CAUSAL ANALYSIS GUIDELINES: According to John J. Ruskiewicz and Jay T. Dolmage, “We all analyze and explain things daily. Someone asks, ‘Why?’ We reply, ‘Because . . .’ and then offer reasons and rationales” (138). This type of thinking is at the core of the causal analysis. You will write a causal analysis which explores, through carefully examined research and logical analysis, certain causes or factors which contribute to an issue or problematic situation, based on the topic you choose to write on. Your causal analysis should explore more than one type of cause, such as necessary causes, sufficient causes, precipitating causes, proximate causes, remote causes, reciprocal causes, contributing factors, and chains of causes, as outlined in our course text in the chapter devoted to Causal Analyses. Your project should also reflect significant critical thinking skills. In addition to the actual causal analysis essay, you will be also create an annotated bibliography. These process elements will help you organize and focus your ideas and research in a beneficial way. The following is an organizational structure that outlines the chronology and content of your Causal Analysis: I. Introduction: In one (or at the most two) paragraph(s) introduce your topic. Give a brief overview of your topic and thesis in a few sentences. your evaluative claim and your causal claim. It should be specific, logical, and clear. II. History/Background to Current Situation: This section should take as much space as needed—a few to several paragraphs. Discuss the significant and relevant history of your topic up to the current situation and how it came to be. Use research as needed to give precise and accurate background for context in making your later causal argument. Comment on your research as well, so that you don’t lose your voice. As you explore other points of view, your own point of view will evolve in significant ways. III. Evaluative Claim: Once you have given a brief history/background of the current situation, evaluate the situation, the topic, as it is at present. Again, use research as appropriate to support your judgments. While this section of your essay could run anywhere from one to three paragraphs, typically one paragraph is the norm, as you are basically passing judgment on the situation, arguing evaluatively. This is an argument of pathos and logos, predominantly. IV. Causal Argument: This is the longest portion of your essay, the “meat,” the heart of your work. Once you have detailed the history/background to current situation and evaluated the current situation, you are ready to present your causal analysis. Demonstrate a link between the current situation and the causes for its negative condition. Of course, you will use current significant and relevant research to support your causal claim, and you will want to find the most dominant and pervasive logical causes, utilizing research, for the current situation as possible. These will connect forward as well to your proposal. Remember to use specific supporting detail/examples, and to analyze all of your research causally, thoroughly, and with clarity. NOTE: SECTIONS THREE AND FOUR ABOVE ARE INTERCHANGEABLE. IN OTHER WORDS, IF YOU FEEL YOU CAN PRESENT A BETTER ARGUMENT BY SHOWING CAUSES FIRST AND THEN EVALUATING THE CURRENT SITUATION, THAT CAN WORK JUST AS WELL AS THE ORDER OUTLINED ABOVE. I WILL LEAVE IT UP TO YOU AS THE WRITER TO ESTABLISH WHICH ORDER WORKS MOST EFFECTIVELY. V. Counterargument/Conditions of Rebuttal and Rebuttal: There will be those who disagree with you so you will want to acknowledge their points of view. What are their assumptions about this topic? What questions do they raise for consideration? Acknowledging other points of view gives your essay credibility and shows that you have been fair and broad in your inquiry and presentation. (You will need at least one credible source to represent at least one counterargument.) Then explain how you have considered this counterargument, but still find your own analysis to be more logical and accurate; this is your rebuttal. VI. Conclusion: Summarize the meaningful conclusions you have drawn clearly and precisely, remembering to resummarize your thesis. Give your specific proposal here as well. This will become your transition paragraph between the causal analysis and the proposal, so you must state your proposal precisely to pave the way for the proposal argument in full to come. Keep in mind these critical thinking outcomes: • Pursue the best information via reliable research (no Internet web sites should be used—Use the library electronic databases, such as ____, for academic research. • Engage in broad and deep inquiry • Analyze different points of view • Examine and challenge your own underlying assumptions as you undergo this exciting journey in scholarship. Please also reflect on these questions as you progress through your research and project work: About yourself: • What assumptions (beliefs) did you have about this topic coming into the project? • Have some of those assumptions been challenged? Have some been validated? • What questions do you still have about your issue? • What questions have you been able to answer through your research? About your audience: • What questions might your audience have about your topic? What points of view do they represent? • What information do you want to provide to help answer those questions? • How can you address a diverse audience so that its members will be moved to see your own point of view as significant and worth consideration? • How has pursuing the best information in a fair and honest, ethical, and logical manner allowed you to show respect for your audience as well as yourself as a thinker? Documentation Style: MLA format for paper format, in-text citations, works cited page, and annotated bibliography format. Paper Length: 6-8 double-spaced pages. Annotated Bibliography: At least 4 sources, formatted in MLA style. List of Sources Page: At least 5-8 sources used; formatted in MLA style. Warning: Plagiarism is punishable with an “F,” so be sure to document your research carefully. Causal Analysis Topics Choose one: • Causes of bullying • Causes of gun violence in schools • Causes of obesity in children • Causes of lying / Reasons why people lie • Causes of the fear of darkness Write in the 3rd-person point of view (using pronouns such as he, she, they, etc.). Do not write in the 1st- person (I, me, etc.) or 2nd-person (you, your) point of view.

CAUSAL ANALYSIS GUIDELINES: According to John J. Ruskiewicz and Jay T. Dolmage, “We all analyze and explain things daily. Someone asks, ‘Why?’ We reply, ‘Because . . .’ and then offer reasons and rationales” (138). This type of thinking is at the core of the causal analysis. You will write a causal analysis which explores, through carefully examined research and logical analysis, certain causes or factors which contribute to an issue or problematic situation, based on the topic you choose to write on. Your causal analysis should explore more than one type of cause, such as necessary causes, sufficient causes, precipitating causes, proximate causes, remote causes, reciprocal causes, contributing factors, and chains of causes, as outlined in our course text in the chapter devoted to Causal Analyses. Your project should also reflect significant critical thinking skills. In addition to the actual causal analysis essay, you will be also create an annotated bibliography. These process elements will help you organize and focus your ideas and research in a beneficial way. The following is an organizational structure that outlines the chronology and content of your Causal Analysis: I. Introduction: In one (or at the most two) paragraph(s) introduce your topic. Give a brief overview of your topic and thesis in a few sentences. your evaluative claim and your causal claim. It should be specific, logical, and clear. II. History/Background to Current Situation: This section should take as much space as needed—a few to several paragraphs. Discuss the significant and relevant history of your topic up to the current situation and how it came to be. Use research as needed to give precise and accurate background for context in making your later causal argument. Comment on your research as well, so that you don’t lose your voice. As you explore other points of view, your own point of view will evolve in significant ways. III. Evaluative Claim: Once you have given a brief history/background of the current situation, evaluate the situation, the topic, as it is at present. Again, use research as appropriate to support your judgments. While this section of your essay could run anywhere from one to three paragraphs, typically one paragraph is the norm, as you are basically passing judgment on the situation, arguing evaluatively. This is an argument of pathos and logos, predominantly. IV. Causal Argument: This is the longest portion of your essay, the “meat,” the heart of your work. Once you have detailed the history/background to current situation and evaluated the current situation, you are ready to present your causal analysis. Demonstrate a link between the current situation and the causes for its negative condition. Of course, you will use current significant and relevant research to support your causal claim, and you will want to find the most dominant and pervasive logical causes, utilizing research, for the current situation as possible. These will connect forward as well to your proposal. Remember to use specific supporting detail/examples, and to analyze all of your research causally, thoroughly, and with clarity. NOTE: SECTIONS THREE AND FOUR ABOVE ARE INTERCHANGEABLE. IN OTHER WORDS, IF YOU FEEL YOU CAN PRESENT A BETTER ARGUMENT BY SHOWING CAUSES FIRST AND THEN EVALUATING THE CURRENT SITUATION, THAT CAN WORK JUST AS WELL AS THE ORDER OUTLINED ABOVE. I WILL LEAVE IT UP TO YOU AS THE WRITER TO ESTABLISH WHICH ORDER WORKS MOST EFFECTIVELY. V. Counterargument/Conditions of Rebuttal and Rebuttal: There will be those who disagree with you so you will want to acknowledge their points of view. What are their assumptions about this topic? What questions do they raise for consideration? Acknowledging other points of view gives your essay credibility and shows that you have been fair and broad in your inquiry and presentation. (You will need at least one credible source to represent at least one counterargument.) Then explain how you have considered this counterargument, but still find your own analysis to be more logical and accurate; this is your rebuttal. VI. Conclusion: Summarize the meaningful conclusions you have drawn clearly and precisely, remembering to resummarize your thesis. Give your specific proposal here as well. This will become your transition paragraph between the causal analysis and the proposal, so you must state your proposal precisely to pave the way for the proposal argument in full to come. Keep in mind these critical thinking outcomes: • Pursue the best information via reliable research (no Internet web sites should be used—Use the library electronic databases, such as ____, for academic research. • Engage in broad and deep inquiry • Analyze different points of view • Examine and challenge your own underlying assumptions as you undergo this exciting journey in scholarship. Please also reflect on these questions as you progress through your research and project work: About yourself: • What assumptions (beliefs) did you have about this topic coming into the project? • Have some of those assumptions been challenged? Have some been validated? • What questions do you still have about your issue? • What questions have you been able to answer through your research? About your audience: • What questions might your audience have about your topic? What points of view do they represent? • What information do you want to provide to help answer those questions? • How can you address a diverse audience so that its members will be moved to see your own point of view as significant and worth consideration? • How has pursuing the best information in a fair and honest, ethical, and logical manner allowed you to show respect for your audience as well as yourself as a thinker? Documentation Style: MLA format for paper format, in-text citations, works cited page, and annotated bibliography format. Paper Length: 6-8 double-spaced pages. Annotated Bibliography: At least 4 sources, formatted in MLA style. List of Sources Page: At least 5-8 sources used; formatted in MLA style. Warning: Plagiarism is punishable with an “F,” so be sure to document your research carefully. Causal Analysis Topics Choose one: • Causes of bullying • Causes of gun violence in schools • Causes of obesity in children • Causes of lying / Reasons why people lie • Causes of the fear of darkness Write in the 3rd-person point of view (using pronouns such as he, she, they, etc.). Do not write in the 1st- person (I, me, etc.) or 2nd-person (you, your) point of view.

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Prompt for Essay 2: Argumentative on Drama Write a strongly persuasive essay on one of the following: 1. In Trifles, once the women have pieced together the clues and solved the mystery of Mr. Wright’s death, they quickly come to an agreement to suppress the information from the men who are investigating the murder. Construct an argument in which you identify whether the women were right to withhold their discovery from the investigators or not. 2. In August Wilson’s Fences, are Troy’s problems self-created or is he a victim of his past? Make a convincing argument on this issue. 3. Oedipus downfall in Oedipus the King: fate, freewill or influence of others Take Note as you write all the essays: If you craft your thesis well, it will contain a set of key words, phrases, and ideas which should then show up in key places/transitions throughout your paper. This stylistic and structural practice builds coherence and clarity in your essay. Sub-claims (Reasons) & Evidence (Textual Evidence): Your thesis/main claim statement must be supported by clearly organized evidence drawn primarily from the text of the story itself. Your argument, then, will be arranged with a main claim/thesis, sub-claims (reasons), and textual evidence. Take care to note that your textual evidence (quoted, paraphrased or summarized bits from the story) is not self-evident; it requires explanatory comment preceding it—to direct readers to what specifically in the evidence illustrates your sub-claim and main claim—and often following it for full elaboration and/or recapitulation. • Review the section in A Writer’s Reference on the MLA and Plagiarism • Use Writing Resources in the Course documents tab. MLA Style: Please follow MLA guidelines in formatting, mechanics and stylistics. Papers that do not follow MLA style will not be graded. I advise you look at the sample MLA papers in your textbooks You do not need any secondary source citations or research to support your analysis, but you must cite the source for the story being analyzed and A Writer’s Reference.

Prompt for Essay 2: Argumentative on Drama Write a strongly persuasive essay on one of the following: 1. In Trifles, once the women have pieced together the clues and solved the mystery of Mr. Wright’s death, they quickly come to an agreement to suppress the information from the men who are investigating the murder. Construct an argument in which you identify whether the women were right to withhold their discovery from the investigators or not. 2. In August Wilson’s Fences, are Troy’s problems self-created or is he a victim of his past? Make a convincing argument on this issue. 3. Oedipus downfall in Oedipus the King: fate, freewill or influence of others Take Note as you write all the essays: If you craft your thesis well, it will contain a set of key words, phrases, and ideas which should then show up in key places/transitions throughout your paper. This stylistic and structural practice builds coherence and clarity in your essay. Sub-claims (Reasons) & Evidence (Textual Evidence): Your thesis/main claim statement must be supported by clearly organized evidence drawn primarily from the text of the story itself. Your argument, then, will be arranged with a main claim/thesis, sub-claims (reasons), and textual evidence. Take care to note that your textual evidence (quoted, paraphrased or summarized bits from the story) is not self-evident; it requires explanatory comment preceding it—to direct readers to what specifically in the evidence illustrates your sub-claim and main claim—and often following it for full elaboration and/or recapitulation. • Review the section in A Writer’s Reference on the MLA and Plagiarism • Use Writing Resources in the Course documents tab. MLA Style: Please follow MLA guidelines in formatting, mechanics and stylistics. Papers that do not follow MLA style will not be graded. I advise you look at the sample MLA papers in your textbooks You do not need any secondary source citations or research to support your analysis, but you must cite the source for the story being analyzed and A Writer’s Reference.

Identify 3 frameworks used in information security

Identify 3 frameworks used in information security

Information security framework is a set of security framework model … Read More...
Social Conditions of Aboriginal People The issue topic is : Loss of languages, loss of elders, knowledge keepers What being done to address the issue (Local, regional, national example Location of Canada

Social Conditions of Aboriginal People The issue topic is : Loss of languages, loss of elders, knowledge keepers What being done to address the issue (Local, regional, national example Location of Canada

For any additional help, please contact: info@checkyourstudy.com Call and Whatsapp … Read More...
1 15325 Pre-work assignment Preparing your conflict scenario (four copies of your scenario must be brought to the workshop) Dear Participant, This letter introduces some pre-course work that is essential for you to complete before arriving at the workshop for the subject Negotiations and Conflict Management: 15325 – in which you are enrolled. The workshop will combine theory and practice in a manner intended to use the wisdom in the room to bring together our thinking about enacting the practices you will learn about. You will bring with you a scenario to work through during the workshop. This letter explains how to write that. 1 The situation (you can give it a title if that helps to frame it for you) Your first task is to identify a situation that is (or in your opinion is) unresolved and has potential to escalate into a matter causing stress, tension, delay or confusion. This may be something at work or in a context where you have the power to take action. You will use fictional names and disguise other facts to ensure confidentiality, but it is essential that this is a real situation – not a hypothetical or fictional one. 2 The Details To enable others to understand the context you will need to describe the following – A The people. Describe each person using the following items – Name – Use a fictional name for each person and do not include more than four others apart from yourself. You can use your own name if you wish or also disguise that as well. General facts about each person – gender, age range, role title, marital status (if relevant) work/life location (if other than yours) Personal characteristics – select at least 5 key words/phrases chosen from the list at the end of this letter Relationship to others in the scenario – boss, subordinate, peer, family member, relative etc. B The context. Type of business or other relevant information to provide a general setting for the moment you will use to describe the unresolved issue. C The event (moment in time). This can be at least partly imagined in that you will need to summarise a lot of information and it might be easier to do so if you write it as conversation even if that has not happened. 2 A sample example written in this way follows. This is a real scenario written by a person who will not be attending the workshop. It took 40 minutes to write. That involved 10 minutes to collect thoughts, select words and frame the setting and then 30 minutes to put it into the words you are reading. The advice is to allow yourself at least this amount of time and also to find a quiet space and time to write your scenario. Example Case Study Title – Where is that space? Setting – a Sydney residential street, in a smallish inner city suburb. There is a main road at one end of the street and a large schoolyard at the other end. At the corner of the street and the main road is a temporary church site whose owners are seeking to extend and develop the site. On the opposite corner is a second hand car yard with the imaginative title of “Junk your Jalopy” (JyJ). Aside from a block of six flats next to the home Eva has lived in for 12 years, all the other residences are single storey homes most built in the first two decades of the 20th century. Most residents have at least one car – often two. Umberto works at JyJ and may be a part owner. He doesn’t live nearby. On a recent occasion Eva, who is reasonably laid back but can be forgetful, was moved to anger by the presence, in the street outside her front door, of a very old and battered panel van that she knew did not belong to any of the residents. It has been there for nearly two weeks and meant that she was parking her car out of sight in a side lane, on land owned by the church. This is not official parking for the street and is often blocked off by the church. Walking to the corner one morning she saw Umberto taking photos of a motorbike and went to raise the issue of the van with him. He is not particularly interested in others’ concerns about the lack of parking and merely wants to make a success of the business. If that means parking extra cars in the street and annoying a few residents he’s opportunistic enough to do so without compunction. Although she is usually fearful of conflict Eva was determined to do something to try and put a stop to JYJ’s habit of parking cars illegally in the residential area. She opened the conversation by asking if Umberto knew anything about the van. He denied all knowledge of it and became quite aggressive (or at least it seemed that way to Eva) about the matter of cars in the street, denying that any were from JyJ, suggesting she talk to the owners of the spare parts yard facing the main road. As Eva tried to ask him to consider the needs and rights of residents, Umberto became ever more inflexible disregarding her issue and suggesting she leave his premises. Although she is quite creative, and has worked for 30 years in a variety of roles Eva is not always able to speak her mind easily, and his denials were not helping. He even began whinging about having to ‘cop the s—t’ for the spare parts yard but resisted the idea of marking his cars so residents could see those parked illegally were not his. 3 As she walked away Eva heard herself say “well if you do nothing about it, then you’ll have to continue copping the s—t, and I hope it hurts”, realising as she did so that she would not be any better off for her efforts. When she got home that night the van was gone – but a different one had arrived within four days. The issue is unresolved. Words to describe the people in your scenario accurate inquisitive empire building adaptable knowledgeable erratic analytical logical fearful of conflict broad in outlook loyal forgetful calm & confident observant frightened of failure caring opportunistic fussy challenging original impatient clever outgoing impulsive competitive outspoken indecisive conscientious perfectionist inflexible conscious of priorities persistent insular consultative persuasive laid back 4 co-operative practical manipulative creative professionally dedicated not interested in others diplomatic Marking Criteria for the Case Study How to get the maximum marks for the case study! For 10 marks – the case study – Accurately uses more than the required number of suggested words to describe the people in the scenario. That is the words used to describe the people are descriptive and placed appropriately to ensure a reader is able to create an informative word picture of each person. The sequence of events is presented in a manner that ensures the current situation, and possible consequences of any future actions, are easily understood by a reader not familiar with the context. Includes enough information to ensure that a stranger does not need to ask additional questions to affirm understanding of the situation as described in the case study. For 8 – 9 marks – the case study – Uses the set minimum number of words. The words are used correctly. The sequence is reasonably ordered, but readers find they need to ask one or two questions about the actual context, order of events. There is less that a sufficient amount of information to ensure that a stranger will quickly understand the nature of issues that remain unresolved. For 5 – 7 – the case study – Uses the set minimum number of words. Not all words are used appropriately in the context, but a stranger is able to gain an impression of the people. The sequence of events – as presented in the case study text – needs some re-ordering in response to questions from other readers to enable them to understand the issues. Strangers will need to seek additional information before they feel able to understand the issue and/or the context. For F = less than 5 – the case study – Uses fewer than the set minimum number of words. They do not add to the information about the people. 5 The sequence of events is unclear and does not represent the issue/s in a manner that can be understood by a stranger. A good deal of additional information is required before a stranger can understand the nature of the issues and context.

1 15325 Pre-work assignment Preparing your conflict scenario (four copies of your scenario must be brought to the workshop) Dear Participant, This letter introduces some pre-course work that is essential for you to complete before arriving at the workshop for the subject Negotiations and Conflict Management: 15325 – in which you are enrolled. The workshop will combine theory and practice in a manner intended to use the wisdom in the room to bring together our thinking about enacting the practices you will learn about. You will bring with you a scenario to work through during the workshop. This letter explains how to write that. 1 The situation (you can give it a title if that helps to frame it for you) Your first task is to identify a situation that is (or in your opinion is) unresolved and has potential to escalate into a matter causing stress, tension, delay or confusion. This may be something at work or in a context where you have the power to take action. You will use fictional names and disguise other facts to ensure confidentiality, but it is essential that this is a real situation – not a hypothetical or fictional one. 2 The Details To enable others to understand the context you will need to describe the following – A The people. Describe each person using the following items – Name – Use a fictional name for each person and do not include more than four others apart from yourself. You can use your own name if you wish or also disguise that as well. General facts about each person – gender, age range, role title, marital status (if relevant) work/life location (if other than yours) Personal characteristics – select at least 5 key words/phrases chosen from the list at the end of this letter Relationship to others in the scenario – boss, subordinate, peer, family member, relative etc. B The context. Type of business or other relevant information to provide a general setting for the moment you will use to describe the unresolved issue. C The event (moment in time). This can be at least partly imagined in that you will need to summarise a lot of information and it might be easier to do so if you write it as conversation even if that has not happened. 2 A sample example written in this way follows. This is a real scenario written by a person who will not be attending the workshop. It took 40 minutes to write. That involved 10 minutes to collect thoughts, select words and frame the setting and then 30 minutes to put it into the words you are reading. The advice is to allow yourself at least this amount of time and also to find a quiet space and time to write your scenario. Example Case Study Title – Where is that space? Setting – a Sydney residential street, in a smallish inner city suburb. There is a main road at one end of the street and a large schoolyard at the other end. At the corner of the street and the main road is a temporary church site whose owners are seeking to extend and develop the site. On the opposite corner is a second hand car yard with the imaginative title of “Junk your Jalopy” (JyJ). Aside from a block of six flats next to the home Eva has lived in for 12 years, all the other residences are single storey homes most built in the first two decades of the 20th century. Most residents have at least one car – often two. Umberto works at JyJ and may be a part owner. He doesn’t live nearby. On a recent occasion Eva, who is reasonably laid back but can be forgetful, was moved to anger by the presence, in the street outside her front door, of a very old and battered panel van that she knew did not belong to any of the residents. It has been there for nearly two weeks and meant that she was parking her car out of sight in a side lane, on land owned by the church. This is not official parking for the street and is often blocked off by the church. Walking to the corner one morning she saw Umberto taking photos of a motorbike and went to raise the issue of the van with him. He is not particularly interested in others’ concerns about the lack of parking and merely wants to make a success of the business. If that means parking extra cars in the street and annoying a few residents he’s opportunistic enough to do so without compunction. Although she is usually fearful of conflict Eva was determined to do something to try and put a stop to JYJ’s habit of parking cars illegally in the residential area. She opened the conversation by asking if Umberto knew anything about the van. He denied all knowledge of it and became quite aggressive (or at least it seemed that way to Eva) about the matter of cars in the street, denying that any were from JyJ, suggesting she talk to the owners of the spare parts yard facing the main road. As Eva tried to ask him to consider the needs and rights of residents, Umberto became ever more inflexible disregarding her issue and suggesting she leave his premises. Although she is quite creative, and has worked for 30 years in a variety of roles Eva is not always able to speak her mind easily, and his denials were not helping. He even began whinging about having to ‘cop the s—t’ for the spare parts yard but resisted the idea of marking his cars so residents could see those parked illegally were not his. 3 As she walked away Eva heard herself say “well if you do nothing about it, then you’ll have to continue copping the s—t, and I hope it hurts”, realising as she did so that she would not be any better off for her efforts. When she got home that night the van was gone – but a different one had arrived within four days. The issue is unresolved. Words to describe the people in your scenario accurate inquisitive empire building adaptable knowledgeable erratic analytical logical fearful of conflict broad in outlook loyal forgetful calm & confident observant frightened of failure caring opportunistic fussy challenging original impatient clever outgoing impulsive competitive outspoken indecisive conscientious perfectionist inflexible conscious of priorities persistent insular consultative persuasive laid back 4 co-operative practical manipulative creative professionally dedicated not interested in others diplomatic Marking Criteria for the Case Study How to get the maximum marks for the case study! For 10 marks – the case study – Accurately uses more than the required number of suggested words to describe the people in the scenario. That is the words used to describe the people are descriptive and placed appropriately to ensure a reader is able to create an informative word picture of each person. The sequence of events is presented in a manner that ensures the current situation, and possible consequences of any future actions, are easily understood by a reader not familiar with the context. Includes enough information to ensure that a stranger does not need to ask additional questions to affirm understanding of the situation as described in the case study. For 8 – 9 marks – the case study – Uses the set minimum number of words. The words are used correctly. The sequence is reasonably ordered, but readers find they need to ask one or two questions about the actual context, order of events. There is less that a sufficient amount of information to ensure that a stranger will quickly understand the nature of issues that remain unresolved. For 5 – 7 – the case study – Uses the set minimum number of words. Not all words are used appropriately in the context, but a stranger is able to gain an impression of the people. The sequence of events – as presented in the case study text – needs some re-ordering in response to questions from other readers to enable them to understand the issues. Strangers will need to seek additional information before they feel able to understand the issue and/or the context. For F = less than 5 – the case study – Uses fewer than the set minimum number of words. They do not add to the information about the people. 5 The sequence of events is unclear and does not represent the issue/s in a manner that can be understood by a stranger. A good deal of additional information is required before a stranger can understand the nature of the issues and context.

(Conflict scenario) Title – Who steal the gold?   Setting: … Read More...
AUCS 340: Ethics in the Profession Written Video Presentation Response Paper As a component of this course you will have the opportunity to view the movie “My Sister’s Keeper” (2009) starring Cameron Diaz, Jason Patric and Abigail Breslin. This movie is an adaptation of the book of the same title written by Jodi Picoult. Your answers are to be based on the movie adaptation of the book. While this movie offers a profound family story it also reflects upon issues related to current technological advancements in medicine and it will also offer you the opportunity to identify and respond to some of ethical issues represented in the movie. After viewing this movie, respond to the following questions. Your answers should be insightful and reflective of the topics researched for class, in regards to the ethical treatment to be afforded all citizens. 1. Identify at least two ethical issues/situations portrayed in the movie. These issues must be separate from the issue of stem cell research which will be addressed in questions later in this assignment. 2. Discuss a solution or solutions to each of the ethical issues that you identified in question number one. If multiple solutions are offered, identify your solutions as to first preference, second preference and so on until concluded. 3. Are your solutions feasible? What cost would it take to implement your solutions: taxes, wholesale system changes, society as a whole? 4. This movie incorporates the topic of stem cell usage for the treatment of medical conditions. Discuss the difference between the acquisition of fetal stem cells and adult stem cells. List ethical arguments both for and against the concept of expanding stem cell research to have a more active role in the development of treatment options for patients. 5. List at least five medical conditions that have the potential to be treated with stem cells. 6. Discuss the attitude of former President George W. Bush and current President Barack Obama in their philosophical approach to the issue of stem cell research. (Do they accept or reject the idea of stem cell research? Is there legislation that supports their views?) 7. From your previous assignment on the administration of healthcare in the United States you should have a general view of some of the problems facing the distribution of healthcare services in the United States. Research the changes to the health care system as proposed by President Barack Obama, and passed into legislation as the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, and outline/list these changes for healthcare reform in the United States. What are the financial implications of this plan? What portions of this plan do you find feasible to solving the problem of inadequate healthcare coverage for all Americans? What portions of this plan do you find unacceptable? 8. Overall, do you feel that these proposed changes will benefit or cause harm to the distribution of healthcare in the United States? Explain the rationale behind your answer. 9. Discuss problems in implication of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) that have occurred since October 2013. Have theses issues been resolved? 10. To date, how many people have been enrolled in the Affordable Care Act? Is this number above expectations, below expectations or at the level of expectation for enrollment at this point in time? 11. How will future enrollment in Medicaid be affected by the passage of the Affordable Care Act? This assignment is due on the date posted in the syllabus. Grading: Content of responses: thought provoking, rationale defended = 70% of grade Correct use of sentence structure, grammar and spelling, stapled for presentation = 20% of grade Appropriate use of citations and references = 10% of grade (No www.Wikipedia.com) It is expected that the length of the computer generated responses to these questions will be presented in at least three – four pages of text. Use 12 font and double spacing for your responses. Format: you may either respond to the questions as a running essay or use the questions as a header for each individual answer.

AUCS 340: Ethics in the Profession Written Video Presentation Response Paper As a component of this course you will have the opportunity to view the movie “My Sister’s Keeper” (2009) starring Cameron Diaz, Jason Patric and Abigail Breslin. This movie is an adaptation of the book of the same title written by Jodi Picoult. Your answers are to be based on the movie adaptation of the book. While this movie offers a profound family story it also reflects upon issues related to current technological advancements in medicine and it will also offer you the opportunity to identify and respond to some of ethical issues represented in the movie. After viewing this movie, respond to the following questions. Your answers should be insightful and reflective of the topics researched for class, in regards to the ethical treatment to be afforded all citizens. 1. Identify at least two ethical issues/situations portrayed in the movie. These issues must be separate from the issue of stem cell research which will be addressed in questions later in this assignment. 2. Discuss a solution or solutions to each of the ethical issues that you identified in question number one. If multiple solutions are offered, identify your solutions as to first preference, second preference and so on until concluded. 3. Are your solutions feasible? What cost would it take to implement your solutions: taxes, wholesale system changes, society as a whole? 4. This movie incorporates the topic of stem cell usage for the treatment of medical conditions. Discuss the difference between the acquisition of fetal stem cells and adult stem cells. List ethical arguments both for and against the concept of expanding stem cell research to have a more active role in the development of treatment options for patients. 5. List at least five medical conditions that have the potential to be treated with stem cells. 6. Discuss the attitude of former President George W. Bush and current President Barack Obama in their philosophical approach to the issue of stem cell research. (Do they accept or reject the idea of stem cell research? Is there legislation that supports their views?) 7. From your previous assignment on the administration of healthcare in the United States you should have a general view of some of the problems facing the distribution of healthcare services in the United States. Research the changes to the health care system as proposed by President Barack Obama, and passed into legislation as the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, and outline/list these changes for healthcare reform in the United States. What are the financial implications of this plan? What portions of this plan do you find feasible to solving the problem of inadequate healthcare coverage for all Americans? What portions of this plan do you find unacceptable? 8. Overall, do you feel that these proposed changes will benefit or cause harm to the distribution of healthcare in the United States? Explain the rationale behind your answer. 9. Discuss problems in implication of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) that have occurred since October 2013. Have theses issues been resolved? 10. To date, how many people have been enrolled in the Affordable Care Act? Is this number above expectations, below expectations or at the level of expectation for enrollment at this point in time? 11. How will future enrollment in Medicaid be affected by the passage of the Affordable Care Act? This assignment is due on the date posted in the syllabus. Grading: Content of responses: thought provoking, rationale defended = 70% of grade Correct use of sentence structure, grammar and spelling, stapled for presentation = 20% of grade Appropriate use of citations and references = 10% of grade (No www.Wikipedia.com) It is expected that the length of the computer generated responses to these questions will be presented in at least three – four pages of text. Use 12 font and double spacing for your responses. Format: you may either respond to the questions as a running essay or use the questions as a header for each individual answer.

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Objective: Persuade readers that they should fear a threat of your choosing, real or fabricated. Due Date: Wednesday, November 18th Length: 4-5 pages Format: typed, double-spaced, standard font and margins For this essay, you will be putting together all the aspects of argument that we have been learning about over the last few weeks. You will be using those elements to convince your readers that some issue of your choosing is a threat to them. This issue can be a real threat that you believe people should actually be aware of, or it can be a threat that is not real but that you treat as real (whether it be a fictional/legendary threat or something that is perhaps a small threat but that you present as a big one). Your job is to convince your audience to take this threat seriously, and to do that, you will need to make use of emotional appeal (especially to fear—think back to essays one and two), logical appeal (partly use of details/facts/ evidence we discussed in essay four, but also through definition such as we worked on in essay three), and ethical appeal (your own credibility—think back to issues besides logic and evidence covered in essay four). You may choose to include outside sources if you wish, but you must cite them if you use them and indicate when you are using the words of the original source. We will discuss how to find and to cite them to prepare you to use them correctly. If writing about a fictional threat, you may wish to make up sources. If you do so, I leave it up to you whether you formally cite them (though you must do this if you are using real sources) or informally refer to them in a manner similar to what we saw in the articles we read for essay four. Turning in an essay in which significant portions are not written by you and/or without outside sources cited will result in an essay grade of zero (and not revisable for a higher grade). If you are unsure what to cite, let me know. For ideas, you may want to browse the website snopes.com. This site contains lists and research about many feasible topics for this essay. Try not to use Snopes itself as a source—most entries there contain a list of sources that would be more appropriate for you to utilize and credit in your research. You may also choose to write about a topic covered by one of the essay four articles—if you liked an issue but felt that the warning about it was not very credible, you can use this paper as an opportunity to write about that topic but in a believable, convincing way. Whatever you choose as your topic, by the end of it, you want your reader to believe that what you discuss is a real threat to them. Essay Five: Argument Paper/Warning Assignment Description English 101, Sections 26 & 30 Fall 2015 Skills We Will Cover In This Unit: • finding & citing sources • utilizing emotional, logical, and ethical appeal SCHEDULE GRADING Incomplete papers or papers that stray from the assigned topic/purpose will receive a D or F. C B A To earn at least a C, the paper should: • have a clearly established threat that it attempts to warn the reader about • cite any information obtained from outside sources • be written in such a way as it can be easily understood by the reader To earn a B, the paper should fulfill the criteria above, plus: • include at least one section intended to appeal to the reader’s emotions (especially fear) • include logical support in the form of evidence, details, or other forms of establishing logical reasoning • be organized well, which includes having a clear sense of structure and transitioning into new ideas • include only the information and discussion necessary to accomplish the purpose of the assignment • have only a few grammatical errors, and those should not interfere with understanding To earn an A, the paper should fulfill the criteria for a B paper, plus: • possess strong unity of ideas • skillfully utilize all three rhetorical appeals • make a convincing case that the threat is real • be nearly free of grammatical or wording problems FRI OCT 30 MON NOV 2 discuss “We Are Training Our Kids to Kill” (p. 481) WED NOV 4 discuss “How Bingeing Became the New College Sport” (p. 476) FRI NOV 6 Homecoming—no classes after noon, no Blackboard assignment MON NOV 9 Discuss “The Real Skinny” (p. 492) No class—Blackboard assignment: online scavenger hunt (opens Monday, due by 11:59pm on Sunday 11/1) WED NOV 11 FRI NOV 13 No class—Blackboard assignment: essay five peer review. Post your draft by noon Friday, respond to two classmates’ by 11:59pm on Monday 11/16. You may wish to review skills from previous assignments as you work on this essay: • essay one: telling a story, creating an emotional response • essay two: how to create emotional response, utilizing evidence • essay three: defining important terms, using logic • essay four: establishing character and credibility WED OCT 28 Discuss “Our Unhealthy Obsession with Sickness (p. 469) MON OCT 26 Essay Four Due; Essay Five Assigned; meet in 70-122 MON NOV 16 No class—Dr. Hill at BTW Symposium (you can attend, too!) Meet in 70-122 for research time and citing instruction MON NOV 18 Essay five due; final portfolio assigned

Objective: Persuade readers that they should fear a threat of your choosing, real or fabricated. Due Date: Wednesday, November 18th Length: 4-5 pages Format: typed, double-spaced, standard font and margins For this essay, you will be putting together all the aspects of argument that we have been learning about over the last few weeks. You will be using those elements to convince your readers that some issue of your choosing is a threat to them. This issue can be a real threat that you believe people should actually be aware of, or it can be a threat that is not real but that you treat as real (whether it be a fictional/legendary threat or something that is perhaps a small threat but that you present as a big one). Your job is to convince your audience to take this threat seriously, and to do that, you will need to make use of emotional appeal (especially to fear—think back to essays one and two), logical appeal (partly use of details/facts/ evidence we discussed in essay four, but also through definition such as we worked on in essay three), and ethical appeal (your own credibility—think back to issues besides logic and evidence covered in essay four). You may choose to include outside sources if you wish, but you must cite them if you use them and indicate when you are using the words of the original source. We will discuss how to find and to cite them to prepare you to use them correctly. If writing about a fictional threat, you may wish to make up sources. If you do so, I leave it up to you whether you formally cite them (though you must do this if you are using real sources) or informally refer to them in a manner similar to what we saw in the articles we read for essay four. Turning in an essay in which significant portions are not written by you and/or without outside sources cited will result in an essay grade of zero (and not revisable for a higher grade). If you are unsure what to cite, let me know. For ideas, you may want to browse the website snopes.com. This site contains lists and research about many feasible topics for this essay. Try not to use Snopes itself as a source—most entries there contain a list of sources that would be more appropriate for you to utilize and credit in your research. You may also choose to write about a topic covered by one of the essay four articles—if you liked an issue but felt that the warning about it was not very credible, you can use this paper as an opportunity to write about that topic but in a believable, convincing way. Whatever you choose as your topic, by the end of it, you want your reader to believe that what you discuss is a real threat to them. Essay Five: Argument Paper/Warning Assignment Description English 101, Sections 26 & 30 Fall 2015 Skills We Will Cover In This Unit: • finding & citing sources • utilizing emotional, logical, and ethical appeal SCHEDULE GRADING Incomplete papers or papers that stray from the assigned topic/purpose will receive a D or F. C B A To earn at least a C, the paper should: • have a clearly established threat that it attempts to warn the reader about • cite any information obtained from outside sources • be written in such a way as it can be easily understood by the reader To earn a B, the paper should fulfill the criteria above, plus: • include at least one section intended to appeal to the reader’s emotions (especially fear) • include logical support in the form of evidence, details, or other forms of establishing logical reasoning • be organized well, which includes having a clear sense of structure and transitioning into new ideas • include only the information and discussion necessary to accomplish the purpose of the assignment • have only a few grammatical errors, and those should not interfere with understanding To earn an A, the paper should fulfill the criteria for a B paper, plus: • possess strong unity of ideas • skillfully utilize all three rhetorical appeals • make a convincing case that the threat is real • be nearly free of grammatical or wording problems FRI OCT 30 MON NOV 2 discuss “We Are Training Our Kids to Kill” (p. 481) WED NOV 4 discuss “How Bingeing Became the New College Sport” (p. 476) FRI NOV 6 Homecoming—no classes after noon, no Blackboard assignment MON NOV 9 Discuss “The Real Skinny” (p. 492) No class—Blackboard assignment: online scavenger hunt (opens Monday, due by 11:59pm on Sunday 11/1) WED NOV 11 FRI NOV 13 No class—Blackboard assignment: essay five peer review. Post your draft by noon Friday, respond to two classmates’ by 11:59pm on Monday 11/16. You may wish to review skills from previous assignments as you work on this essay: • essay one: telling a story, creating an emotional response • essay two: how to create emotional response, utilizing evidence • essay three: defining important terms, using logic • essay four: establishing character and credibility WED OCT 28 Discuss “Our Unhealthy Obsession with Sickness (p. 469) MON OCT 26 Essay Four Due; Essay Five Assigned; meet in 70-122 MON NOV 16 No class—Dr. Hill at BTW Symposium (you can attend, too!) Meet in 70-122 for research time and citing instruction MON NOV 18 Essay five due; final portfolio assigned

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. What are the chief claims of Epicurus about life and how to live it? What is his definition of the “pleasurable life”? What is the proper role and value of philosophy?

. What are the chief claims of Epicurus about life and how to live it? What is his definition of the “pleasurable life”? What is the proper role and value of philosophy?

Epicurus also differentiates in between actual and also psychological excitement … Read More...