Evaluation Methodology , Fall 2015 EVALUATION PROPOSAL GUIDELINES The evaluation proposal is a major application of knowledge assignment for this course. The proposal should represent your cumulative knowledge of evaluation research methodology. You may be required to submit part of this assignment in sequential stages. If so, you will be provided, in writing, the due dates for the various aspects of the proposal. The date for the submission of the entire proposal is indicated in your course outline. The below components must be included in the proposal. I. Introduction (maximum 10 pages) A. Description of the Program and Organization (the Evaluand) (In this section, be sure to describe who, what, when, and how long the program has been in place; describe the program, types of people involved in the program, and the types of services offered; briefly discussed need for program as determined by program managers) I. Organizational Overview 1. Program Mission, Goals, SMART Objectives, Activities, Resources 2. Organizational Context of the Program II. Program Logic Model of Evaluand (insert program logic model from your previous assignment, attending to feedback from instructor and classmates) III. Significance of the Program and the Evaluation Discuss the Rationale of the Evaluation B. Evaluation Goals, Objectives, and Stakeholders Objectives of the Evaluation Study Description of Key Direct and Indirect Evaluation Stakeholders (e.g., clients, agents, beneficiaries, etc.) Potential Constraints and Barriers of the Evaluation Evaluation Proposal Guidelines (continued) C. Evaluation Approach, Questions and/or Hypotheses Evaluation Approach/Guiding Framework Evaluation Questions (at least three process and three outcome questions) Describe How Evaluation Questions Will Be Generated II. Methodology (maximum 10 pages) A. Participants Target Population/Sample Plan (describe the target population/sample from whom you intend to obtain collect data; justify sampling procedures by relating them to stakeholder characteristics, evaluation questions and criteria, and constraints of the evaluation) Handling Respondents’ Confidentiality and Ethical Concerns (include Informed Consent Form) B. Instrumentation Data Collection Instruments/Measures Describe Measures, Justify Choices, Address Issues of Validity, Reliability, and Cultural/Contextual Relevance; Rationale for Selection of Instruments C. Evaluation Design Data Collection Procedures (Research Design – Qualitative, Quantitative, Mixed Methods) Explain Choice for Data Collection Methods Selected D. Data Map (set up a data map or summary table to show how each step of the evaluation is related to each other); see example below) Evaluation Methodology Evaluation Proposal Guidelines (continued) Table 1. Data Map of Evaluation of the Kids House Afterschool Program (An Illustrative Example) Evaluation Questions Methodology Data Collection Strategy Timeline Does the program provide individual tutoring to the children in the community three days per week, as intended? (process question) Document analysis Evaluator will review copies of program’s weekly service delivery records Ongoing Has the program reached it intended target population? (process question) Document analysis Evaluator will review documents describing the children being served Six weeks after program start How satisfied are the children and their parents (guardian) with the Kids house Program? Qualitative Focus group interviews with the children in the program and separately with their parents (guardian) Ongoing after two weeks program start Did the children in the Kids House Program demonstrate significant improvements in reading? Quantitative Pretest/Posttest Questionnaire Pretest at first session Posttest at last session E. Projected Statistical Analysis of Data F. Data Collection Schedule (Timetable) (must be described in chart form) G. Standards for Evaluation (describe how your proposed evaluation will meet the Program Evaluation Standards – utility, feasibility, propriety, accuracy, accountability and the AEA Guiding Principles for Evaluation) III. Evaluation Products and Communication Plan (maximum two pages) A. Listing of Deliverable or Products Evaluation Methodology Evaluation Proposal Guidelines (continued) B. Communicating Results: The Evaluation Report (describe plan for communicating evaluation findings during the evaluation and at the end of the evaluation – orally? written report? combination? who will you involve in a discussion of the findings and why) . C. Potential Use of Findings for Aiding Direct and Indirect Stakeholders IV. Staffing, Management Plan, and Budget (maximum two pages) A. Describe tasks, deadlines, and who completes them? B. Describe the time, money, and other resources required for addressing your evaluation questions C. Include a narrative a budget and time schedule in table format V. References (minimum of three sources) VI. Appendices (include copies of instruments, consent forms, etc.) VII. Reflective Journaling (Separate Document) Using a diary format, describe// explain what you have learned about yourself and the evaluation profession by taking this course and writing this proposal Other Important Proposal Guidelines A. Typed, double space, 12 point font; one-inch margins on all sides B. Include title page, table of contents, and (if applicable) listing of figures and/or tables C. Maximum of 25 pages (excluding cover page, references, appendices) D. Proper and complete citation for all materials and sources using the American Psychological Association Style Manual (latest edition). Evaluation Methodology Evaluation Proposal Guidelines (cont’d.) E. As a general rule, sources (unless a classic) must be within the past decade and statistical/demographic data no earlier than 2009

Evaluation Methodology , Fall 2015 EVALUATION PROPOSAL GUIDELINES The evaluation proposal is a major application of knowledge assignment for this course. The proposal should represent your cumulative knowledge of evaluation research methodology. You may be required to submit part of this assignment in sequential stages. If so, you will be provided, in writing, the due dates for the various aspects of the proposal. The date for the submission of the entire proposal is indicated in your course outline. The below components must be included in the proposal. I. Introduction (maximum 10 pages) A. Description of the Program and Organization (the Evaluand) (In this section, be sure to describe who, what, when, and how long the program has been in place; describe the program, types of people involved in the program, and the types of services offered; briefly discussed need for program as determined by program managers) I. Organizational Overview 1. Program Mission, Goals, SMART Objectives, Activities, Resources 2. Organizational Context of the Program II. Program Logic Model of Evaluand (insert program logic model from your previous assignment, attending to feedback from instructor and classmates) III. Significance of the Program and the Evaluation Discuss the Rationale of the Evaluation B. Evaluation Goals, Objectives, and Stakeholders Objectives of the Evaluation Study Description of Key Direct and Indirect Evaluation Stakeholders (e.g., clients, agents, beneficiaries, etc.) Potential Constraints and Barriers of the Evaluation Evaluation Proposal Guidelines (continued) C. Evaluation Approach, Questions and/or Hypotheses Evaluation Approach/Guiding Framework Evaluation Questions (at least three process and three outcome questions) Describe How Evaluation Questions Will Be Generated II. Methodology (maximum 10 pages) A. Participants Target Population/Sample Plan (describe the target population/sample from whom you intend to obtain collect data; justify sampling procedures by relating them to stakeholder characteristics, evaluation questions and criteria, and constraints of the evaluation) Handling Respondents’ Confidentiality and Ethical Concerns (include Informed Consent Form) B. Instrumentation Data Collection Instruments/Measures Describe Measures, Justify Choices, Address Issues of Validity, Reliability, and Cultural/Contextual Relevance; Rationale for Selection of Instruments C. Evaluation Design Data Collection Procedures (Research Design – Qualitative, Quantitative, Mixed Methods) Explain Choice for Data Collection Methods Selected D. Data Map (set up a data map or summary table to show how each step of the evaluation is related to each other); see example below) Evaluation Methodology Evaluation Proposal Guidelines (continued) Table 1. Data Map of Evaluation of the Kids House Afterschool Program (An Illustrative Example) Evaluation Questions Methodology Data Collection Strategy Timeline Does the program provide individual tutoring to the children in the community three days per week, as intended? (process question) Document analysis Evaluator will review copies of program’s weekly service delivery records Ongoing Has the program reached it intended target population? (process question) Document analysis Evaluator will review documents describing the children being served Six weeks after program start How satisfied are the children and their parents (guardian) with the Kids house Program? Qualitative Focus group interviews with the children in the program and separately with their parents (guardian) Ongoing after two weeks program start Did the children in the Kids House Program demonstrate significant improvements in reading? Quantitative Pretest/Posttest Questionnaire Pretest at first session Posttest at last session E. Projected Statistical Analysis of Data F. Data Collection Schedule (Timetable) (must be described in chart form) G. Standards for Evaluation (describe how your proposed evaluation will meet the Program Evaluation Standards – utility, feasibility, propriety, accuracy, accountability and the AEA Guiding Principles for Evaluation) III. Evaluation Products and Communication Plan (maximum two pages) A. Listing of Deliverable or Products Evaluation Methodology Evaluation Proposal Guidelines (continued) B. Communicating Results: The Evaluation Report (describe plan for communicating evaluation findings during the evaluation and at the end of the evaluation – orally? written report? combination? who will you involve in a discussion of the findings and why) . C. Potential Use of Findings for Aiding Direct and Indirect Stakeholders IV. Staffing, Management Plan, and Budget (maximum two pages) A. Describe tasks, deadlines, and who completes them? B. Describe the time, money, and other resources required for addressing your evaluation questions C. Include a narrative a budget and time schedule in table format V. References (minimum of three sources) VI. Appendices (include copies of instruments, consent forms, etc.) VII. Reflective Journaling (Separate Document) Using a diary format, describe// explain what you have learned about yourself and the evaluation profession by taking this course and writing this proposal Other Important Proposal Guidelines A. Typed, double space, 12 point font; one-inch margins on all sides B. Include title page, table of contents, and (if applicable) listing of figures and/or tables C. Maximum of 25 pages (excluding cover page, references, appendices) D. Proper and complete citation for all materials and sources using the American Psychological Association Style Manual (latest edition). Evaluation Methodology Evaluation Proposal Guidelines (cont’d.) E. As a general rule, sources (unless a classic) must be within the past decade and statistical/demographic data no earlier than 2009

Define: 41 Things Philosophy is: 1. Ignorant 2. Selfish 3. Ironic 4. Plain 5. Misunderstood 6. A failure 7. Poor 8. Unscientific 9. Unteachable 10. Foolish 11. Abnormal 12. Divine trickery 13. Egalitarian 14. A divine calling 15. Laborious 16. Countercultural 17. Uncomfortable 18. Virtuous 19. Dangerous 20. Simplistic<br />21. Polemical 22. Therapeutic 23. “conformist” 24. Embarrassi ng 25. Invulnerable 26. Annoying 27. Pneumatic 28. Apolitic al 29. Docile/teachable 30. Messianic 31. Pious 32. Impract ical 33. Happy 34. Necessary 35. Death-defying 36. Fallible 37. Immortal 38. Confident 39. Painful 40. agnostic</br

Define: 41 Things Philosophy is: 1. Ignorant 2. Selfish 3. Ironic 4. Plain 5. Misunderstood 6. A failure 7. Poor 8. Unscientific 9. Unteachable 10. Foolish 11. Abnormal 12. Divine trickery 13. Egalitarian 14. A divine calling 15. Laborious 16. Countercultural 17. Uncomfortable 18. Virtuous 19. Dangerous 20. Simplistic
21. Polemical 22. Therapeutic 23. “conformist” 24. Embarrassi ng 25. Invulnerable 26. Annoying 27. Pneumatic 28. Apolitic al 29. Docile/teachable 30. Messianic 31. Pious 32. Impract ical 33. Happy 34. Necessary 35. Death-defying 36. Fallible 37. Immortal 38. Confident 39. Painful 40. agnostic

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Essay list

Essay list

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Engineering Ethics Steve is updating the HVAC system in his house. The house is older and quite large. It will likely require new zoning as temperatures vary considerably throughout the home. His friend, Terry, owns a small HVAC company and tells Steve that new zoning is going to be difficult without doing major construction. However, there are some things that could be done to improve the temperature disparities throughout the house but “it will be far from perfect.” He quotes Steve a very favorable “friend discount” for the job. For good measure, Steve enlists a larger and more reputable firm to bid on the job as well. The company sends out their best project engineer, Bobby, to see if anything can be done to zone the house effectively and efficiently. Bobby spends the day at the house trying to come up with a creative solution for the problem. Bobby appears very committed to finding a solution and is genuinely excited and enthusiastic about the challenge. A week later Bobby returns with an elaborate and creative proposal for Steve. Bobby assures Steve that this solution will correct the temperature disparities and guarantees that he will work above and beyond to make sure the job is done to near perfection. Steve is very impressed with the design that Bobby has come up with but needs to think about it because the cost is more than he intended to spend. Steve tells his friend Terry about the proposal and Terry says that it is a “genius” idea. He also tells him that he will do the job using Bobby’s design for half the price. Steve did not sign any agreement with Bobby’s company; however, Bobby invested a tremendous amount of time and energy on the design. Bobby is very committed to his job and as has a tendency to trust people as evidenced by the fact that he let Steve make a copy of his detailed proposal that included his drawings. Bobby’s philosophy is to trust people “unless they give you a reason not to.” Using two moral theories, one of them being Kant’s deontology, try to determine the best course of action for Steve by constructing a brief ethical argument. Also, make sure to include the perspective of all three parties involved.

Engineering Ethics Steve is updating the HVAC system in his house. The house is older and quite large. It will likely require new zoning as temperatures vary considerably throughout the home. His friend, Terry, owns a small HVAC company and tells Steve that new zoning is going to be difficult without doing major construction. However, there are some things that could be done to improve the temperature disparities throughout the house but “it will be far from perfect.” He quotes Steve a very favorable “friend discount” for the job. For good measure, Steve enlists a larger and more reputable firm to bid on the job as well. The company sends out their best project engineer, Bobby, to see if anything can be done to zone the house effectively and efficiently. Bobby spends the day at the house trying to come up with a creative solution for the problem. Bobby appears very committed to finding a solution and is genuinely excited and enthusiastic about the challenge. A week later Bobby returns with an elaborate and creative proposal for Steve. Bobby assures Steve that this solution will correct the temperature disparities and guarantees that he will work above and beyond to make sure the job is done to near perfection. Steve is very impressed with the design that Bobby has come up with but needs to think about it because the cost is more than he intended to spend. Steve tells his friend Terry about the proposal and Terry says that it is a “genius” idea. He also tells him that he will do the job using Bobby’s design for half the price. Steve did not sign any agreement with Bobby’s company; however, Bobby invested a tremendous amount of time and energy on the design. Bobby is very committed to his job and as has a tendency to trust people as evidenced by the fact that he let Steve make a copy of his detailed proposal that included his drawings. Bobby’s philosophy is to trust people “unless they give you a reason not to.” Using two moral theories, one of them being Kant’s deontology, try to determine the best course of action for Steve by constructing a brief ethical argument. Also, make sure to include the perspective of all three parties involved.

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1-Two notions serve as the basis for all torts: wrongs and compensation. True False 2-The goal of tort law is to put a defendant in the position that he or she would have been in had the tort occurred to the defendant. True False 3-Hayley is injured in an accident precipitated by Isolde. Hayley files a tort action against Isolde, seeking to recover for the damage suffered. Damages that are intended to compensate or reimburse a plaintiff for actual losses are: compensatory damages. reimbursement damages. actual damages. punitive damages. 4-Ladd throws a rock intending to hit Minh but misses and hits Nasir instead. On the basis of the tort of battery, Nasir can sue: Ladd. Minh. the rightful owner of the rock. no one. 4-Luella trespasses on Merchandise Mart’s property. Through the use of reasonable force, Merchandise Mart’s security guard detains Luella until the police arrive. Merchandise Mart is liable for: assault. battery. false imprisonment. none of the choice 6-The extreme risk of an activity is a defense against imposing strict liability. True False 7-Misrepresentation in an ad is enough to show an intent to induce the reliance of anyone who may use the product. True False 8-Luke is playing a video game on a defective disk that melts in his game player, starting a fire that injures his hands. Luke files a suit against Mystic Maze, Inc., the game’s maker under the doctrine of strict liability. A significant application of this doctrine is in the area of: cyber torts. intentional torts. product liability. unintentional torts 9-More than two hundred years ago, the Declaration of Independence recognized the importance of protecting creative works. True False 10-n 2014, Cloud Computing Corporation registers its trademark as provided by federal law. After the first renewal, this registration: is renewable every ten years. is renewable every twenty years. runs for life of the corporation plus seventy years. runs forever. 11-Wendy works as a weather announcer for a TV station under the character name Weather Wendy. Wendy can register her character’s name as: a certification mark. a trade name. a service mark. none of the choices 12-Much of the material on the Internet, including software and database information, is not copyrighted. True False 13-In a criminal case, the state must prove its case by a preponderance of the evidence. True False 14-Under the Fourth Amendmentt, general searches through a person’s belongings are permissible. True False 15-Maura enters a gas station and points a gun at the clerk Nate. She then forces Nate to open the cash register and give her all the money. Maura can be charged with: burglary. robbery. larceny. receiving stolen property. 16-Reno, driving while intoxicated, causes a car accident that results in the death of Santo. Reno is arrested and charged with a felony. A felony is a crime punishable by death or imprisonment for: any period of time. more than one year. more than six months. more than ten days. 17-Corporate officers and directors may be held criminally liable for the actions of employees under their supervision. True False 18-Sal assures Tom that she will deliver a truckload of hay to his cattle ranch. A person’s declaration to do a certain act is part of the definition of: an expectation. a moral obligation. a prediction. a promise. 19-Lark promises to buy Mac’s used textbook for $60. Lark is: an offeror. an offeree a promisee. a promisor. 20-Casey offers to sell a certain used forklift to DIY Lumber Outlet, but Casey dies before DIY accepts. Most likely, Casey’s death: did not affect the offer. shortened the time of the offer but did not terminated it. extended the time of the offer. terminated the offer.

1-Two notions serve as the basis for all torts: wrongs and compensation. True False 2-The goal of tort law is to put a defendant in the position that he or she would have been in had the tort occurred to the defendant. True False 3-Hayley is injured in an accident precipitated by Isolde. Hayley files a tort action against Isolde, seeking to recover for the damage suffered. Damages that are intended to compensate or reimburse a plaintiff for actual losses are: compensatory damages. reimbursement damages. actual damages. punitive damages. 4-Ladd throws a rock intending to hit Minh but misses and hits Nasir instead. On the basis of the tort of battery, Nasir can sue: Ladd. Minh. the rightful owner of the rock. no one. 4-Luella trespasses on Merchandise Mart’s property. Through the use of reasonable force, Merchandise Mart’s security guard detains Luella until the police arrive. Merchandise Mart is liable for: assault. battery. false imprisonment. none of the choice 6-The extreme risk of an activity is a defense against imposing strict liability. True False 7-Misrepresentation in an ad is enough to show an intent to induce the reliance of anyone who may use the product. True False 8-Luke is playing a video game on a defective disk that melts in his game player, starting a fire that injures his hands. Luke files a suit against Mystic Maze, Inc., the game’s maker under the doctrine of strict liability. A significant application of this doctrine is in the area of: cyber torts. intentional torts. product liability. unintentional torts 9-More than two hundred years ago, the Declaration of Independence recognized the importance of protecting creative works. True False 10-n 2014, Cloud Computing Corporation registers its trademark as provided by federal law. After the first renewal, this registration: is renewable every ten years. is renewable every twenty years. runs for life of the corporation plus seventy years. runs forever. 11-Wendy works as a weather announcer for a TV station under the character name Weather Wendy. Wendy can register her character’s name as: a certification mark. a trade name. a service mark. none of the choices 12-Much of the material on the Internet, including software and database information, is not copyrighted. True False 13-In a criminal case, the state must prove its case by a preponderance of the evidence. True False 14-Under the Fourth Amendmentt, general searches through a person’s belongings are permissible. True False 15-Maura enters a gas station and points a gun at the clerk Nate. She then forces Nate to open the cash register and give her all the money. Maura can be charged with: burglary. robbery. larceny. receiving stolen property. 16-Reno, driving while intoxicated, causes a car accident that results in the death of Santo. Reno is arrested and charged with a felony. A felony is a crime punishable by death or imprisonment for: any period of time. more than one year. more than six months. more than ten days. 17-Corporate officers and directors may be held criminally liable for the actions of employees under their supervision. True False 18-Sal assures Tom that she will deliver a truckload of hay to his cattle ranch. A person’s declaration to do a certain act is part of the definition of: an expectation. a moral obligation. a prediction. a promise. 19-Lark promises to buy Mac’s used textbook for $60. Lark is: an offeror. an offeree a promisee. a promisor. 20-Casey offers to sell a certain used forklift to DIY Lumber Outlet, but Casey dies before DIY accepts. Most likely, Casey’s death: did not affect the offer. shortened the time of the offer but did not terminated it. extended the time of the offer. terminated the offer.

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INDIRECT MESSAGE STRATEGY (DELIVERING BAD NEWS) As sales manager of Sol-Way, Inc., you must refuse to sell your solar collectors to the Dusek Construction Company. After viewing your website, they sent by email an order worth $64,544. But the prices they used came from the password-protected distributors only section of your website, intended and clearly labeled for your dealers only. You sell exclusively through dealers. You thought you made this clear on the web, but apparently Alfred Dusek, the Dusek president, found a way to obtain these prices. Your dealer in his area is Eli Toms and Son. Sol-Way management thinks that selling through exclusive dealers is necessary. After all, your technique of collecting and using solar energy is only in its infant stage, and consumers often need technical help. Thus factory-trained technicians are available at every dealership. Experience has shown that they are necessary. Your task now is to write a message to Mr. Dusek explaining Sol-Way’s distribution method and defending it. Probably Mr. Dusek already has learned much about your product from your website – how it uses its exclusive evacuated-glass-tubing technology to convey sunlight into useful heat, how the tubing is vacuum insulated, how it retains heat, how it collects significant improvement over flat-plate collectors. You may want to note some of its points in your response. As Dusek is a good prospective customer, be most tactful in your refusal. You will set this message up as an email. Mr. Dusek’s email address is: . Remember to include “to, from, subject, and date” as you set up your email. Please note – you will only create this email and send it to me, DO NOT send this to the email address above as it is a fictitious company. You will need to create this email as a Word document but it will need to look like an email.

INDIRECT MESSAGE STRATEGY (DELIVERING BAD NEWS) As sales manager of Sol-Way, Inc., you must refuse to sell your solar collectors to the Dusek Construction Company. After viewing your website, they sent by email an order worth $64,544. But the prices they used came from the password-protected distributors only section of your website, intended and clearly labeled for your dealers only. You sell exclusively through dealers. You thought you made this clear on the web, but apparently Alfred Dusek, the Dusek president, found a way to obtain these prices. Your dealer in his area is Eli Toms and Son. Sol-Way management thinks that selling through exclusive dealers is necessary. After all, your technique of collecting and using solar energy is only in its infant stage, and consumers often need technical help. Thus factory-trained technicians are available at every dealership. Experience has shown that they are necessary. Your task now is to write a message to Mr. Dusek explaining Sol-Way’s distribution method and defending it. Probably Mr. Dusek already has learned much about your product from your website – how it uses its exclusive evacuated-glass-tubing technology to convey sunlight into useful heat, how the tubing is vacuum insulated, how it retains heat, how it collects significant improvement over flat-plate collectors. You may want to note some of its points in your response. As Dusek is a good prospective customer, be most tactful in your refusal. You will set this message up as an email. Mr. Dusek’s email address is: . Remember to include “to, from, subject, and date” as you set up your email. Please note – you will only create this email and send it to me, DO NOT send this to the email address above as it is a fictitious company. You will need to create this email as a Word document but it will need to look like an email.

To: Mr. Dusek Subject: Selling of solar collectors Sir, We … Read More...
Name: Date: Document Analysis Worksheet 1. Title of the document: 2. Date(s) the document was originally produced: 3. Author of this document: 4. Type of document: 5. Is this a primary source or a secondary source? 6. Who is the audience or intended recipient of the document? Be specific. 7. Why do you think this document was written? Be specific. Write in your own words. 8. List three things the author/document said that you think are important. Be specific. Write in your own words. 1. 2. 3. 9. List two things the document tells you about life in the United States at the time the document was written (if a primary source) or the time described in the document (if a secondary source). Be specific. Write in your own words. 1. 2. 10. Write a question to the author that is left unanswered by the document. Be specific. Write in your own words.

Name: Date: Document Analysis Worksheet 1. Title of the document: 2. Date(s) the document was originally produced: 3. Author of this document: 4. Type of document: 5. Is this a primary source or a secondary source? 6. Who is the audience or intended recipient of the document? Be specific. 7. Why do you think this document was written? Be specific. Write in your own words. 8. List three things the author/document said that you think are important. Be specific. Write in your own words. 1. 2. 3. 9. List two things the document tells you about life in the United States at the time the document was written (if a primary source) or the time described in the document (if a secondary source). Be specific. Write in your own words. 1. 2. 10. Write a question to the author that is left unanswered by the document. Be specific. Write in your own words.

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