A beam of light is diffracted by a single slit. The distance between the positions of zero intensity (m = ±1) is 4.54 mm.Estimate the wavelength of the laser light. Use a small angle approximation sin θ = tan θ .

A beam of light is diffracted by a single slit. The distance between the positions of zero intensity (m = ±1) is 4.54 mm.Estimate the wavelength of the laser light. Use a small angle approximation sin θ = tan θ .

In case the body have to stay in lower temperature for extended time period (more than 1 hour), how does the body regulate its response?

In case the body have to stay in lower temperature for extended time period (more than 1 hour), how does the body regulate its response?

Arterioles transporting blood to external capillaries beneath the surface of … Read More...
According to previous research, women are generally higher than men in affect intensity. This finding may provide evidence for why ________. it is more adaptive for women to express their anger than it is for men women are more emotionally intelligent compared to men women have a higher threshold for pain compared to men women are more prone to depression compared to men

According to previous research, women are generally higher than men in affect intensity. This finding may provide evidence for why ________. it is more adaptive for women to express their anger than it is for men women are more emotionally intelligent compared to men women have a higher threshold for pain compared to men women are more prone to depression compared to men

According to previous research, women are generally higher than men … Read More...
Lab #02 Relationship between distance & illumination As engineers, we deal with the effects of light on many projects. The first key to working with light is understanding how the light waves propagate. Once we understand light waves, we will test a manufacturers claim that lower wattage fluorescent bulbs output the same quantity of light as incandescent bulbs. This experiment is designed for you to work as a class to collect data regarding a given light source and then, working within your individual group, attempt to determine the re-lationship(s) between the measured parameter (lux) and the distance (meter) from the source. Measure and record data, in the manner described below, as a class. Work on your so-lutions as a group of 2-3. Your first task is to develop a mathematical formula, or a simple relationship that predicts the amount of lux that can be expected at a given distance from the light source. Purpose: The purpose of this assignment is to accomplish the following goals: • Gain experience collecting data in a controlled, systematic fashion. • Practice working as a group to infer relationships between variables from your collected data. • Use the data you collect to draw conclusions. In this case, to evaluate the hypothesis that the fluorescent and incandescent bulb output the same quantity of light. • Become accustomed to working in teams (note, teamwork often requires individual work as well). • Learn to balance workload across your team. (Individuals will be responsible for certain tasks, and ensure they are performed on time and to the desired quality level. • Demonstrate to me what your group’s attention to detail is, as well as your ability to construct a written explanation of work. Problem: What effect does distance have on the lux, intensity, emitted from a light source and are the 5 light bulbs producing the same intensity light? Use the rough protocol listed below and the data sheet provided to collect your data, then complete the assignment outlined below. 1. Set up a light source on one of the lab tables. 2. Using the illumination meter, measure the lux at 0.5 meter increments from the source back to 3 meters from the source. • Be sure the keep the meter perpendicular to the horizontal line from the source at all times! 3. Record your measurements on your data sheets. 4. Measurements should be taken in a random order 5. Repeat the experiment 3 times, using different people and a different order of collection and different colors. Assignment Requirements: 1. Create the appropriate graph(s) to express the data you have collected. Your report must, at the minimum, contain the following: a. An X-Y Scatter plot showing the data from both bulbs. The chart should follow all conventions taught in lecture, and display the equation for the trend-line you choose. b. A column or bar chart of your choosing showing the difference, if any, between the two bulbs. 2. Write an introduction, briefly explaining what you are accomplishing with this exper-iment. 3. Create a hierarchal outline that states, step by step, each activity that was performed to conduct the experiment and analyze the experimental data. 4. Anova analysis for data collected 5. Write a verbal explanation of what each of the charts from requirement #1 are showing. 6. Include, at the end of the document, a summary of all the tasks required to complete the assignment, including the 5 listed above, and which member or members of the group were principally responsible for completing those tasks. This should be in the form of a simple list. 7. Write at least 3 possible applications of the experiment with detailed explanation. DUE DATE: This assignment is to be completed and turned in at the beginning of your laboratory meeting during the week of 18th February Microsoft office package: Excel: Insert, page layout tab functions, Mean, standard deviation, graph functions

Lab #02 Relationship between distance & illumination As engineers, we deal with the effects of light on many projects. The first key to working with light is understanding how the light waves propagate. Once we understand light waves, we will test a manufacturers claim that lower wattage fluorescent bulbs output the same quantity of light as incandescent bulbs. This experiment is designed for you to work as a class to collect data regarding a given light source and then, working within your individual group, attempt to determine the re-lationship(s) between the measured parameter (lux) and the distance (meter) from the source. Measure and record data, in the manner described below, as a class. Work on your so-lutions as a group of 2-3. Your first task is to develop a mathematical formula, or a simple relationship that predicts the amount of lux that can be expected at a given distance from the light source. Purpose: The purpose of this assignment is to accomplish the following goals: • Gain experience collecting data in a controlled, systematic fashion. • Practice working as a group to infer relationships between variables from your collected data. • Use the data you collect to draw conclusions. In this case, to evaluate the hypothesis that the fluorescent and incandescent bulb output the same quantity of light. • Become accustomed to working in teams (note, teamwork often requires individual work as well). • Learn to balance workload across your team. (Individuals will be responsible for certain tasks, and ensure they are performed on time and to the desired quality level. • Demonstrate to me what your group’s attention to detail is, as well as your ability to construct a written explanation of work. Problem: What effect does distance have on the lux, intensity, emitted from a light source and are the 5 light bulbs producing the same intensity light? Use the rough protocol listed below and the data sheet provided to collect your data, then complete the assignment outlined below. 1. Set up a light source on one of the lab tables. 2. Using the illumination meter, measure the lux at 0.5 meter increments from the source back to 3 meters from the source. • Be sure the keep the meter perpendicular to the horizontal line from the source at all times! 3. Record your measurements on your data sheets. 4. Measurements should be taken in a random order 5. Repeat the experiment 3 times, using different people and a different order of collection and different colors. Assignment Requirements: 1. Create the appropriate graph(s) to express the data you have collected. Your report must, at the minimum, contain the following: a. An X-Y Scatter plot showing the data from both bulbs. The chart should follow all conventions taught in lecture, and display the equation for the trend-line you choose. b. A column or bar chart of your choosing showing the difference, if any, between the two bulbs. 2. Write an introduction, briefly explaining what you are accomplishing with this exper-iment. 3. Create a hierarchal outline that states, step by step, each activity that was performed to conduct the experiment and analyze the experimental data. 4. Anova analysis for data collected 5. Write a verbal explanation of what each of the charts from requirement #1 are showing. 6. Include, at the end of the document, a summary of all the tasks required to complete the assignment, including the 5 listed above, and which member or members of the group were principally responsible for completing those tasks. This should be in the form of a simple list. 7. Write at least 3 possible applications of the experiment with detailed explanation. DUE DATE: This assignment is to be completed and turned in at the beginning of your laboratory meeting during the week of 18th February Microsoft office package: Excel: Insert, page layout tab functions, Mean, standard deviation, graph functions

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7.[ Book Section 8.2] A 2mC charge with velocity ˙u = 5˙ax − ˙ay + 12˙azm/s enters a region with a magnetic flux density of 20˙az Wb/m2 (a) Calculate the force on the charge (b) Determine the electric field intensity necessary to make the velocity of the charge constant

7.[ Book Section 8.2] A 2mC charge with velocity ˙u = 5˙ax − ˙ay + 12˙azm/s enters a region with a magnetic flux density of 20˙az Wb/m2 (a) Calculate the force on the charge (b) Determine the electric field intensity necessary to make the velocity of the charge constant

light that has a wavelength equal to 420 nm falls normally on four slits. Each slit is 2.00 um wide and the center-to-center separation between it and the next slit is 8.00 um. (a) find the angular width of the central intensity maximum of the single slit diffraction pattern on a distant screen. This is the angle between the two minima adjacent to the central bright maximum of one of the four slits. (b) Find the angular position of all of the interference intensity maxima that lie inside the central diffraction maximum . sketch the positions of these maxima.

light that has a wavelength equal to 420 nm falls normally on four slits. Each slit is 2.00 um wide and the center-to-center separation between it and the next slit is 8.00 um. (a) find the angular width of the central intensity maximum of the single slit diffraction pattern on a distant screen. This is the angle between the two minima adjacent to the central bright maximum of one of the four slits. (b) Find the angular position of all of the interference intensity maxima that lie inside the central diffraction maximum . sketch the positions of these maxima.

Question 1, chap 33, sect 3. part 1 of 2 10 points The compound eyes of bees and other insects are highly sensitive to light in the ultraviolet portion of the spectrum, particularly light with frequencies between 7.5 × 1014 Hz and 1.0 × 1015 Hz. The speed of light is 3 × 108 m/s. What is the largest wavelength to which these frequencies correspond? Question 3, chap 33, sect 3. part 1 of 3 10 points A plane electromagnetic sinusoidal wave of frequency 10.7 MHz travels in free space. The speed of light is 2.99792 × 108 m/s. Determine the wavelength of the wave. Question 4, chap 33, sect 3. part 2 of 3 10 points Find the period of the wave. Question 2, chap 33, sect 3. part 2 of 2 10 points What is the smallest wavelength? Question 5, chap 33, sect 3. part 3 of 3 10 points At some point and some instant, the electric field has has a value of 998 N/C. Calculate the magnitude of the magnetic field at this point and this instant. Question 6, chap 33, sect 3. part 1 of 2 10 points A plane electromagnetic sinusoidal wave of frequency 10.7 MHz travels in free space. The speed of light is 2.99792 × 108 m/s. Determine the wavelength of the wave. Question 8, chap 33, sect 3. part 1 of 1 10 points The magnetic field amplitude of an electromagnetic wave is 9.9 × 10−6 T. The speed of light is 2.99792 × 108 m/s . Calculate the amplitude of the electric field if the wave is traveling in free space. Question 7, chap 33, sect 3. part 2 of 2 10 points At some point and some instant, the electric field has has a value of 998 V/m. Calculate the magnitude of the magnetic field at this point and this instant. Question 9, chap 33, sect 5. part 1 of 1 10 points The cable is carrying the current I(t). at the surface of a long transmission cable of resistivity ρ, length ℓ and radius a, using the expression ~S = 1 μ0 ~E × ~B . Question 10, chap 33, sect 5. part 1 of 1 10 points In 1965 Penzias and Wilson discovered the cosmic microwave radiation left over from the Big Bang expansion of the universe. The energy density of this radiation is 7.64 × 10−14 J/m3. The speed of light 2.99792 × 108 m/s and the permeability of free space is 4π × 10−7 N/A2. Determine the corresponding electric field amplQuestion 11, chap 33, sect 5. part 1 of 5 10 points Consider a monochromatic electromagnetic plane wave propagating in the x direction. At a particular point in space, the magnitude of the electric field has an instantaneous value of 998 V/m in the positive y-direction. The wave is traveling in the positive x-direction. x y z E wave propagation The speed of light is 2.99792×108 m/s, the permeability of free space is 4π×10−7 T ・ N/A and the permittivity of free space 8.85419 × 10−12 C2/N ・ m2. Compute the instantaneous magnitude of the magnetic field at the same point and time.itude. Question 12, chap 33, sect 5. part 2 of 5 10 points What is the instantaneous magnitude of the Poynting vector at the same point and time? Question 13, chap 33, sect 5. part 3 of 5 10 points What are the directions of the instantaneous magnetic field and theQuestion 14, chap 33, sect 5. part 4 of 5 10 points What is the instantaneous value of the energy density of the electric field? Question 16, chap 33, sect 6. part 1 of 4 10 points Consider an electromagnetic plane wave with time average intensity 104 W/m2 . The speed of light is 2.99792 × 108 m/s and the permeability of free space is 4 π × 10−7 T・m/A. What is its maximum electric field? What is the instantaneous value of the energy density of the magnetic field? Question 17, chap 33, sect 6. part 2 of 4 10 points What is the the maximum magnetic field? Question 19, chap 33, sect 6. part 4 of 4 10 points Consider an electromagnetic wave pattern as shown in the figure below. Question 18, chap 33, sect 6. part 3 of 4 10 points What is the pressure on a surface which is perpendicular to the beam and is totally reflective? Question 20, chap 33, sect 8. part 1 of 1 10 points A coin is at the bottom of a beaker. The beaker is filled with 1.6 cm of water (n1 = 1.33) covered by 2.1 cm of liquid (n2 = 1.4) floating on the water. How deep does the coin appear to be from the upper surface of the liquid (near the top of the beaker)? An cylindrical opaque drinking glass has a diameter 3 cm and height h, as shown in the figure. An observer’s eye is placed as shown (the observer is just barely looking over the rim of the glass). When empty, the observer can just barely see the edge of the bottom of the glass. When filled to the brim with a transparent liquid, the observer can just barely see the center of the bottom of the glass. The liquid in the drinking glass has an index of refraction of 1.4 . θi h d θr eye Calculate the angle θr . Question 22, chap 33, sect 8. part 2 of 2 10 points Calculate the height h of the glass.

Question 1, chap 33, sect 3. part 1 of 2 10 points The compound eyes of bees and other insects are highly sensitive to light in the ultraviolet portion of the spectrum, particularly light with frequencies between 7.5 × 1014 Hz and 1.0 × 1015 Hz. The speed of light is 3 × 108 m/s. What is the largest wavelength to which these frequencies correspond? Question 3, chap 33, sect 3. part 1 of 3 10 points A plane electromagnetic sinusoidal wave of frequency 10.7 MHz travels in free space. The speed of light is 2.99792 × 108 m/s. Determine the wavelength of the wave. Question 4, chap 33, sect 3. part 2 of 3 10 points Find the period of the wave. Question 2, chap 33, sect 3. part 2 of 2 10 points What is the smallest wavelength? Question 5, chap 33, sect 3. part 3 of 3 10 points At some point and some instant, the electric field has has a value of 998 N/C. Calculate the magnitude of the magnetic field at this point and this instant. Question 6, chap 33, sect 3. part 1 of 2 10 points A plane electromagnetic sinusoidal wave of frequency 10.7 MHz travels in free space. The speed of light is 2.99792 × 108 m/s. Determine the wavelength of the wave. Question 8, chap 33, sect 3. part 1 of 1 10 points The magnetic field amplitude of an electromagnetic wave is 9.9 × 10−6 T. The speed of light is 2.99792 × 108 m/s . Calculate the amplitude of the electric field if the wave is traveling in free space. Question 7, chap 33, sect 3. part 2 of 2 10 points At some point and some instant, the electric field has has a value of 998 V/m. Calculate the magnitude of the magnetic field at this point and this instant. Question 9, chap 33, sect 5. part 1 of 1 10 points The cable is carrying the current I(t). at the surface of a long transmission cable of resistivity ρ, length ℓ and radius a, using the expression ~S = 1 μ0 ~E × ~B . Question 10, chap 33, sect 5. part 1 of 1 10 points In 1965 Penzias and Wilson discovered the cosmic microwave radiation left over from the Big Bang expansion of the universe. The energy density of this radiation is 7.64 × 10−14 J/m3. The speed of light 2.99792 × 108 m/s and the permeability of free space is 4π × 10−7 N/A2. Determine the corresponding electric field amplQuestion 11, chap 33, sect 5. part 1 of 5 10 points Consider a monochromatic electromagnetic plane wave propagating in the x direction. At a particular point in space, the magnitude of the electric field has an instantaneous value of 998 V/m in the positive y-direction. The wave is traveling in the positive x-direction. x y z E wave propagation The speed of light is 2.99792×108 m/s, the permeability of free space is 4π×10−7 T ・ N/A and the permittivity of free space 8.85419 × 10−12 C2/N ・ m2. Compute the instantaneous magnitude of the magnetic field at the same point and time.itude. Question 12, chap 33, sect 5. part 2 of 5 10 points What is the instantaneous magnitude of the Poynting vector at the same point and time? Question 13, chap 33, sect 5. part 3 of 5 10 points What are the directions of the instantaneous magnetic field and theQuestion 14, chap 33, sect 5. part 4 of 5 10 points What is the instantaneous value of the energy density of the electric field? Question 16, chap 33, sect 6. part 1 of 4 10 points Consider an electromagnetic plane wave with time average intensity 104 W/m2 . The speed of light is 2.99792 × 108 m/s and the permeability of free space is 4 π × 10−7 T・m/A. What is its maximum electric field? What is the instantaneous value of the energy density of the magnetic field? Question 17, chap 33, sect 6. part 2 of 4 10 points What is the the maximum magnetic field? Question 19, chap 33, sect 6. part 4 of 4 10 points Consider an electromagnetic wave pattern as shown in the figure below. Question 18, chap 33, sect 6. part 3 of 4 10 points What is the pressure on a surface which is perpendicular to the beam and is totally reflective? Question 20, chap 33, sect 8. part 1 of 1 10 points A coin is at the bottom of a beaker. The beaker is filled with 1.6 cm of water (n1 = 1.33) covered by 2.1 cm of liquid (n2 = 1.4) floating on the water. How deep does the coin appear to be from the upper surface of the liquid (near the top of the beaker)? An cylindrical opaque drinking glass has a diameter 3 cm and height h, as shown in the figure. An observer’s eye is placed as shown (the observer is just barely looking over the rim of the glass). When empty, the observer can just barely see the edge of the bottom of the glass. When filled to the brim with a transparent liquid, the observer can just barely see the center of the bottom of the glass. The liquid in the drinking glass has an index of refraction of 1.4 . θi h d θr eye Calculate the angle θr . Question 22, chap 33, sect 8. part 2 of 2 10 points Calculate the height h of the glass.

Read this article and answer this question in 2 pages : Answers should be from the below article only. What is the difference between “standards-based” and “standards-embedded” curriculum? what are the curricular implications of this difference? Article: In 2007, at the dawn of 21st century in education, it is impossible to talk about teaching, curriculum, schools, or education without discussing standards . standards-based v. standards-embedded curriculum We are in an age of accountability where our success as educators is determined by individual and group mastery of specific standards dem- onstrated by standardized test per- formance. Even before No Child Left Behind (NCLB), standards and measures were used to determine if schools and students were success- ful (McClure, 2005). But, NCLB has increased the pace, intensity, and high stakes of this trend. Gifted and talented students and their teach- ers are significantly impacted by these local or state proficiency stan- dards and grade-level assessments (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2006). This article explores how to use these standards in the develop- ment of high-quality curriculum for gifted students. NCLB, High-Stakes State Testing, and Standards- Based Instruction There are a few potentially positive outcomes of this evolution to public accountability. All stakeholders have had to ask themselves, “Are students learning? If so, what are they learning and how do we know?” In cases where we have been allowed to thoughtfully evaluate curriculum and instruction, we have also asked, “What’s worth learning?” “When’s the best time to learn it?” and “Who needs to learn it?” Even though state achievement tests are only a single measure, citizens are now offered a yardstick, albeit a nar- row one, for comparing communities, schools, and in some cases, teachers. Some testing reports allow teachers to identify for parents what their chil- dren can do and what they can not do. Testing also has focused attention on the not-so-new observations that pov- erty, discrimination and prejudices, and language proficiency impacts learning. With enough ceiling (e.g., above-grade-level assessments), even gifted students’ actual achievement and readiness levels can be identi- fied and provide a starting point for appropriately differentiated instruc- tion (Tomlinson, 2001). Unfortunately, as a veteran teacher for more than three decades and as a teacher-educator, my recent observa- tions of and conversations with class- room and gifted teachers have usually revealed negative outcomes. For gifted children, their actual achievement level is often unrecognized by teachers because both the tests and the reporting of the results rarely reach above the student’s grade-level placement. Assessments also focus on a huge number of state stan- dards for a given school year that cre- ate “overload” (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006) and have a devastating impact on the development and implementation of rich and relevant curriculum and instruction. In too many scenarios, I see teachers teach- ing directly to the test. And, in the worst cases, some teachers actually teach The Test. In those cases, The Test itself becomes the curriculum. Consistently I hear, “Oh, I used to teach a great unit on ________ but I can’t do it any- more because I have to teach the standards.” Or, “I have to teach my favorite units in April and May after testing.” If the outcomes can’t be boiled down to simple “I can . . .” state- ments that can be posted on a school’s walls, then teachers seem to omit poten- tially meaningful learning opportunities from the school year. In many cases, real education and learning are being trivial- ized. We seem to have lost sight of the more significant purpose of teaching and learning: individual growth and develop- ment. We also have surrendered much of the joy of learning, as the incidentals, the tangents, the “bird walks” are cut short or elimi- nated because teachers hear the con- stant ticking clock of the countdown to the state test and feel the pressure of the way-too-many standards that have to be covered in a mere 180 school days. The accountability movement has pushed us away from seeing the whole child: “Students are not machines, as the standards movement suggests; they are volatile, complicated, and paradoxical” (Cookson, 2001, p. 42). How does this impact gifted chil- dren? In many heterogeneous class- rooms, teachers have retreated to traditional subject delineations and traditional instruction in an effort to ensure direct standards-based instruc- tion even though “no solid basis exists in the research literature for the ways we currently develop, place, and align educational standards in school cur- ricula” (Zenger & Zenger, 2002, p. 212). Grade-level standards are often particularly inappropriate for the gifted and talented whose pace of learning, achievement levels, and depth of knowledge are significantly beyond their chronological peers. A broad-based, thematically rich, and challenging curriculum is the heart of education for the gifted. Virgil Ward, one of the earliest voices for a differen- tial education for the gifted, said, “It is insufficient to consider the curriculum for the gifted in terms of traditional subjects and instructional processes” (Ward, 1980, p. 5). VanTassel-Baska Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum gifted child today 45 Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum and Stambaugh (2006) described three dimensions of successful curriculum for gifted students: content mastery, pro- cess and product, and epistemological concept, “understanding and appre- ciating systems of knowledge rather than individual elements of those systems” (p. 9). Overemphasis on testing and grade-level standards limits all three and therefore limits learning for gifted students. Hirsch (2001) concluded that “broad gen- eral knowledge is the best entrée to deep knowledge” (p. 23) and that it is highly correlated with general ability to learn. He continued, “the best way to learn a subject is to learn its gen- eral principles and to study an ample number of diverse examples that illustrate those principles” (Hirsch, 2001, p. 23). Principle-based learn- ing applies to both gifted and general education children. In order to meet the needs of gifted and general education students, cur- riculum should be differentiated in ways that are relevant and engaging. Curriculum content, processes, and products should provide challenge, depth, and complexity, offering multiple opportunities for problem solving, creativity, and exploration. In specific content areas, the cur- riculum should reflect the elegance and sophistication unique to the discipline. Even with this expanded view of curriculum in mind, we still must find ways to address the current reality of state standards and assess- ments. Standards-Embedded Curriculum How can educators address this chal- lenge? As in most things, a change of perspective can be helpful. Standards- based curriculum as described above should be replaced with standards- embedded curriculum. Standards- embedded curriculum begins with broad questions and topics, either discipline specific or interdisciplinary. Once teachers have given thoughtful consideration to relevant, engaging, and important content and the con- nections that support meaning-making (Jensen, 1998), they next select stan- dards that are relevant to this content and to summative assessments. This process is supported by the backward planning advocated in Understanding by Design by Wiggins and McTighe (2005) and its predecessors, as well as current thinkers in other fields, such as Covey (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006). It is a critical component of differenti- ating instruction for advanced learners (Tomlinson, 2001) and a significant factor in the Core Parallel in the Parallel Curriculum Model (Tomlinson et al., 2002). Teachers choose from standards in multiple disciplines at both above and below grade level depending on the needs of the students and the classroom or program structure. Preassessment data and the results of prior instruc- tion also inform this process of embed- ding appropriate standards. For gifted students, this formative assessment will result in “more advanced curricula available at younger ages, ensuring that all levels of the standards are traversed in the process” (VanTassel-Baska & Little, 2003, p. 3). Once the essential questions, key content, and relevant standards are selected and sequenced, they are embedded into a coherent unit design and instructional decisions (grouping, pacing, instructional methodology) can be made. For gifted students, this includes the identification of appropri- ate resources, often including advanced texts, mentors, and independent research, as appropriate to the child’s developmental level and interest. Applying Standards- Embedded Curriculum What does this look like in practice? In reading the possible class- room applications below, consider these three Ohio Academic Content Standards for third grade: 1. Math: “Read thermometers in both Fahrenheit and Celsius scales” (“Academic Content Standards: K–12 Mathematics,” n.d., p. 71). 2. Social Studies: “Compare some of the cultural practices and products of various groups of people who have lived in the local community including artistic expression, religion, language, and food. Compare the cultural practices and products of the local community with those of other communities in Ohio, the United States, and countries of the world” (Academic Content Standards: K–12 Social Studies, n.d., p. 122). 3. Life Science: “Observe and explore how fossils provide evidence about animals that lived long ago and the nature of the environment at that time” (Academic Content Standards: K–12 Science, n.d., p. 57). When students are fortunate to have a teacher who is dedicated to helping all of them make good use of their time, the gifted may have a preassessment opportunity where they can demonstrate their familiarity with the content and potential mastery of a standard at their grade level. Students who pass may get to read by them- selves for the brief period while the rest of the class works on the single outcome. Sometimes more experienced teachers will create opportunities for gifted and advanced students Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum to work on a standard in the same domain or strand at the next higher grade level (i.e., accelerate through the standards). For example, a stu- dent might be able to work on a Life Science standard for fourth grade that progresses to other communities such as ecosystems. These above-grade-level standards can provide rich material for differentiation, advanced problem solving, and more in-depth curriculum integration. In another classroom scenario, a teacher may focus on the math stan- dard above, identifying the standard number on his lesson plan. He creates or collects paper thermometers, some showing measurement in Celsius and some in Fahrenheit. He also has some real thermometers. He demonstrates thermometer use with boiling water and with freezing water and reads the different temperatures. Students complete a worksheet that has them read thermometers in Celsius and Fahrenheit. The more advanced students may learn how to convert between the two scales. Students then practice with several questions on the topic that are similar in structure and content to those that have been on past proficiency tests. They are coached in how to answer them so that the stan- dard, instruction, formative assess- ment, and summative assessment are all aligned. Then, each student writes a statement that says, “I can read a thermometer using either Celsius or Fahrenheit scales.” Both of these examples describe a standards-based environment, where the starting point is the standard. Direct instruction to that standard is followed by an observable student behavior that demonstrates specific mastery of that single standard. The standard becomes both the start- ing point and the ending point of the curriculum. Education, rather than opening up a student’s mind, becomes a series of closed links in a chain. Whereas the above lessons may be differentiated to some extent, they have no context; they may relate only to the next standard on the list, such as, “Telling time to the nearest minute and finding elapsed time using a cal- endar or a clock.” How would a “standards-embed- ded” model of curriculum design be different? It would begin with the development of an essential ques- tion such as, “Who or what lived here before me? How were they different from me? How were they the same? How do we know?” These questions might be more relevant to our con- temporary highly mobile students. It would involve place and time. Using this intriguing line of inquiry, students might work on the social studies stan- dard as part of the study of their home- town, their school, or even their house or apartment. Because where people live and what they do is influenced by the weather, students could look into weather patterns of their area and learn how to measure temperature using a Fahrenheit scale so they could see if it is similar now to what it was a century ago. Skipping ahead to consideration of the social studies standard, students could then choose another country, preferably one that uses Celsius, and do the same investigation of fossils, communities, and the like. Students could complete a weather comparison, looking at the temperature in Celsius as people in other parts of the world, such as those in Canada, do. Thus, learning is contextualized and connected, dem- onstrating both depth and complexity. This approach takes a lot more work and time. It is a sophisticated integrated view of curriculum devel- opment and involves in-depth knowl- edge of the content areas, as well as an understanding of the scope and sequence of the standards in each dis- cipline. Teachers who develop vital single-discipline units, as well as inter- disciplinary teaching units, begin with a central topic surrounded by subtopics and connections to other areas. Then they connect important terms, facts, or concepts to the subtopics. Next, the skilled teacher/curriculum devel- oper embeds relevant, multileveled standards and objectives appropriate to a given student or group of stu- dents into the unit. Finally, teachers select the instructional strategies and develop student assessments. These assessments include, but are not lim- ited to, the types of questions asked on standardized and state assessments. Comparing Standards- Based and Standards- Embedded Curriculum Design Following is an articulation of the differences between standards-based and standards-embedded curriculum design. (See Figure 1.) 1. The starting point. Standards- based curriculum begins with the grade-level standard and the underlying assumption that every student needs to master that stan- dard at that moment in time. In standards-embedded curriculum, the multifaceted essential ques- tion and students’ needs are the starting points. 2. Preassessment. In standards- based curriculum and teaching, if a preassessment is provided, it cov- ers a single standard or two. In a standards-embedded curriculum, preassessment includes a broader range of grade-level and advanced standards, as well as students’ knowledge of surrounding content such as background experiences with the subject, relevant skills (such as reading and writing), and continued on page ?? even learning style or interests. gifted child today 47 Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum Standards Based Standards Embedded Starting Points The grade-level standard. Whole class’ general skill level Essential questions and content relevant to individual students and groups. Preassessment Targeted to a single grade-level standard. Short-cycle assessments. Background knowledge. Multiple grade-level standards from multiple areas connected by the theme of the unit. Includes annual learning style and interest inventories. Acceleration/ Enrichment To next grade-level standard in the same strand. To above-grade-level standards, as well as into broader thematically connected content. Language Arts Divided into individual skills. Reading and writing skills often separated from real-world relevant contexts. The language arts are embedded in all units and themes and connected to differentiated processes and products across all content areas. Instruction Lesson planning begins with the standard as the objective. Sequential direct instruction progresses through the standards in each content area separately. Strategies are selected to introduce, practice, and demonstrate mastery of all grade-level standards in all content areas in one school year. Lesson planning begins with essential questions, topics, and significant themes. Integrated instruction is designed around connections among content areas and embeds all relevant standards. Assessment Format modeled after the state test. Variety of assessments including questions similar to the state test format. Teacher Role Monitor of standards mastery. Time manager. Facilitator of instructional design and student engagement with learning, as well as assessor of achievement. Student Self- Esteem “I can . . .” statements. Star Charts. Passing “the test.” Completed projects/products. Making personal connections to learning and the theme/topic. Figure 1. Standards based v. standards-embedded instruction and gifted students. and the potential political outcry of “stepping on the toes” of the next grade’s teacher. Few classroom teachers have been provided with the in-depth professional develop- ment and understanding of curric- ulum compacting that would allow them to implement this effectively. In standards-embedded curricu- lum, enrichment and extensions of learning are more possible and more interesting because ideas, top- ics, and questions lend themselves more easily to depth and complex- ity than isolated skills. 4. Language arts. In standards- based classrooms, the language arts have been redivided into sepa- rate skills, with reading separated from writing, and writing sepa- rated from grammar. To many concrete thinkers, whole-language approaches seem antithetical to teaching “to the standards.” In a standards-embedded classroom, integrated language arts skills (reading, writing, listening, speak- ing, presenting, and even pho- nics) are embedded into the study of every unit. Especially for the gifted, the communication and language arts are essential, regard- less of domain-specific talents (Ward, 1980) and should be com- ponents of all curriculum because they are the underpinnings of scholarship in all areas. 5. Instruction. A standards-based classroom lends itself to direct instruction and sequential pro- gression from one standard to the next. A standards-embedded class- room requires a variety of more open-ended instructional strate- gies and materials that extend and diversify learning rather than focus it narrowly. Creativity and differ- entiation in instruction and stu- dent performance are supported more effectively in a standards- embedded approach. 6. Assessment. A standards-based classroom uses targeted assess- ments focused on the structure and content of questions on the externally imposed standardized test (i.e., proficiency tests). A stan- dards-embedded classroom lends itself to greater use of authentic assessment and differentiated 3. Acceleration/Enrichment. In a standards-based curriculum, the narrow definition of the learning outcome (a test item) often makes acceleration or curriculum compact- ing the only path for differentiating instruction for gifted, talented, and/ or advanced learners. This rarely happens, however, because of lack of materials, knowledge, o

Read this article and answer this question in 2 pages : Answers should be from the below article only. What is the difference between “standards-based” and “standards-embedded” curriculum? what are the curricular implications of this difference? Article: In 2007, at the dawn of 21st century in education, it is impossible to talk about teaching, curriculum, schools, or education without discussing standards . standards-based v. standards-embedded curriculum We are in an age of accountability where our success as educators is determined by individual and group mastery of specific standards dem- onstrated by standardized test per- formance. Even before No Child Left Behind (NCLB), standards and measures were used to determine if schools and students were success- ful (McClure, 2005). But, NCLB has increased the pace, intensity, and high stakes of this trend. Gifted and talented students and their teach- ers are significantly impacted by these local or state proficiency stan- dards and grade-level assessments (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2006). This article explores how to use these standards in the develop- ment of high-quality curriculum for gifted students. NCLB, High-Stakes State Testing, and Standards- Based Instruction There are a few potentially positive outcomes of this evolution to public accountability. All stakeholders have had to ask themselves, “Are students learning? If so, what are they learning and how do we know?” In cases where we have been allowed to thoughtfully evaluate curriculum and instruction, we have also asked, “What’s worth learning?” “When’s the best time to learn it?” and “Who needs to learn it?” Even though state achievement tests are only a single measure, citizens are now offered a yardstick, albeit a nar- row one, for comparing communities, schools, and in some cases, teachers. Some testing reports allow teachers to identify for parents what their chil- dren can do and what they can not do. Testing also has focused attention on the not-so-new observations that pov- erty, discrimination and prejudices, and language proficiency impacts learning. With enough ceiling (e.g., above-grade-level assessments), even gifted students’ actual achievement and readiness levels can be identi- fied and provide a starting point for appropriately differentiated instruc- tion (Tomlinson, 2001). Unfortunately, as a veteran teacher for more than three decades and as a teacher-educator, my recent observa- tions of and conversations with class- room and gifted teachers have usually revealed negative outcomes. For gifted children, their actual achievement level is often unrecognized by teachers because both the tests and the reporting of the results rarely reach above the student’s grade-level placement. Assessments also focus on a huge number of state stan- dards for a given school year that cre- ate “overload” (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006) and have a devastating impact on the development and implementation of rich and relevant curriculum and instruction. In too many scenarios, I see teachers teach- ing directly to the test. And, in the worst cases, some teachers actually teach The Test. In those cases, The Test itself becomes the curriculum. Consistently I hear, “Oh, I used to teach a great unit on ________ but I can’t do it any- more because I have to teach the standards.” Or, “I have to teach my favorite units in April and May after testing.” If the outcomes can’t be boiled down to simple “I can . . .” state- ments that can be posted on a school’s walls, then teachers seem to omit poten- tially meaningful learning opportunities from the school year. In many cases, real education and learning are being trivial- ized. We seem to have lost sight of the more significant purpose of teaching and learning: individual growth and develop- ment. We also have surrendered much of the joy of learning, as the incidentals, the tangents, the “bird walks” are cut short or elimi- nated because teachers hear the con- stant ticking clock of the countdown to the state test and feel the pressure of the way-too-many standards that have to be covered in a mere 180 school days. The accountability movement has pushed us away from seeing the whole child: “Students are not machines, as the standards movement suggests; they are volatile, complicated, and paradoxical” (Cookson, 2001, p. 42). How does this impact gifted chil- dren? In many heterogeneous class- rooms, teachers have retreated to traditional subject delineations and traditional instruction in an effort to ensure direct standards-based instruc- tion even though “no solid basis exists in the research literature for the ways we currently develop, place, and align educational standards in school cur- ricula” (Zenger & Zenger, 2002, p. 212). Grade-level standards are often particularly inappropriate for the gifted and talented whose pace of learning, achievement levels, and depth of knowledge are significantly beyond their chronological peers. A broad-based, thematically rich, and challenging curriculum is the heart of education for the gifted. Virgil Ward, one of the earliest voices for a differen- tial education for the gifted, said, “It is insufficient to consider the curriculum for the gifted in terms of traditional subjects and instructional processes” (Ward, 1980, p. 5). VanTassel-Baska Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum gifted child today 45 Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum and Stambaugh (2006) described three dimensions of successful curriculum for gifted students: content mastery, pro- cess and product, and epistemological concept, “understanding and appre- ciating systems of knowledge rather than individual elements of those systems” (p. 9). Overemphasis on testing and grade-level standards limits all three and therefore limits learning for gifted students. Hirsch (2001) concluded that “broad gen- eral knowledge is the best entrée to deep knowledge” (p. 23) and that it is highly correlated with general ability to learn. He continued, “the best way to learn a subject is to learn its gen- eral principles and to study an ample number of diverse examples that illustrate those principles” (Hirsch, 2001, p. 23). Principle-based learn- ing applies to both gifted and general education children. In order to meet the needs of gifted and general education students, cur- riculum should be differentiated in ways that are relevant and engaging. Curriculum content, processes, and products should provide challenge, depth, and complexity, offering multiple opportunities for problem solving, creativity, and exploration. In specific content areas, the cur- riculum should reflect the elegance and sophistication unique to the discipline. Even with this expanded view of curriculum in mind, we still must find ways to address the current reality of state standards and assess- ments. Standards-Embedded Curriculum How can educators address this chal- lenge? As in most things, a change of perspective can be helpful. Standards- based curriculum as described above should be replaced with standards- embedded curriculum. Standards- embedded curriculum begins with broad questions and topics, either discipline specific or interdisciplinary. Once teachers have given thoughtful consideration to relevant, engaging, and important content and the con- nections that support meaning-making (Jensen, 1998), they next select stan- dards that are relevant to this content and to summative assessments. This process is supported by the backward planning advocated in Understanding by Design by Wiggins and McTighe (2005) and its predecessors, as well as current thinkers in other fields, such as Covey (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006). It is a critical component of differenti- ating instruction for advanced learners (Tomlinson, 2001) and a significant factor in the Core Parallel in the Parallel Curriculum Model (Tomlinson et al., 2002). Teachers choose from standards in multiple disciplines at both above and below grade level depending on the needs of the students and the classroom or program structure. Preassessment data and the results of prior instruc- tion also inform this process of embed- ding appropriate standards. For gifted students, this formative assessment will result in “more advanced curricula available at younger ages, ensuring that all levels of the standards are traversed in the process” (VanTassel-Baska & Little, 2003, p. 3). Once the essential questions, key content, and relevant standards are selected and sequenced, they are embedded into a coherent unit design and instructional decisions (grouping, pacing, instructional methodology) can be made. For gifted students, this includes the identification of appropri- ate resources, often including advanced texts, mentors, and independent research, as appropriate to the child’s developmental level and interest. Applying Standards- Embedded Curriculum What does this look like in practice? In reading the possible class- room applications below, consider these three Ohio Academic Content Standards for third grade: 1. Math: “Read thermometers in both Fahrenheit and Celsius scales” (“Academic Content Standards: K–12 Mathematics,” n.d., p. 71). 2. Social Studies: “Compare some of the cultural practices and products of various groups of people who have lived in the local community including artistic expression, religion, language, and food. Compare the cultural practices and products of the local community with those of other communities in Ohio, the United States, and countries of the world” (Academic Content Standards: K–12 Social Studies, n.d., p. 122). 3. Life Science: “Observe and explore how fossils provide evidence about animals that lived long ago and the nature of the environment at that time” (Academic Content Standards: K–12 Science, n.d., p. 57). When students are fortunate to have a teacher who is dedicated to helping all of them make good use of their time, the gifted may have a preassessment opportunity where they can demonstrate their familiarity with the content and potential mastery of a standard at their grade level. Students who pass may get to read by them- selves for the brief period while the rest of the class works on the single outcome. Sometimes more experienced teachers will create opportunities for gifted and advanced students Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum to work on a standard in the same domain or strand at the next higher grade level (i.e., accelerate through the standards). For example, a stu- dent might be able to work on a Life Science standard for fourth grade that progresses to other communities such as ecosystems. These above-grade-level standards can provide rich material for differentiation, advanced problem solving, and more in-depth curriculum integration. In another classroom scenario, a teacher may focus on the math stan- dard above, identifying the standard number on his lesson plan. He creates or collects paper thermometers, some showing measurement in Celsius and some in Fahrenheit. He also has some real thermometers. He demonstrates thermometer use with boiling water and with freezing water and reads the different temperatures. Students complete a worksheet that has them read thermometers in Celsius and Fahrenheit. The more advanced students may learn how to convert between the two scales. Students then practice with several questions on the topic that are similar in structure and content to those that have been on past proficiency tests. They are coached in how to answer them so that the stan- dard, instruction, formative assess- ment, and summative assessment are all aligned. Then, each student writes a statement that says, “I can read a thermometer using either Celsius or Fahrenheit scales.” Both of these examples describe a standards-based environment, where the starting point is the standard. Direct instruction to that standard is followed by an observable student behavior that demonstrates specific mastery of that single standard. The standard becomes both the start- ing point and the ending point of the curriculum. Education, rather than opening up a student’s mind, becomes a series of closed links in a chain. Whereas the above lessons may be differentiated to some extent, they have no context; they may relate only to the next standard on the list, such as, “Telling time to the nearest minute and finding elapsed time using a cal- endar or a clock.” How would a “standards-embed- ded” model of curriculum design be different? It would begin with the development of an essential ques- tion such as, “Who or what lived here before me? How were they different from me? How were they the same? How do we know?” These questions might be more relevant to our con- temporary highly mobile students. It would involve place and time. Using this intriguing line of inquiry, students might work on the social studies stan- dard as part of the study of their home- town, their school, or even their house or apartment. Because where people live and what they do is influenced by the weather, students could look into weather patterns of their area and learn how to measure temperature using a Fahrenheit scale so they could see if it is similar now to what it was a century ago. Skipping ahead to consideration of the social studies standard, students could then choose another country, preferably one that uses Celsius, and do the same investigation of fossils, communities, and the like. Students could complete a weather comparison, looking at the temperature in Celsius as people in other parts of the world, such as those in Canada, do. Thus, learning is contextualized and connected, dem- onstrating both depth and complexity. This approach takes a lot more work and time. It is a sophisticated integrated view of curriculum devel- opment and involves in-depth knowl- edge of the content areas, as well as an understanding of the scope and sequence of the standards in each dis- cipline. Teachers who develop vital single-discipline units, as well as inter- disciplinary teaching units, begin with a central topic surrounded by subtopics and connections to other areas. Then they connect important terms, facts, or concepts to the subtopics. Next, the skilled teacher/curriculum devel- oper embeds relevant, multileveled standards and objectives appropriate to a given student or group of stu- dents into the unit. Finally, teachers select the instructional strategies and develop student assessments. These assessments include, but are not lim- ited to, the types of questions asked on standardized and state assessments. Comparing Standards- Based and Standards- Embedded Curriculum Design Following is an articulation of the differences between standards-based and standards-embedded curriculum design. (See Figure 1.) 1. The starting point. Standards- based curriculum begins with the grade-level standard and the underlying assumption that every student needs to master that stan- dard at that moment in time. In standards-embedded curriculum, the multifaceted essential ques- tion and students’ needs are the starting points. 2. Preassessment. In standards- based curriculum and teaching, if a preassessment is provided, it cov- ers a single standard or two. In a standards-embedded curriculum, preassessment includes a broader range of grade-level and advanced standards, as well as students’ knowledge of surrounding content such as background experiences with the subject, relevant skills (such as reading and writing), and continued on page ?? even learning style or interests. gifted child today 47 Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum Standards Based Standards Embedded Starting Points The grade-level standard. Whole class’ general skill level Essential questions and content relevant to individual students and groups. Preassessment Targeted to a single grade-level standard. Short-cycle assessments. Background knowledge. Multiple grade-level standards from multiple areas connected by the theme of the unit. Includes annual learning style and interest inventories. Acceleration/ Enrichment To next grade-level standard in the same strand. To above-grade-level standards, as well as into broader thematically connected content. Language Arts Divided into individual skills. Reading and writing skills often separated from real-world relevant contexts. The language arts are embedded in all units and themes and connected to differentiated processes and products across all content areas. Instruction Lesson planning begins with the standard as the objective. Sequential direct instruction progresses through the standards in each content area separately. Strategies are selected to introduce, practice, and demonstrate mastery of all grade-level standards in all content areas in one school year. Lesson planning begins with essential questions, topics, and significant themes. Integrated instruction is designed around connections among content areas and embeds all relevant standards. Assessment Format modeled after the state test. Variety of assessments including questions similar to the state test format. Teacher Role Monitor of standards mastery. Time manager. Facilitator of instructional design and student engagement with learning, as well as assessor of achievement. Student Self- Esteem “I can . . .” statements. Star Charts. Passing “the test.” Completed projects/products. Making personal connections to learning and the theme/topic. Figure 1. Standards based v. standards-embedded instruction and gifted students. and the potential political outcry of “stepping on the toes” of the next grade’s teacher. Few classroom teachers have been provided with the in-depth professional develop- ment and understanding of curric- ulum compacting that would allow them to implement this effectively. In standards-embedded curricu- lum, enrichment and extensions of learning are more possible and more interesting because ideas, top- ics, and questions lend themselves more easily to depth and complex- ity than isolated skills. 4. Language arts. In standards- based classrooms, the language arts have been redivided into sepa- rate skills, with reading separated from writing, and writing sepa- rated from grammar. To many concrete thinkers, whole-language approaches seem antithetical to teaching “to the standards.” In a standards-embedded classroom, integrated language arts skills (reading, writing, listening, speak- ing, presenting, and even pho- nics) are embedded into the study of every unit. Especially for the gifted, the communication and language arts are essential, regard- less of domain-specific talents (Ward, 1980) and should be com- ponents of all curriculum because they are the underpinnings of scholarship in all areas. 5. Instruction. A standards-based classroom lends itself to direct instruction and sequential pro- gression from one standard to the next. A standards-embedded class- room requires a variety of more open-ended instructional strate- gies and materials that extend and diversify learning rather than focus it narrowly. Creativity and differ- entiation in instruction and stu- dent performance are supported more effectively in a standards- embedded approach. 6. Assessment. A standards-based classroom uses targeted assess- ments focused on the structure and content of questions on the externally imposed standardized test (i.e., proficiency tests). A stan- dards-embedded classroom lends itself to greater use of authentic assessment and differentiated 3. Acceleration/Enrichment. In a standards-based curriculum, the narrow definition of the learning outcome (a test item) often makes acceleration or curriculum compact- ing the only path for differentiating instruction for gifted, talented, and/ or advanced learners. This rarely happens, however, because of lack of materials, knowledge, o

Standard based Curriculum In standard based curriculum, the initial point … Read More...
Homework 4 – Construction and Water Management 80 points total Refer to Lecture 6a – Construction Part I, 6b – Construction Part II, and Chapter 6 in your textbook. 1. What is the difference between an owner, a design professional, and a constructor? (6 points) 2. Briefly explain the process of ‘Design-bid-build’ construction. How is it different than a ‘design-build’ type of project? (6 points) 3. Describe, in at least one sentence, the main function of the following construction equipment (2 points each): a. Crane b. Skidsteer c. Excavator d. Backhoe e. Grader f. Pile driver 4. What are 5 major components of a construction staging plan? (5 points) 5. What are 5 administrative controls used for environmental management on a construction site? (For example: protecting native plants) (5 points) 6. Explain the major differences between scaffolding, falsework, and formwork. (6 points) Refer to Lecture 7a, slides 11, 12, & 13 and pages 165-166 in your textbook for background information on using the Rational Method for flowrate calculations. 7. The Bush library park is planted with native grasses and is 15 acres in size. Assume the drainage system was designed to handle a 1-hour storm of 100-year-storm magnitude. The intensity data for different storm events for Dallas County can be found in this document, on page 6: http://iswm.nctcog.org/Documents/archives/site_development_manual/Appendices.pdf a. What is the expected flowrate for the native park area, calculated using the Rational Method? The runoff coefficient for the park can be approximated as 0.10. (6 points) b. What would be the design flowrate if they had paved over the area to create a large parking lot, instead of the park? Assume the runoff coefficient of concrete to be 0.92. (6 points) 8. Refer to page 94 in your textbook. What are four common urban stormwater pollutants and their possible sources? What are the possible impacts from each pollutant to receiving waters? (12 points) Refer to slides 6, 7, and 8 of Lecture 7b, and your in-class assignment for the following question. 9. What is the horizontal pressure force from water stored behind a dam wall if the dam is filled to capacity at 425ft? How high up from the bottom of the dam does the force act? (10 points) Read the following article and answer the question below: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/06/060609-gorges-dam_2.html 10. What are three negative environmental, social, or political impacts in China from the Three Gorges Dam? What are three positive impacts? (6 points)

Homework 4 – Construction and Water Management 80 points total Refer to Lecture 6a – Construction Part I, 6b – Construction Part II, and Chapter 6 in your textbook. 1. What is the difference between an owner, a design professional, and a constructor? (6 points) 2. Briefly explain the process of ‘Design-bid-build’ construction. How is it different than a ‘design-build’ type of project? (6 points) 3. Describe, in at least one sentence, the main function of the following construction equipment (2 points each): a. Crane b. Skidsteer c. Excavator d. Backhoe e. Grader f. Pile driver 4. What are 5 major components of a construction staging plan? (5 points) 5. What are 5 administrative controls used for environmental management on a construction site? (For example: protecting native plants) (5 points) 6. Explain the major differences between scaffolding, falsework, and formwork. (6 points) Refer to Lecture 7a, slides 11, 12, & 13 and pages 165-166 in your textbook for background information on using the Rational Method for flowrate calculations. 7. The Bush library park is planted with native grasses and is 15 acres in size. Assume the drainage system was designed to handle a 1-hour storm of 100-year-storm magnitude. The intensity data for different storm events for Dallas County can be found in this document, on page 6: http://iswm.nctcog.org/Documents/archives/site_development_manual/Appendices.pdf a. What is the expected flowrate for the native park area, calculated using the Rational Method? The runoff coefficient for the park can be approximated as 0.10. (6 points) b. What would be the design flowrate if they had paved over the area to create a large parking lot, instead of the park? Assume the runoff coefficient of concrete to be 0.92. (6 points) 8. Refer to page 94 in your textbook. What are four common urban stormwater pollutants and their possible sources? What are the possible impacts from each pollutant to receiving waters? (12 points) Refer to slides 6, 7, and 8 of Lecture 7b, and your in-class assignment for the following question. 9. What is the horizontal pressure force from water stored behind a dam wall if the dam is filled to capacity at 425ft? How high up from the bottom of the dam does the force act? (10 points) Read the following article and answer the question below: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/06/060609-gorges-dam_2.html 10. What are three negative environmental, social, or political impacts in China from the Three Gorges Dam? What are three positive impacts? (6 points)

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