Read this article and answer this question in 2 pages : Answers should be from the below article only. What is the difference between “standards-based” and “standards-embedded” curriculum? what are the curricular implications of this difference? Article: In 2007, at the dawn of 21st century in education, it is impossible to talk about teaching, curriculum, schools, or education without discussing standards . standards-based v. standards-embedded curriculum We are in an age of accountability where our success as educators is determined by individual and group mastery of specific standards dem- onstrated by standardized test per- formance. Even before No Child Left Behind (NCLB), standards and measures were used to determine if schools and students were success- ful (McClure, 2005). But, NCLB has increased the pace, intensity, and high stakes of this trend. Gifted and talented students and their teach- ers are significantly impacted by these local or state proficiency stan- dards and grade-level assessments (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2006). This article explores how to use these standards in the develop- ment of high-quality curriculum for gifted students. NCLB, High-Stakes State Testing, and Standards- Based Instruction There are a few potentially positive outcomes of this evolution to public accountability. All stakeholders have had to ask themselves, “Are students learning? If so, what are they learning and how do we know?” In cases where we have been allowed to thoughtfully evaluate curriculum and instruction, we have also asked, “What’s worth learning?” “When’s the best time to learn it?” and “Who needs to learn it?” Even though state achievement tests are only a single measure, citizens are now offered a yardstick, albeit a nar- row one, for comparing communities, schools, and in some cases, teachers. Some testing reports allow teachers to identify for parents what their chil- dren can do and what they can not do. Testing also has focused attention on the not-so-new observations that pov- erty, discrimination and prejudices, and language proficiency impacts learning. With enough ceiling (e.g., above-grade-level assessments), even gifted students’ actual achievement and readiness levels can be identi- fied and provide a starting point for appropriately differentiated instruc- tion (Tomlinson, 2001). Unfortunately, as a veteran teacher for more than three decades and as a teacher-educator, my recent observa- tions of and conversations with class- room and gifted teachers have usually revealed negative outcomes. For gifted children, their actual achievement level is often unrecognized by teachers because both the tests and the reporting of the results rarely reach above the student’s grade-level placement. Assessments also focus on a huge number of state stan- dards for a given school year that cre- ate “overload” (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006) and have a devastating impact on the development and implementation of rich and relevant curriculum and instruction. In too many scenarios, I see teachers teach- ing directly to the test. And, in the worst cases, some teachers actually teach The Test. In those cases, The Test itself becomes the curriculum. Consistently I hear, “Oh, I used to teach a great unit on ________ but I can’t do it any- more because I have to teach the standards.” Or, “I have to teach my favorite units in April and May after testing.” If the outcomes can’t be boiled down to simple “I can . . .” state- ments that can be posted on a school’s walls, then teachers seem to omit poten- tially meaningful learning opportunities from the school year. In many cases, real education and learning are being trivial- ized. We seem to have lost sight of the more significant purpose of teaching and learning: individual growth and develop- ment. We also have surrendered much of the joy of learning, as the incidentals, the tangents, the “bird walks” are cut short or elimi- nated because teachers hear the con- stant ticking clock of the countdown to the state test and feel the pressure of the way-too-many standards that have to be covered in a mere 180 school days. The accountability movement has pushed us away from seeing the whole child: “Students are not machines, as the standards movement suggests; they are volatile, complicated, and paradoxical” (Cookson, 2001, p. 42). How does this impact gifted chil- dren? In many heterogeneous class- rooms, teachers have retreated to traditional subject delineations and traditional instruction in an effort to ensure direct standards-based instruc- tion even though “no solid basis exists in the research literature for the ways we currently develop, place, and align educational standards in school cur- ricula” (Zenger & Zenger, 2002, p. 212). Grade-level standards are often particularly inappropriate for the gifted and talented whose pace of learning, achievement levels, and depth of knowledge are significantly beyond their chronological peers. A broad-based, thematically rich, and challenging curriculum is the heart of education for the gifted. Virgil Ward, one of the earliest voices for a differen- tial education for the gifted, said, “It is insufficient to consider the curriculum for the gifted in terms of traditional subjects and instructional processes” (Ward, 1980, p. 5). VanTassel-Baska Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum gifted child today 45 Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum and Stambaugh (2006) described three dimensions of successful curriculum for gifted students: content mastery, pro- cess and product, and epistemological concept, “understanding and appre- ciating systems of knowledge rather than individual elements of those systems” (p. 9). Overemphasis on testing and grade-level standards limits all three and therefore limits learning for gifted students. Hirsch (2001) concluded that “broad gen- eral knowledge is the best entrée to deep knowledge” (p. 23) and that it is highly correlated with general ability to learn. He continued, “the best way to learn a subject is to learn its gen- eral principles and to study an ample number of diverse examples that illustrate those principles” (Hirsch, 2001, p. 23). Principle-based learn- ing applies to both gifted and general education children. In order to meet the needs of gifted and general education students, cur- riculum should be differentiated in ways that are relevant and engaging. Curriculum content, processes, and products should provide challenge, depth, and complexity, offering multiple opportunities for problem solving, creativity, and exploration. In specific content areas, the cur- riculum should reflect the elegance and sophistication unique to the discipline. Even with this expanded view of curriculum in mind, we still must find ways to address the current reality of state standards and assess- ments. Standards-Embedded Curriculum How can educators address this chal- lenge? As in most things, a change of perspective can be helpful. Standards- based curriculum as described above should be replaced with standards- embedded curriculum. Standards- embedded curriculum begins with broad questions and topics, either discipline specific or interdisciplinary. Once teachers have given thoughtful consideration to relevant, engaging, and important content and the con- nections that support meaning-making (Jensen, 1998), they next select stan- dards that are relevant to this content and to summative assessments. This process is supported by the backward planning advocated in Understanding by Design by Wiggins and McTighe (2005) and its predecessors, as well as current thinkers in other fields, such as Covey (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006). It is a critical component of differenti- ating instruction for advanced learners (Tomlinson, 2001) and a significant factor in the Core Parallel in the Parallel Curriculum Model (Tomlinson et al., 2002). Teachers choose from standards in multiple disciplines at both above and below grade level depending on the needs of the students and the classroom or program structure. Preassessment data and the results of prior instruc- tion also inform this process of embed- ding appropriate standards. For gifted students, this formative assessment will result in “more advanced curricula available at younger ages, ensuring that all levels of the standards are traversed in the process” (VanTassel-Baska & Little, 2003, p. 3). Once the essential questions, key content, and relevant standards are selected and sequenced, they are embedded into a coherent unit design and instructional decisions (grouping, pacing, instructional methodology) can be made. For gifted students, this includes the identification of appropri- ate resources, often including advanced texts, mentors, and independent research, as appropriate to the child’s developmental level and interest. Applying Standards- Embedded Curriculum What does this look like in practice? In reading the possible class- room applications below, consider these three Ohio Academic Content Standards for third grade: 1. Math: “Read thermometers in both Fahrenheit and Celsius scales” (“Academic Content Standards: K–12 Mathematics,” n.d., p. 71). 2. Social Studies: “Compare some of the cultural practices and products of various groups of people who have lived in the local community including artistic expression, religion, language, and food. Compare the cultural practices and products of the local community with those of other communities in Ohio, the United States, and countries of the world” (Academic Content Standards: K–12 Social Studies, n.d., p. 122). 3. Life Science: “Observe and explore how fossils provide evidence about animals that lived long ago and the nature of the environment at that time” (Academic Content Standards: K–12 Science, n.d., p. 57). When students are fortunate to have a teacher who is dedicated to helping all of them make good use of their time, the gifted may have a preassessment opportunity where they can demonstrate their familiarity with the content and potential mastery of a standard at their grade level. Students who pass may get to read by them- selves for the brief period while the rest of the class works on the single outcome. Sometimes more experienced teachers will create opportunities for gifted and advanced students Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum to work on a standard in the same domain or strand at the next higher grade level (i.e., accelerate through the standards). For example, a stu- dent might be able to work on a Life Science standard for fourth grade that progresses to other communities such as ecosystems. These above-grade-level standards can provide rich material for differentiation, advanced problem solving, and more in-depth curriculum integration. In another classroom scenario, a teacher may focus on the math stan- dard above, identifying the standard number on his lesson plan. He creates or collects paper thermometers, some showing measurement in Celsius and some in Fahrenheit. He also has some real thermometers. He demonstrates thermometer use with boiling water and with freezing water and reads the different temperatures. Students complete a worksheet that has them read thermometers in Celsius and Fahrenheit. The more advanced students may learn how to convert between the two scales. Students then practice with several questions on the topic that are similar in structure and content to those that have been on past proficiency tests. They are coached in how to answer them so that the stan- dard, instruction, formative assess- ment, and summative assessment are all aligned. Then, each student writes a statement that says, “I can read a thermometer using either Celsius or Fahrenheit scales.” Both of these examples describe a standards-based environment, where the starting point is the standard. Direct instruction to that standard is followed by an observable student behavior that demonstrates specific mastery of that single standard. The standard becomes both the start- ing point and the ending point of the curriculum. Education, rather than opening up a student’s mind, becomes a series of closed links in a chain. Whereas the above lessons may be differentiated to some extent, they have no context; they may relate only to the next standard on the list, such as, “Telling time to the nearest minute and finding elapsed time using a cal- endar or a clock.” How would a “standards-embed- ded” model of curriculum design be different? It would begin with the development of an essential ques- tion such as, “Who or what lived here before me? How were they different from me? How were they the same? How do we know?” These questions might be more relevant to our con- temporary highly mobile students. It would involve place and time. Using this intriguing line of inquiry, students might work on the social studies stan- dard as part of the study of their home- town, their school, or even their house or apartment. Because where people live and what they do is influenced by the weather, students could look into weather patterns of their area and learn how to measure temperature using a Fahrenheit scale so they could see if it is similar now to what it was a century ago. Skipping ahead to consideration of the social studies standard, students could then choose another country, preferably one that uses Celsius, and do the same investigation of fossils, communities, and the like. Students could complete a weather comparison, looking at the temperature in Celsius as people in other parts of the world, such as those in Canada, do. Thus, learning is contextualized and connected, dem- onstrating both depth and complexity. This approach takes a lot more work and time. It is a sophisticated integrated view of curriculum devel- opment and involves in-depth knowl- edge of the content areas, as well as an understanding of the scope and sequence of the standards in each dis- cipline. Teachers who develop vital single-discipline units, as well as inter- disciplinary teaching units, begin with a central topic surrounded by subtopics and connections to other areas. Then they connect important terms, facts, or concepts to the subtopics. Next, the skilled teacher/curriculum devel- oper embeds relevant, multileveled standards and objectives appropriate to a given student or group of stu- dents into the unit. Finally, teachers select the instructional strategies and develop student assessments. These assessments include, but are not lim- ited to, the types of questions asked on standardized and state assessments. Comparing Standards- Based and Standards- Embedded Curriculum Design Following is an articulation of the differences between standards-based and standards-embedded curriculum design. (See Figure 1.) 1. The starting point. Standards- based curriculum begins with the grade-level standard and the underlying assumption that every student needs to master that stan- dard at that moment in time. In standards-embedded curriculum, the multifaceted essential ques- tion and students’ needs are the starting points. 2. Preassessment. In standards- based curriculum and teaching, if a preassessment is provided, it cov- ers a single standard or two. In a standards-embedded curriculum, preassessment includes a broader range of grade-level and advanced standards, as well as students’ knowledge of surrounding content such as background experiences with the subject, relevant skills (such as reading and writing), and continued on page ?? even learning style or interests. gifted child today 47 Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum Standards Based Standards Embedded Starting Points The grade-level standard. Whole class’ general skill level Essential questions and content relevant to individual students and groups. Preassessment Targeted to a single grade-level standard. Short-cycle assessments. Background knowledge. Multiple grade-level standards from multiple areas connected by the theme of the unit. Includes annual learning style and interest inventories. Acceleration/ Enrichment To next grade-level standard in the same strand. To above-grade-level standards, as well as into broader thematically connected content. Language Arts Divided into individual skills. Reading and writing skills often separated from real-world relevant contexts. The language arts are embedded in all units and themes and connected to differentiated processes and products across all content areas. Instruction Lesson planning begins with the standard as the objective. Sequential direct instruction progresses through the standards in each content area separately. Strategies are selected to introduce, practice, and demonstrate mastery of all grade-level standards in all content areas in one school year. Lesson planning begins with essential questions, topics, and significant themes. Integrated instruction is designed around connections among content areas and embeds all relevant standards. Assessment Format modeled after the state test. Variety of assessments including questions similar to the state test format. Teacher Role Monitor of standards mastery. Time manager. Facilitator of instructional design and student engagement with learning, as well as assessor of achievement. Student Self- Esteem “I can . . .” statements. Star Charts. Passing “the test.” Completed projects/products. Making personal connections to learning and the theme/topic. Figure 1. Standards based v. standards-embedded instruction and gifted students. and the potential political outcry of “stepping on the toes” of the next grade’s teacher. Few classroom teachers have been provided with the in-depth professional develop- ment and understanding of curric- ulum compacting that would allow them to implement this effectively. In standards-embedded curricu- lum, enrichment and extensions of learning are more possible and more interesting because ideas, top- ics, and questions lend themselves more easily to depth and complex- ity than isolated skills. 4. Language arts. In standards- based classrooms, the language arts have been redivided into sepa- rate skills, with reading separated from writing, and writing sepa- rated from grammar. To many concrete thinkers, whole-language approaches seem antithetical to teaching “to the standards.” In a standards-embedded classroom, integrated language arts skills (reading, writing, listening, speak- ing, presenting, and even pho- nics) are embedded into the study of every unit. Especially for the gifted, the communication and language arts are essential, regard- less of domain-specific talents (Ward, 1980) and should be com- ponents of all curriculum because they are the underpinnings of scholarship in all areas. 5. Instruction. A standards-based classroom lends itself to direct instruction and sequential pro- gression from one standard to the next. A standards-embedded class- room requires a variety of more open-ended instructional strate- gies and materials that extend and diversify learning rather than focus it narrowly. Creativity and differ- entiation in instruction and stu- dent performance are supported more effectively in a standards- embedded approach. 6. Assessment. A standards-based classroom uses targeted assess- ments focused on the structure and content of questions on the externally imposed standardized test (i.e., proficiency tests). A stan- dards-embedded classroom lends itself to greater use of authentic assessment and differentiated 3. Acceleration/Enrichment. In a standards-based curriculum, the narrow definition of the learning outcome (a test item) often makes acceleration or curriculum compact- ing the only path for differentiating instruction for gifted, talented, and/ or advanced learners. This rarely happens, however, because of lack of materials, knowledge, o

Read this article and answer this question in 2 pages : Answers should be from the below article only. What is the difference between “standards-based” and “standards-embedded” curriculum? what are the curricular implications of this difference? Article: In 2007, at the dawn of 21st century in education, it is impossible to talk about teaching, curriculum, schools, or education without discussing standards . standards-based v. standards-embedded curriculum We are in an age of accountability where our success as educators is determined by individual and group mastery of specific standards dem- onstrated by standardized test per- formance. Even before No Child Left Behind (NCLB), standards and measures were used to determine if schools and students were success- ful (McClure, 2005). But, NCLB has increased the pace, intensity, and high stakes of this trend. Gifted and talented students and their teach- ers are significantly impacted by these local or state proficiency stan- dards and grade-level assessments (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2006). This article explores how to use these standards in the develop- ment of high-quality curriculum for gifted students. NCLB, High-Stakes State Testing, and Standards- Based Instruction There are a few potentially positive outcomes of this evolution to public accountability. All stakeholders have had to ask themselves, “Are students learning? If so, what are they learning and how do we know?” In cases where we have been allowed to thoughtfully evaluate curriculum and instruction, we have also asked, “What’s worth learning?” “When’s the best time to learn it?” and “Who needs to learn it?” Even though state achievement tests are only a single measure, citizens are now offered a yardstick, albeit a nar- row one, for comparing communities, schools, and in some cases, teachers. Some testing reports allow teachers to identify for parents what their chil- dren can do and what they can not do. Testing also has focused attention on the not-so-new observations that pov- erty, discrimination and prejudices, and language proficiency impacts learning. With enough ceiling (e.g., above-grade-level assessments), even gifted students’ actual achievement and readiness levels can be identi- fied and provide a starting point for appropriately differentiated instruc- tion (Tomlinson, 2001). Unfortunately, as a veteran teacher for more than three decades and as a teacher-educator, my recent observa- tions of and conversations with class- room and gifted teachers have usually revealed negative outcomes. For gifted children, their actual achievement level is often unrecognized by teachers because both the tests and the reporting of the results rarely reach above the student’s grade-level placement. Assessments also focus on a huge number of state stan- dards for a given school year that cre- ate “overload” (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006) and have a devastating impact on the development and implementation of rich and relevant curriculum and instruction. In too many scenarios, I see teachers teach- ing directly to the test. And, in the worst cases, some teachers actually teach The Test. In those cases, The Test itself becomes the curriculum. Consistently I hear, “Oh, I used to teach a great unit on ________ but I can’t do it any- more because I have to teach the standards.” Or, “I have to teach my favorite units in April and May after testing.” If the outcomes can’t be boiled down to simple “I can . . .” state- ments that can be posted on a school’s walls, then teachers seem to omit poten- tially meaningful learning opportunities from the school year. In many cases, real education and learning are being trivial- ized. We seem to have lost sight of the more significant purpose of teaching and learning: individual growth and develop- ment. We also have surrendered much of the joy of learning, as the incidentals, the tangents, the “bird walks” are cut short or elimi- nated because teachers hear the con- stant ticking clock of the countdown to the state test and feel the pressure of the way-too-many standards that have to be covered in a mere 180 school days. The accountability movement has pushed us away from seeing the whole child: “Students are not machines, as the standards movement suggests; they are volatile, complicated, and paradoxical” (Cookson, 2001, p. 42). How does this impact gifted chil- dren? In many heterogeneous class- rooms, teachers have retreated to traditional subject delineations and traditional instruction in an effort to ensure direct standards-based instruc- tion even though “no solid basis exists in the research literature for the ways we currently develop, place, and align educational standards in school cur- ricula” (Zenger & Zenger, 2002, p. 212). Grade-level standards are often particularly inappropriate for the gifted and talented whose pace of learning, achievement levels, and depth of knowledge are significantly beyond their chronological peers. A broad-based, thematically rich, and challenging curriculum is the heart of education for the gifted. Virgil Ward, one of the earliest voices for a differen- tial education for the gifted, said, “It is insufficient to consider the curriculum for the gifted in terms of traditional subjects and instructional processes” (Ward, 1980, p. 5). VanTassel-Baska Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum gifted child today 45 Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum and Stambaugh (2006) described three dimensions of successful curriculum for gifted students: content mastery, pro- cess and product, and epistemological concept, “understanding and appre- ciating systems of knowledge rather than individual elements of those systems” (p. 9). Overemphasis on testing and grade-level standards limits all three and therefore limits learning for gifted students. Hirsch (2001) concluded that “broad gen- eral knowledge is the best entrée to deep knowledge” (p. 23) and that it is highly correlated with general ability to learn. He continued, “the best way to learn a subject is to learn its gen- eral principles and to study an ample number of diverse examples that illustrate those principles” (Hirsch, 2001, p. 23). Principle-based learn- ing applies to both gifted and general education children. In order to meet the needs of gifted and general education students, cur- riculum should be differentiated in ways that are relevant and engaging. Curriculum content, processes, and products should provide challenge, depth, and complexity, offering multiple opportunities for problem solving, creativity, and exploration. In specific content areas, the cur- riculum should reflect the elegance and sophistication unique to the discipline. Even with this expanded view of curriculum in mind, we still must find ways to address the current reality of state standards and assess- ments. Standards-Embedded Curriculum How can educators address this chal- lenge? As in most things, a change of perspective can be helpful. Standards- based curriculum as described above should be replaced with standards- embedded curriculum. Standards- embedded curriculum begins with broad questions and topics, either discipline specific or interdisciplinary. Once teachers have given thoughtful consideration to relevant, engaging, and important content and the con- nections that support meaning-making (Jensen, 1998), they next select stan- dards that are relevant to this content and to summative assessments. This process is supported by the backward planning advocated in Understanding by Design by Wiggins and McTighe (2005) and its predecessors, as well as current thinkers in other fields, such as Covey (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006). It is a critical component of differenti- ating instruction for advanced learners (Tomlinson, 2001) and a significant factor in the Core Parallel in the Parallel Curriculum Model (Tomlinson et al., 2002). Teachers choose from standards in multiple disciplines at both above and below grade level depending on the needs of the students and the classroom or program structure. Preassessment data and the results of prior instruc- tion also inform this process of embed- ding appropriate standards. For gifted students, this formative assessment will result in “more advanced curricula available at younger ages, ensuring that all levels of the standards are traversed in the process” (VanTassel-Baska & Little, 2003, p. 3). Once the essential questions, key content, and relevant standards are selected and sequenced, they are embedded into a coherent unit design and instructional decisions (grouping, pacing, instructional methodology) can be made. For gifted students, this includes the identification of appropri- ate resources, often including advanced texts, mentors, and independent research, as appropriate to the child’s developmental level and interest. Applying Standards- Embedded Curriculum What does this look like in practice? In reading the possible class- room applications below, consider these three Ohio Academic Content Standards for third grade: 1. Math: “Read thermometers in both Fahrenheit and Celsius scales” (“Academic Content Standards: K–12 Mathematics,” n.d., p. 71). 2. Social Studies: “Compare some of the cultural practices and products of various groups of people who have lived in the local community including artistic expression, religion, language, and food. Compare the cultural practices and products of the local community with those of other communities in Ohio, the United States, and countries of the world” (Academic Content Standards: K–12 Social Studies, n.d., p. 122). 3. Life Science: “Observe and explore how fossils provide evidence about animals that lived long ago and the nature of the environment at that time” (Academic Content Standards: K–12 Science, n.d., p. 57). When students are fortunate to have a teacher who is dedicated to helping all of them make good use of their time, the gifted may have a preassessment opportunity where they can demonstrate their familiarity with the content and potential mastery of a standard at their grade level. Students who pass may get to read by them- selves for the brief period while the rest of the class works on the single outcome. Sometimes more experienced teachers will create opportunities for gifted and advanced students Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum to work on a standard in the same domain or strand at the next higher grade level (i.e., accelerate through the standards). For example, a stu- dent might be able to work on a Life Science standard for fourth grade that progresses to other communities such as ecosystems. These above-grade-level standards can provide rich material for differentiation, advanced problem solving, and more in-depth curriculum integration. In another classroom scenario, a teacher may focus on the math stan- dard above, identifying the standard number on his lesson plan. He creates or collects paper thermometers, some showing measurement in Celsius and some in Fahrenheit. He also has some real thermometers. He demonstrates thermometer use with boiling water and with freezing water and reads the different temperatures. Students complete a worksheet that has them read thermometers in Celsius and Fahrenheit. The more advanced students may learn how to convert between the two scales. Students then practice with several questions on the topic that are similar in structure and content to those that have been on past proficiency tests. They are coached in how to answer them so that the stan- dard, instruction, formative assess- ment, and summative assessment are all aligned. Then, each student writes a statement that says, “I can read a thermometer using either Celsius or Fahrenheit scales.” Both of these examples describe a standards-based environment, where the starting point is the standard. Direct instruction to that standard is followed by an observable student behavior that demonstrates specific mastery of that single standard. The standard becomes both the start- ing point and the ending point of the curriculum. Education, rather than opening up a student’s mind, becomes a series of closed links in a chain. Whereas the above lessons may be differentiated to some extent, they have no context; they may relate only to the next standard on the list, such as, “Telling time to the nearest minute and finding elapsed time using a cal- endar or a clock.” How would a “standards-embed- ded” model of curriculum design be different? It would begin with the development of an essential ques- tion such as, “Who or what lived here before me? How were they different from me? How were they the same? How do we know?” These questions might be more relevant to our con- temporary highly mobile students. It would involve place and time. Using this intriguing line of inquiry, students might work on the social studies stan- dard as part of the study of their home- town, their school, or even their house or apartment. Because where people live and what they do is influenced by the weather, students could look into weather patterns of their area and learn how to measure temperature using a Fahrenheit scale so they could see if it is similar now to what it was a century ago. Skipping ahead to consideration of the social studies standard, students could then choose another country, preferably one that uses Celsius, and do the same investigation of fossils, communities, and the like. Students could complete a weather comparison, looking at the temperature in Celsius as people in other parts of the world, such as those in Canada, do. Thus, learning is contextualized and connected, dem- onstrating both depth and complexity. This approach takes a lot more work and time. It is a sophisticated integrated view of curriculum devel- opment and involves in-depth knowl- edge of the content areas, as well as an understanding of the scope and sequence of the standards in each dis- cipline. Teachers who develop vital single-discipline units, as well as inter- disciplinary teaching units, begin with a central topic surrounded by subtopics and connections to other areas. Then they connect important terms, facts, or concepts to the subtopics. Next, the skilled teacher/curriculum devel- oper embeds relevant, multileveled standards and objectives appropriate to a given student or group of stu- dents into the unit. Finally, teachers select the instructional strategies and develop student assessments. These assessments include, but are not lim- ited to, the types of questions asked on standardized and state assessments. Comparing Standards- Based and Standards- Embedded Curriculum Design Following is an articulation of the differences between standards-based and standards-embedded curriculum design. (See Figure 1.) 1. The starting point. Standards- based curriculum begins with the grade-level standard and the underlying assumption that every student needs to master that stan- dard at that moment in time. In standards-embedded curriculum, the multifaceted essential ques- tion and students’ needs are the starting points. 2. Preassessment. In standards- based curriculum and teaching, if a preassessment is provided, it cov- ers a single standard or two. In a standards-embedded curriculum, preassessment includes a broader range of grade-level and advanced standards, as well as students’ knowledge of surrounding content such as background experiences with the subject, relevant skills (such as reading and writing), and continued on page ?? even learning style or interests. gifted child today 47 Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum Standards Based Standards Embedded Starting Points The grade-level standard. Whole class’ general skill level Essential questions and content relevant to individual students and groups. Preassessment Targeted to a single grade-level standard. Short-cycle assessments. Background knowledge. Multiple grade-level standards from multiple areas connected by the theme of the unit. Includes annual learning style and interest inventories. Acceleration/ Enrichment To next grade-level standard in the same strand. To above-grade-level standards, as well as into broader thematically connected content. Language Arts Divided into individual skills. Reading and writing skills often separated from real-world relevant contexts. The language arts are embedded in all units and themes and connected to differentiated processes and products across all content areas. Instruction Lesson planning begins with the standard as the objective. Sequential direct instruction progresses through the standards in each content area separately. Strategies are selected to introduce, practice, and demonstrate mastery of all grade-level standards in all content areas in one school year. Lesson planning begins with essential questions, topics, and significant themes. Integrated instruction is designed around connections among content areas and embeds all relevant standards. Assessment Format modeled after the state test. Variety of assessments including questions similar to the state test format. Teacher Role Monitor of standards mastery. Time manager. Facilitator of instructional design and student engagement with learning, as well as assessor of achievement. Student Self- Esteem “I can . . .” statements. Star Charts. Passing “the test.” Completed projects/products. Making personal connections to learning and the theme/topic. Figure 1. Standards based v. standards-embedded instruction and gifted students. and the potential political outcry of “stepping on the toes” of the next grade’s teacher. Few classroom teachers have been provided with the in-depth professional develop- ment and understanding of curric- ulum compacting that would allow them to implement this effectively. In standards-embedded curricu- lum, enrichment and extensions of learning are more possible and more interesting because ideas, top- ics, and questions lend themselves more easily to depth and complex- ity than isolated skills. 4. Language arts. In standards- based classrooms, the language arts have been redivided into sepa- rate skills, with reading separated from writing, and writing sepa- rated from grammar. To many concrete thinkers, whole-language approaches seem antithetical to teaching “to the standards.” In a standards-embedded classroom, integrated language arts skills (reading, writing, listening, speak- ing, presenting, and even pho- nics) are embedded into the study of every unit. Especially for the gifted, the communication and language arts are essential, regard- less of domain-specific talents (Ward, 1980) and should be com- ponents of all curriculum because they are the underpinnings of scholarship in all areas. 5. Instruction. A standards-based classroom lends itself to direct instruction and sequential pro- gression from one standard to the next. A standards-embedded class- room requires a variety of more open-ended instructional strate- gies and materials that extend and diversify learning rather than focus it narrowly. Creativity and differ- entiation in instruction and stu- dent performance are supported more effectively in a standards- embedded approach. 6. Assessment. A standards-based classroom uses targeted assess- ments focused on the structure and content of questions on the externally imposed standardized test (i.e., proficiency tests). A stan- dards-embedded classroom lends itself to greater use of authentic assessment and differentiated 3. Acceleration/Enrichment. In a standards-based curriculum, the narrow definition of the learning outcome (a test item) often makes acceleration or curriculum compact- ing the only path for differentiating instruction for gifted, talented, and/ or advanced learners. This rarely happens, however, because of lack of materials, knowledge, o

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AUCS 340: Ethics in the Professions Medical Ethics Case Study You work as a registered nurse in a busy urban emergency department. Today you are caring for an adorable four-year old female patient who presents with a broken right arm and several bruises around her abdomen. You suspect that this patient is a victim of accidental trauma (child abuse). If you report your suspicions to the proper authorities, your state laws mandate that the child be removed from the care of the parents until an investigation of the allegation is complete. You know that this may take up to a week. Answer the following questions. 1) What type of ethical problem is this professional facing and why? 2) What steps should this medical professional take and why? 3) What would be the result of the nurse’s actions if this child is found to have a genetic problem and it is not a case of child abuse? 4) Are there other types of professionals who may also be required to report cases of suspected child abuse? If yes, what type of professional would that be? 5) What would you do in this situation?

AUCS 340: Ethics in the Professions Medical Ethics Case Study You work as a registered nurse in a busy urban emergency department. Today you are caring for an adorable four-year old female patient who presents with a broken right arm and several bruises around her abdomen. You suspect that this patient is a victim of accidental trauma (child abuse). If you report your suspicions to the proper authorities, your state laws mandate that the child be removed from the care of the parents until an investigation of the allegation is complete. You know that this may take up to a week. Answer the following questions. 1) What type of ethical problem is this professional facing and why? 2) What steps should this medical professional take and why? 3) What would be the result of the nurse’s actions if this child is found to have a genetic problem and it is not a case of child abuse? 4) Are there other types of professionals who may also be required to report cases of suspected child abuse? If yes, what type of professional would that be? 5) What would you do in this situation?

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Paper 2. Cultural Analysis Essay Overview: The second paper for our class will be a cultural analysis. You will choose an artifact common in American culture and use the object as a way to understand an aspect of American culture. Analysis: The word analysis derives from a Greek word meaning “to dissolve, loosen, or undo.” In a sense, analysis means to divide the whole into its parts, to examine those parts carefully, to look at the relationships among the parts, and then to use this understanding of the parts to better understand the whole. Synonyms for writing to analyze would be writing to interpret, clarify and explain. Purpose: When you write to analyze, you apply your own critical thinking to a puzzling object to offer your own ideas. Your goal is raise interesting questions and make interesting observations about the object or event being analyzed. These may be questions that your audience hasn’t even thought to ask. And you will need to provide tentative answers to those questions, supported by your close examination. Analysis—not Evaluation: Please keep in mind that your purpose is to explore and explain why an artifact is important in American culture and what it says about American culture. However, you are not writing about whether or not this aspect of the culture is good or bad. You should not talk about whether or not the people who engage with this artifact are good or bad for doing so. Format: The first draft will be three typed pages, and you will bring to class 2 copies. It should have your name on every page. Ideally, it will be in MLA (Modern Language Association) format, though this is not important at that stage. See the format of the paper in the example below. Details: For your analysis, you must choose a cultural artifact and explain what this artifact says about an aspect of American culture. Please look through the class PowerPoint on Blackboard entitles “Analysis of a Cultural Artifact” to see a thorough description of the process of analysis. Assessment: In this essay, I am looking for • Superior essays will chose a good artifact, a take readers through a thorough investigation to the artifact to interpret, clarify and explain what the artifact demonstrates about American culture. • well-formed, clear sentences • unified and coherent paragraphs • use of standard grammar, diction, and mechanics of American English. Sample Paper Format (on back) Last Name 1 Your Full Name Dr. Riley-Brown ENG 110: Composition Essay 2 Date Title of Paper Centered This is where the first line of your paper will go. Double space beneath your title and indent the first line of each paragraph five (5) spaces. The essay should have margins that are one each on each side. You should use Times New Roman font in 12 point font size.

Paper 2. Cultural Analysis Essay Overview: The second paper for our class will be a cultural analysis. You will choose an artifact common in American culture and use the object as a way to understand an aspect of American culture. Analysis: The word analysis derives from a Greek word meaning “to dissolve, loosen, or undo.” In a sense, analysis means to divide the whole into its parts, to examine those parts carefully, to look at the relationships among the parts, and then to use this understanding of the parts to better understand the whole. Synonyms for writing to analyze would be writing to interpret, clarify and explain. Purpose: When you write to analyze, you apply your own critical thinking to a puzzling object to offer your own ideas. Your goal is raise interesting questions and make interesting observations about the object or event being analyzed. These may be questions that your audience hasn’t even thought to ask. And you will need to provide tentative answers to those questions, supported by your close examination. Analysis—not Evaluation: Please keep in mind that your purpose is to explore and explain why an artifact is important in American culture and what it says about American culture. However, you are not writing about whether or not this aspect of the culture is good or bad. You should not talk about whether or not the people who engage with this artifact are good or bad for doing so. Format: The first draft will be three typed pages, and you will bring to class 2 copies. It should have your name on every page. Ideally, it will be in MLA (Modern Language Association) format, though this is not important at that stage. See the format of the paper in the example below. Details: For your analysis, you must choose a cultural artifact and explain what this artifact says about an aspect of American culture. Please look through the class PowerPoint on Blackboard entitles “Analysis of a Cultural Artifact” to see a thorough description of the process of analysis. Assessment: In this essay, I am looking for • Superior essays will chose a good artifact, a take readers through a thorough investigation to the artifact to interpret, clarify and explain what the artifact demonstrates about American culture. • well-formed, clear sentences • unified and coherent paragraphs • use of standard grammar, diction, and mechanics of American English. Sample Paper Format (on back) Last Name 1 Your Full Name Dr. Riley-Brown ENG 110: Composition Essay 2 Date Title of Paper Centered This is where the first line of your paper will go. Double space beneath your title and indent the first line of each paragraph five (5) spaces. The essay should have margins that are one each on each side. You should use Times New Roman font in 12 point font size.

Take Home Exam 3: Special Note Before Starting the Exam: If you scan your solutions to the exam and save it as a pdf or image file and put it on dropbox and I can not read it or open it, you will not receive credit for the exam. Furthermore, if you write the solutions up in word, latex ect. and give me a print out, which does not include all the pages you will not get credit for the missing pages. Also if your folder on dropbox is not clearly labeled and I can not find your exam then you will not get credit for the exam. Finally, please make sure you put your name on the exam!! Math 2100 Exam 3, Out of Class, Due by December 8th, 2015 at 5:00 pm. Name: Problem 1. (15 points) A random variable is said to have the (standard) Cauchy distribution if its PDF is given by f (x) = 1 π 1 1+ x2 , −∞< x <∞ This problem uses computer simulations to demonstrate that a) samples from this distribution often have extreme outliers (a consequence of the heavy tails of the distribution), and b) the sample mean is prone to the same type of outliers. Below is a graph of the pdf a) (5 points) The R commands x=rcauchy(500); summary(x) generate a random sample of size 500 from the Cauchy distribution and display the sample’s five number summary; Report the five number summary and the interquartile range, and comment on whether or not the smallest and largest numbers generated from this sample of 500 are outliers. Repeat this 10 times. b) (5 points) The R commands m=matrix(rcauchy(50000), nrow=500); xb=apply(m,1,mean);summary(xb) generate the matrix m that has 500 rows, each of which is a sample of size n=100 from the Cauchy distribution, compute the 500 sample means and store them in xb. and display the five number summary xb. Repeat these commands 10 times, and report the 10 sets of five number summaries. Compare with the 10 sets of five number summaries from part (a), and comment on whether or not the distribution of the averages seems to be more prone to extreme outliers as that of the individual observations. c) (5 points) Why does this happen? (hint: try to calculate E(X) and V(X) for this distribution) and does the LLN and CLT apply for samples from a Cauchy distribution? Hint: E(X) is undefined for this distribution unless you use the Cauchy Principle Value as such for the mean lim a→∞ xf (x)dx −a a∫ In addition x2 1+ x2 dx = x2 +1−1 1+ x2 dx = 1− 1 1+ x2 " # $ % & ' ∫ ∫ ∫ dx 1 1+ x2 dx = tan−1 ∫ x +C Problem 2. (5 points) A marketing expert for a pasta-making company believes that 40% of pasta lovers prefer lasagna. If 9 out of 20 pasta lovers choose lasagna over other pastas, what can be concluded about the expert's claim? Use a 0.05 level of significance. Problem 3. (10 points) A coin is tossed 20 times, resulting in 5 heads. Is this sufficient evidence to reject the hypothesis that the coin is balanced in favor of the alternative that heads occur less than 50% of the time (essentially is this significant evidence to claim that the coin is unbalanced in favor of tails)? Use a 0.05 level of significance. Problem 4. (25 points) Since the chemical benzene may cause cancer, the federal government has set the maximum allowable benzene concentration in the workplace at 1 part per million (1 ppm) Suppose that a steel manufacturing plant is under investigation for possible violations regarding benzene level. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) will analyze 14 air samples over a one-month period. Assume normality of the population from which the samples were drawn. a) (3 points) What is an appropriate null hypothesis for this scenario? (Give this in symbols) b) (3 points) What is an appropriate alternative hypothesis for this scenario? (Give this in symbols) c) (3 points) What kind of hypothesis test is this: left-tailed, right-tailed or two-tailed? Explain how you picked your answer. d) (3 points) Is this a one-sample t-test or a one-sample test using a normal distribution? Explain how you picked your answer. e) (4 points) If the test using this sample of size 14 is to be done at the 1% significance level, calculate the critical value(s) and describe the rejection region(s) for the test statistic. Show your work. f) (5 points) OHSA finds the following for their sample of size 14: a mean benzene level of 1.51 ppm and a standard deviation of 1.415 ppm. What should be concluded at the 1% significance level? Support your answer with calculation(s) and reasoning. g) (4 points) Calculate the p-value for this test and verify that this answer would lead to the same conclusion you made in part f. Problem 5. (15 points) A normally distributed random variable Y possesses a mean of μ = 20 and a standard deviation of σ = 5. A random sample of n = 31 observations is to be selected. Let X be the sample average. (X in this problem is really x _ ) a)(5 points) Describe the sampling distribution of X (i.e. describe the distribution of X and give μx, σx ) b) (5 points) Find the z-score of x = 22 c) (5 points) Find P(X ≥ 22) = Problem 6. (10 points) A restaurants receipts show that the cost of customers' dinners has a distribution with a mean of $54 and a standard deviation of $18. What is the probability that the next 100 customers will spend a total of at least $5800 on dinner? Problem 7. (10 points) The operations manager of a large production plant would like to estimate the mean amount of time a worker takes to assemble a new electronic component. Assume that the standard deviation of this assembly time is 3.6 minutes and is normally distributed. a) (3 points) After observing 120 workers assembling similar devices, the manager noticed that their average time was 16.2 minutes. Construct a 92% confidence interval for the mean assembly time. b) (2 points) How many workers should be involved in this study in order to have the mean assembly time estimated up to ± 15 seconds with 92% confidence? c) (5 points) Construct a 92% confidence interval if instead of observing 120 workers assembling similar devices, rather the manager observes 25 workers and notice their average time was 16.2 minutes with a standard deviation of 4.0 minutes. Problem 8. (10 points): A manufacturer of candy must monitor the temperature at which the candies are baked. Too much variation will cause inconsistency in the taste of the candy. Past records show that the standard deviation of the temperature has been 1.2oF . A random sample of 30 batches of candy is selected, and the sample standard deviation of the temperature is 2.1oF . a. (5 points) At the 0.05 level of significance, is there evidence that the population standard deviation has increased above 1.2oF ? b. (3 points) What assumption do you need to make in order to perform this test? c. (2 points) Compute the p-value in (a) and interpret its meaning.

Take Home Exam 3: Special Note Before Starting the Exam: If you scan your solutions to the exam and save it as a pdf or image file and put it on dropbox and I can not read it or open it, you will not receive credit for the exam. Furthermore, if you write the solutions up in word, latex ect. and give me a print out, which does not include all the pages you will not get credit for the missing pages. Also if your folder on dropbox is not clearly labeled and I can not find your exam then you will not get credit for the exam. Finally, please make sure you put your name on the exam!! Math 2100 Exam 3, Out of Class, Due by December 8th, 2015 at 5:00 pm. Name: Problem 1. (15 points) A random variable is said to have the (standard) Cauchy distribution if its PDF is given by f (x) = 1 π 1 1+ x2 , −∞< x <∞ This problem uses computer simulations to demonstrate that a) samples from this distribution often have extreme outliers (a consequence of the heavy tails of the distribution), and b) the sample mean is prone to the same type of outliers. Below is a graph of the pdf a) (5 points) The R commands x=rcauchy(500); summary(x) generate a random sample of size 500 from the Cauchy distribution and display the sample’s five number summary; Report the five number summary and the interquartile range, and comment on whether or not the smallest and largest numbers generated from this sample of 500 are outliers. Repeat this 10 times. b) (5 points) The R commands m=matrix(rcauchy(50000), nrow=500); xb=apply(m,1,mean);summary(xb) generate the matrix m that has 500 rows, each of which is a sample of size n=100 from the Cauchy distribution, compute the 500 sample means and store them in xb. and display the five number summary xb. Repeat these commands 10 times, and report the 10 sets of five number summaries. Compare with the 10 sets of five number summaries from part (a), and comment on whether or not the distribution of the averages seems to be more prone to extreme outliers as that of the individual observations. c) (5 points) Why does this happen? (hint: try to calculate E(X) and V(X) for this distribution) and does the LLN and CLT apply for samples from a Cauchy distribution? Hint: E(X) is undefined for this distribution unless you use the Cauchy Principle Value as such for the mean lim a→∞ xf (x)dx −a a∫ In addition x2 1+ x2 dx = x2 +1−1 1+ x2 dx = 1− 1 1+ x2 " # $ % & ' ∫ ∫ ∫ dx 1 1+ x2 dx = tan−1 ∫ x +C Problem 2. (5 points) A marketing expert for a pasta-making company believes that 40% of pasta lovers prefer lasagna. If 9 out of 20 pasta lovers choose lasagna over other pastas, what can be concluded about the expert's claim? Use a 0.05 level of significance. Problem 3. (10 points) A coin is tossed 20 times, resulting in 5 heads. Is this sufficient evidence to reject the hypothesis that the coin is balanced in favor of the alternative that heads occur less than 50% of the time (essentially is this significant evidence to claim that the coin is unbalanced in favor of tails)? Use a 0.05 level of significance. Problem 4. (25 points) Since the chemical benzene may cause cancer, the federal government has set the maximum allowable benzene concentration in the workplace at 1 part per million (1 ppm) Suppose that a steel manufacturing plant is under investigation for possible violations regarding benzene level. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) will analyze 14 air samples over a one-month period. Assume normality of the population from which the samples were drawn. a) (3 points) What is an appropriate null hypothesis for this scenario? (Give this in symbols) b) (3 points) What is an appropriate alternative hypothesis for this scenario? (Give this in symbols) c) (3 points) What kind of hypothesis test is this: left-tailed, right-tailed or two-tailed? Explain how you picked your answer. d) (3 points) Is this a one-sample t-test or a one-sample test using a normal distribution? Explain how you picked your answer. e) (4 points) If the test using this sample of size 14 is to be done at the 1% significance level, calculate the critical value(s) and describe the rejection region(s) for the test statistic. Show your work. f) (5 points) OHSA finds the following for their sample of size 14: a mean benzene level of 1.51 ppm and a standard deviation of 1.415 ppm. What should be concluded at the 1% significance level? Support your answer with calculation(s) and reasoning. g) (4 points) Calculate the p-value for this test and verify that this answer would lead to the same conclusion you made in part f. Problem 5. (15 points) A normally distributed random variable Y possesses a mean of μ = 20 and a standard deviation of σ = 5. A random sample of n = 31 observations is to be selected. Let X be the sample average. (X in this problem is really x _ ) a)(5 points) Describe the sampling distribution of X (i.e. describe the distribution of X and give μx, σx ) b) (5 points) Find the z-score of x = 22 c) (5 points) Find P(X ≥ 22) = Problem 6. (10 points) A restaurants receipts show that the cost of customers' dinners has a distribution with a mean of $54 and a standard deviation of $18. What is the probability that the next 100 customers will spend a total of at least $5800 on dinner? Problem 7. (10 points) The operations manager of a large production plant would like to estimate the mean amount of time a worker takes to assemble a new electronic component. Assume that the standard deviation of this assembly time is 3.6 minutes and is normally distributed. a) (3 points) After observing 120 workers assembling similar devices, the manager noticed that their average time was 16.2 minutes. Construct a 92% confidence interval for the mean assembly time. b) (2 points) How many workers should be involved in this study in order to have the mean assembly time estimated up to ± 15 seconds with 92% confidence? c) (5 points) Construct a 92% confidence interval if instead of observing 120 workers assembling similar devices, rather the manager observes 25 workers and notice their average time was 16.2 minutes with a standard deviation of 4.0 minutes. Problem 8. (10 points): A manufacturer of candy must monitor the temperature at which the candies are baked. Too much variation will cause inconsistency in the taste of the candy. Past records show that the standard deviation of the temperature has been 1.2oF . A random sample of 30 batches of candy is selected, and the sample standard deviation of the temperature is 2.1oF . a. (5 points) At the 0.05 level of significance, is there evidence that the population standard deviation has increased above 1.2oF ? b. (3 points) What assumption do you need to make in order to perform this test? c. (2 points) Compute the p-value in (a) and interpret its meaning.

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Tornado Eddy Investigation Abstract The objective of this lab was to write a bunch of jibberish to provide students with a formatting template. Chemical engineering, bioengineering, and environmental engineering are “process engineering” disciplines. Good abstracts contains real content, such as 560 mL/min, 35 deg, and 67 percent yield. Ideal degreed graduates are technically strong, bring broad system perspectives to problem solving, and have the professional “soft skills” to make immediate contributions in the workplace. The senior lab sequence is the “capstone” opportunity to realize this ideal by integrating technical skills and developing professional soft skills to ensure workforce preparedness. The best conclusions are objective and numerical, such as operating conditions of 45 L/min at 32 deg C with expected costs of $4.55/lb. Background Insect exchange processes are often used in bug filtration, as they are effective at removing either positive or negative insects from water. An insect exchange column is a packed or fluidized bed filled with resin beads. Water flows through the column and most of the insects from the water enter the beads, but some of them pass in between the beads, which makes the exchange of insects non-ideal. Insectac 249 resin is a cation exchange resin, as it is being used to attract cationic Ca2+ from the toxic waste stream. This means the resin is negatively charged, and needs to be regenerated with a solution that produces positively charged insects, in this case, salt water which contains Na+ insects. The resin contains acidic styrene backbones which capture the cationic insects in a reversible process. A curve of Ca2+ concentration concentration vs. time was obtained after a standard curve was made to determine how many drops from the low cost barium test kit from Aquarium Pharmaceuticals (API)1 bottle #2 would correspond to a certain concentration in solution. A standard curve works by preparing solutions with known concentrations and testing these concentrations using the kit to create a curve of number of drops from bottle #2 (obtained result) vs. concentration of Ca2+ in solution (desired response). The standard curve can then be used for every test on the prototype and in the field, to quickly and accurately obtain a concentration from the test kit. The barium concentration vs. time curve can be used to calculate the exchange capacity of the resin and, in later tests, the regeneration efficiency. The curves must be used to get the total amount of barium removed from the water, m. Seen in Equation 2, the volumetric flow rate of water, , is multiplied by the integral from tinitial to tfinal of the total concentration of Ca2+ absorbed by the resin as a function of time, C. (2) 1 http://aquariumpharm.com/Products/Product.aspx?ProductID=72 , date accessed: 11/26/10 CBEE 102: ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING AND COMPUTATIONS PROJECT DESCRIPTION 9 Josephine Hornsnogger CBEE 414, Lab Section M 1300–‐1550 April 19, 2010 Oregon State University School of CBEE A graphical trapezoid method was used to evaluate the integral and get the final solution in equivalents of Ca2+ per L, it must be noted that there are 2 equivalents per mole of barium, as the charge of the barium insect is +2. An initial exchange capacity was calculated for the virgin resin, and an adjusted exchange capacity was calculated once the resin was regenerated. The regenerated resin capacity was found by multiplying the virgin resin capacity by the regeneration efficiency, expressed in Equation 3. (3) See Appendix A for the calculation of the exchange capacities and the regeneration efficiency. Materials and Methods Rosalie and Peter Johnson of Corvallis established the Linus Pauling Chair in Chemical Engineering to honor Oregon State University’s most famous graduate. Peter Johnson, former President and owner of Tekmax, Inc., a company which revolutionized battery manufacturing equipment, is a 1955 graduate of the College of Engineering.2 The Chair, also known as the Linus Pauling Distinguished Engineer or Linus Pauling Engineer (LPE), was originally designed to focus on the traditional “capstone” senior lab sequence in the former Department of Chemical Engineering. The focus is now extended to all the process engineering disciplines. The LPE is charged with establishing strong ties with industry, ensuring current and relevant laboratory experiences, and helping upperclass students develop skills in communication, teamwork, project management, and leadership. Include details about lab procedures not sufficiently detailed in the SOP, problems you had, etc. The bulk solution prepared to create the standard curve was used in the second day of testing to obtain the exchange capacity of the insectac 249 resin. The solution was pumped through a bathroom scale into the prototype insect exchange column. 45 mL of resin was rinsed and added to the column. The bed was fluidized as the solution was pumped through the resin, but for the creation of the Ca2+ concentration vs. time curve, the solution was pumped down through the column, as illustrated in the process flow diagram seen in Figure 1. Figure 1. Process sketch of the insect exchange column used for the project. Ref: http://www.generon.co.uk/acatalog/Chromatography.html 2 Harding, P. Viscosity Measurement SOP, Spring, 2010. CBEE 102: ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING AND COMPUTATIONS PROJECT DESCRIPTION 10 Josephine Hornsnogger CBEE 414, Lab Section M 1300–‐1550 April 19, 2010 Oregon State University School of CBEE A bathroom scale calibration curve was created to ensure that the 150 mL/min, used to calculate the breakthrough time, would be delivered to the resin. The bathroom scale used was a Dwyer brand with flowrates between 0 and 300 cc/min of water. Originally, values between 120 and 180 mL/min were chosen for the calibration, with three runs for each flowrate, however the bathroom scale values were so far away from the measure values the range was extended to 100 to 200 mL/min. The regeneration experiment was performed using a method similar to that used in the water softening experiment, however instead of using a 640 ppm Ca2+ solution to fill the resin, a 6000 ppm Na+ solution was used to eject the Ca2+ from the resin. Twelve samples times were chosen and adjusted as the experiment progressed, with more than half of the samples taken at times less than 10 minutes, and the last sample taken at 45 minutes. The bulk exit solution was also tested to determine the regeneration efficiency. Results and Discussion The senior lab sequence has its roots in the former Department of Chemical Engineering. CHE 414 and 415 were taught in Winter and Spring and included 6 hours of lab time per week. The School has endeavored to incorporate the courses into the BIOE and ENVE curriculum, and this will be complete in 2008-2009. Recent development of the senior lab course sequence is shown chronologically in Fig. 1. In 2006-2007, CHE 414 and 415 were moved to Fall and Winter to enable CHE 416, an elective independent senior project course. Also that year, BIOE students took BIOE 414 in the Fall and BIOE 415 was developed and taught. No BIOE students enrolled in the optional CHE. In 2007-2008, the program transitioned in a new Linus Pauling Engineer and ENVE 414 was offered. Also, approximately 30 percent of BIOE students enrolled in the optional CHE 416. Accommodating the academic calendars of the three disciplines required a reduction in weekly student lab time from 6 to 3 hours. The expected relationship between coughing rate, y, and length of canine, x, is Bx z y Fe− (1) where F is a pre-exponential constant, B is vitamin B concentration and z is the height of an average trapeze artist. 3 The 2008-2009 brings the challenge of the dramatic enrollment increase shown in Fig. 1 and the first offering of ENVE 415. The result, shown on the right in Fig. 1, is the delivery of the senior lab sequence uniformly across the process engineering disciplines. CBEE 416 is expected to drawn approximately of the students that take the 415 courses. In 2007-2008, 414 and 415 were required for CHEs, 414 and 415 for BIOEs, and only 414 for ENVEs. CHE 416 is ostensibly an elective for all disciplines. In 2008-2009, 414 and 415 is required for all disciplines and CHE 416 will be an elective. The content of 414 is essentially 3 Fundamentals of Momentum, Heat, and Mass Transfer, Welty, J.R. et al., 4th edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. CBEE 102: ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING AND COMPUTATIONS PROJECT DESCRIPTION 11 Josephine Hornsnogger CBEE 414, Lab Section M 1300–‐1550 April 19, 2010 Oregon State University School of CBEE identical for all three disciplines, 415 has discipline-specific labs, and 416 consists of senior projects with potentially cross-discipline teams of 2 to 4 students. Tremendous labor and struggling with the lab equipment resulted in the data shown in y = –‐0.29x + 1.71 y = –‐0.25x + 2.03 y = –‐0.135x + 2.20 –‐1.5 –‐1.0 –‐0.5 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 0 2 4 6 8 10 ln y (units) x (units) ln y_1 ln y_2 ln y_3 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 Case 1 Case 2 Case 3 Slope (units) (a) (b) Figure 1. (a) Data for y and x plotted for various values of z and (b) a comparison of slopes for the 3 cases investigate. The log plot slope yields the vitamin B concentration. The slopes were shown to be significantly at the 90% confidence level, but the instructor ran out of time and did not include error bars. The slope changed as predicted by the Snirtenhoffer equation. Improvements to the lab might include advice on how to legally change my name to something less embarrassing. My whole life I have been forced to repeat and spell it. I really feel that this has affected my psychologically. This was perhaps the worst lab I have ever done in my academic career, primarily due to the fact that there was no lab time. I simply typed in this entire report and filled it with jibberish. Some might think nobody will notice, but I know that …… Harding reads every word. Acknowledgments The author acknowledges his elementary teacher for providing truly foundational instruction in addition and subtraction. Jenny Burninbalm was instrumental with guidance on use of the RT-345 dog scratching device. CBEE 102: ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING AND COMPUTATIONS PROJECT DESCRIPTION 12

Tornado Eddy Investigation Abstract The objective of this lab was to write a bunch of jibberish to provide students with a formatting template. Chemical engineering, bioengineering, and environmental engineering are “process engineering” disciplines. Good abstracts contains real content, such as 560 mL/min, 35 deg, and 67 percent yield. Ideal degreed graduates are technically strong, bring broad system perspectives to problem solving, and have the professional “soft skills” to make immediate contributions in the workplace. The senior lab sequence is the “capstone” opportunity to realize this ideal by integrating technical skills and developing professional soft skills to ensure workforce preparedness. The best conclusions are objective and numerical, such as operating conditions of 45 L/min at 32 deg C with expected costs of $4.55/lb. Background Insect exchange processes are often used in bug filtration, as they are effective at removing either positive or negative insects from water. An insect exchange column is a packed or fluidized bed filled with resin beads. Water flows through the column and most of the insects from the water enter the beads, but some of them pass in between the beads, which makes the exchange of insects non-ideal. Insectac 249 resin is a cation exchange resin, as it is being used to attract cationic Ca2+ from the toxic waste stream. This means the resin is negatively charged, and needs to be regenerated with a solution that produces positively charged insects, in this case, salt water which contains Na+ insects. The resin contains acidic styrene backbones which capture the cationic insects in a reversible process. A curve of Ca2+ concentration concentration vs. time was obtained after a standard curve was made to determine how many drops from the low cost barium test kit from Aquarium Pharmaceuticals (API)1 bottle #2 would correspond to a certain concentration in solution. A standard curve works by preparing solutions with known concentrations and testing these concentrations using the kit to create a curve of number of drops from bottle #2 (obtained result) vs. concentration of Ca2+ in solution (desired response). The standard curve can then be used for every test on the prototype and in the field, to quickly and accurately obtain a concentration from the test kit. The barium concentration vs. time curve can be used to calculate the exchange capacity of the resin and, in later tests, the regeneration efficiency. The curves must be used to get the total amount of barium removed from the water, m. Seen in Equation 2, the volumetric flow rate of water, , is multiplied by the integral from tinitial to tfinal of the total concentration of Ca2+ absorbed by the resin as a function of time, C. (2) 1 http://aquariumpharm.com/Products/Product.aspx?ProductID=72 , date accessed: 11/26/10 CBEE 102: ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING AND COMPUTATIONS PROJECT DESCRIPTION 9 Josephine Hornsnogger CBEE 414, Lab Section M 1300–‐1550 April 19, 2010 Oregon State University School of CBEE A graphical trapezoid method was used to evaluate the integral and get the final solution in equivalents of Ca2+ per L, it must be noted that there are 2 equivalents per mole of barium, as the charge of the barium insect is +2. An initial exchange capacity was calculated for the virgin resin, and an adjusted exchange capacity was calculated once the resin was regenerated. The regenerated resin capacity was found by multiplying the virgin resin capacity by the regeneration efficiency, expressed in Equation 3. (3) See Appendix A for the calculation of the exchange capacities and the regeneration efficiency. Materials and Methods Rosalie and Peter Johnson of Corvallis established the Linus Pauling Chair in Chemical Engineering to honor Oregon State University’s most famous graduate. Peter Johnson, former President and owner of Tekmax, Inc., a company which revolutionized battery manufacturing equipment, is a 1955 graduate of the College of Engineering.2 The Chair, also known as the Linus Pauling Distinguished Engineer or Linus Pauling Engineer (LPE), was originally designed to focus on the traditional “capstone” senior lab sequence in the former Department of Chemical Engineering. The focus is now extended to all the process engineering disciplines. The LPE is charged with establishing strong ties with industry, ensuring current and relevant laboratory experiences, and helping upperclass students develop skills in communication, teamwork, project management, and leadership. Include details about lab procedures not sufficiently detailed in the SOP, problems you had, etc. The bulk solution prepared to create the standard curve was used in the second day of testing to obtain the exchange capacity of the insectac 249 resin. The solution was pumped through a bathroom scale into the prototype insect exchange column. 45 mL of resin was rinsed and added to the column. The bed was fluidized as the solution was pumped through the resin, but for the creation of the Ca2+ concentration vs. time curve, the solution was pumped down through the column, as illustrated in the process flow diagram seen in Figure 1. Figure 1. Process sketch of the insect exchange column used for the project. Ref: http://www.generon.co.uk/acatalog/Chromatography.html 2 Harding, P. Viscosity Measurement SOP, Spring, 2010. CBEE 102: ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING AND COMPUTATIONS PROJECT DESCRIPTION 10 Josephine Hornsnogger CBEE 414, Lab Section M 1300–‐1550 April 19, 2010 Oregon State University School of CBEE A bathroom scale calibration curve was created to ensure that the 150 mL/min, used to calculate the breakthrough time, would be delivered to the resin. The bathroom scale used was a Dwyer brand with flowrates between 0 and 300 cc/min of water. Originally, values between 120 and 180 mL/min were chosen for the calibration, with three runs for each flowrate, however the bathroom scale values were so far away from the measure values the range was extended to 100 to 200 mL/min. The regeneration experiment was performed using a method similar to that used in the water softening experiment, however instead of using a 640 ppm Ca2+ solution to fill the resin, a 6000 ppm Na+ solution was used to eject the Ca2+ from the resin. Twelve samples times were chosen and adjusted as the experiment progressed, with more than half of the samples taken at times less than 10 minutes, and the last sample taken at 45 minutes. The bulk exit solution was also tested to determine the regeneration efficiency. Results and Discussion The senior lab sequence has its roots in the former Department of Chemical Engineering. CHE 414 and 415 were taught in Winter and Spring and included 6 hours of lab time per week. The School has endeavored to incorporate the courses into the BIOE and ENVE curriculum, and this will be complete in 2008-2009. Recent development of the senior lab course sequence is shown chronologically in Fig. 1. In 2006-2007, CHE 414 and 415 were moved to Fall and Winter to enable CHE 416, an elective independent senior project course. Also that year, BIOE students took BIOE 414 in the Fall and BIOE 415 was developed and taught. No BIOE students enrolled in the optional CHE. In 2007-2008, the program transitioned in a new Linus Pauling Engineer and ENVE 414 was offered. Also, approximately 30 percent of BIOE students enrolled in the optional CHE 416. Accommodating the academic calendars of the three disciplines required a reduction in weekly student lab time from 6 to 3 hours. The expected relationship between coughing rate, y, and length of canine, x, is Bx z y Fe− (1) where F is a pre-exponential constant, B is vitamin B concentration and z is the height of an average trapeze artist. 3 The 2008-2009 brings the challenge of the dramatic enrollment increase shown in Fig. 1 and the first offering of ENVE 415. The result, shown on the right in Fig. 1, is the delivery of the senior lab sequence uniformly across the process engineering disciplines. CBEE 416 is expected to drawn approximately of the students that take the 415 courses. In 2007-2008, 414 and 415 were required for CHEs, 414 and 415 for BIOEs, and only 414 for ENVEs. CHE 416 is ostensibly an elective for all disciplines. In 2008-2009, 414 and 415 is required for all disciplines and CHE 416 will be an elective. The content of 414 is essentially 3 Fundamentals of Momentum, Heat, and Mass Transfer, Welty, J.R. et al., 4th edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. CBEE 102: ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING AND COMPUTATIONS PROJECT DESCRIPTION 11 Josephine Hornsnogger CBEE 414, Lab Section M 1300–‐1550 April 19, 2010 Oregon State University School of CBEE identical for all three disciplines, 415 has discipline-specific labs, and 416 consists of senior projects with potentially cross-discipline teams of 2 to 4 students. Tremendous labor and struggling with the lab equipment resulted in the data shown in y = –‐0.29x + 1.71 y = –‐0.25x + 2.03 y = –‐0.135x + 2.20 –‐1.5 –‐1.0 –‐0.5 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 0 2 4 6 8 10 ln y (units) x (units) ln y_1 ln y_2 ln y_3 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 Case 1 Case 2 Case 3 Slope (units) (a) (b) Figure 1. (a) Data for y and x plotted for various values of z and (b) a comparison of slopes for the 3 cases investigate. The log plot slope yields the vitamin B concentration. The slopes were shown to be significantly at the 90% confidence level, but the instructor ran out of time and did not include error bars. The slope changed as predicted by the Snirtenhoffer equation. Improvements to the lab might include advice on how to legally change my name to something less embarrassing. My whole life I have been forced to repeat and spell it. I really feel that this has affected my psychologically. This was perhaps the worst lab I have ever done in my academic career, primarily due to the fact that there was no lab time. I simply typed in this entire report and filled it with jibberish. Some might think nobody will notice, but I know that …… Harding reads every word. Acknowledgments The author acknowledges his elementary teacher for providing truly foundational instruction in addition and subtraction. Jenny Burninbalm was instrumental with guidance on use of the RT-345 dog scratching device. CBEE 102: ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING AND COMPUTATIONS PROJECT DESCRIPTION 12

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After reading the supplement article on Business Analytics linked to the week 1 schedule, write an essay on how business analytics impacts you today, or its potential role in your chosen career path. Do research for your paper, or interview someone who works in your area. The goals of this paper are two-fold: (1) focus on high quality writing, using the COBE Writing Styles Guide for writing help and citations. (2) consider the importance of BI from a personal/work/career perspective.

After reading the supplement article on Business Analytics linked to the week 1 schedule, write an essay on how business analytics impacts you today, or its potential role in your chosen career path. Do research for your paper, or interview someone who works in your area. The goals of this paper are two-fold: (1) focus on high quality writing, using the COBE Writing Styles Guide for writing help and citations. (2) consider the importance of BI from a personal/work/career perspective.

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Name___________________________________ Period_____ Investigation: Making Waves PART I: Objectives: • Learn vocabulary describing waves • Calculate the speed of a wave • Understand how amplitude affects the speed of a wave • Understand how frequency and wavelength affect the speed of a wave Open this web site: http://phet.colorado.edu/new/simulations/sims.php?sim=Wave_on_a_String You can click on Run Now! to run the simulation online, or Run Offline to save it to your desktop. It might run faster this way. Start by Wiggling the Wrench. Spend about 5 minutes experimenting with the Tension, Manual/Pulse/Oscillate, Fixed/Loose/No end, and changing the Amplitude, Frequency and Damping. Click on Show Rulers and Timer. Practice moving the rulers around and starting/resetting the timer. Click on the Pause/Play and Step buttons to see how they work. Use these settings: Pulse, Amplitude=50, Pulse Width=35, Damping=0, Tension at High and No End. NOTE that the amplitude is just a relative scale (not centimeters). Send a single pulse down the string. This is called a TRANSVERSE PULSE. Watch the motion of the green dots.  1. As the pulse goes by from left to right, in what direction does the string move? ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________  2. A definition of TRANSVERSE is “lying across”. Why is TRANSVERSE a good name for the wave you just observed? ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Make another pulse, and then PAUSE the wave. Use the vertical ruler to measure the amplitude of the wave in centimeters. This is the distance from the dotted orange line to the crest of the wave. Record the amplitude in Table 1 in the first row. Now, measure the time for a pulse to travel 100 cm. To do this: • Reset the clock to 0:00 and reset the generator • Click Pause/Play—it should say PAUSED on the screen • Click Pulse • Click Pause/Play again to start a timed pulse. Pause again just as the crest (peak) of the pulse touches the window 100 cm away. Record the time for a pulse to travel 100 cm in Table 1. Run 3 time trials, and record in the table. Calculate the average time. Now, measure the amplitude and timing of pulses for two other amplitudes (one smaller than 50, one larger than 50). Do three trials at each amplitude and calculate the average times. Calculate the average wave speed for each of the three amplitudes. See below for a sample calculation. Table 1 Your measured amplitude, cm Time for pulse to travel 100 cm, seconds Average time, seconds Speed=length of string / average time Example of speed calculation: Speed = string length/ average time Speed = 100 cm/2 seconds = 50 cm/second  3. How does the amplitude of a wave affect the speed of a wave? ________________________________________________________________________ Use these settings: Oscillate, Fixed end. Try amplitude=20, frequency=51, damping=0. The result is called a periodic wave. 4. Describe the appearance of the wave you created. ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ You should see waves that do not move along the string. You will also see points where the string does not move at all. These waves are called STANDING WAVES. The points where the wave doesn’t move are called NODES. Pause the simulation.  5. Draw the standing wave in the box below, labeling the AMPLITUDE, WAVELENGTH and NODES of a standing wave. Use these settings: Amplitude=20, Frequency=50, Damping=0, Oscillate, No End. Reset the clock. You can also measure the wave frequency. To do this, you should pair up with another student if possible. Watch the piston go up and down to make the wave. One up and down motion represents one wave. Use the clock to measure the time required for 10 complete cycles or waves. You will also need to PAUSE the wave to measure the wavelength of the wave in centimeters (cm). The frequency of the wave is calculated in the following way: Frequency = 10 waves/# seconds for 10 cycles For example, 10 waves/5 seconds = 2 cycles per second, or 2 Hertz. Make several waves by changing the wave frequency—use numbers over 30 on the scale. For each wave, measure the wavelength using the ruler. Now, calculate the frequency. See the example in the first row of Table 2. Record the wavelength and frequency of three waves with different wavelengths. Wavelength (cm) Frequency (cycles/second or Hertz) Speed (cm/s) = Wavelength x frequency 33 cm 10 waves/5.45 sec = 1.8 Hertz 33 cm x 1.8 Hertz = 59.4 cm/second Based on the equation used to calculate the speed of a wave, answer questions 6 and 7.  6. If you increase the wavelength of a wave, how does the speed change? ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________  7. If you increase the frequency of a wave, how does the speed change? ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Part II: Objectives: • Interpret a 2D top view picture of a wave • Identify areas of constructive and destructive interference in 2D • Predict the behavior of water, sound, or light when you have two sources o What will happen in constructive areas o What will happen in destructive areas 1) Open the “Wave Interference” simulation from the PhET website (in Sound & Waves) 2) On the water simulation, what does the crest (peak) of the wave look like in the top view? What does the trough look like? 3) When you add two drips, what changes about the waves’ patterns? 4) What does the wave look like in the area that the two waves constructively interfere? Describe both the top view and what the side view would look like. a. TOP: b. SIDE: 5) What does the wave look like in the area that the two waves destructively interfere? Describe both the top view and what the side view would look like. a. TOP: b. SIDE: 6) Switch to the sound simulation. a. What do you think will happen when you put two speakers next to each other? b. Why do you think this will happen? c. Try it (putting two speakers together) and tell me what happened. 7) Now switch to the light simulation. a. What do you think will happen when you put two light sources next to each other? b. Why do you think this will happen? c. Try it (putting two light sources together) and tell me what happened. d. What happens when you use one light source and two slits? 8) What is similar about all three of these simulations (i.e. water, sound & light)? 9) How do I know that these things are waves and not particles? (Think about what would happen in the two slit experiment if they were particles).

Name___________________________________ Period_____ Investigation: Making Waves PART I: Objectives: • Learn vocabulary describing waves • Calculate the speed of a wave • Understand how amplitude affects the speed of a wave • Understand how frequency and wavelength affect the speed of a wave Open this web site: http://phet.colorado.edu/new/simulations/sims.php?sim=Wave_on_a_String You can click on Run Now! to run the simulation online, or Run Offline to save it to your desktop. It might run faster this way. Start by Wiggling the Wrench. Spend about 5 minutes experimenting with the Tension, Manual/Pulse/Oscillate, Fixed/Loose/No end, and changing the Amplitude, Frequency and Damping. Click on Show Rulers and Timer. Practice moving the rulers around and starting/resetting the timer. Click on the Pause/Play and Step buttons to see how they work. Use these settings: Pulse, Amplitude=50, Pulse Width=35, Damping=0, Tension at High and No End. NOTE that the amplitude is just a relative scale (not centimeters). Send a single pulse down the string. This is called a TRANSVERSE PULSE. Watch the motion of the green dots.  1. As the pulse goes by from left to right, in what direction does the string move? ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________  2. A definition of TRANSVERSE is “lying across”. Why is TRANSVERSE a good name for the wave you just observed? ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Make another pulse, and then PAUSE the wave. Use the vertical ruler to measure the amplitude of the wave in centimeters. This is the distance from the dotted orange line to the crest of the wave. Record the amplitude in Table 1 in the first row. Now, measure the time for a pulse to travel 100 cm. To do this: • Reset the clock to 0:00 and reset the generator • Click Pause/Play—it should say PAUSED on the screen • Click Pulse • Click Pause/Play again to start a timed pulse. Pause again just as the crest (peak) of the pulse touches the window 100 cm away. Record the time for a pulse to travel 100 cm in Table 1. Run 3 time trials, and record in the table. Calculate the average time. Now, measure the amplitude and timing of pulses for two other amplitudes (one smaller than 50, one larger than 50). Do three trials at each amplitude and calculate the average times. Calculate the average wave speed for each of the three amplitudes. See below for a sample calculation. Table 1 Your measured amplitude, cm Time for pulse to travel 100 cm, seconds Average time, seconds Speed=length of string / average time Example of speed calculation: Speed = string length/ average time Speed = 100 cm/2 seconds = 50 cm/second  3. How does the amplitude of a wave affect the speed of a wave? ________________________________________________________________________ Use these settings: Oscillate, Fixed end. Try amplitude=20, frequency=51, damping=0. The result is called a periodic wave. 4. Describe the appearance of the wave you created. ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ You should see waves that do not move along the string. You will also see points where the string does not move at all. These waves are called STANDING WAVES. The points where the wave doesn’t move are called NODES. Pause the simulation.  5. Draw the standing wave in the box below, labeling the AMPLITUDE, WAVELENGTH and NODES of a standing wave. Use these settings: Amplitude=20, Frequency=50, Damping=0, Oscillate, No End. Reset the clock. You can also measure the wave frequency. To do this, you should pair up with another student if possible. Watch the piston go up and down to make the wave. One up and down motion represents one wave. Use the clock to measure the time required for 10 complete cycles or waves. You will also need to PAUSE the wave to measure the wavelength of the wave in centimeters (cm). The frequency of the wave is calculated in the following way: Frequency = 10 waves/# seconds for 10 cycles For example, 10 waves/5 seconds = 2 cycles per second, or 2 Hertz. Make several waves by changing the wave frequency—use numbers over 30 on the scale. For each wave, measure the wavelength using the ruler. Now, calculate the frequency. See the example in the first row of Table 2. Record the wavelength and frequency of three waves with different wavelengths. Wavelength (cm) Frequency (cycles/second or Hertz) Speed (cm/s) = Wavelength x frequency 33 cm 10 waves/5.45 sec = 1.8 Hertz 33 cm x 1.8 Hertz = 59.4 cm/second Based on the equation used to calculate the speed of a wave, answer questions 6 and 7.  6. If you increase the wavelength of a wave, how does the speed change? ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________  7. If you increase the frequency of a wave, how does the speed change? ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Part II: Objectives: • Interpret a 2D top view picture of a wave • Identify areas of constructive and destructive interference in 2D • Predict the behavior of water, sound, or light when you have two sources o What will happen in constructive areas o What will happen in destructive areas 1) Open the “Wave Interference” simulation from the PhET website (in Sound & Waves) 2) On the water simulation, what does the crest (peak) of the wave look like in the top view? What does the trough look like? 3) When you add two drips, what changes about the waves’ patterns? 4) What does the wave look like in the area that the two waves constructively interfere? Describe both the top view and what the side view would look like. a. TOP: b. SIDE: 5) What does the wave look like in the area that the two waves destructively interfere? Describe both the top view and what the side view would look like. a. TOP: b. SIDE: 6) Switch to the sound simulation. a. What do you think will happen when you put two speakers next to each other? b. Why do you think this will happen? c. Try it (putting two speakers together) and tell me what happened. 7) Now switch to the light simulation. a. What do you think will happen when you put two light sources next to each other? b. Why do you think this will happen? c. Try it (putting two light sources together) and tell me what happened. d. What happens when you use one light source and two slits? 8) What is similar about all three of these simulations (i.e. water, sound & light)? 9) How do I know that these things are waves and not particles? (Think about what would happen in the two slit experiment if they were particles).

You have had the unique opportunity to develop a career plan in this academic program. By determining career goals and objectives, you should have become insightful and capable of assessing your current skills and abilities and their respective usefulness in attaining that ideal position. According to your plan, what training and education may be required before advancement is possible with respect to your future plans? What is the biggest obstacle you face in search of success?

You have had the unique opportunity to develop a career plan in this academic program. By determining career goals and objectives, you should have become insightful and capable of assessing your current skills and abilities and their respective usefulness in attaining that ideal position. According to your plan, what training and education may be required before advancement is possible with respect to your future plans? What is the biggest obstacle you face in search of success?

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5. Provide a brief discussion with supporting evidence to the following inquiry: With the responsibility of overseeing career development processes, how does management equip employees with skills that impact their performance in an efficient and effective manner?

5. Provide a brief discussion with supporting evidence to the following inquiry: With the responsibility of overseeing career development processes, how does management equip employees with skills that impact their performance in an efficient and effective manner?

Career development can facilitate we attain superior contentment and accomplishment. … Read More...