Many people believe that choosing a job and choosing a career are the same. You know my position; I believe a JOB is Just over Broke. What is your position? Explain the differences between a job and a career.

Many people believe that choosing a job and choosing a career are the same. You know my position; I believe a JOB is Just over Broke. What is your position? Explain the differences between a job and a career.

A job is essentially one thing an individual do to … Read More...
Chapter 7 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, March 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy A Book on a Table A book weighing 5 N rests on top of a table. Part A A downward force of magnitude 5 N is exerted on the book by the force of ANSWER: Part B An upward force of magnitude _____ is exerted on the _____ by the table. the table gravity inertia . ANSWER: Part C Do the downward force in Part A and the upward force in Part B constitute a 3rd law pair? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D The reaction to the force in Part A is a force of magnitude _____, exerted on the _____ by the _____. Its direction is _____ . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: 6 N / table 5 N / table 5 N / book 6 N / book yes no Part E The reaction to the force in Part B is a force of magnitude _____, exerted on the _____ by the _____. Its direction is _____. ANSWER: Part F Which of Newton’s laws dictates that the forces in Parts A and B are equal and opposite? ANSWER: Part G Which of Newton’s laws dictates that the forces in Parts B and E are equal and opposite? ANSWER: 5 N / earth / book / upward 5 N / book / table / upward 5 N / book / earth / upward 5 N / earth / book / downward 5 N / table / book / upward 5 N / table / earth / upward 5 N / book / table / upward 5 N / table / book / downward 5 N / earth / book / downward Newton’s 1st or 2nd law Newton’s 3rd law Blocks in an Elevator Ranking Task Three blocks are stacked on top of each other inside an elevator as shown in the figure. Answer the following questions with reference to the eight forces defined as follows. the force of the 3 block on the 2 block, , the force of the 2 block on the 3 block, , the force of the 3 block on the 1 block, , the force of the 1 block on the 3 block, , the force of the 2 block on the 1 block, , the force of the 1 block on the 2 block, , the force of the 1 block on the floor, , and the force of the floor on the 1 block, . Part A Assume the elevator is at rest. Rank the magnitude of the forces. Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Newton’s 1st or 2nd law Newton’s 3rd law kg kg F3 on 2 kg kg F2 on 3 kg kg F3 on 1 kg kg F1 on 3 kg kg F2 on 1 kg kg F1 on 2 kg F1 on floor kg Ffloor on 1 Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Newton’s 3rd Law Discussed Learning Goal: To understand Newton’s 3rd law, which states that a physical interaction always generates a pair of forces on the two interacting bodies. In Principia, Newton wrote: To every action there is always opposed an equal reaction: or, the mutual actions of two bodies upon each other are always equal, and directed to contrary parts. (translation by Cajori) The phrase after the colon (often omitted from textbooks) makes it clear that this is a statement about the nature of force. The central idea is that physical interactions (e.g., due to gravity, bodies touching, or electric forces) cause forces to arise between pairs of bodies. Each pairwise interaction produces a pair of opposite forces, one acting on each body. In summary, each physical interaction between two bodies generates a pair of forces. Whatever the physical cause of the interaction, the force on body A from body B is equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to the force on body B from body A. Incidentally, Newton states that the word “action” denotes both (a) the force due to an interaction and (b) the changes in momentum that it imparts to the two interacting bodies. If you haven’t learned about momentum, don’t worry; for now this is just a statement about the origin of forces. Mark each of the following statements as true or false. If a statement refers to “two bodies” interacting via some force, you are not to assume that these two bodies have the same mass. Part A Every force has one and only one 3rd law pair force. ANSWER: Part B The two forces in each pair act in opposite directions. ANSWER: Part C The two forces in each pair can either both act on the same body or they can act on different bodies. ANSWER: true false true false Part D The two forces in each pair may have different physical origins (for instance, one of the forces could be due to gravity, and its pair force could be due to friction or electric charge). ANSWER: Part E The two forces of a 3rd law pair always act on different bodies. ANSWER: Part F Given that two bodies interact via some force, the accelerations of these two bodies have the same magnitude but opposite directions. (Assume no other forces act on either body.) You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: true false true false true false Part G According to Newton’s 3rd law, the force on the (smaller) moon due to the (larger) earth is ANSWER: Pulling Three Blocks Three identical blocks connected by ideal strings are being pulled along a horizontal frictionless surface by a horizontal force . The magnitude of the tension in the string between blocks B and C is = 3.00 . Assume that each block has mass = 0.400 . true false greater in magnitude and antiparallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. greater in magnitude and parallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. equal in magnitude but antiparallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. equal in magnitude and parallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. smaller in magnitude and antiparallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. smaller in magnitude and parallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. F T N m kg Part A What is the magnitude of the force? Express your answer numerically in newtons. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is the tension in the string between block A and block B? Express your answer numerically in newtons You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Pulling Two Blocks In the situation shown in the figure, a person is pulling with a constant, nonzero force on string 1, which is attached to block A. Block A is also attached to block B via string 2, as shown. For this problem, assume that neither string stretches and that friction is negligible. Both blocks have finite (nonzero) mass. F F = N TAB TAB = N F Part A Which one of the following statements correctly descibes the relationship between the accelerations of blocks A and B? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B How does the magnitude of the tension in string 1, , compare with the tension in string 2, ? You did not open hints for this part. Block A has a larger acceleration than block B. Block B has a larger acceleration than block A. Both blocks have the same acceleration. More information is needed to determine the relationship between the accelerations. T1 T2 ANSWER: Tension in a Massless Rope Learning Goal: To understand the concept of tension and the relationship between tension and force. This problem introduces the concept of tension. The example is a rope, oriented vertically, that is being pulled from both ends. Let and (with u for up and d for down) represent the magnitude of the forces acting on the top and bottom of the rope, respectively. Assume that the rope is massless, so that its weight is negligible compared with the tension. (This is not a ridiculous approximation–modern rope materials such as Kevlar can carry tensions thousands of times greater than the weight of tens of meters of such rope.) Consider the three sections of rope labeled a, b, and c in the figure. At point 1, a downward force of magnitude acts on section a. At point 1, an upward force of magnitude acts on section b. At point 1, the tension in the rope is . At point 2, a downward force of magnitude acts on section b. At point 2, an upward force of magnitude acts on section c. At point 2, the tension in the rope is . Assume, too, that the rope is at equilibrium. Part A What is the magnitude of the downward force on section a? Express your answer in terms of the tension . ANSWER: More information is needed to determine the relationship between and . T1 > T2 T1 = T2 T1 < T2 T1 T2 Fu Fd Fad Fbu T1 Fbd Fcu T2 Fad T1 Part B What is the magnitude of the upward force on section b? Express your answer in terms of the tension . ANSWER: Part C The magnitude of the upward force on c, , and the magnitude of the downward force on b, , are equal because of which of Newton's laws? ANSWER: Part D The magnitude of the force is ____ . ANSWER: Fad = Fbu T1 Fbu = Fcu Fbd 1st 2nd 3rd Fbu Fbd Part E Now consider the forces on the ends of the rope. What is the relationship between the magnitudes of these two forces? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part F The ends of a massless rope are attached to two stationary objects (e.g., two trees or two cars) so that the rope makes a straight line. For this situation, which of the following statements are true? Check all that apply. ANSWER: less than greater than equal to Fu > Fd Fu = Fd Fu < Fd The tension in the rope is everywhere the same. The magnitudes of the forces exerted on the two objects by the rope are the same. The forces exerted on the two objects by the rope must be in opposite directions. The forces exerted on the two objects by the rope must be in the direction of the rope. Two Hanging Masses Two blocks with masses and hang one under the other. For this problem, take the positive direction to be upward, and use for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. Case 1: Blocks at rest For Parts A and B assume the blocks are at rest. Part A Find , the tension in the lower rope. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: M1 M2 g T2 M1 M2 g Part B Find , the tension in the upper rope. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Case 2: Accelerating blocks For Parts C and D the blocks are now accelerating upward (due to the tension in the strings) with acceleration of magnitude . Part C Find , the tension in the lower rope. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: T2 = T1 M1 M2 g T1 = a T2 M1 M2 a g Part D Find , the tension in the upper rope. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Video Tutor: Suspended Balls: Which String Breaks? First, launch the video below. You will be asked to use your knowledge of physics to predict the outcome of an experiment. Then, close the video window and answer the question at right. You can watch the video again at any point. T2 = T1 M1 M2 a g T1 = Part A A heavy crate is attached to the wall by a light rope, as shown in the figure. Another rope hangs off the opposite edge of the box. If you slowly increase the force on the free rope by pulling on it in a horizontal direction, which rope will break? Ignore friction and the mass of the ropes. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. The rope attached to the wall will break. The rope that you are pulling on will break. Both ropes are equally likely to break.

Chapter 7 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, March 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy A Book on a Table A book weighing 5 N rests on top of a table. Part A A downward force of magnitude 5 N is exerted on the book by the force of ANSWER: Part B An upward force of magnitude _____ is exerted on the _____ by the table. the table gravity inertia . ANSWER: Part C Do the downward force in Part A and the upward force in Part B constitute a 3rd law pair? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D The reaction to the force in Part A is a force of magnitude _____, exerted on the _____ by the _____. Its direction is _____ . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: 6 N / table 5 N / table 5 N / book 6 N / book yes no Part E The reaction to the force in Part B is a force of magnitude _____, exerted on the _____ by the _____. Its direction is _____. ANSWER: Part F Which of Newton’s laws dictates that the forces in Parts A and B are equal and opposite? ANSWER: Part G Which of Newton’s laws dictates that the forces in Parts B and E are equal and opposite? ANSWER: 5 N / earth / book / upward 5 N / book / table / upward 5 N / book / earth / upward 5 N / earth / book / downward 5 N / table / book / upward 5 N / table / earth / upward 5 N / book / table / upward 5 N / table / book / downward 5 N / earth / book / downward Newton’s 1st or 2nd law Newton’s 3rd law Blocks in an Elevator Ranking Task Three blocks are stacked on top of each other inside an elevator as shown in the figure. Answer the following questions with reference to the eight forces defined as follows. the force of the 3 block on the 2 block, , the force of the 2 block on the 3 block, , the force of the 3 block on the 1 block, , the force of the 1 block on the 3 block, , the force of the 2 block on the 1 block, , the force of the 1 block on the 2 block, , the force of the 1 block on the floor, , and the force of the floor on the 1 block, . Part A Assume the elevator is at rest. Rank the magnitude of the forces. Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Newton’s 1st or 2nd law Newton’s 3rd law kg kg F3 on 2 kg kg F2 on 3 kg kg F3 on 1 kg kg F1 on 3 kg kg F2 on 1 kg kg F1 on 2 kg F1 on floor kg Ffloor on 1 Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Newton’s 3rd Law Discussed Learning Goal: To understand Newton’s 3rd law, which states that a physical interaction always generates a pair of forces on the two interacting bodies. In Principia, Newton wrote: To every action there is always opposed an equal reaction: or, the mutual actions of two bodies upon each other are always equal, and directed to contrary parts. (translation by Cajori) The phrase after the colon (often omitted from textbooks) makes it clear that this is a statement about the nature of force. The central idea is that physical interactions (e.g., due to gravity, bodies touching, or electric forces) cause forces to arise between pairs of bodies. Each pairwise interaction produces a pair of opposite forces, one acting on each body. In summary, each physical interaction between two bodies generates a pair of forces. Whatever the physical cause of the interaction, the force on body A from body B is equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to the force on body B from body A. Incidentally, Newton states that the word “action” denotes both (a) the force due to an interaction and (b) the changes in momentum that it imparts to the two interacting bodies. If you haven’t learned about momentum, don’t worry; for now this is just a statement about the origin of forces. Mark each of the following statements as true or false. If a statement refers to “two bodies” interacting via some force, you are not to assume that these two bodies have the same mass. Part A Every force has one and only one 3rd law pair force. ANSWER: Part B The two forces in each pair act in opposite directions. ANSWER: Part C The two forces in each pair can either both act on the same body or they can act on different bodies. ANSWER: true false true false Part D The two forces in each pair may have different physical origins (for instance, one of the forces could be due to gravity, and its pair force could be due to friction or electric charge). ANSWER: Part E The two forces of a 3rd law pair always act on different bodies. ANSWER: Part F Given that two bodies interact via some force, the accelerations of these two bodies have the same magnitude but opposite directions. (Assume no other forces act on either body.) You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: true false true false true false Part G According to Newton’s 3rd law, the force on the (smaller) moon due to the (larger) earth is ANSWER: Pulling Three Blocks Three identical blocks connected by ideal strings are being pulled along a horizontal frictionless surface by a horizontal force . The magnitude of the tension in the string between blocks B and C is = 3.00 . Assume that each block has mass = 0.400 . true false greater in magnitude and antiparallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. greater in magnitude and parallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. equal in magnitude but antiparallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. equal in magnitude and parallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. smaller in magnitude and antiparallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. smaller in magnitude and parallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. F T N m kg Part A What is the magnitude of the force? Express your answer numerically in newtons. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is the tension in the string between block A and block B? Express your answer numerically in newtons You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Pulling Two Blocks In the situation shown in the figure, a person is pulling with a constant, nonzero force on string 1, which is attached to block A. Block A is also attached to block B via string 2, as shown. For this problem, assume that neither string stretches and that friction is negligible. Both blocks have finite (nonzero) mass. F F = N TAB TAB = N F Part A Which one of the following statements correctly descibes the relationship between the accelerations of blocks A and B? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B How does the magnitude of the tension in string 1, , compare with the tension in string 2, ? You did not open hints for this part. Block A has a larger acceleration than block B. Block B has a larger acceleration than block A. Both blocks have the same acceleration. More information is needed to determine the relationship between the accelerations. T1 T2 ANSWER: Tension in a Massless Rope Learning Goal: To understand the concept of tension and the relationship between tension and force. This problem introduces the concept of tension. The example is a rope, oriented vertically, that is being pulled from both ends. Let and (with u for up and d for down) represent the magnitude of the forces acting on the top and bottom of the rope, respectively. Assume that the rope is massless, so that its weight is negligible compared with the tension. (This is not a ridiculous approximation–modern rope materials such as Kevlar can carry tensions thousands of times greater than the weight of tens of meters of such rope.) Consider the three sections of rope labeled a, b, and c in the figure. At point 1, a downward force of magnitude acts on section a. At point 1, an upward force of magnitude acts on section b. At point 1, the tension in the rope is . At point 2, a downward force of magnitude acts on section b. At point 2, an upward force of magnitude acts on section c. At point 2, the tension in the rope is . Assume, too, that the rope is at equilibrium. Part A What is the magnitude of the downward force on section a? Express your answer in terms of the tension . ANSWER: More information is needed to determine the relationship between and . T1 > T2 T1 = T2 T1 < T2 T1 T2 Fu Fd Fad Fbu T1 Fbd Fcu T2 Fad T1 Part B What is the magnitude of the upward force on section b? Express your answer in terms of the tension . ANSWER: Part C The magnitude of the upward force on c, , and the magnitude of the downward force on b, , are equal because of which of Newton's laws? ANSWER: Part D The magnitude of the force is ____ . ANSWER: Fad = Fbu T1 Fbu = Fcu Fbd 1st 2nd 3rd Fbu Fbd Part E Now consider the forces on the ends of the rope. What is the relationship between the magnitudes of these two forces? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part F The ends of a massless rope are attached to two stationary objects (e.g., two trees or two cars) so that the rope makes a straight line. For this situation, which of the following statements are true? Check all that apply. ANSWER: less than greater than equal to Fu > Fd Fu = Fd Fu < Fd The tension in the rope is everywhere the same. The magnitudes of the forces exerted on the two objects by the rope are the same. The forces exerted on the two objects by the rope must be in opposite directions. The forces exerted on the two objects by the rope must be in the direction of the rope. Two Hanging Masses Two blocks with masses and hang one under the other. For this problem, take the positive direction to be upward, and use for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. Case 1: Blocks at rest For Parts A and B assume the blocks are at rest. Part A Find , the tension in the lower rope. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: M1 M2 g T2 M1 M2 g Part B Find , the tension in the upper rope. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Case 2: Accelerating blocks For Parts C and D the blocks are now accelerating upward (due to the tension in the strings) with acceleration of magnitude . Part C Find , the tension in the lower rope. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: T2 = T1 M1 M2 g T1 = a T2 M1 M2 a g Part D Find , the tension in the upper rope. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Video Tutor: Suspended Balls: Which String Breaks? First, launch the video below. You will be asked to use your knowledge of physics to predict the outcome of an experiment. Then, close the video window and answer the question at right. You can watch the video again at any point. T2 = T1 M1 M2 a g T1 = Part A A heavy crate is attached to the wall by a light rope, as shown in the figure. Another rope hangs off the opposite edge of the box. If you slowly increase the force on the free rope by pulling on it in a horizontal direction, which rope will break? Ignore friction and the mass of the ropes. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. The rope attached to the wall will break. The rope that you are pulling on will break. Both ropes are equally likely to break.

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Extra Credit Due: 11:59pm on Thursday, May 15, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy A Man Running to Catch a Bus A man is running at speed (much less than the speed of light) to catch a bus already at a stop. At , when he is a distance from the door to the bus, the bus starts moving with the positive acceleration . Use a coordinate system with at the door of the stopped bus. Part A What is , the position of the man as a function of time? Answer symbolically in terms of the variables , , and . Hint 1. Which equation should you use for the man’s speed? Because the man’s speed is constant, you may use . ANSWER: c t = 0 b a x = 0 xman(t) b c t x(t) = x(0) + vt xman(t) = −b + ct

Extra Credit Due: 11:59pm on Thursday, May 15, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy A Man Running to Catch a Bus A man is running at speed (much less than the speed of light) to catch a bus already at a stop. At , when he is a distance from the door to the bus, the bus starts moving with the positive acceleration . Use a coordinate system with at the door of the stopped bus. Part A What is , the position of the man as a function of time? Answer symbolically in terms of the variables , , and . Hint 1. Which equation should you use for the man’s speed? Because the man’s speed is constant, you may use . ANSWER: c t = 0 b a x = 0 xman(t) b c t x(t) = x(0) + vt xman(t) = −b + ct

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Chapter 06 Homework Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 23, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Concept Review: Species Interactions Can you identify the type of species interaction that each label describes? Part A Drag each description to the appropriate bin. ANSWER: Activity: Food Webs Click here to complete this activity. Then answer the questions. Part A In an ecosystem, phytoplankton are _____. ANSWER: Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 1 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Correct Autotrophs, such as phytoplankton, are producers. Part B An earthworm that feeds on the remains of plants and animals is acting as a _____. ANSWER: Correct The earthworm is feeding on the remains of dead organisms. Part C When a human eats a steak, the human is acting as a _____. ANSWER: Correct By feeding on a primary consumer, the human is acting as a secondary consumer. Part D A cow eating grass is an example of a _____. ANSWER: Correct By feeding on a producer, the cow is acting as a primary consumer. Part E primary consumers tertiary consumers detritivores producers secondary consumers tertiary consumer secondary consumer producer detritivore primary consumer primary consumer detritivore secondary consumer producer tertiary consumer detritivore producer tertiary consumer secondary consumer primary consumer Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 2 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM A seal that just ate a clam is eaten by a shark. The shark is acting as a _____. ANSWER: Correct The shark that ate the seal that ate the clam that ate the algae is the tertiary consumer. Activity: Pyramids of Production Click here to complete this activity. Then answer the questions. Part A _____ are secondary consumers. ANSWER: Correct Secondary consumers are animals that eat other animals; thus, they are carnivores. Part B Approximately _____% of the energy at one trophic level is passed on to the next highest trophic level. ANSWER: Correct Approximately 5–10% of the energy at one trophic level is passed on to the next highest trophic level. producer primary consumer tertiary consumer secondary consumer detritivore Producers Herbivores Plants Cows Carnivores 0–5 5–10 10–15 15–20 90–100 Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 3 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Part C 10,000 kcal of producer could support approximately _____ kcal of tertiary consumer. ANSWER: Correct This is the number of kcal of tertiary consumer that could be supported. Activity: Primary Succession Click here to complete this activity. Then answer the question. Part A Which of these is a starting point for primary succession? ANSWER: Correct Such a surface lacks any life and is thus a starting point for primary succession. Part B The first colonizing organisms during primary succession tend to be: ANSWER: 1,000 100 10 1 0 a surface exposed by a retreating glacier abandoned farmland an abandoned city a neglected yard none of these is a starting point for primary succession small shrubs trees lichens and mosses herbs Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 4 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Correct After the glacier retreats, bare ground is eventually colonized by lichens and mosses. Part C Which one of the following is a general characteristic of plants that are early colonizers during primary succession? ANSWER: Correct After the glacier retreats, bare ground is eventually colonized by lichens and mosses, then by deciduous trees with wind-borne seeds. Concept Review: Secondary Succession Can you order the steps of secondary succession? Part A Order the labels in the flowchart to complete the model of secondary succession as observed in a deciduous forest of eastern North America. ANSWER: Current Events: In Yellowstone, Killing One Kind of Trout to Save Another (New York Times, 8/23/2011) Read this New York Times article and then answer the questions. In Yellowstone, Killing One Kind of Trout to Save Another (8/23/2011) Registration with The New York Times provides instant access to breaking news on NYTimes.com. To register, go to http://www.nytimes.com/register. Visit http://www.nytimes.com/content/help/rights/terms/terms-of-service.html to review the current NYT Terms of Service. Part A Which of the following would be the best discovery regarding the Judas fish? ANSWER: plants are able to fix their own nitrogen plants can outcompete other plants that invade the area plants have wind-dispersed seeds plants are shade-tolerant Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 5 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Part B Which of the following is true? ANSWER: Part C Why is protecting cutthroat trout in Yellowstone so important? ANSWER: Part D Which of the following is true? ANSWER: Part E Why don’t bears in Yellowstone eat lake trout? ANSWER: Part F How did rainbow trout become established worldwide? ANSWER: Learning where lake trout feed. Learning where lake trout hibernate. Learning where lake trout spawn. Learning where lake trout migrate to during fall. Officials are working only in certain areas to eliminate lake trout. Officials are working to eliminate lake trout throughout Wyoming. Officials are working to eliminate lake trout throughout the Great Lakes. All states in the U.S. are working to eliminate lake trout. Because many other species depend on cutthroat trout. Because local people depend on cutthroat trout for food. Because Yellowstone is the only place cutthroat trout are found. Because cutthroat trout are listed as a threatened species. Cutthroat trout are to Yellowstone Lake as rainbow trout are to Yellowstone Lake. Cutthroat trout are to Yellowstone Lake as Asian carp are to the Great Lakes. Lake trout are to Yellowstone Lake as see lamprey are to the Great Lakes. Lake trout are to the Great Lakes as Asian carp are to the Yellowstone Lake. They don’t like the taste. They cannot find them. Lake trout skin is too tough. Lake trout are too small for bears to be interested. Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 6 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Current Events: In Thailand, Love of Food Carries Deadly Risks (New York Times, 4/25/2011) Read this New York Times article and then answer the questions. In Thailand, Love of Food Carries Deadly Risks (4/25/2011) Registration with The New York Times provides instant access to breaking news on NYTimes.com. To register, go to http://www.nytimes.com/register. Visit http://www.nytimes.com/content/help/rights/terms/terms-of-service.html to review the current NYT Terms of Service. Part A Rather than stop eating fish, what should Thai people do to eliminate the risk of liver fluke infection? ANSWER: Part B Liver flukes are transmitted through which of the following? ANSWER: Part C Getting rid of which of the following would help decrease the population of liver flukes? ANSWER: Part D Pla som is a unique dish because it is what? ANSWER: Part E Due to warming oceans caused by climate change. Natural process of migration. Accidental introduction via ships. Purposeful stocking. Consume ethyl alcohol while eating fish. Add more garlic. Cook it thoroughly. Pick the flukes out by hand. urine saliva feces blood rats mosquitoes frogs snails pickled frozen fermented blanched Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 7 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM You have liver flukes. What are your chances of getting liver cancer? ANSWER: Part F You are a scientist studying liver flukes in Thailand. Where should you look for them? ANSWER: ABC News Video: The Cuttlefish Watch the ABC News video (2:20 minutes). Then answer the questions below. Part A The changes to the cuttlefish’s skin are related to _______. ANSWER: Correct Part B Camouflage contributes to the cuttlefish’s survival by enabling it to _______. 1-5% 5-10% 10-15% 15-20% The northwestern part of the country. The southeastern part of the country. The southwestern part of the country. The northeastern part of the country. camouflage elimination of waste reproductive strategies feeding behavior Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 8 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM ANSWER: Correct Part C Cuttlefish placed in a sandy environment with white rocks will camouflage their skin in a pattern called _______. ANSWER: Correct Part D In the presence of a black-and-white striped background, a cuttlefish was observed to _______. ANSWER: Correct Part E Which question was raised but not answered in the video? ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 48.5%. You received 16 out of a possible total of 33 points. sneak up on prey mimic poisonous species hide from predators warn potential predators that it is poisonous universal camouflage disruptive camouflage warning coloration camouflage tide-pool camouflage move its arm to match the orientation of the stripes turn completely white and hide in the white stripe turn completely black and hide in the black stripe exhibit the exact striping pattern of its surroundings Why does the cuttlefish change its skin pattern? What happens when a cuttlefish is placed in an unnatural environment? Is the cuttlefish able to grow a protective shell? How do cuttlefish camouflage themselves even though they are colorblind? Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 9 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM

Chapter 06 Homework Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 23, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Concept Review: Species Interactions Can you identify the type of species interaction that each label describes? Part A Drag each description to the appropriate bin. ANSWER: Activity: Food Webs Click here to complete this activity. Then answer the questions. Part A In an ecosystem, phytoplankton are _____. ANSWER: Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 1 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Correct Autotrophs, such as phytoplankton, are producers. Part B An earthworm that feeds on the remains of plants and animals is acting as a _____. ANSWER: Correct The earthworm is feeding on the remains of dead organisms. Part C When a human eats a steak, the human is acting as a _____. ANSWER: Correct By feeding on a primary consumer, the human is acting as a secondary consumer. Part D A cow eating grass is an example of a _____. ANSWER: Correct By feeding on a producer, the cow is acting as a primary consumer. Part E primary consumers tertiary consumers detritivores producers secondary consumers tertiary consumer secondary consumer producer detritivore primary consumer primary consumer detritivore secondary consumer producer tertiary consumer detritivore producer tertiary consumer secondary consumer primary consumer Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 2 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM A seal that just ate a clam is eaten by a shark. The shark is acting as a _____. ANSWER: Correct The shark that ate the seal that ate the clam that ate the algae is the tertiary consumer. Activity: Pyramids of Production Click here to complete this activity. Then answer the questions. Part A _____ are secondary consumers. ANSWER: Correct Secondary consumers are animals that eat other animals; thus, they are carnivores. Part B Approximately _____% of the energy at one trophic level is passed on to the next highest trophic level. ANSWER: Correct Approximately 5–10% of the energy at one trophic level is passed on to the next highest trophic level. producer primary consumer tertiary consumer secondary consumer detritivore Producers Herbivores Plants Cows Carnivores 0–5 5–10 10–15 15–20 90–100 Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 3 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Part C 10,000 kcal of producer could support approximately _____ kcal of tertiary consumer. ANSWER: Correct This is the number of kcal of tertiary consumer that could be supported. Activity: Primary Succession Click here to complete this activity. Then answer the question. Part A Which of these is a starting point for primary succession? ANSWER: Correct Such a surface lacks any life and is thus a starting point for primary succession. Part B The first colonizing organisms during primary succession tend to be: ANSWER: 1,000 100 10 1 0 a surface exposed by a retreating glacier abandoned farmland an abandoned city a neglected yard none of these is a starting point for primary succession small shrubs trees lichens and mosses herbs Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 4 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Correct After the glacier retreats, bare ground is eventually colonized by lichens and mosses. Part C Which one of the following is a general characteristic of plants that are early colonizers during primary succession? ANSWER: Correct After the glacier retreats, bare ground is eventually colonized by lichens and mosses, then by deciduous trees with wind-borne seeds. Concept Review: Secondary Succession Can you order the steps of secondary succession? Part A Order the labels in the flowchart to complete the model of secondary succession as observed in a deciduous forest of eastern North America. ANSWER: Current Events: In Yellowstone, Killing One Kind of Trout to Save Another (New York Times, 8/23/2011) Read this New York Times article and then answer the questions. In Yellowstone, Killing One Kind of Trout to Save Another (8/23/2011) Registration with The New York Times provides instant access to breaking news on NYTimes.com. To register, go to http://www.nytimes.com/register. Visit http://www.nytimes.com/content/help/rights/terms/terms-of-service.html to review the current NYT Terms of Service. Part A Which of the following would be the best discovery regarding the Judas fish? ANSWER: plants are able to fix their own nitrogen plants can outcompete other plants that invade the area plants have wind-dispersed seeds plants are shade-tolerant Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 5 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Part B Which of the following is true? ANSWER: Part C Why is protecting cutthroat trout in Yellowstone so important? ANSWER: Part D Which of the following is true? ANSWER: Part E Why don’t bears in Yellowstone eat lake trout? ANSWER: Part F How did rainbow trout become established worldwide? ANSWER: Learning where lake trout feed. Learning where lake trout hibernate. Learning where lake trout spawn. Learning where lake trout migrate to during fall. Officials are working only in certain areas to eliminate lake trout. Officials are working to eliminate lake trout throughout Wyoming. Officials are working to eliminate lake trout throughout the Great Lakes. All states in the U.S. are working to eliminate lake trout. Because many other species depend on cutthroat trout. Because local people depend on cutthroat trout for food. Because Yellowstone is the only place cutthroat trout are found. Because cutthroat trout are listed as a threatened species. Cutthroat trout are to Yellowstone Lake as rainbow trout are to Yellowstone Lake. Cutthroat trout are to Yellowstone Lake as Asian carp are to the Great Lakes. Lake trout are to Yellowstone Lake as see lamprey are to the Great Lakes. Lake trout are to the Great Lakes as Asian carp are to the Yellowstone Lake. They don’t like the taste. They cannot find them. Lake trout skin is too tough. Lake trout are too small for bears to be interested. Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 6 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM Current Events: In Thailand, Love of Food Carries Deadly Risks (New York Times, 4/25/2011) Read this New York Times article and then answer the questions. In Thailand, Love of Food Carries Deadly Risks (4/25/2011) Registration with The New York Times provides instant access to breaking news on NYTimes.com. To register, go to http://www.nytimes.com/register. Visit http://www.nytimes.com/content/help/rights/terms/terms-of-service.html to review the current NYT Terms of Service. Part A Rather than stop eating fish, what should Thai people do to eliminate the risk of liver fluke infection? ANSWER: Part B Liver flukes are transmitted through which of the following? ANSWER: Part C Getting rid of which of the following would help decrease the population of liver flukes? ANSWER: Part D Pla som is a unique dish because it is what? ANSWER: Part E Due to warming oceans caused by climate change. Natural process of migration. Accidental introduction via ships. Purposeful stocking. Consume ethyl alcohol while eating fish. Add more garlic. Cook it thoroughly. Pick the flukes out by hand. urine saliva feces blood rats mosquitoes frogs snails pickled frozen fermented blanched Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 7 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM You have liver flukes. What are your chances of getting liver cancer? ANSWER: Part F You are a scientist studying liver flukes in Thailand. Where should you look for them? ANSWER: ABC News Video: The Cuttlefish Watch the ABC News video (2:20 minutes). Then answer the questions below. Part A The changes to the cuttlefish’s skin are related to _______. ANSWER: Correct Part B Camouflage contributes to the cuttlefish’s survival by enabling it to _______. 1-5% 5-10% 10-15% 15-20% The northwestern part of the country. The southeastern part of the country. The southwestern part of the country. The northeastern part of the country. camouflage elimination of waste reproductive strategies feeding behavior Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 8 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM ANSWER: Correct Part C Cuttlefish placed in a sandy environment with white rocks will camouflage their skin in a pattern called _______. ANSWER: Correct Part D In the presence of a black-and-white striped background, a cuttlefish was observed to _______. ANSWER: Correct Part E Which question was raised but not answered in the video? ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 48.5%. You received 16 out of a possible total of 33 points. sneak up on prey mimic poisonous species hide from predators warn potential predators that it is poisonous universal camouflage disruptive camouflage warning coloration camouflage tide-pool camouflage move its arm to match the orientation of the stripes turn completely white and hide in the white stripe turn completely black and hide in the black stripe exhibit the exact striping pattern of its surroundings Why does the cuttlefish change its skin pattern? What happens when a cuttlefish is placed in an unnatural environment? Is the cuttlefish able to grow a protective shell? How do cuttlefish camouflage themselves even though they are colorblind? Chapter 06 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 9 of 9 5/21/2014 8:01 PM

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Chapter 15 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 16, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Fluid Pressure in a U-Tube A U-tube is filled with water, and the two arms are capped. The tube is cylindrical, and the right arm has twice the radius of the left arm. The caps have negligible mass, are watertight, and can freely slide up and down the tube. Part A A one-inch depth of sand is poured onto the cap on each arm. After the caps have moved (if necessary) to reestablish equilibrium, is the right cap higher, lower, or the same height as the left cap? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Pressure in the Ocean The pressure at 10 below the surface of the ocean is about 2.00×105 . Part A higher lower the same height m Pa Which of the following statements is true? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Now consider the pressure 20 below the surface of the ocean. Which of the following statements is true? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Relating Pressure and Height in a Container Learning Goal: To understand the derivation of the law relating height and pressure in a container. The weight of a column of seawater 1 in cross section and 10 high is about 2.00×105 . The weight of a column of seawater 1 in cross section and 10 high plus the weight of a column of air with the same cross section extending up to the top of the atmosphere is about 2.00×105 . The weight of 1 of seawater at 10 below the surface of the ocean is about 2.00×105 . The density of seawater is about 2.00×105 times the density of air at sea level. m2 m N m2 m N m3 m N m The pressure is twice that at a depth of 10 . The pressure is the same as that at a depth of 10 . The pressure is equal to that at a depth of 10 plus the weight per 1 cross sectional area of a column of seawater 10 high. The pressure is equal to the weight per 1 cross sectional area of a column of seawater 20 high. m m m m2 m m2 m In this problem, you will derive the law relating pressure to height in a container by analyzing a particular system. A container of uniform cross-sectional area is filled with liquid of uniform density . Consider a thin horizontal layer of liquid (thickness ) at a height as measured from the bottom of the container. Let the pressure exerted upward on the bottom of the layer be and the pressure exerted downward on the top be . Assume throughout the problem that the system is in equilibrium (the container has not been recently shaken or moved, etc.). Part A What is , the magnitude of the force exerted upward on the bottom of the liquid? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is , the magnitude of the force exerted downward on the top of the liquid? A  dy y p p + dp Fup Fup = Fdown You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C What is the weight of the thin layer of liquid? Express your answer in terms of quantities given in the problem introduction and , the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D Since the liquid is in equilibrium, the net force on the thin layer of liquid is zero. Complete the force equation for the sum of the vertical forces acting on the liquid layer described in the problem introduction. Express your answer in terms of quantities given in the problem introduction and taking upward forces to be positive. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Fdown = wlayer g wlayer = Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). A Submerged Ball A ball of mass and volume is lowered on a string into a fluid of density . Assume that the object would sink to the bottom if it were not supported by the string. Part A  = = i Fy,i mb V f What is the tension in the string when the ball is fully submerged but not touching the bottom, as shown in the figure? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the given quantities and , the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Archimedes’ Principle Learning Goal: To understand the applications of Archimedes’ principle. Archimedes’ principle is a powerful tool for solving many problems involving equilibrium in fluids. It states the following: When a body is partially or completely submerged in a fluid (either a liquid or a gas), the fluid exerts an upward force on the body equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the body. As a result of the upward Archimedes force (often called the buoyant force), some objects may float in a fluid, and all of them appear to weigh less. This is the familiar phenomenon of buoyancy. Quantitatively, the buoyant force can be found as , where is the force, is the density of the fluid, is the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity, and is the volume of the displaced fluid. In this problem, you will be asked several qualitative questions that should help you develop a feel for Archimedes’ principle. An object is placed in a fluid and then released. Assume that the object either floats to the surface (settling so that the object is partly above and partly below the fluid surface) or sinks to the bottom. (Note that for Parts A through D, you should assume that the object has settled in equilibrium.) Part A Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force is equal to the weight of fluid displaced by the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? T g T = Fbuoyant = fluidgV Fbuoyant fluid g V You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force is equal to the weight of the amount of fluid that has the same total volume as the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force equals the weight of the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? for every object submerged partially or completely in a fluid only for an object that floats only for an object that sinks for no object submerged in a fluid for an object that is partially submerged in a fluid only for an object that floats for an object completely submerged in a fluid for no object partially or completely submerged in a fluid You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force is less than the weight of the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? ANSWER: Now apply what you know to some more complicated situations. Part E An object is floating in equilibrium on the surface of a liquid. The object is then removed and placed in another container, filled with a denser liquid. What would you observe? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: for every object submerged partially or completely in a fluid for an object that floats only for an object that sinks for no object submerged in a fluid for every object submerged partially or completely in a fluid for an object that floats for an object that sinks for no object submerged in a fluid Part F An object is floating in equilibrium on the surface of a liquid. The object is then removed and placed in another container, filled with a less dense liquid. What would you observe? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part G Two objects, T and B, have identical size and shape and have uniform density. They are carefully placed in a container filled with a liquid. Both objects float in equilibrium. Less of object T is submerged than of object B, which floats, fully submerged, closer to the bottom of the container. Which of the following statements is true? ANSWER: The object would sink all the way to the bottom. The object would float submerged more deeply than in the first container. The object would float submerged less deeply than in the first container. More than one of these outcomes is possible. The object would sink all the way to the bottom. The object would float submerged more deeply than in the first container. The object would float submerged less deeply than in the first container. More than one of these outcomes is possible. Object T has a greater density than object B. Object B has a greater density than object T. Both objects have the same density. ± Buoyant Force Conceptual Question A rectangular wooden block of weight floats with exactly one-half of its volume below the waterline. Part A What is the buoyant force acting on the block? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B W The buoyant force cannot be determined. 2W W 1 W 2 The density of water is 1.00 . What is the density of the block? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). g/cm3 2.00 between 1.00 and 2.00 1.00 between 0.50 and 1.00 0.50 The density cannot be determined. g/cm3 g/cm3 g/cm3 g/cm3 g/cm3 Flow Velocity of Blood Conceptual Question Arteriosclerotic plaques forming on the inner walls of arteries can decrease the effective cross-sectional area of an artery. Even small changes in the effective area of an artery can lead to very large changes in the blood pressure in the artery and possibly to the collapse of the blood vessel. Imagine a healthy artery, with blood flow velocity of and mass per unit volume of . The kinetic energy per unit volume of blood is given by Imagine that plaque has narrowed an artery to one-fifth of its normal cross-sectional area (an 80% blockage). Part A Compared to normal blood flow velocity, , what is the velocity of blood as it passes through this blockage? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C v0 = 0.14 m/s  = 1050 kg/m3 K0 =  . 1 2 v20 v0 80v0 20v0 5v0 v0/5 This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). For parts D – F imagine that plaque has grown to a 90% blockage. Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). ± Playing with a Water Hose Two children, Ferdinand and Isabella, are playing with a water hose on a sunny summer day. Isabella is holding the hose in her hand 1.0 meters above the ground and is trying to spray Ferdinand, who is standing 10.0 meters away. Part A Will Isabella be able to spray Ferdinand if the water is flowing out of the hose at a constant speed of 3.5 meters per second? Assume that the hose is pointed parallel to the ground and take the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity to be 9.81 meters per second, per second. You did not open hints for this part. v0 g ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Tactics Box 15.2 Finding Whether an Object Floats or Sinks Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 15.2 Finding whether an object floats or sinks. If you hold an object underwater and then release it, it can float to the surface, sink, or remain “hanging” in the water, depending on whether the fluid density is larger than, smaller than, or equal to the object’s average density . These conditions are summarized in this Tactics Box. Yes No f avg TACTICS BOX 15.2 Finding whether an object floats or sinks Object sinks Object floats Object has neutral buoyancy An object sinks if it weighs more than the fluid it displaces, that is, if its average density is greater than the density of the fluid: . An object floats on the surface if it weighs less than the fluid it displaces, that is, if its average density is less than the density of the fluid: . An object hangs motionless in the fluid if it weighs exactly the same as the fluid it displaces. It has neutral buoyancy if its average density equals the density of the fluid: . Part A Ice at 0.0 has a density of 917 . A 3.00 ice cube is gently released inside a small container filled with oil and is observed to be neutrally buoyant. What is the density of the oil, ? Express your answer in kilograms per meter cubed to three significant figures. ANSWER: Part B Once the ice cube melts, what happens to the liquid water that it produces? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: avg > f avg < f avg = f 'C kg/m3 cm3 oil oil = kg/m3 Part C What happens if some ethyl alcohol of density 790 is poured into the container after the ice cube has melted? ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. The liquid water sinks to the bottom of the container. The liquid water rises to the surface and floats on top of the oil. The liquid water is in static equilibrium at the location where the ice cube was originally placed. kg/m3 A layer of ethyl alcohol forms between the oil and the water. The layer of ethyl alcohol forms at the bottom of the container. The layer of ethyl alcohol forms on the surface.

Chapter 15 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 16, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Fluid Pressure in a U-Tube A U-tube is filled with water, and the two arms are capped. The tube is cylindrical, and the right arm has twice the radius of the left arm. The caps have negligible mass, are watertight, and can freely slide up and down the tube. Part A A one-inch depth of sand is poured onto the cap on each arm. After the caps have moved (if necessary) to reestablish equilibrium, is the right cap higher, lower, or the same height as the left cap? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Pressure in the Ocean The pressure at 10 below the surface of the ocean is about 2.00×105 . Part A higher lower the same height m Pa Which of the following statements is true? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Now consider the pressure 20 below the surface of the ocean. Which of the following statements is true? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Relating Pressure and Height in a Container Learning Goal: To understand the derivation of the law relating height and pressure in a container. The weight of a column of seawater 1 in cross section and 10 high is about 2.00×105 . The weight of a column of seawater 1 in cross section and 10 high plus the weight of a column of air with the same cross section extending up to the top of the atmosphere is about 2.00×105 . The weight of 1 of seawater at 10 below the surface of the ocean is about 2.00×105 . The density of seawater is about 2.00×105 times the density of air at sea level. m2 m N m2 m N m3 m N m The pressure is twice that at a depth of 10 . The pressure is the same as that at a depth of 10 . The pressure is equal to that at a depth of 10 plus the weight per 1 cross sectional area of a column of seawater 10 high. The pressure is equal to the weight per 1 cross sectional area of a column of seawater 20 high. m m m m2 m m2 m In this problem, you will derive the law relating pressure to height in a container by analyzing a particular system. A container of uniform cross-sectional area is filled with liquid of uniform density . Consider a thin horizontal layer of liquid (thickness ) at a height as measured from the bottom of the container. Let the pressure exerted upward on the bottom of the layer be and the pressure exerted downward on the top be . Assume throughout the problem that the system is in equilibrium (the container has not been recently shaken or moved, etc.). Part A What is , the magnitude of the force exerted upward on the bottom of the liquid? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is , the magnitude of the force exerted downward on the top of the liquid? A  dy y p p + dp Fup Fup = Fdown You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C What is the weight of the thin layer of liquid? Express your answer in terms of quantities given in the problem introduction and , the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D Since the liquid is in equilibrium, the net force on the thin layer of liquid is zero. Complete the force equation for the sum of the vertical forces acting on the liquid layer described in the problem introduction. Express your answer in terms of quantities given in the problem introduction and taking upward forces to be positive. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Fdown = wlayer g wlayer = Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). A Submerged Ball A ball of mass and volume is lowered on a string into a fluid of density . Assume that the object would sink to the bottom if it were not supported by the string. Part A  = = i Fy,i mb V f What is the tension in the string when the ball is fully submerged but not touching the bottom, as shown in the figure? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the given quantities and , the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Archimedes’ Principle Learning Goal: To understand the applications of Archimedes’ principle. Archimedes’ principle is a powerful tool for solving many problems involving equilibrium in fluids. It states the following: When a body is partially or completely submerged in a fluid (either a liquid or a gas), the fluid exerts an upward force on the body equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the body. As a result of the upward Archimedes force (often called the buoyant force), some objects may float in a fluid, and all of them appear to weigh less. This is the familiar phenomenon of buoyancy. Quantitatively, the buoyant force can be found as , where is the force, is the density of the fluid, is the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity, and is the volume of the displaced fluid. In this problem, you will be asked several qualitative questions that should help you develop a feel for Archimedes’ principle. An object is placed in a fluid and then released. Assume that the object either floats to the surface (settling so that the object is partly above and partly below the fluid surface) or sinks to the bottom. (Note that for Parts A through D, you should assume that the object has settled in equilibrium.) Part A Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force is equal to the weight of fluid displaced by the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? T g T = Fbuoyant = fluidgV Fbuoyant fluid g V You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force is equal to the weight of the amount of fluid that has the same total volume as the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force equals the weight of the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? for every object submerged partially or completely in a fluid only for an object that floats only for an object that sinks for no object submerged in a fluid for an object that is partially submerged in a fluid only for an object that floats for an object completely submerged in a fluid for no object partially or completely submerged in a fluid You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force is less than the weight of the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? ANSWER: Now apply what you know to some more complicated situations. Part E An object is floating in equilibrium on the surface of a liquid. The object is then removed and placed in another container, filled with a denser liquid. What would you observe? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: for every object submerged partially or completely in a fluid for an object that floats only for an object that sinks for no object submerged in a fluid for every object submerged partially or completely in a fluid for an object that floats for an object that sinks for no object submerged in a fluid Part F An object is floating in equilibrium on the surface of a liquid. The object is then removed and placed in another container, filled with a less dense liquid. What would you observe? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part G Two objects, T and B, have identical size and shape and have uniform density. They are carefully placed in a container filled with a liquid. Both objects float in equilibrium. Less of object T is submerged than of object B, which floats, fully submerged, closer to the bottom of the container. Which of the following statements is true? ANSWER: The object would sink all the way to the bottom. The object would float submerged more deeply than in the first container. The object would float submerged less deeply than in the first container. More than one of these outcomes is possible. The object would sink all the way to the bottom. The object would float submerged more deeply than in the first container. The object would float submerged less deeply than in the first container. More than one of these outcomes is possible. Object T has a greater density than object B. Object B has a greater density than object T. Both objects have the same density. ± Buoyant Force Conceptual Question A rectangular wooden block of weight floats with exactly one-half of its volume below the waterline. Part A What is the buoyant force acting on the block? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B W The buoyant force cannot be determined. 2W W 1 W 2 The density of water is 1.00 . What is the density of the block? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). g/cm3 2.00 between 1.00 and 2.00 1.00 between 0.50 and 1.00 0.50 The density cannot be determined. g/cm3 g/cm3 g/cm3 g/cm3 g/cm3 Flow Velocity of Blood Conceptual Question Arteriosclerotic plaques forming on the inner walls of arteries can decrease the effective cross-sectional area of an artery. Even small changes in the effective area of an artery can lead to very large changes in the blood pressure in the artery and possibly to the collapse of the blood vessel. Imagine a healthy artery, with blood flow velocity of and mass per unit volume of . The kinetic energy per unit volume of blood is given by Imagine that plaque has narrowed an artery to one-fifth of its normal cross-sectional area (an 80% blockage). Part A Compared to normal blood flow velocity, , what is the velocity of blood as it passes through this blockage? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C v0 = 0.14 m/s  = 1050 kg/m3 K0 =  . 1 2 v20 v0 80v0 20v0 5v0 v0/5 This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). For parts D – F imagine that plaque has grown to a 90% blockage. Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). ± Playing with a Water Hose Two children, Ferdinand and Isabella, are playing with a water hose on a sunny summer day. Isabella is holding the hose in her hand 1.0 meters above the ground and is trying to spray Ferdinand, who is standing 10.0 meters away. Part A Will Isabella be able to spray Ferdinand if the water is flowing out of the hose at a constant speed of 3.5 meters per second? Assume that the hose is pointed parallel to the ground and take the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity to be 9.81 meters per second, per second. You did not open hints for this part. v0 g ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Tactics Box 15.2 Finding Whether an Object Floats or Sinks Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 15.2 Finding whether an object floats or sinks. If you hold an object underwater and then release it, it can float to the surface, sink, or remain “hanging” in the water, depending on whether the fluid density is larger than, smaller than, or equal to the object’s average density . These conditions are summarized in this Tactics Box. Yes No f avg TACTICS BOX 15.2 Finding whether an object floats or sinks Object sinks Object floats Object has neutral buoyancy An object sinks if it weighs more than the fluid it displaces, that is, if its average density is greater than the density of the fluid: . An object floats on the surface if it weighs less than the fluid it displaces, that is, if its average density is less than the density of the fluid: . An object hangs motionless in the fluid if it weighs exactly the same as the fluid it displaces. It has neutral buoyancy if its average density equals the density of the fluid: . Part A Ice at 0.0 has a density of 917 . A 3.00 ice cube is gently released inside a small container filled with oil and is observed to be neutrally buoyant. What is the density of the oil, ? Express your answer in kilograms per meter cubed to three significant figures. ANSWER: Part B Once the ice cube melts, what happens to the liquid water that it produces? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: avg > f avg < f avg = f 'C kg/m3 cm3 oil oil = kg/m3 Part C What happens if some ethyl alcohol of density 790 is poured into the container after the ice cube has melted? ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. The liquid water sinks to the bottom of the container. The liquid water rises to the surface and floats on top of the oil. The liquid water is in static equilibrium at the location where the ice cube was originally placed. kg/m3 A layer of ethyl alcohol forms between the oil and the water. The layer of ethyl alcohol forms at the bottom of the container. The layer of ethyl alcohol forms on the surface.

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Chapter 5 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, March 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Tactics Box 5.1 Drawing Force Vectors Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 5.1 Drawing Force Vectors. To visualize how forces are exerted on objects, we can use simple diagrams such as vectors. This Tactics Box illustrates the process of drawing a force vector by using the particle model, in which objects are treated as points. TACTICS BOX 5.1 Drawing force vectors Represent the object 1. as a particle. 2. Place the tail of the force vector on the particle. 3. Draw the force vector as an arrow pointing in the proper direction and with a length proportional to the size of the force. 4. Give the vector an appropriate label. The resulting diagram for a force exerted on an object is shown in the drawing. Note that the object is represented as a black dot. Part A A book lies on a table. A pushing force parallel to the table top and directed to the right is exerted on the book. Follow the steps above to draw the force vector . Use the black dot as the particle representing the book. F  F push F push Draw the vector starting at the black dot. The location and orientation of the vector will be graded. The length of the vector will not be graded. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Tactics Box 5.2 Identifying Forces Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 5.2 Identifying Forces. The first basic step in solving force and motion problems generally involves identifying all of the forces acting on an object. This tactics box provides a step-by-step method for identifying each force in a problem. TACTICS BOX 5.2 Identifying forces Identify the object of interest. This is the object whose motion 1. you wish to study. 2. Draw a picture of the situation. Show the object of interest and all other objects—such as ropes, springs, or surfaces—that touch it. 3. Draw a closed curve around the object. Only the object of interest is inside the curve; everything else is outside. 4. Locate every point on the boundary of this curve where other objects touch the object of interest. These are the points where contact forces are exerted on the object. Name and label each contact force acting on the object. There is at least one force at each point of contact; there may be more than one. When necessary, use subscripts to distinguish forces of the same type. 5. 6. Name and label each long-range force acting on the object. For now, the only long-range force is the gravitational force. Apply these steps to the following problem: A crate is pulled up a rough inclined wood board by a tow rope. Identify the forces on the crate. Part A Which of the following objects are of interest? Check all that apply. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Conceptual Questions on Newton’s 1st and 2nd Laws Learning Goal: To understand the meaning and the basic applications of Newton’s 1st and 2nd laws. In this problem, you are given a diagram representing the motion of an object–a motion diagram. The dots represent the object’s position at moments separated by equal intervals of time. The dots are connected by arrows representing the object’s average velocity during the corresponding time interval. Your goal is to use this motion diagram to determine the direction of the net force acting on the object. You will then determine which force diagrams and which situations may correspond to such a motion. crate earth rope wood board Part A What is the direction of the net force acting on the object at position A? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D upward downward to the left to the right The net force is zero. This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part I This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part J This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Understanding Newton’s Laws Part A An object cannot remain at rest unless which of the following holds? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B If a block is moving to the left at a constant velocity, what can one conclude? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: The net force acting on it is zero. The net force acting on it is constant and nonzero. There are no forces at all acting on it. There is only one force acting on it. Part C A block of mass is acted upon by two forces: (directed to the left) and (directed to the right). What can you say about the block’s motion? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D A massive block is being pulled along a horizontal frictionless surface by a constant horizontal force. The block must be __________. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: There is exactly one force applied to the block. The net force applied to the block is directed to the left. The net force applied to the block is zero. There must be no forces at all applied to the block. 2 kg 3 N 4 N It must be moving to the left. It must be moving to the right. It must be at rest. It could be moving to the left, moving to the right, or be instantaneously at rest. Part E Two forces, of magnitude and , are applied to an object. The relative direction of the forces is unknown. The net force acting on the object __________. Check all that apply. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Tactics Box 5.3 Drawing a Free-Body Diagram Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 5.3 Drawing a Free-Body Diagram. A free-body diagram is a diagram that represents the object as a particle and shows all of the forces acting on the object. Learning how to draw such a diagram is a very important skill in solving physics problems. This tactics box explains the essential steps to construct a correct free-body diagram. TACTICS BOX 5.3 Drawing a free-body diagram Identify all forces acting on the object. This step was described 1. in Tactics Box 5.2. continuously changing direction moving at constant velocity moving with a constant nonzero acceleration moving with continuously increasing acceleration 4 N 10 N cannot have a magnitude equal to cannot have a magnitude equal to cannot have the same direction as the force with magnitude must have a magnitude greater than 5 N 10 N 10 N 10 N Draw a coordinate system. Use the axes defined in your pictorial representation. If those axes are tilted, for motion along an incline, then the axes of the free-body diagram should be similarly tilted. 2. Represent the object as a dot at the origin of the coordinate axes. This is 3. the particle model. 4. Draw vectors representing each of the identified forces. This was described in Tactics Box 5.1. Be sure to label each force vector. Draw and label the net force vector . Draw this vector beside the diagram, not on the particle. Or, if appropriate, write . Then, check that points in the same direction as the acceleration vector on your motion diagram. 5. Apply these steps to the following problem: Your physics book is sliding on the carpet. Draw a free-body diagram. Part A Which forces are acting on the book? Check all that apply. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: F  net F =  net 0 F  net a Part B Draw the most appropriate set of coordinate axes for this problem. The orientation of your vectors will be graded. ANSWER: gravity normal force drag static friction tension kinetic friction spring force Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points.

Chapter 5 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, March 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Tactics Box 5.1 Drawing Force Vectors Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 5.1 Drawing Force Vectors. To visualize how forces are exerted on objects, we can use simple diagrams such as vectors. This Tactics Box illustrates the process of drawing a force vector by using the particle model, in which objects are treated as points. TACTICS BOX 5.1 Drawing force vectors Represent the object 1. as a particle. 2. Place the tail of the force vector on the particle. 3. Draw the force vector as an arrow pointing in the proper direction and with a length proportional to the size of the force. 4. Give the vector an appropriate label. The resulting diagram for a force exerted on an object is shown in the drawing. Note that the object is represented as a black dot. Part A A book lies on a table. A pushing force parallel to the table top and directed to the right is exerted on the book. Follow the steps above to draw the force vector . Use the black dot as the particle representing the book. F  F push F push Draw the vector starting at the black dot. The location and orientation of the vector will be graded. The length of the vector will not be graded. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Tactics Box 5.2 Identifying Forces Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 5.2 Identifying Forces. The first basic step in solving force and motion problems generally involves identifying all of the forces acting on an object. This tactics box provides a step-by-step method for identifying each force in a problem. TACTICS BOX 5.2 Identifying forces Identify the object of interest. This is the object whose motion 1. you wish to study. 2. Draw a picture of the situation. Show the object of interest and all other objects—such as ropes, springs, or surfaces—that touch it. 3. Draw a closed curve around the object. Only the object of interest is inside the curve; everything else is outside. 4. Locate every point on the boundary of this curve where other objects touch the object of interest. These are the points where contact forces are exerted on the object. Name and label each contact force acting on the object. There is at least one force at each point of contact; there may be more than one. When necessary, use subscripts to distinguish forces of the same type. 5. 6. Name and label each long-range force acting on the object. For now, the only long-range force is the gravitational force. Apply these steps to the following problem: A crate is pulled up a rough inclined wood board by a tow rope. Identify the forces on the crate. Part A Which of the following objects are of interest? Check all that apply. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Conceptual Questions on Newton’s 1st and 2nd Laws Learning Goal: To understand the meaning and the basic applications of Newton’s 1st and 2nd laws. In this problem, you are given a diagram representing the motion of an object–a motion diagram. The dots represent the object’s position at moments separated by equal intervals of time. The dots are connected by arrows representing the object’s average velocity during the corresponding time interval. Your goal is to use this motion diagram to determine the direction of the net force acting on the object. You will then determine which force diagrams and which situations may correspond to such a motion. crate earth rope wood board Part A What is the direction of the net force acting on the object at position A? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D upward downward to the left to the right The net force is zero. This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part I This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part J This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Understanding Newton’s Laws Part A An object cannot remain at rest unless which of the following holds? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B If a block is moving to the left at a constant velocity, what can one conclude? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: The net force acting on it is zero. The net force acting on it is constant and nonzero. There are no forces at all acting on it. There is only one force acting on it. Part C A block of mass is acted upon by two forces: (directed to the left) and (directed to the right). What can you say about the block’s motion? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D A massive block is being pulled along a horizontal frictionless surface by a constant horizontal force. The block must be __________. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: There is exactly one force applied to the block. The net force applied to the block is directed to the left. The net force applied to the block is zero. There must be no forces at all applied to the block. 2 kg 3 N 4 N It must be moving to the left. It must be moving to the right. It must be at rest. It could be moving to the left, moving to the right, or be instantaneously at rest. Part E Two forces, of magnitude and , are applied to an object. The relative direction of the forces is unknown. The net force acting on the object __________. Check all that apply. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Tactics Box 5.3 Drawing a Free-Body Diagram Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 5.3 Drawing a Free-Body Diagram. A free-body diagram is a diagram that represents the object as a particle and shows all of the forces acting on the object. Learning how to draw such a diagram is a very important skill in solving physics problems. This tactics box explains the essential steps to construct a correct free-body diagram. TACTICS BOX 5.3 Drawing a free-body diagram Identify all forces acting on the object. This step was described 1. in Tactics Box 5.2. continuously changing direction moving at constant velocity moving with a constant nonzero acceleration moving with continuously increasing acceleration 4 N 10 N cannot have a magnitude equal to cannot have a magnitude equal to cannot have the same direction as the force with magnitude must have a magnitude greater than 5 N 10 N 10 N 10 N Draw a coordinate system. Use the axes defined in your pictorial representation. If those axes are tilted, for motion along an incline, then the axes of the free-body diagram should be similarly tilted. 2. Represent the object as a dot at the origin of the coordinate axes. This is 3. the particle model. 4. Draw vectors representing each of the identified forces. This was described in Tactics Box 5.1. Be sure to label each force vector. Draw and label the net force vector . Draw this vector beside the diagram, not on the particle. Or, if appropriate, write . Then, check that points in the same direction as the acceleration vector on your motion diagram. 5. Apply these steps to the following problem: Your physics book is sliding on the carpet. Draw a free-body diagram. Part A Which forces are acting on the book? Check all that apply. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: F  net F =  net 0 F  net a Part B Draw the most appropriate set of coordinate axes for this problem. The orientation of your vectors will be graded. ANSWER: gravity normal force drag static friction tension kinetic friction spring force Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points.

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Chapter 8 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 12:59pm on Friday, April 18, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Circular Launch A ball is launched up a semicircular chute in such a way that at the top of the chute, just before it goes into free fall, the ball has a centripetal acceleration of magnitude 2 . Part A How far from the bottom of the chute does the ball land? Your answer for the distance the ball travels from the end of the chute should contain . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: g R Normal Force and Centripetal Force Ranking Task A roller-coaster track has six semicircular “dips” with different radii of curvature. The same roller-coaster cart rides through each dip at a different speed. Part A For the different values given for the radius of curvature and speed , rank the magnitude of the force of the roller-coaster track on the cart at the bottom of each dip. Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: D = R v Two Cars on a Curving Road Part A A small car of mass and a large car of mass drive along a highway. They approach a curve of radius . Both cars maintain the same acceleration as they travel around the curve. How does the speed of the small car compare to the speed of the large car as they round the curve? You did not open hints for this part. m 4m R a vS vL ANSWER: Part B Now assume that two identical cars of mass drive along a highway. One car approaches a curve of radius at speed . The second car approaches a curve of radius at a speed of . How does the magnitude of the net force exerted on the first car compare to the magnitude of the net force exerted on the second car? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: ± A Ride on the Ferris Wheel A woman rides on a Ferris wheel of radius 16 that maintains the same speed throughout its motion. To better understand physics, she takes along a digital bathroom scale (with memory) and sits on it. When she gets off the ride, she uploads the scale readings to a computer and creates a graph of scale reading versus time. Note that the graph has a minimum value of 510 and a maximum value of 666 . vS = 1 4 vL vS = 1 2 vL vS = vL vS = 2vL vS = 4vL m 2R v 6R 3v F1 F2 F1 = 1 3 F2 F1 = 3 4 F2 F1 = F2 F1 = 3F2 F1 = 27F2 m N N Part A What is the woman’s mass? Express your answer in kilograms. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: ± Mass on Turntable A small metal cylinder rests on a circular turntable that is rotating at a constant speed as illustrated in the diagram . The small metal cylinder has a mass of 0.20 , the coefficient of static friction between the cylinder and the turntable is 0.080, and the cylinder is located 0.15 from the center of the turntable. Take the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity to be 9.81 . m = kg kg m m/s2 Part A What is the maximum speed that the cylinder can move along its circular path without slipping off the turntable? Express your answer numerically in meters per second to two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. vmax vmax = m/s

Chapter 8 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 12:59pm on Friday, April 18, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Circular Launch A ball is launched up a semicircular chute in such a way that at the top of the chute, just before it goes into free fall, the ball has a centripetal acceleration of magnitude 2 . Part A How far from the bottom of the chute does the ball land? Your answer for the distance the ball travels from the end of the chute should contain . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: g R Normal Force and Centripetal Force Ranking Task A roller-coaster track has six semicircular “dips” with different radii of curvature. The same roller-coaster cart rides through each dip at a different speed. Part A For the different values given for the radius of curvature and speed , rank the magnitude of the force of the roller-coaster track on the cart at the bottom of each dip. Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: D = R v Two Cars on a Curving Road Part A A small car of mass and a large car of mass drive along a highway. They approach a curve of radius . Both cars maintain the same acceleration as they travel around the curve. How does the speed of the small car compare to the speed of the large car as they round the curve? You did not open hints for this part. m 4m R a vS vL ANSWER: Part B Now assume that two identical cars of mass drive along a highway. One car approaches a curve of radius at speed . The second car approaches a curve of radius at a speed of . How does the magnitude of the net force exerted on the first car compare to the magnitude of the net force exerted on the second car? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: ± A Ride on the Ferris Wheel A woman rides on a Ferris wheel of radius 16 that maintains the same speed throughout its motion. To better understand physics, she takes along a digital bathroom scale (with memory) and sits on it. When she gets off the ride, she uploads the scale readings to a computer and creates a graph of scale reading versus time. Note that the graph has a minimum value of 510 and a maximum value of 666 . vS = 1 4 vL vS = 1 2 vL vS = vL vS = 2vL vS = 4vL m 2R v 6R 3v F1 F2 F1 = 1 3 F2 F1 = 3 4 F2 F1 = F2 F1 = 3F2 F1 = 27F2 m N N Part A What is the woman’s mass? Express your answer in kilograms. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: ± Mass on Turntable A small metal cylinder rests on a circular turntable that is rotating at a constant speed as illustrated in the diagram . The small metal cylinder has a mass of 0.20 , the coefficient of static friction between the cylinder and the turntable is 0.080, and the cylinder is located 0.15 from the center of the turntable. Take the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity to be 9.81 . m = kg kg m m/s2 Part A What is the maximum speed that the cylinder can move along its circular path without slipping off the turntable? Express your answer numerically in meters per second to two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. vmax vmax = m/s

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