the embryo gains a basic structural resemblance to the adult. Given these distinctions, there are certain kinds of non-fetal abortion—such as usage of RU-486 (the morning-after “abortion pill”)—though most of the writers we will study refer to fetal abortions. So now let us consider the “Classical Argument against Abortion”, which has been very influential: P1) It is wrong to kill innocent persons. P2) A fetus is an innocent person. C) It is wrong to kill a fetus. (Note that this argument has received various formulations, including those from Warren and Thomson which differ from the above. For this course, we will refer to the above formulation as the “Classical Argument”.) Before evaluating this argument, we should talk about terminology: A person is a member of the moral community; i.e., someone who has rights and/or duties. ‘Persons’ is the plural of ‘person’. ‘Person’ can be contrasted with ‘human being’; a human being is anyone who is genetically human (i.e., a member of Homo sapiens). ‘People’ (or ‘human beings’) is the plural of ‘human being’. Why does this matter? First, not all persons are human beings. For example, consider an alien from another planet who mentally resembled us. If he were to visit Earth, it would be morally reprehensible to kick him or to set him on fire because of the pain and suffering that these acts would cause. And, similarly, the alien would be morally condemnable if he were to propagate such acts on us; he has a moral duty not to act in those ways (again, assuming a certain mental resemblance to us). So, even though this alien is not a human being, he is nevertheless a person with the associative rights and/or duties. 2 | P a g e And, more controversially, maybe not all human beings are persons. For example, anencephalic infants—i.e., ones born without cerebral cortexes and therefore with severely limited cognitive abilities—certainly do not have duties since they are not capable of rational thought and autonomous action. Some philosophers have even argued that they do not have rights. Now let us return to the Classical Argument. It is valid insofar as, if the premises are true, then the conclusion has to be true. But maybe it commits equivocation, which is to say that it uses the same word in multiple senses; equivocation is an informal fallacy (i.e., attaches to arguments that are formally valid but otherwise fallacious). Consider the following: P1) I put my money in the bank. P2) The bank borders the river. C) I put my money somewhere that borders the river. This argument equivocates since ‘bank’ is being used in two different senses: in P1 it is used to represent a financial institution and, in P2, it is used to represent a geological feature. Returning to the classical argument, it could be argued that ‘person’ is being used in two different senses: in P1 it is used in its appropriate moral sense and, in P2, it is inappropriately used instead of ‘human being’. The critic might suggest that a more accurate way to represent the argument would be as follows: P1) It is wrong to kill innocent persons. P2) A fetus is a human being. C) It is wrong to kill a fetus. This argument is obviously invalid. So one way to criticize the Classical Argument is to say that it conflates two different concepts—viz., ‘person’ and ‘human being’—and therefore commits equivocation. However, the more straightforward way to attack the Classical Argument is just to deny its second premise and thus contend that the argument is unsound. This is the approach that Mary Anne Warren takes in “On the Moral and Legal Status of Abortion”. Why does Warren think that the second premise is false? Remember that we defined a person as “a member of the moral community.” And we said that an alien, for example, could be afforded moral status even though it is not a human being. Why do we think that this alien should not be tortured or set on fire? Warren thinks that, intuitively, we think that membership in the moral community is based upon possession of the following traits: 3 | P a g e 1. Consciousness of objects and events external and/or internal to the being and especially the capacity to feel pain; 2. Reasoning or rationality (i.e., the developed capacity to solve new and relatively complex problems); 3. Self-motivated activity (i.e., activity which is relatively independent of either genetic or direct external control); 4. Capacity to communicate (not necessarily verbal or linguistic); and 5. Possession of self-concepts and self-awareness. Warren then admits that, though all of the items on this list look promising, we need not require that a person have all of the items on this list. (4) is perhaps the most expendable: imagine someone who is fully paralyzed as well as deaf, these incapacities, which preclude communication, are not sufficient to justify torture. Similarly, we might be able to imagine certain psychological afflictions that negate (5) without compromising personhood. Warren suspects that (1) and (2) are might be sufficient to confer personhood, and thinks that (1)-(3) “quite probably” are sufficient. Note that, if she is right, we would not be able to torture chimps, let us say, but we could set plants on fire (and most likely ants as well). However, given Warren’s aims, she does not need to specify which of these traits are necessary or sufficient for personhood; all that she wants to observe is that the fetus has none of them! Therefore, regardless of which traits we want to require, Warren thinks that the fetus is not a person. Therefore she thinks that the Classical Argument is unsound and should be rejected. Even if we accept Warren’s refutation of the second premise, we might be inclined to say that, while the fetus is not (now) a person, it is a potential person: the fetus will hopefully mature into a being that possesses all five of the traits on Warren’s list. We might then propose the following adjustment to the Classical Argument: P1) It is wrong to kill all innocent persons. P2) A fetus is a potential person. C) It is wrong to kill a fetus. However, this argument is invalid. Warren grants that potentiality might serve as a prima facie reason (i.e., a reason that has some moral weight but which might be outweighed by other considerations) not to abort a fetus, but potentiality alone is insufficient to grant the fetus a moral right against being terminated. By analogy, consider the following argument: 4 | P a g e P1) The President has the right to declare war. P2) Mary is a potential President. C) Mary has the right to declare war. This argument is invalid since the premises are both true and the conclusion is false. By parity, the following argument is also invalid: P1) A person has a right to life. P2) A fetus is a potential person. C) A fetus has a right to life. Thus Warren thinks that considerations of potentiality are insufficient to undermine her argument that fetuses—which are potential persons but, she thinks, not persons—do not have a right to life.

1 | P a g e Lecture #2: Abortion (Warren) While studying this topic, we will ask whether it is morally permissible to intentionally terminate a pregnancy and, if so, whether certain restrictions should be placed upon such practices. Even though we will most often be speaking of terminating a fetus, biologists make further classifications: the zygote is the single cell resulting from the fusion of the egg and the sperm; the morula is the cluster of cells that travels through the fallopian tubes; the blastocyte exists once an outer shell of cells has formed around an inner group of cells; the embryo exists once the cells begin to take on specific functions (around the 15th day); the fetus comes into existence in the 8th week when the embryo gains a basic structural resemblance to the adult. Given these distinctions, there are certain kinds of non-fetal abortion—such as usage of RU-486 (the morning-after “abortion pill”)—though most of the writers we will study refer to fetal abortions. So now let us consider the “Classical Argument against Abortion”, which has been very influential: P1) It is wrong to kill innocent persons. P2) A fetus is an innocent person. C) It is wrong to kill a fetus. (Note that this argument has received various formulations, including those from Warren and Thomson which differ from the above. For this course, we will refer to the above formulation as the “Classical Argument”.) Before evaluating this argument, we should talk about terminology: A person is a member of the moral community; i.e., someone who has rights and/or duties. ‘Persons’ is the plural of ‘person’. ‘Person’ can be contrasted with ‘human being’; a human being is anyone who is genetically human (i.e., a member of Homo sapiens). ‘People’ (or ‘human beings’) is the plural of ‘human being’. Why does this matter? First, not all persons are human beings. For example, consider an alien from another planet who mentally resembled us. If he were to visit Earth, it would be morally reprehensible to kick him or to set him on fire because of the pain and suffering that these acts would cause. And, similarly, the alien would be morally condemnable if he were to propagate such acts on us; he has a moral duty not to act in those ways (again, assuming a certain mental resemblance to us). So, even though this alien is not a human being, he is nevertheless a person with the associative rights and/or duties. 2 | P a g e And, more controversially, maybe not all human beings are persons. For example, anencephalic infants—i.e., ones born without cerebral cortexes and therefore with severely limited cognitive abilities—certainly do not have duties since they are not capable of rational thought and autonomous action. Some philosophers have even argued that they do not have rights. Now let us return to the Classical Argument. It is valid insofar as, if the premises are true, then the conclusion has to be true. But maybe it commits equivocation, which is to say that it uses the same word in multiple senses; equivocation is an informal fallacy (i.e., attaches to arguments that are formally valid but otherwise fallacious). Consider the following: P1) I put my money in the bank. P2) The bank borders the river. C) I put my money somewhere that borders the river. This argument equivocates since ‘bank’ is being used in two different senses: in P1 it is used to represent a financial institution and, in P2, it is used to represent a geological feature. Returning to the classical argument, it could be argued that ‘person’ is being used in two different senses: in P1 it is used in its appropriate moral sense and, in P2, it is inappropriately used instead of ‘human being’. The critic might suggest that a more accurate way to represent the argument would be as follows: P1) It is wrong to kill innocent persons. P2) A fetus is a human being. C) It is wrong to kill a fetus. This argument is obviously invalid. So one way to criticize the Classical Argument is to say that it conflates two different concepts—viz., ‘person’ and ‘human being’—and therefore commits equivocation. However, the more straightforward way to attack the Classical Argument is just to deny its second premise and thus contend that the argument is unsound. This is the approach that Mary Anne Warren takes in “On the Moral and Legal Status of Abortion”. Why does Warren think that the second premise is false? Remember that we defined a person as “a member of the moral community.” And we said that an alien, for example, could be afforded moral status even though it is not a human being. Why do we think that this alien should not be tortured or set on fire? Warren thinks that, intuitively, we think that membership in the moral community is based upon possession of the following traits: 3 | P a g e 1. Consciousness of objects and events external and/or internal to the being and especially the capacity to feel pain; 2. Reasoning or rationality (i.e., the developed capacity to solve new and relatively complex problems); 3. Self-motivated activity (i.e., activity which is relatively independent of either genetic or direct external control); 4. Capacity to communicate (not necessarily verbal or linguistic); and 5. Possession of self-concepts and self-awareness. Warren then admits that, though all of the items on this list look promising, we need not require that a person have all of the items on this list. (4) is perhaps the most expendable: imagine someone who is fully paralyzed as well as deaf, these incapacities, which preclude communication, are not sufficient to justify torture. Similarly, we might be able to imagine certain psychological afflictions that negate (5) without compromising personhood. Warren suspects that (1) and (2) are might be sufficient to confer personhood, and thinks that (1)-(3) “quite probably” are sufficient. Note that, if she is right, we would not be able to torture chimps, let us say, but we could set plants on fire (and most likely ants as well). However, given Warren’s aims, she does not need to specify which of these traits are necessary or sufficient for personhood; all that she wants to observe is that the fetus has none of them! Therefore, regardless of which traits we want to require, Warren thinks that the fetus is not a person. Therefore she thinks that the Classical Argument is unsound and should be rejected. Even if we accept Warren’s refutation of the second premise, we might be inclined to say that, while the fetus is not (now) a person, it is a potential person: the fetus will hopefully mature into a being that possesses all five of the traits on Warren’s list. We might then propose the following adjustment to the Classical Argument: P1) It is wrong to kill all innocent persons. P2) A fetus is a potential person. C) It is wrong to kill a fetus. However, this argument is invalid. Warren grants that potentiality might serve as a prima facie reason (i.e., a reason that has some moral weight but which might be outweighed by other considerations) not to abort a fetus, but potentiality alone is insufficient to grant the fetus a moral right against being terminated. By analogy, consider the following argument: 4 | P a g e P1) The President has the right to declare war. P2) Mary is a potential President. C) Mary has the right to declare war. This argument is invalid since the premises are both true and the conclusion is false. By parity, the following argument is also invalid: P1) A person has a right to life. P2) A fetus is a potential person. C) A fetus has a right to life. Thus Warren thinks that considerations of potentiality are insufficient to undermine her argument that fetuses—which are potential persons but, she thinks, not persons—do not have a right to life.

You work for a healthcare insurance company as an industrial engineer. As part of the company’s customer service department, there is a call center that responds to customer questions by phone. Your manager has asked you to perform an analysis of some data that the call center has collected over the last two years in an effort to determine how many workers are needed. In particular your manager wants to find out if there is a relationship between how long it takes to answer a call (independent variable) and whether or not customers will hang up (dependent variable). Is there a linear relationship between these two variables? Include a graph and analysis to support your opinion. If the goal of the call center is to have fewer than 15% of calls abandoned, how quickly must the call center respond? Learning Outcome #2. Data for Question 3 Average Answer Speed = Average number of seconds to answer an incoming call during the week % abandoned = % of calls that are abandoned (hang up) before being answered during the week.

You work for a healthcare insurance company as an industrial engineer. As part of the company’s customer service department, there is a call center that responds to customer questions by phone. Your manager has asked you to perform an analysis of some data that the call center has collected over the last two years in an effort to determine how many workers are needed. In particular your manager wants to find out if there is a relationship between how long it takes to answer a call (independent variable) and whether or not customers will hang up (dependent variable). Is there a linear relationship between these two variables? Include a graph and analysis to support your opinion. If the goal of the call center is to have fewer than 15% of calls abandoned, how quickly must the call center respond? Learning Outcome #2. Data for Question 3 Average Answer Speed = Average number of seconds to answer an incoming call during the week % abandoned = % of calls that are abandoned (hang up) before being answered during the week.

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5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 Problem List 5.1 Total mass of a shell 5.2 Tunnel through the moon 5.3 Gravitational eld above the center of a thin hoop 5.4 Gravitational force near a metal-cored planet surrounded by a gaseous cloud 5.5 Sphere with linearly increasing mass density 5.6 Jumping o Vesta 5.7 Gravitational force between two massive rods 5.8 Potential energy { Check your answer! 5.9 Ways of solving gravitational problems 5.10 Rod with linearly increasing mass density 5.11 Sphere with constant internal gravitational eld 5.12 Throwing a rock o the moon These problems are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Un- ported License. Please share and/or modify. Back to Problem List 1 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.1 Total mass of a shell Given: Marino { Fall 2011 Consider a spherical shell that extends from r = R to r = 2R with a non-uniform density (r) = 0r. What is the total mass of the shell? Back to Problem List 2 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.2 Tunnel through the moon Given: Marino { Fall 2011 Imagine that NASA digs a straight tunnel through the center of the moon (see gure) to access the Moon’s 3He deposits. An astronaut places a rock in the tunnel at the surface of the moon, and releases it (from rest). Show that the rock obeys the force law for a mass connected to a spring. What is the spring constant? Find the oscillation period for this motion if you assume that Moon has a mass of 7.351022 kg and a radius of 1.74106 m. Assume the moon’s density is uniform throughout its volume, and ignore the moon’s rotation. Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 Imagine (in a parallel universe of unlimited budgets) that NASA digs a straight tunnel through the center of the moon (see gure). A robot place a rock in the tunnel at position r = r0 from the center of the moon, and releases it (from rest). Use Newton’s second law to write the equation of motion of the rock and solve for r(t). Explain in words the rock’s motion. Does the rock return to its initial position at any later time? If so, how long does it takes to return to it? (Give a formula, and a number.) Assume the moon’s density is uniform throughout its volume, and ignore the moon’s rotation. Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Now lets consider our (real) planet Earth, with total mass M and radius R which we will approximate as a uniform mass density, (r) = 0. (a) Neglecting rotational and frictional e ects, show that a particle dropped into a hole drilled straight through the center of the earth all the way to the far side will oscillate between the two endpoints. (Hint: you will need to set up, and solve, an ODE for the motion) (b) Find the period of the oscillation of this motion. Get a number (in minutes) as a nal result, using data for the earth’s size and mass. (How does that compare to ying to Perth and back?!) Extra Credit: OK, even with unlimited budgets, digging a tunnel through the center of the earth is preposterous. But, suppose instead that the tunnel is a straight-line \chord” through the earth, say directly from New York to Los Angeles. Show that your nal answer for the time taken does not depend on the location of that chord! This is rather remarkable – look again at the time for a free-fall trip (no energy required, except perhaps to compensate for friction) How long would that trip take? Could this work?! Back to Problem List 3 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.3 Gravitational eld above the center of a thin hoop Given: Pollock { Spring 2011, Spring 2012 Consider a very (in nitesimally!) thin but massive loop, radius R (total mass M), centered around the origin, sitting in the x-y plane. Assume it has a uniform linear mass density  (which has units of kg/m) all around it. (So, it’s like a skinny donut that is mostly hole, centered around the z-axis) (a) What is  in terms of M and R? What is the direction of the gravitational eld generated by this mass distribution at a point in space a distance z above the center of the donut, i.e. at (0; 0; z) Explain your reasoning for the direction carefully, try not to simply \wave your hands.” (The answer is extremely intuitive, but can you justify that it is correct?) (b) Compute the gravitational eld, ~g, at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating Newton’s law of gravity, summing over all in nitesimal \chunks” of mass along the loop. (c) Compute the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating ?Gdm=r, sum- ming over all in nitesimal \chunks” dm along the loop. Then, take the z-component of the gradient of this potential to check that you agree with your result from the previous part. (d) In the two separate limits z << R and z >> R, Taylor expand your g- eld (in the z-direction)out only to the rst non-zero term, and convince us that both limits make good physical sense. (e) Can you use Gauss’ law to gure out the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z)? (If so, do it and check your previous answers. If not, why not?) Extra credit: If you place a small mass a small distance z away from the center, use your Taylor limit for z << R above to write a simple ODE for the equation of motion. Solve it, and discuss the motion Back to Problem List 4 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.4 Gravitational force near a metal-cored planet surrounded by a gaseous cloud Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 Jupiter is composed of a dense spherical core (of liquid metallic hydrogen!) of radius Rc. It is sur- rounded by a spherical cloud of gaseous hydrogen of radius Rg, where Rg > Rc. Let’s assume that the core is of uniform density c and the gaseous cloud is also of uniform density g. What is the gravitational force on an object of mass m that is located at a radius r from the center of Jupiter? Note that you must consider the cases where the object is inside the core, within the gas layer, and outside of the planet. Back to Problem List 5 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.5 Sphere with linearly increasing mass density Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 A planet of mass M and radius R has a nonuniform density that varies with r, the distance from the center according to  = Ar for 0  r  R. (a) What is the constant A in terms of M and R? Does this density pro le strike you as physically plausible, or is just designed as a mathematical exercise? (Brie y, explain) (b) Determine the gravitational force on a satellite of mass m orbiting this planet. In words, please outline the method you plan to use for your solution. (Use the easiest method you can come up with!) In your calculation, you will need to argue that the magnitude of ~g(r; ; ) depends only on r. Be very explicit about this – how do you know that it doesn’t, in fact, depend on  or ? (c) Determine the gravitational force felt by a rock of mass m inside the planet, located at radius r < R. (If the method you use is di erent than in part b, explain why you switched. If not, just proceed!) Explicitly check your result for this part by considering the limits r ! 0 and r ! R. Back to Problem List 6 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.6 Jumping o Vesta Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 You are stranded on the surface of the asteroid Vesta. If the mass of the asteroid is M and its radius is R, how fast would you have to jump o its surface to be able to escape from its gravitational eld? (Your estimate should be based on parameters that characterize the asteroid, not parameters that describe your jumping ability.) Given your formula, look up the approximate mass and radius of the asteroid Vesta 3 and determine a numerical value of the escape velocity. Could you escape in this way? (Brie y, explain) If so, roughly how big in radius is the maximum the asteroid could be, for you to still escape this way? If not, estimate how much smaller an asteroid you would need, to escape from it in this way? Figure 1: Back to Problem List 7 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.7 Gravitational force between two massive rods Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 Consider two identical uniform rods of length L and mass m lying along the same line and having their closest points separated by a distance d as shown in the gure (a) Calculate the mutual force between these rods, both its direction and magnitude. (b) Now do several checks. First, make sure the units worked out (!) The, nd the magnitude of the force in the limit L ! 0. What do you expect? Brie y, discuss. Lastly, nd the magnitude of the force in the limit d ! 1 ? Again, is it what you expect? Brie y, discuss. Figure 2: Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Determining the gravitational force between two rods: (a) Consider a thin, uniform rod of mass m and length L (and negligible other dimensions) lying on the x axis (from x=-L to 0), as shown in g 1a. Derive a formula for the gravitational eld \g" at any arbitrary point x to the right of the origin (but still on the x-axis!) due to this rod. (b) Now suppose a second rod of length L and mass m sits on the x axis as shown in g 1b, with the left edge a distance \d" away. Calculate the mutual gravitational force between these rods. (c) Let's do some checks! Show that the units work out in parts a and b. Find the magnitude of the force in part a, in the limit x >> L: What do you expect? Brie y, discuss! Finally, verify that your answer to part b gives what you expect in the limit d >> L. ( Hint: This is a bit harder! You need to consistently expand everything to second order, not just rst, because of some interesting cancellations) Fig 1a Fig 1b L m +x x=0 L x=0 x=d m Fig 1a Fig 1b L m +x x=0 L +x x=0 x=d L m m Back to Problem List 8 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.8 Potential energy { Check your answer! Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 On the last exam, we had a problem with a at ring, uniform mass per unit area of , inner radius of R, outer radius of 2R. A satellite (mass m) sat a distance z above the center of the ring. We asked for the gravitational potential energy, and the answer was U(z) = ?2Gm( p 4R2 + z2 ? p R2 + z2) (1) (a) If you are far from the disk (on the z axis), what do you expect for the formula for U(z)? (Don’t say \0″ – as usual, we want the functional form of U(z) as you move far away. Also, explicitly state what we mean by \far away”. (Please don’t compare something with units to something without units!) (b) Show explicitly that the formula above does indeed give precisely the functional dependence you expect. Back to Problem List 9 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.9 Ways of solving gravitational problems Given: Pollock { Spring 2011, Spring 2012 Infinite cylinder ρ=cr x z (a) Half-infinite line mass, uniform linear mass density, λ x (b) R z  P Figure 3: (a) An in nite cylinder of radius R centered on the z-axis, with non-uniform volume mass density  = cr, where r is the radius in cylindrical coordinates. (b) A half-in nite line of mass on the x-axis extending from x = 0 to x = +1, with uniform linear mass density . There are two general methods we use to solve gravitational problems (i.e. nd ~g given some distribution of mass). (a) Describe these two methods. We claim one of these methods is easiest to solve for ~g of mass distribution (a) above, and the other method is easiest to solve for ~g of the mass distribution (b) above. Which method goes with which mass distribution? Please justify your answer. (b) Find ~g of the mass distribution (a) above for any arbitrary point outside the cylinder. (c) Find the x component of the gravitational acceleration, gx, generated by the mass distribution labeled (b) above, at a point P a given distance z up the positive z-axis (as shown). Back to Problem List 10 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.10 Rod with linearly increasing mass density Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Consider a very (in nitesimally!) thin but massive rod, length L (total mass M), centered around the origin, sitting along the x-axis. (So the left end is at (-L/2, 0,0) and the right end is at (+L/2,0,0) Assume the mass density  (which has units of kg/m)is not uniform, but instead varies linearly with distance from the origin, (x) = cjxj. (a) What is that constant \c” in terms of M and L? What is the direction of the gravitational eld generated by this mass distribution at a point in space a distance z above the center of the rod, i.e. at (0; 0; z) Explain your reasoning for the direction carefully, try not to simply \wave your hands.” (The answer is extremely intuitive, but can you justify that it is correct?) (b) Compute the gravitational eld, ~g, at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating Newton’s law of gravity, summing over all in nitesimal \chunks” of mass along the rod. (c) Compute the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating ?Gdm=r, sum- ming over all in nitesimal \chunks” dm along the rod. Then, take the z-component of the gradient of this potential to check that you agree with your result from the previous part. (d) In the limit of large z what do you expect for the functional form for gravitational potential? (Hint: Don’t just say it goes to zero! It’s a rod of mass M, when you’re far away what does it look like? How does it go to zero?) What does \large z” mean here? Use the binomial (or Taylor) expansion to verify that your formula does indeed give exactly what you expect. (Hint: you cannot Taylor expand in something BIG, you have to Taylor expand in something small.) (e) Can you use Gauss’ law to gure out the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z)? (If so, do it and check your previous answers. If not, why not?) Back to Problem List 11 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.11 Sphere with constant internal gravitational eld Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 (a) Imagine a planet of total mass M and radius R which has a nonuniform mass density that varies just with r, the distance from the center. For this (admittedly very unusual!) planet, suppose the gravitational eld strength inside the planet turns out to be independent of the radial distance within the sphere. Find the function describing the mass density  = (r) of this planet. (Your nal answer should be written in terms of the given constants.) (b) Now, determine the gravitational force on a satellite of mass m orbiting this planet at distance r > R. (Use the easiest method you can come up with!) Explain your work in words as well as formulas. For instance, in your calculation, you will need to argue that the magnitude of ~g(r; ; ) depends only on r. Be explicit about this – how do you know that it doesn’t, in fact, depend on  or ? (c) As a nal check, explicitly show that your solutions inside and outside the planet (parts a and b) are consistent when r = R. Please also comment on whether this density pro le strikes you as physically plausible, or is it just designed as a mathematical exercise? Defend your reasoning. Back to Problem List 12 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.12 Throwing a rock o the moon Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Assuming that asteroids have roughly the same mass density as the moon, make an estimate of the largest asteroid that an astronaut could be standing on, and still have a chance of throwing a small object (with their arms, no machinery!) so that it completely escapes the asteroid’s gravitational eld. (This minimum speed is called \escape velocity”) Is the size you computed typical for asteroids in our solar system? Back to Problem List 13

5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 Problem List 5.1 Total mass of a shell 5.2 Tunnel through the moon 5.3 Gravitational eld above the center of a thin hoop 5.4 Gravitational force near a metal-cored planet surrounded by a gaseous cloud 5.5 Sphere with linearly increasing mass density 5.6 Jumping o Vesta 5.7 Gravitational force between two massive rods 5.8 Potential energy { Check your answer! 5.9 Ways of solving gravitational problems 5.10 Rod with linearly increasing mass density 5.11 Sphere with constant internal gravitational eld 5.12 Throwing a rock o the moon These problems are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Un- ported License. Please share and/or modify. Back to Problem List 1 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.1 Total mass of a shell Given: Marino { Fall 2011 Consider a spherical shell that extends from r = R to r = 2R with a non-uniform density (r) = 0r. What is the total mass of the shell? Back to Problem List 2 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.2 Tunnel through the moon Given: Marino { Fall 2011 Imagine that NASA digs a straight tunnel through the center of the moon (see gure) to access the Moon’s 3He deposits. An astronaut places a rock in the tunnel at the surface of the moon, and releases it (from rest). Show that the rock obeys the force law for a mass connected to a spring. What is the spring constant? Find the oscillation period for this motion if you assume that Moon has a mass of 7.351022 kg and a radius of 1.74106 m. Assume the moon’s density is uniform throughout its volume, and ignore the moon’s rotation. Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 Imagine (in a parallel universe of unlimited budgets) that NASA digs a straight tunnel through the center of the moon (see gure). A robot place a rock in the tunnel at position r = r0 from the center of the moon, and releases it (from rest). Use Newton’s second law to write the equation of motion of the rock and solve for r(t). Explain in words the rock’s motion. Does the rock return to its initial position at any later time? If so, how long does it takes to return to it? (Give a formula, and a number.) Assume the moon’s density is uniform throughout its volume, and ignore the moon’s rotation. Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Now lets consider our (real) planet Earth, with total mass M and radius R which we will approximate as a uniform mass density, (r) = 0. (a) Neglecting rotational and frictional e ects, show that a particle dropped into a hole drilled straight through the center of the earth all the way to the far side will oscillate between the two endpoints. (Hint: you will need to set up, and solve, an ODE for the motion) (b) Find the period of the oscillation of this motion. Get a number (in minutes) as a nal result, using data for the earth’s size and mass. (How does that compare to ying to Perth and back?!) Extra Credit: OK, even with unlimited budgets, digging a tunnel through the center of the earth is preposterous. But, suppose instead that the tunnel is a straight-line \chord” through the earth, say directly from New York to Los Angeles. Show that your nal answer for the time taken does not depend on the location of that chord! This is rather remarkable – look again at the time for a free-fall trip (no energy required, except perhaps to compensate for friction) How long would that trip take? Could this work?! Back to Problem List 3 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.3 Gravitational eld above the center of a thin hoop Given: Pollock { Spring 2011, Spring 2012 Consider a very (in nitesimally!) thin but massive loop, radius R (total mass M), centered around the origin, sitting in the x-y plane. Assume it has a uniform linear mass density  (which has units of kg/m) all around it. (So, it’s like a skinny donut that is mostly hole, centered around the z-axis) (a) What is  in terms of M and R? What is the direction of the gravitational eld generated by this mass distribution at a point in space a distance z above the center of the donut, i.e. at (0; 0; z) Explain your reasoning for the direction carefully, try not to simply \wave your hands.” (The answer is extremely intuitive, but can you justify that it is correct?) (b) Compute the gravitational eld, ~g, at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating Newton’s law of gravity, summing over all in nitesimal \chunks” of mass along the loop. (c) Compute the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating ?Gdm=r, sum- ming over all in nitesimal \chunks” dm along the loop. Then, take the z-component of the gradient of this potential to check that you agree with your result from the previous part. (d) In the two separate limits z << R and z >> R, Taylor expand your g- eld (in the z-direction)out only to the rst non-zero term, and convince us that both limits make good physical sense. (e) Can you use Gauss’ law to gure out the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z)? (If so, do it and check your previous answers. If not, why not?) Extra credit: If you place a small mass a small distance z away from the center, use your Taylor limit for z << R above to write a simple ODE for the equation of motion. Solve it, and discuss the motion Back to Problem List 4 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.4 Gravitational force near a metal-cored planet surrounded by a gaseous cloud Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 Jupiter is composed of a dense spherical core (of liquid metallic hydrogen!) of radius Rc. It is sur- rounded by a spherical cloud of gaseous hydrogen of radius Rg, where Rg > Rc. Let’s assume that the core is of uniform density c and the gaseous cloud is also of uniform density g. What is the gravitational force on an object of mass m that is located at a radius r from the center of Jupiter? Note that you must consider the cases where the object is inside the core, within the gas layer, and outside of the planet. Back to Problem List 5 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.5 Sphere with linearly increasing mass density Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 A planet of mass M and radius R has a nonuniform density that varies with r, the distance from the center according to  = Ar for 0  r  R. (a) What is the constant A in terms of M and R? Does this density pro le strike you as physically plausible, or is just designed as a mathematical exercise? (Brie y, explain) (b) Determine the gravitational force on a satellite of mass m orbiting this planet. In words, please outline the method you plan to use for your solution. (Use the easiest method you can come up with!) In your calculation, you will need to argue that the magnitude of ~g(r; ; ) depends only on r. Be very explicit about this – how do you know that it doesn’t, in fact, depend on  or ? (c) Determine the gravitational force felt by a rock of mass m inside the planet, located at radius r < R. (If the method you use is di erent than in part b, explain why you switched. If not, just proceed!) Explicitly check your result for this part by considering the limits r ! 0 and r ! R. Back to Problem List 6 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.6 Jumping o Vesta Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 You are stranded on the surface of the asteroid Vesta. If the mass of the asteroid is M and its radius is R, how fast would you have to jump o its surface to be able to escape from its gravitational eld? (Your estimate should be based on parameters that characterize the asteroid, not parameters that describe your jumping ability.) Given your formula, look up the approximate mass and radius of the asteroid Vesta 3 and determine a numerical value of the escape velocity. Could you escape in this way? (Brie y, explain) If so, roughly how big in radius is the maximum the asteroid could be, for you to still escape this way? If not, estimate how much smaller an asteroid you would need, to escape from it in this way? Figure 1: Back to Problem List 7 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.7 Gravitational force between two massive rods Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 Consider two identical uniform rods of length L and mass m lying along the same line and having their closest points separated by a distance d as shown in the gure (a) Calculate the mutual force between these rods, both its direction and magnitude. (b) Now do several checks. First, make sure the units worked out (!) The, nd the magnitude of the force in the limit L ! 0. What do you expect? Brie y, discuss. Lastly, nd the magnitude of the force in the limit d ! 1 ? Again, is it what you expect? Brie y, discuss. Figure 2: Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Determining the gravitational force between two rods: (a) Consider a thin, uniform rod of mass m and length L (and negligible other dimensions) lying on the x axis (from x=-L to 0), as shown in g 1a. Derive a formula for the gravitational eld \g" at any arbitrary point x to the right of the origin (but still on the x-axis!) due to this rod. (b) Now suppose a second rod of length L and mass m sits on the x axis as shown in g 1b, with the left edge a distance \d" away. Calculate the mutual gravitational force between these rods. (c) Let's do some checks! Show that the units work out in parts a and b. Find the magnitude of the force in part a, in the limit x >> L: What do you expect? Brie y, discuss! Finally, verify that your answer to part b gives what you expect in the limit d >> L. ( Hint: This is a bit harder! You need to consistently expand everything to second order, not just rst, because of some interesting cancellations) Fig 1a Fig 1b L m +x x=0 L x=0 x=d m Fig 1a Fig 1b L m +x x=0 L +x x=0 x=d L m m Back to Problem List 8 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.8 Potential energy { Check your answer! Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 On the last exam, we had a problem with a at ring, uniform mass per unit area of , inner radius of R, outer radius of 2R. A satellite (mass m) sat a distance z above the center of the ring. We asked for the gravitational potential energy, and the answer was U(z) = ?2Gm( p 4R2 + z2 ? p R2 + z2) (1) (a) If you are far from the disk (on the z axis), what do you expect for the formula for U(z)? (Don’t say \0″ – as usual, we want the functional form of U(z) as you move far away. Also, explicitly state what we mean by \far away”. (Please don’t compare something with units to something without units!) (b) Show explicitly that the formula above does indeed give precisely the functional dependence you expect. Back to Problem List 9 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.9 Ways of solving gravitational problems Given: Pollock { Spring 2011, Spring 2012 Infinite cylinder ρ=cr x z (a) Half-infinite line mass, uniform linear mass density, λ x (b) R z  P Figure 3: (a) An in nite cylinder of radius R centered on the z-axis, with non-uniform volume mass density  = cr, where r is the radius in cylindrical coordinates. (b) A half-in nite line of mass on the x-axis extending from x = 0 to x = +1, with uniform linear mass density . There are two general methods we use to solve gravitational problems (i.e. nd ~g given some distribution of mass). (a) Describe these two methods. We claim one of these methods is easiest to solve for ~g of mass distribution (a) above, and the other method is easiest to solve for ~g of the mass distribution (b) above. Which method goes with which mass distribution? Please justify your answer. (b) Find ~g of the mass distribution (a) above for any arbitrary point outside the cylinder. (c) Find the x component of the gravitational acceleration, gx, generated by the mass distribution labeled (b) above, at a point P a given distance z up the positive z-axis (as shown). Back to Problem List 10 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.10 Rod with linearly increasing mass density Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Consider a very (in nitesimally!) thin but massive rod, length L (total mass M), centered around the origin, sitting along the x-axis. (So the left end is at (-L/2, 0,0) and the right end is at (+L/2,0,0) Assume the mass density  (which has units of kg/m)is not uniform, but instead varies linearly with distance from the origin, (x) = cjxj. (a) What is that constant \c” in terms of M and L? What is the direction of the gravitational eld generated by this mass distribution at a point in space a distance z above the center of the rod, i.e. at (0; 0; z) Explain your reasoning for the direction carefully, try not to simply \wave your hands.” (The answer is extremely intuitive, but can you justify that it is correct?) (b) Compute the gravitational eld, ~g, at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating Newton’s law of gravity, summing over all in nitesimal \chunks” of mass along the rod. (c) Compute the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating ?Gdm=r, sum- ming over all in nitesimal \chunks” dm along the rod. Then, take the z-component of the gradient of this potential to check that you agree with your result from the previous part. (d) In the limit of large z what do you expect for the functional form for gravitational potential? (Hint: Don’t just say it goes to zero! It’s a rod of mass M, when you’re far away what does it look like? How does it go to zero?) What does \large z” mean here? Use the binomial (or Taylor) expansion to verify that your formula does indeed give exactly what you expect. (Hint: you cannot Taylor expand in something BIG, you have to Taylor expand in something small.) (e) Can you use Gauss’ law to gure out the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z)? (If so, do it and check your previous answers. If not, why not?) Back to Problem List 11 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.11 Sphere with constant internal gravitational eld Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 (a) Imagine a planet of total mass M and radius R which has a nonuniform mass density that varies just with r, the distance from the center. For this (admittedly very unusual!) planet, suppose the gravitational eld strength inside the planet turns out to be independent of the radial distance within the sphere. Find the function describing the mass density  = (r) of this planet. (Your nal answer should be written in terms of the given constants.) (b) Now, determine the gravitational force on a satellite of mass m orbiting this planet at distance r > R. (Use the easiest method you can come up with!) Explain your work in words as well as formulas. For instance, in your calculation, you will need to argue that the magnitude of ~g(r; ; ) depends only on r. Be explicit about this – how do you know that it doesn’t, in fact, depend on  or ? (c) As a nal check, explicitly show that your solutions inside and outside the planet (parts a and b) are consistent when r = R. Please also comment on whether this density pro le strikes you as physically plausible, or is it just designed as a mathematical exercise? Defend your reasoning. Back to Problem List 12 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.12 Throwing a rock o the moon Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Assuming that asteroids have roughly the same mass density as the moon, make an estimate of the largest asteroid that an astronaut could be standing on, and still have a chance of throwing a small object (with their arms, no machinery!) so that it completely escapes the asteroid’s gravitational eld. (This minimum speed is called \escape velocity”) Is the size you computed typical for asteroids in our solar system? Back to Problem List 13

Read the excerpt provided, then answer the questions below. http://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?flash=true&doc=23&page=transcript What is the line of division suggested by the Monroe Doctrine? A. It establishes a dividing line that leaves all of the Americas to the United States. B. It establishes a sphere of security that ends roughly at the divide between Central and South America. C. It states that anything south of the U.S. border is available for colonization but nothing north of it. D. It establishes a division of territorial control between the United States and Canada. E. It establishes a division between East and West Germany. What does the Monroe Doctrine establish in terms of the U.S. realm of security? A. An agreement among South American states to protect themselves against European and U.S. intervention. B. A declaration that establishes South and Central America as included into the U.S. sphere of security and that intervention by Europe would be met with hostility. C. A European policy of non-intervention into the Americas. D. A treaty of mutual cooperation between Europe and the United States to protect each other’s colonies. E. A free trade sphere among North and South America. What does the Monroe Doctrine indicate in terms of European colonization of Central and South America? A. A policy of cooperative assistance, if Europe wishes to colonize South American countries we will assist. B. A policy of non-interference, the colonization of South American countries by European states will be considered a threat to U.S. security interests. C. A policy of the expansion of the rights of Central and South American states. D. The creation of a unified group of colonies including the U.S. and European colonies for collective security. E. A policy of complete cooperation and humanitarian development through aid dollars. For the newly independent states who were at one point European colonies, what does the Doctrine indicate? A. That the United States sees the rights of the European countries to reestablish control of those territories. B. That the United States will take over and colonize those countries rather than allow the Europeans to re-establish control. C. That the United States sees no legitimacy in recognizing the newly independent states who are stable. D. That the United States supports the maintenance of the independence of those former colonies. E. That the United States will accept payment for the loss of control over those former colonies.

Read the excerpt provided, then answer the questions below. http://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?flash=true&doc=23&page=transcript What is the line of division suggested by the Monroe Doctrine? A. It establishes a dividing line that leaves all of the Americas to the United States. B. It establishes a sphere of security that ends roughly at the divide between Central and South America. C. It states that anything south of the U.S. border is available for colonization but nothing north of it. D. It establishes a division of territorial control between the United States and Canada. E. It establishes a division between East and West Germany. What does the Monroe Doctrine establish in terms of the U.S. realm of security? A. An agreement among South American states to protect themselves against European and U.S. intervention. B. A declaration that establishes South and Central America as included into the U.S. sphere of security and that intervention by Europe would be met with hostility. C. A European policy of non-intervention into the Americas. D. A treaty of mutual cooperation between Europe and the United States to protect each other’s colonies. E. A free trade sphere among North and South America. What does the Monroe Doctrine indicate in terms of European colonization of Central and South America? A. A policy of cooperative assistance, if Europe wishes to colonize South American countries we will assist. B. A policy of non-interference, the colonization of South American countries by European states will be considered a threat to U.S. security interests. C. A policy of the expansion of the rights of Central and South American states. D. The creation of a unified group of colonies including the U.S. and European colonies for collective security. E. A policy of complete cooperation and humanitarian development through aid dollars. For the newly independent states who were at one point European colonies, what does the Doctrine indicate? A. That the United States sees the rights of the European countries to reestablish control of those territories. B. That the United States will take over and colonize those countries rather than allow the Europeans to re-establish control. C. That the United States sees no legitimacy in recognizing the newly independent states who are stable. D. That the United States supports the maintenance of the independence of those former colonies. E. That the United States will accept payment for the loss of control over those former colonies.

Read the excerpt provided, then answer the questions below. http://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?flash=true&doc=23&page=transcript … Read More...