Paper 1: Summary Our first few weeks of class have been devoted to summaries, and the practice of writing effective, informative synopses of longer texts. In each class session, we have discussed how to read an article or essay to extract its major points, how to phrase those points in your own words, how to organize those points logically, and how to ensure that your summary accurately reflects the contents of the original text. We have also focused on the importance of summaries for academic work, as they allow readers to understand the key elements of a significant issue or phenomenon, and allow writers to test their knowledge of a text by explaining its main points in brief. For this assignment, you will write a summary of either Lee Ross and Richard E. Nisbett’s “The Power of Situations” (WRAC, 579-582) or Solomon E. Asch’s “Opinions and Social Pressure” Your summary should clearly restate the central claim or thesis of the essay you select, go through the essay’s subordinate claims that support that thesis, and provide a few brief examples that illustrate those claims. Remember that you are not to offer your opinion on the essay – rather, you are summarizing the contents of the essay, without making your own arguments about those contents. Things to Keep in Mind When writing your summary, ask yourself the following questions: • Does this summary begin by stating the thesis of the essay you’ve chosen? • Does that statement of the thesis clearly communicate the central argument of the entire essay? That is, does it give the reader a firm sense of what the whole essay is about? • Are the subordinate points you’ve provided the most significant points within the essay that support the essay’s thesis? • Are the examples you’ve chosen important to understanding the essay’s argument? • Is the summary organized logically, with each idea clearly building upon its predecessor? • Is the summary clearly written, and free of grammatical errors? These will be the questions I ask as I evaluate your summary, so keep them in mind as you’re writing. You should also look over them again once you’ve finished the summary, and make any revisions you might need before submitting the final summary for a grade. Formal Requirements Papers should be 2-3 full pages long (no less, and not significantly more), typed in 12-point, Times New Roman font, and double-spaced. All papers must include a list of works cited, and all in-text citations should be provided in MLA format.

Paper 1: Summary Our first few weeks of class have been devoted to summaries, and the practice of writing effective, informative synopses of longer texts. In each class session, we have discussed how to read an article or essay to extract its major points, how to phrase those points in your own words, how to organize those points logically, and how to ensure that your summary accurately reflects the contents of the original text. We have also focused on the importance of summaries for academic work, as they allow readers to understand the key elements of a significant issue or phenomenon, and allow writers to test their knowledge of a text by explaining its main points in brief. For this assignment, you will write a summary of either Lee Ross and Richard E. Nisbett’s “The Power of Situations” (WRAC, 579-582) or Solomon E. Asch’s “Opinions and Social Pressure” Your summary should clearly restate the central claim or thesis of the essay you select, go through the essay’s subordinate claims that support that thesis, and provide a few brief examples that illustrate those claims. Remember that you are not to offer your opinion on the essay – rather, you are summarizing the contents of the essay, without making your own arguments about those contents. Things to Keep in Mind When writing your summary, ask yourself the following questions: • Does this summary begin by stating the thesis of the essay you’ve chosen? • Does that statement of the thesis clearly communicate the central argument of the entire essay? That is, does it give the reader a firm sense of what the whole essay is about? • Are the subordinate points you’ve provided the most significant points within the essay that support the essay’s thesis? • Are the examples you’ve chosen important to understanding the essay’s argument? • Is the summary organized logically, with each idea clearly building upon its predecessor? • Is the summary clearly written, and free of grammatical errors? These will be the questions I ask as I evaluate your summary, so keep them in mind as you’re writing. You should also look over them again once you’ve finished the summary, and make any revisions you might need before submitting the final summary for a grade. Formal Requirements Papers should be 2-3 full pages long (no less, and not significantly more), typed in 12-point, Times New Roman font, and double-spaced. All papers must include a list of works cited, and all in-text citations should be provided in MLA format.

info@checkyourstudy.com
You have had the unique opportunity to develop a career plan in this academic program. By determining career goals and objectives, you should have become insightful and capable of assessing your current skills and abilities and their respective usefulness in attaining that ideal position. According to your plan, what training and education may be required before advancement is possible with respect to your future plans? What is the biggest obstacle you face in search of success?

You have had the unique opportunity to develop a career plan in this academic program. By determining career goals and objectives, you should have become insightful and capable of assessing your current skills and abilities and their respective usefulness in attaining that ideal position. According to your plan, what training and education may be required before advancement is possible with respect to your future plans? What is the biggest obstacle you face in search of success?

We can’t escape from the reality that if we wish … Read More...
1 Lab Assignment Q1) The PIC16F1937 Memory Banks i) The Special Function Registers within the PIC16F1937 microcontroller are held within a number of memory banks. How many memory banks are there within the PIC16F1937 microcontroller? ii) Explain two methods to show how a special function register within a particular memory bank can be selected. Q1) The TRIS Registers The PIC16F61937 microcontroller has five TRIS registers, TRISA, TRISB, TRISC, TRISD, and TRISE situated in bank 1 in the special function register memory map. i) What is the function of the TRIS registers? ii) How can the TRIS registers in bank 1 be accessed? Write a short program to configure PORTA of the microcontroller as inputs and PORTB of the microcontroller as outputs. For the remaining exercises assume that PORTA is connected to switches and PORTB is connected to LEDs in common cathode configuration (i.e. output a 1 to illuminate). Q2) Key Press Accumulator It is required to produce a system incorporating a microcontroller that keeps count (in binary) of the number of times that a key has been pressed. The key is connected to bit RA0 of PORTA and when pressed should increment the binary value displayed on LEDs connected to PORTB. Write a program to meet the above specification, simulate the program to ensure correct operation, program a microcontroller and test. (Marks allocated for correct program demonstration). 2 Q3) Software Delays The PIC16F1937 assembly language program listed below is a software time delay incorporating two nested loops. value1 equ 0x20 value2 equ 0x21 org 0x00 delay movlw .65 movwf value1 outer movlw .255 movwf value2 inner decfsz value2 goto inner decfsz value1 goto outer wait goto wait By incorporating breakpoints and using the stopwatch determine the amount of time elapsed in the software delay assuming the microcontroller is operating from a 4 MHz crystal oscillator. Compare the value obtained above with that obtained by calculation. Are the time values equal? Q4) Travelling LED program It is required to produce a system incorporating a PIC16F1937 to produce the following sequence on LEDs (travelling LED). And repeat The LEDs are connected to PORTB and the sequence should only start after the key connected to RA0 has been asserted. Should key RA1 be pressed then all of the LEDs should be switched off. The sequence can be set off again by reasserting key RA0. Incorporate a 100ms delay between changes of state of the sequence. Write a program to carry out the above specification, simulate, program a microcontroller and test. (Marks allocated for correct program demonstration). 3 Lab Assignment Checklist Marks allocation: Q1) The PIC16F1937 memory banks Qi) 2% Qii) 2% Q1) TRIS Registers Qi) 2% Qii) 2% Configuration program 4% Q2) Key Press Accumulator Program Flowchart 8% Program 20% Explanation 5% Demonstration 5% Q3) Software Delays By stopwatch 6% By calculation 6% Q4) Travelling LED program Flowchart 8% Program 20% Explanation 5% Demonstration 5% TOTAL 100%

1 Lab Assignment Q1) The PIC16F1937 Memory Banks i) The Special Function Registers within the PIC16F1937 microcontroller are held within a number of memory banks. How many memory banks are there within the PIC16F1937 microcontroller? ii) Explain two methods to show how a special function register within a particular memory bank can be selected. Q1) The TRIS Registers The PIC16F61937 microcontroller has five TRIS registers, TRISA, TRISB, TRISC, TRISD, and TRISE situated in bank 1 in the special function register memory map. i) What is the function of the TRIS registers? ii) How can the TRIS registers in bank 1 be accessed? Write a short program to configure PORTA of the microcontroller as inputs and PORTB of the microcontroller as outputs. For the remaining exercises assume that PORTA is connected to switches and PORTB is connected to LEDs in common cathode configuration (i.e. output a 1 to illuminate). Q2) Key Press Accumulator It is required to produce a system incorporating a microcontroller that keeps count (in binary) of the number of times that a key has been pressed. The key is connected to bit RA0 of PORTA and when pressed should increment the binary value displayed on LEDs connected to PORTB. Write a program to meet the above specification, simulate the program to ensure correct operation, program a microcontroller and test. (Marks allocated for correct program demonstration). 2 Q3) Software Delays The PIC16F1937 assembly language program listed below is a software time delay incorporating two nested loops. value1 equ 0x20 value2 equ 0x21 org 0x00 delay movlw .65 movwf value1 outer movlw .255 movwf value2 inner decfsz value2 goto inner decfsz value1 goto outer wait goto wait By incorporating breakpoints and using the stopwatch determine the amount of time elapsed in the software delay assuming the microcontroller is operating from a 4 MHz crystal oscillator. Compare the value obtained above with that obtained by calculation. Are the time values equal? Q4) Travelling LED program It is required to produce a system incorporating a PIC16F1937 to produce the following sequence on LEDs (travelling LED). And repeat The LEDs are connected to PORTB and the sequence should only start after the key connected to RA0 has been asserted. Should key RA1 be pressed then all of the LEDs should be switched off. The sequence can be set off again by reasserting key RA0. Incorporate a 100ms delay between changes of state of the sequence. Write a program to carry out the above specification, simulate, program a microcontroller and test. (Marks allocated for correct program demonstration). 3 Lab Assignment Checklist Marks allocation: Q1) The PIC16F1937 memory banks Qi) 2% Qii) 2% Q1) TRIS Registers Qi) 2% Qii) 2% Configuration program 4% Q2) Key Press Accumulator Program Flowchart 8% Program 20% Explanation 5% Demonstration 5% Q3) Software Delays By stopwatch 6% By calculation 6% Q4) Travelling LED program Flowchart 8% Program 20% Explanation 5% Demonstration 5% TOTAL 100%

info@checkyourstudy.com Whatsapp +919911743277
BI 102 Lab 1 Writing Assignment How did the different concentrations of sucrose impact osmotic rate? This assignment requires you to evaluate a hypothesis and communicate the results of your experiment on the rate of osmosis into sucrose solutions of varying concentrations. The questions below are meant to guide you to reporting the key findings of your experiment and help you think through how to explain the findings and draw conclusions from them in a scientific manner. ASSIGNMENT: Please respond to the following questions to complete your laboratory write up. For this assignment you will only focus on the osmosis of water into sucrose concentrations of varying concentration. Make sure that your write up is accurate, and clearly written so that it is easily readable. A grading rubric is provided on the second page of this assignment. To earn full points on your write up, you must provide answers that align to the “meets” column of your grading rubric as well as meeting all “Quality of Writing and Mechanics” elements described in the rubric. There are also some tips on pages 3-4 of this assignment to help you succeed. FORMAT: • Type your responses, using 1.5 or double spacing. • Include the section headings (Hypothesis, Results, Analysis) and question number (example: 1, 2, 3, etc) in your answers but do not rewrite the question. • Graphs may be made with a computer program (example: Microsoft excel, Mac numbers, etc) or may be neatly produced with a ruler on graphing paper. • Print out the cover sheet on page 2 of this assignment, read and sign the academic honesty statement, and submit it with your write up. Your instructor WILL NOT accept a write up without the signed cover sheet. DUE DATE: Your write up is due at the beginning of class next week. Late assignments will have 1 point deducted per day up to 5 days, at which point the assignment will be assigned 0 points. Hypothesis and Prediction – Part 1 of Rubric 1. What did you think was going to happen in this experiment and why? You may find it helpful to state your answers to these questions as an “if-then” hypothesis-prediction. Be sure you have included a biological rationale that explains WHY you made this hypothesis/prediction. (You worked on this in question 2 on page 10 of this lab activity) Results – Part 2 of Rubric 2. How did the different concentrations of sucrose impact osmotic rate? Answer this question by creating a line graph that shows the results of your experiment. If you need assistance building a graph, there is a Guide to Graphing resource available on your Moodle lab course site. Analysis- Part 3 of Rubric 3. Explain why you think that the results shown in your graph support or refute your hypothesis (remember we never “prove” anything in science). Consider all your data and the overall data pattern as you answer this question. Don’t ignore unusual data that may not seem to fit into a specific patterns (“outliers”). Explain what you think might be behind these unusual data points. 4. What is the biological significance of your results? What biological concepts explain completely why these events happened in the experiment? How do these results help you understand the biology of the cell and how materials move back and forth across the cell membrane? (A hint: refer back to questions 1A-1F on page 10 of this lab activity). Think about giving a specific example. References- Mechanics Checklist 5. Provide at least one full citation (make sure you include an in-text citation that pinpoints where you used this resource) for a resource you made use of in performing the experiment, understanding the concepts and writing this assignment. (Perhaps your lab manual? Your textbook? A website?) If you used more than one resource, you need to cite each one! If you need help with citations, a Guide to Citing References is available on your Moodle lab course site. Please print out and submit this cover sheet with your lab writeup! Lab Writeup Assignment (1) Assessment Rubric-­‐ 10 points total Name: ________________________________________ Element Misses (1 point) Approaches (2 points) Meets (3 points) Hypothesis Clarity/Specificity Testability Rationale ___Hypothesis is unclear and hardto- understand ___Hypothesis is not testable ___No biological rationale for hypothesis or rationale is fully inaccurate ___Hypothesis included is clearly stated, but not specific or lacks specific details __Hypothesis is testable, but not in a feasible way in this lab ___Some foundation for hypothesis, but based in part on biological inaccuracy ___Hypothesis included is clearly stated and very specific ___Hypothesis is testable and could be tested within lab parameters ___Rationale for hypothesis is grounded in accurate biological information Graph Title Axes Variables Key Graph clarity Data accuracy ___Graph lacks a title ___Axes are not labeled ___Variables not addressed in graph ___No key or way to tell data points apart ___Graph is hard to read and comparisons cannot be made: Inappropriate graph type or use of scale ___Data graphed is inaccurate or does not relate to experiment ___Graph has a title that is not very descriptive ___Axes are either unlabeled, or units are unclear or wrong ___Variables addressed in graph, but not on correct axes ___Key included, but is hard to understand ___Graph is somewhat readable, comparisons can be made with difficulty: Appropriate graph type, but not scaled well ___Data graphed is partially accurate; some data is missing ___Graph has a concise, descriptive title ___Axes are labeled, including clarification of units used ___Variables on correct axes ___A clear, easy-to-use key to data points is included ___Graph is clearly readable and comparisons between treatments are easy to make: Graph type and scale are appropriate to data ___Data graphed is accurate and includes all relevant data, including controls (if needed) Analysis Hypothesis Scientific language Data addressed Explanation ___Hypothesis is not addressed ___Hypothesis is described using language like proven, true, or right ___No explanations for data patterns observed in graph or data does not support conclusions. ___No biological explanation for data trends or explanations are completely inaccurate ___Hypothesis is mentioned, but not linked well to data ___Hypothesis is not consistently described as supported or refuted ___Some data considered in conclusions but other data is ignored. Any unusual “outliers” are ignored ___Explanations include minimal or some inaccurate biological concepts ___Hypothesis is evaluated based upon data ___Hypothesis is consistently described as supported or refuted ___All data collected is considered and addressed by conclusions, including presence of outliers, ___Explanations include relevant and accurate biological concepts Quality of Writing and Mechanics: Worth 1 point. Writeup should meet all of the following criteria! Yes No ☐ ☐ Write up includes your name, the date, and your lab section ☐ ☐ Write up is free from spelling and grammatical errors (make sure you proofread!!) ☐ ☐ Write up is clear and easy-to-understand ☐ ☐ Write up includes full citation for at least one reference with corresponding in-text citation ☐ ☐ All portions of write up are clearly labeled, and question numbers are included Plagiarism refers to the use of original work, ideas, or text that are not your own. This includes cut-and-paste from websites, copying directly from texts, and copying the work of others, including fellow students. Telling someone your answers to the questions (including telling someone how to make their graph, question #2), or asking for the answers to any question, is cheating. (Asking someone how to make the graph for this assignment is NOT the same as asking for help learning excel or some other software). All forms of cheating, including plagiarism and copying of work will result in an immediate zero for the exam, quiz, or assignment. In the case of copying, all parties involved in the unethical behavior will earn zeros. Cheating students will be referred to the Student Conduct Committee for further action. You also have the right to appeal to the Student Conduct Committee. I have read and understand the plagiarism statement. ____________________________________________________ Signature Guidelines for Good Quality Scientific Reports Hypothesis and Prediction: The hypothesis is a tentative explanation for the phenomenon. Remember that: • A good hypothesis and prediction is testable (and should be testable under the conditions of our lab environment; For example, if your hypothesis requires shooting a rocket into space, then its not really testable under our laboratory conditions). • Your explanation can be ruled out through testing, or falsified. • A good hypothesis and prediction is detailed and specific in what it is testing. • A good hypothesis provides a rationale or explanation for why you think your prediction is reasonable and this rationale is based on what we know about biology. • A good prediction is specific and can be tested with a specific experiment. Examples*: I think that diet soda will float and regular soda will sink. {This hypothesis misses the goal. It is not specific as we don’t know where the sodas are floating and sinking, and it does not provide any explanation to explain why the hypothesis makes sense} Because diet soda does not contain sugar and regular soda does, the diet soda will float in a bucket of water, while regular soda will sink. {This hypothesis approaches the goal. It is more specific about the conditions, and it provides a partial explanation about why the hypothesis makes sense, but the connection between sugar and sinking is unclear} If diet soda does not contain sugar, then its density (mass/volume) is lower than that of regular soda which does contain sugar, and so diet soda will float in a bucket of water while regular soda sinks. {This hypothesis meets the goal. It is specific and the rationale- sugar affects density and density is what determines floating or sinking in water- is clearly articulated} *Note that these examples are for different experiments and investigations and NOT about your osmosis lab. They are provided only to help you think about what you need to include in your write up. Graph: The graph is a visual representation of the data you gathered while testing your hypothesis. Remember that: • A graph needs a concise title that clearly describes the data that it is showing. • Data must be put on the correct axes of the graph. In general, the data you collected (representing what you are trying to find out about) goes on the vertical (Y) axis. The supporting data that that describes how, when or under what conditions you collected your data goes on the horizontal (X) axis. (For this reason time nearly always goes on the X-axis). • Axes must be labeled, including the units in which data were recorded • Data points should be clearly marked and identified; a key is helpful if more than one group of data is included in the graph. • The scale of a graph is important. It should be consistent (there should be no change in the units or increments on a single axis) and appropriate to the data you collected Examples: {This graph misses the goal. There is no title, nor is there a key to help distinguish what the data points mean. The scale is too large- from 0 to 100 with an increment of 50, when the maximum number in the graph is 25- and makes it hard to interpret this graph. The x-axis is labeled, but without units (the months) and the y-axis has units, but the label is incomplete- number of what?} {This graph meets the goal. There is a descriptive title, and all of the axes are clearly labeled with units. There is a key so that we can distinguish what each set of data points represent. The dependent variable (number of individuals) is correctly placed on the y-axis with the independent variable of time placed on the x-axis. The scale of 0-30 is appropriate to the data, with each line on the x-axis representing an increment of 5.} 0 50 100 Number Month 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 March April May June July Number of individuals Month (2011) Population size of three different madtom catiCish in the Marais de Cygnes River in Spring/Summer 2011 Brindled madtom Neosho madtom Slender madtom Analysis: You need to evaluate your hypothesis based on the data patterns shown by your graph. Remember that: • You use data to determine support or refute your hypothesis. It is only possible to support a hypothesis, not to “prove” one (that would require testing every possible permutation and combination of factors). Your evaluation of your hypothesis should not be contradicted by the pattern shown by your data. • Refer back to the prediction you made as part of your hypothesis and use your data to justify your decision to support or refute your hypothesis. • In the “if” part of your hypothesis you should have provided a rationale, or explanation for the prediction you made in your hypothesis (“then” part of hypothesis”). Use this to help you explain why you think you observed the specific pattern of data revealed in your graph. • You should consider all of the data you collected in examining the support (or lack of support for your hypothesis). If there are unusual data points or “outliers” that don’t seem to fit the general pattern in your graph, explain what you think those mean. Examples: I was right. Diet Pepsi floated and so did Apricot Nectar. Regular Pepsi sank. Obviously the regular Pepsi was heavier. This helps us understand the concept of density, which is a really important one. {This analysis misses the goal. The hypothesis isn’t actually mentioned and the data is only briefly described. There is no explanation of the importance of the Apricot Nectar results. Finally, there is no connection to how these results help understand density or why it is biologically important} I hypothesized that diet soda would float, and all three cans of diet Pepsi did float while the regular Pepsi sank. This supports my hypothesis. Both types of Pepsi were 8.5 fluid ounces in volume, but the regular Pepsi also contained 16 grams of sugar. This means that the regular Pepsi had 16 more grams of mass provided by the sugar in the same amount of volume. This would lead to an increase in density, which explains why the regular soda cans sank. When we put in a can of Apricot Nectar, which had 19 grams of sugar, it floated. This was unexpected, but I think it is explained by the fact that an Apricot Nectar can had a volume of 7 fluid ounces, but the dimensions of the can are the same as that of a Pepsi can. A same-sized can with less liquid probably has an air space that helped it float. The results of this experiment help us understand how the air bladder of a fish, which creates an air space inside the fish, helps it float in the water and also how seaweeds and other living things with air spaces or other factors that decrease their density keep from sinking to the bottom of the water. {This analysis meets the goal. It clearly ties the hypothesis to the results and outlines what they mean. It describes how the results support the hypothesis, but also explains a possible reason behind the unusual results of the Apricot Nectar. Finally, there is a link to how this experiment helps us understand biology}

BI 102 Lab 1 Writing Assignment How did the different concentrations of sucrose impact osmotic rate? This assignment requires you to evaluate a hypothesis and communicate the results of your experiment on the rate of osmosis into sucrose solutions of varying concentrations. The questions below are meant to guide you to reporting the key findings of your experiment and help you think through how to explain the findings and draw conclusions from them in a scientific manner. ASSIGNMENT: Please respond to the following questions to complete your laboratory write up. For this assignment you will only focus on the osmosis of water into sucrose concentrations of varying concentration. Make sure that your write up is accurate, and clearly written so that it is easily readable. A grading rubric is provided on the second page of this assignment. To earn full points on your write up, you must provide answers that align to the “meets” column of your grading rubric as well as meeting all “Quality of Writing and Mechanics” elements described in the rubric. There are also some tips on pages 3-4 of this assignment to help you succeed. FORMAT: • Type your responses, using 1.5 or double spacing. • Include the section headings (Hypothesis, Results, Analysis) and question number (example: 1, 2, 3, etc) in your answers but do not rewrite the question. • Graphs may be made with a computer program (example: Microsoft excel, Mac numbers, etc) or may be neatly produced with a ruler on graphing paper. • Print out the cover sheet on page 2 of this assignment, read and sign the academic honesty statement, and submit it with your write up. Your instructor WILL NOT accept a write up without the signed cover sheet. DUE DATE: Your write up is due at the beginning of class next week. Late assignments will have 1 point deducted per day up to 5 days, at which point the assignment will be assigned 0 points. Hypothesis and Prediction – Part 1 of Rubric 1. What did you think was going to happen in this experiment and why? You may find it helpful to state your answers to these questions as an “if-then” hypothesis-prediction. Be sure you have included a biological rationale that explains WHY you made this hypothesis/prediction. (You worked on this in question 2 on page 10 of this lab activity) Results – Part 2 of Rubric 2. How did the different concentrations of sucrose impact osmotic rate? Answer this question by creating a line graph that shows the results of your experiment. If you need assistance building a graph, there is a Guide to Graphing resource available on your Moodle lab course site. Analysis- Part 3 of Rubric 3. Explain why you think that the results shown in your graph support or refute your hypothesis (remember we never “prove” anything in science). Consider all your data and the overall data pattern as you answer this question. Don’t ignore unusual data that may not seem to fit into a specific patterns (“outliers”). Explain what you think might be behind these unusual data points. 4. What is the biological significance of your results? What biological concepts explain completely why these events happened in the experiment? How do these results help you understand the biology of the cell and how materials move back and forth across the cell membrane? (A hint: refer back to questions 1A-1F on page 10 of this lab activity). Think about giving a specific example. References- Mechanics Checklist 5. Provide at least one full citation (make sure you include an in-text citation that pinpoints where you used this resource) for a resource you made use of in performing the experiment, understanding the concepts and writing this assignment. (Perhaps your lab manual? Your textbook? A website?) If you used more than one resource, you need to cite each one! If you need help with citations, a Guide to Citing References is available on your Moodle lab course site. Please print out and submit this cover sheet with your lab writeup! Lab Writeup Assignment (1) Assessment Rubric-­‐ 10 points total Name: ________________________________________ Element Misses (1 point) Approaches (2 points) Meets (3 points) Hypothesis Clarity/Specificity Testability Rationale ___Hypothesis is unclear and hardto- understand ___Hypothesis is not testable ___No biological rationale for hypothesis or rationale is fully inaccurate ___Hypothesis included is clearly stated, but not specific or lacks specific details __Hypothesis is testable, but not in a feasible way in this lab ___Some foundation for hypothesis, but based in part on biological inaccuracy ___Hypothesis included is clearly stated and very specific ___Hypothesis is testable and could be tested within lab parameters ___Rationale for hypothesis is grounded in accurate biological information Graph Title Axes Variables Key Graph clarity Data accuracy ___Graph lacks a title ___Axes are not labeled ___Variables not addressed in graph ___No key or way to tell data points apart ___Graph is hard to read and comparisons cannot be made: Inappropriate graph type or use of scale ___Data graphed is inaccurate or does not relate to experiment ___Graph has a title that is not very descriptive ___Axes are either unlabeled, or units are unclear or wrong ___Variables addressed in graph, but not on correct axes ___Key included, but is hard to understand ___Graph is somewhat readable, comparisons can be made with difficulty: Appropriate graph type, but not scaled well ___Data graphed is partially accurate; some data is missing ___Graph has a concise, descriptive title ___Axes are labeled, including clarification of units used ___Variables on correct axes ___A clear, easy-to-use key to data points is included ___Graph is clearly readable and comparisons between treatments are easy to make: Graph type and scale are appropriate to data ___Data graphed is accurate and includes all relevant data, including controls (if needed) Analysis Hypothesis Scientific language Data addressed Explanation ___Hypothesis is not addressed ___Hypothesis is described using language like proven, true, or right ___No explanations for data patterns observed in graph or data does not support conclusions. ___No biological explanation for data trends or explanations are completely inaccurate ___Hypothesis is mentioned, but not linked well to data ___Hypothesis is not consistently described as supported or refuted ___Some data considered in conclusions but other data is ignored. Any unusual “outliers” are ignored ___Explanations include minimal or some inaccurate biological concepts ___Hypothesis is evaluated based upon data ___Hypothesis is consistently described as supported or refuted ___All data collected is considered and addressed by conclusions, including presence of outliers, ___Explanations include relevant and accurate biological concepts Quality of Writing and Mechanics: Worth 1 point. Writeup should meet all of the following criteria! Yes No ☐ ☐ Write up includes your name, the date, and your lab section ☐ ☐ Write up is free from spelling and grammatical errors (make sure you proofread!!) ☐ ☐ Write up is clear and easy-to-understand ☐ ☐ Write up includes full citation for at least one reference with corresponding in-text citation ☐ ☐ All portions of write up are clearly labeled, and question numbers are included Plagiarism refers to the use of original work, ideas, or text that are not your own. This includes cut-and-paste from websites, copying directly from texts, and copying the work of others, including fellow students. Telling someone your answers to the questions (including telling someone how to make their graph, question #2), or asking for the answers to any question, is cheating. (Asking someone how to make the graph for this assignment is NOT the same as asking for help learning excel or some other software). All forms of cheating, including plagiarism and copying of work will result in an immediate zero for the exam, quiz, or assignment. In the case of copying, all parties involved in the unethical behavior will earn zeros. Cheating students will be referred to the Student Conduct Committee for further action. You also have the right to appeal to the Student Conduct Committee. I have read and understand the plagiarism statement. ____________________________________________________ Signature Guidelines for Good Quality Scientific Reports Hypothesis and Prediction: The hypothesis is a tentative explanation for the phenomenon. Remember that: • A good hypothesis and prediction is testable (and should be testable under the conditions of our lab environment; For example, if your hypothesis requires shooting a rocket into space, then its not really testable under our laboratory conditions). • Your explanation can be ruled out through testing, or falsified. • A good hypothesis and prediction is detailed and specific in what it is testing. • A good hypothesis provides a rationale or explanation for why you think your prediction is reasonable and this rationale is based on what we know about biology. • A good prediction is specific and can be tested with a specific experiment. Examples*: I think that diet soda will float and regular soda will sink. {This hypothesis misses the goal. It is not specific as we don’t know where the sodas are floating and sinking, and it does not provide any explanation to explain why the hypothesis makes sense} Because diet soda does not contain sugar and regular soda does, the diet soda will float in a bucket of water, while regular soda will sink. {This hypothesis approaches the goal. It is more specific about the conditions, and it provides a partial explanation about why the hypothesis makes sense, but the connection between sugar and sinking is unclear} If diet soda does not contain sugar, then its density (mass/volume) is lower than that of regular soda which does contain sugar, and so diet soda will float in a bucket of water while regular soda sinks. {This hypothesis meets the goal. It is specific and the rationale- sugar affects density and density is what determines floating or sinking in water- is clearly articulated} *Note that these examples are for different experiments and investigations and NOT about your osmosis lab. They are provided only to help you think about what you need to include in your write up. Graph: The graph is a visual representation of the data you gathered while testing your hypothesis. Remember that: • A graph needs a concise title that clearly describes the data that it is showing. • Data must be put on the correct axes of the graph. In general, the data you collected (representing what you are trying to find out about) goes on the vertical (Y) axis. The supporting data that that describes how, when or under what conditions you collected your data goes on the horizontal (X) axis. (For this reason time nearly always goes on the X-axis). • Axes must be labeled, including the units in which data were recorded • Data points should be clearly marked and identified; a key is helpful if more than one group of data is included in the graph. • The scale of a graph is important. It should be consistent (there should be no change in the units or increments on a single axis) and appropriate to the data you collected Examples: {This graph misses the goal. There is no title, nor is there a key to help distinguish what the data points mean. The scale is too large- from 0 to 100 with an increment of 50, when the maximum number in the graph is 25- and makes it hard to interpret this graph. The x-axis is labeled, but without units (the months) and the y-axis has units, but the label is incomplete- number of what?} {This graph meets the goal. There is a descriptive title, and all of the axes are clearly labeled with units. There is a key so that we can distinguish what each set of data points represent. The dependent variable (number of individuals) is correctly placed on the y-axis with the independent variable of time placed on the x-axis. The scale of 0-30 is appropriate to the data, with each line on the x-axis representing an increment of 5.} 0 50 100 Number Month 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 March April May June July Number of individuals Month (2011) Population size of three different madtom catiCish in the Marais de Cygnes River in Spring/Summer 2011 Brindled madtom Neosho madtom Slender madtom Analysis: You need to evaluate your hypothesis based on the data patterns shown by your graph. Remember that: • You use data to determine support or refute your hypothesis. It is only possible to support a hypothesis, not to “prove” one (that would require testing every possible permutation and combination of factors). Your evaluation of your hypothesis should not be contradicted by the pattern shown by your data. • Refer back to the prediction you made as part of your hypothesis and use your data to justify your decision to support or refute your hypothesis. • In the “if” part of your hypothesis you should have provided a rationale, or explanation for the prediction you made in your hypothesis (“then” part of hypothesis”). Use this to help you explain why you think you observed the specific pattern of data revealed in your graph. • You should consider all of the data you collected in examining the support (or lack of support for your hypothesis). If there are unusual data points or “outliers” that don’t seem to fit the general pattern in your graph, explain what you think those mean. Examples: I was right. Diet Pepsi floated and so did Apricot Nectar. Regular Pepsi sank. Obviously the regular Pepsi was heavier. This helps us understand the concept of density, which is a really important one. {This analysis misses the goal. The hypothesis isn’t actually mentioned and the data is only briefly described. There is no explanation of the importance of the Apricot Nectar results. Finally, there is no connection to how these results help understand density or why it is biologically important} I hypothesized that diet soda would float, and all three cans of diet Pepsi did float while the regular Pepsi sank. This supports my hypothesis. Both types of Pepsi were 8.5 fluid ounces in volume, but the regular Pepsi also contained 16 grams of sugar. This means that the regular Pepsi had 16 more grams of mass provided by the sugar in the same amount of volume. This would lead to an increase in density, which explains why the regular soda cans sank. When we put in a can of Apricot Nectar, which had 19 grams of sugar, it floated. This was unexpected, but I think it is explained by the fact that an Apricot Nectar can had a volume of 7 fluid ounces, but the dimensions of the can are the same as that of a Pepsi can. A same-sized can with less liquid probably has an air space that helped it float. The results of this experiment help us understand how the air bladder of a fish, which creates an air space inside the fish, helps it float in the water and also how seaweeds and other living things with air spaces or other factors that decrease their density keep from sinking to the bottom of the water. {This analysis meets the goal. It clearly ties the hypothesis to the results and outlines what they mean. It describes how the results support the hypothesis, but also explains a possible reason behind the unusual results of the Apricot Nectar. Finally, there is a link to how this experiment helps us understand biology}

info@checkyourstudy.com Whatsapp +919911743277
Prompt for Essay 2: Argumentative on Drama Write a strongly persuasive essay on one of the following: 1. In Trifles, once the women have pieced together the clues and solved the mystery of Mr. Wright’s death, they quickly come to an agreement to suppress the information from the men who are investigating the murder. Construct an argument in which you identify whether the women were right to withhold their discovery from the investigators or not. 2. In August Wilson’s Fences, are Troy’s problems self-created or is he a victim of his past? Make a convincing argument on this issue. 3. Oedipus downfall in Oedipus the King: fate, freewill or influence of others Take Note as you write all the essays: If you craft your thesis well, it will contain a set of key words, phrases, and ideas which should then show up in key places/transitions throughout your paper. This stylistic and structural practice builds coherence and clarity in your essay. Sub-claims (Reasons) & Evidence (Textual Evidence): Your thesis/main claim statement must be supported by clearly organized evidence drawn primarily from the text of the story itself. Your argument, then, will be arranged with a main claim/thesis, sub-claims (reasons), and textual evidence. Take care to note that your textual evidence (quoted, paraphrased or summarized bits from the story) is not self-evident; it requires explanatory comment preceding it—to direct readers to what specifically in the evidence illustrates your sub-claim and main claim—and often following it for full elaboration and/or recapitulation. • Review the section in A Writer’s Reference on the MLA and Plagiarism • Use Writing Resources in the Course documents tab. MLA Style: Please follow MLA guidelines in formatting, mechanics and stylistics. Papers that do not follow MLA style will not be graded. I advise you look at the sample MLA papers in your textbooks You do not need any secondary source citations or research to support your analysis, but you must cite the source for the story being analyzed and A Writer’s Reference.

Prompt for Essay 2: Argumentative on Drama Write a strongly persuasive essay on one of the following: 1. In Trifles, once the women have pieced together the clues and solved the mystery of Mr. Wright’s death, they quickly come to an agreement to suppress the information from the men who are investigating the murder. Construct an argument in which you identify whether the women were right to withhold their discovery from the investigators or not. 2. In August Wilson’s Fences, are Troy’s problems self-created or is he a victim of his past? Make a convincing argument on this issue. 3. Oedipus downfall in Oedipus the King: fate, freewill or influence of others Take Note as you write all the essays: If you craft your thesis well, it will contain a set of key words, phrases, and ideas which should then show up in key places/transitions throughout your paper. This stylistic and structural practice builds coherence and clarity in your essay. Sub-claims (Reasons) & Evidence (Textual Evidence): Your thesis/main claim statement must be supported by clearly organized evidence drawn primarily from the text of the story itself. Your argument, then, will be arranged with a main claim/thesis, sub-claims (reasons), and textual evidence. Take care to note that your textual evidence (quoted, paraphrased or summarized bits from the story) is not self-evident; it requires explanatory comment preceding it—to direct readers to what specifically in the evidence illustrates your sub-claim and main claim—and often following it for full elaboration and/or recapitulation. • Review the section in A Writer’s Reference on the MLA and Plagiarism • Use Writing Resources in the Course documents tab. MLA Style: Please follow MLA guidelines in formatting, mechanics and stylistics. Papers that do not follow MLA style will not be graded. I advise you look at the sample MLA papers in your textbooks You do not need any secondary source citations or research to support your analysis, but you must cite the source for the story being analyzed and A Writer’s Reference.

1 IN2009: Language Processors Coursework Part 3: The Interpreter Introduction This is the 3rd and final part of the coursework. In the second part of the coursework you created a parser for the Moopl grammar which, given a syntactically correct Moopl program as input, builds an AST representation of the program. In Part 3 you will develop an interpreter which executes Moopl programs by visiting their AST representations. For this part of the coursework we provide functional code (with limitations, see below) for parsing, building a symbol table, type checking and variable allocation. Marks This part of the coursework is worth 12 of the 30 coursework marks for the Language Processors module. This part of the coursework is marked out of 12. Submission deadline This part of the coursework should be handed in before 5pm on Sunday 9th April 2017. In line with school policy, late submissions will be awarded no marks. Return & Feedback Marks and feedback will be available as soon as possible, certainly on or before Wed 3rd May 2017. Plagiarism If you copy the work of others (either that of fellow students or of a third party), with or without their permission, you will score no marks and further disciplinary action will be taken against you. Group working You will be working in the same groups as for the previous parts of the coursework except where group changes have already been approved. Submission: Submit a zip archive (not a rar file) of all your source code (the src folder of your project). We do not want the other parts of your NetBeans project, only the source code. Note 1: Submissions which do not compile will get zero marks. Note 2: You must not change the names or types of any of the existing packages, classes or public methods. 2 Getting started Download either moopl-interp.zip or moopl-interp.tgz from Moodle and extract all files. Key contents to be aware of: • A fully implemented Moopl parser (also implements a parser for the interpreter command language; see below). • A partially implemented Moopl type checker. • Test harnesses for the type checker and interpreter. • A directory of a few example Moopl programs (see Testing below). • Folder interp containing prototype interpreter code. The type-checker is only partially implemented but a more complete implementation will be provided following Session 6. That version is still not fully complete because it doesn’t support inheritance. Part d) below asks you to remove this restriction. The VarAllocator visitor in the interp package uses a simple implementation which only works for methods in which all parameter and local variable names are different. Part e) below asks you to remove this restriction. The three parts below should be attempted in sequence. When you have completed one part you should make a back-up copy of the work and keep it safe, in case you break it in your attempt at the next part. Be sure to test old functionality as well as new (regression testing). We will not assess multiple versions so, if your attempt at part d) or e) breaks previously working code, you may gain a better mark by submitting the earlier version for assessment. c) [8 marks] The Basic Interpreter: complete the implementation of the Interpreter visitor in the interp package. d) [2 marks] Inheritance: extend the type-checker, variable allocator and interpreter to support inheritance. e) [2 marks] Variable Allocation: extend the variable allocator to fully support blockstructure and lexical scoping, removing the requirement that all parameter and local variable names are different. Aim to minimise the number of local variable slots allocated in a stack frame. Note: variable and parameter names declared at the same scope level are still required to be different from each other (a method cannot have two different parameters called x, for example) and this is enforced by the existing typechecking code. But variables declared in different blocks (even when nested) can have the same name. Exceptions Your interpreter will only ever be run on Moopl code which is type-correct (and free from uninitialised local variables). But it is still possible that the Moopl code contains logical errors which may cause runtime errors (such as null-reference or array-bound errors). Your interpreter should throw a MooplRunTimeException with an appropriate error message in these cases. The only kind of exception your interpreter should ever throw is a MooplRunTimeException. 3 Testing The examples folder does not contain a comprehensive test-suite. You need to invent and run your own tests. The document Moopl compared with Java gives a concise summary of how Moopl programs are supposed to behave. You can (and should) also compare the behaviour of your interpreter with that of the online tool: https://smcse.city.ac.uk/student/sj353/langproc/Moopl.html (Note: the online tool checks for uninitialised local variables. Your implementation is not expected to do this.) To test your work, run the top-level Interpret harness, providing the name of a Moopl source file as a command-line argument. When run on a type-correct Moopl source file, Interpret will pretty-print the Moopl program then display a command prompt (>) at which you can enter one of the following commands: :quit This will quit the interpreter. :call main() This will call the top-level proc main, interpreted in the context defined by the Moopl program. (Any top-level proc can be called this way). :eval Exp ; This will evaluate expression Exp, interpreted in the context defined by the Moopl program, and print the result. Note the required terminating semi-colon. Testing your Expression visitors To unit-test your Exp visit methods, run the top-level Interpret harness on a complete Moopl program (though it can be trivial) and use the :eval command. For example, to test your visit methods for the Boolean-literals (ExpTrue and ExpFalse), you would enter the commands > :eval true ; > :eval false ; which should output 1 and 0, respectively. For the most basic cases, the Moopl program is essentially irrelevant (a single top-level proc with empty body may be sufficient). For other cases you will need to write programs containing class definitions (in order, for example, to test object creation and method call). Testing your Statement visitors To unit-test your Stm visit methods, write very simple Moopl programs, each with a top-level proc main() containing just a few lines of code. Run the top-level Interpret harness on these simple programs and enter the command > :call main() You will find a few examples to get you started in the folder examples/unittests. As for the Exp tests, simple cases can be tested using Moopl programs with just a main proc but for the more complex tests you will need to write Moopl programs containing class definitions. 4 Grading criteria Solutions will be graded according to their functional correctness, and the elegance of their implementation. Below are criteria that guide the award of marks. 70 – 100 [1st class] Work that meets all the requirements in full, constructed and presented to a professional standard. Showing evidence of independent reading, thinking and analysis. 60 – 69 [2:1] Work that makes a good attempt to address the requirements, realising all to some extent and most well. Well-structured and well presented. 50 – 59 [2:2] Work that attempts to address requirements realising all to some extent and some well but perhaps also including irrelevant or underdeveloped material. Structure and presentation may not always be clear. 40 – 49 [3rd class] Work that attempts to address the requirements but only realises them to some extent and may not include important elements or be completely accurate. Structure and presentation may lack clarity. 0 – 39 [fail] Unsatisfactory work that does not adequately address the requirements. Structure and presentation may be confused or incoherent.

1 IN2009: Language Processors Coursework Part 3: The Interpreter Introduction This is the 3rd and final part of the coursework. In the second part of the coursework you created a parser for the Moopl grammar which, given a syntactically correct Moopl program as input, builds an AST representation of the program. In Part 3 you will develop an interpreter which executes Moopl programs by visiting their AST representations. For this part of the coursework we provide functional code (with limitations, see below) for parsing, building a symbol table, type checking and variable allocation. Marks This part of the coursework is worth 12 of the 30 coursework marks for the Language Processors module. This part of the coursework is marked out of 12. Submission deadline This part of the coursework should be handed in before 5pm on Sunday 9th April 2017. In line with school policy, late submissions will be awarded no marks. Return & Feedback Marks and feedback will be available as soon as possible, certainly on or before Wed 3rd May 2017. Plagiarism If you copy the work of others (either that of fellow students or of a third party), with or without their permission, you will score no marks and further disciplinary action will be taken against you. Group working You will be working in the same groups as for the previous parts of the coursework except where group changes have already been approved. Submission: Submit a zip archive (not a rar file) of all your source code (the src folder of your project). We do not want the other parts of your NetBeans project, only the source code. Note 1: Submissions which do not compile will get zero marks. Note 2: You must not change the names or types of any of the existing packages, classes or public methods. 2 Getting started Download either moopl-interp.zip or moopl-interp.tgz from Moodle and extract all files. Key contents to be aware of: • A fully implemented Moopl parser (also implements a parser for the interpreter command language; see below). • A partially implemented Moopl type checker. • Test harnesses for the type checker and interpreter. • A directory of a few example Moopl programs (see Testing below). • Folder interp containing prototype interpreter code. The type-checker is only partially implemented but a more complete implementation will be provided following Session 6. That version is still not fully complete because it doesn’t support inheritance. Part d) below asks you to remove this restriction. The VarAllocator visitor in the interp package uses a simple implementation which only works for methods in which all parameter and local variable names are different. Part e) below asks you to remove this restriction. The three parts below should be attempted in sequence. When you have completed one part you should make a back-up copy of the work and keep it safe, in case you break it in your attempt at the next part. Be sure to test old functionality as well as new (regression testing). We will not assess multiple versions so, if your attempt at part d) or e) breaks previously working code, you may gain a better mark by submitting the earlier version for assessment. c) [8 marks] The Basic Interpreter: complete the implementation of the Interpreter visitor in the interp package. d) [2 marks] Inheritance: extend the type-checker, variable allocator and interpreter to support inheritance. e) [2 marks] Variable Allocation: extend the variable allocator to fully support blockstructure and lexical scoping, removing the requirement that all parameter and local variable names are different. Aim to minimise the number of local variable slots allocated in a stack frame. Note: variable and parameter names declared at the same scope level are still required to be different from each other (a method cannot have two different parameters called x, for example) and this is enforced by the existing typechecking code. But variables declared in different blocks (even when nested) can have the same name. Exceptions Your interpreter will only ever be run on Moopl code which is type-correct (and free from uninitialised local variables). But it is still possible that the Moopl code contains logical errors which may cause runtime errors (such as null-reference or array-bound errors). Your interpreter should throw a MooplRunTimeException with an appropriate error message in these cases. The only kind of exception your interpreter should ever throw is a MooplRunTimeException. 3 Testing The examples folder does not contain a comprehensive test-suite. You need to invent and run your own tests. The document Moopl compared with Java gives a concise summary of how Moopl programs are supposed to behave. You can (and should) also compare the behaviour of your interpreter with that of the online tool: https://smcse.city.ac.uk/student/sj353/langproc/Moopl.html (Note: the online tool checks for uninitialised local variables. Your implementation is not expected to do this.) To test your work, run the top-level Interpret harness, providing the name of a Moopl source file as a command-line argument. When run on a type-correct Moopl source file, Interpret will pretty-print the Moopl program then display a command prompt (>) at which you can enter one of the following commands: :quit This will quit the interpreter. :call main() This will call the top-level proc main, interpreted in the context defined by the Moopl program. (Any top-level proc can be called this way). :eval Exp ; This will evaluate expression Exp, interpreted in the context defined by the Moopl program, and print the result. Note the required terminating semi-colon. Testing your Expression visitors To unit-test your Exp visit methods, run the top-level Interpret harness on a complete Moopl program (though it can be trivial) and use the :eval command. For example, to test your visit methods for the Boolean-literals (ExpTrue and ExpFalse), you would enter the commands > :eval true ; > :eval false ; which should output 1 and 0, respectively. For the most basic cases, the Moopl program is essentially irrelevant (a single top-level proc with empty body may be sufficient). For other cases you will need to write programs containing class definitions (in order, for example, to test object creation and method call). Testing your Statement visitors To unit-test your Stm visit methods, write very simple Moopl programs, each with a top-level proc main() containing just a few lines of code. Run the top-level Interpret harness on these simple programs and enter the command > :call main() You will find a few examples to get you started in the folder examples/unittests. As for the Exp tests, simple cases can be tested using Moopl programs with just a main proc but for the more complex tests you will need to write Moopl programs containing class definitions. 4 Grading criteria Solutions will be graded according to their functional correctness, and the elegance of their implementation. Below are criteria that guide the award of marks. 70 – 100 [1st class] Work that meets all the requirements in full, constructed and presented to a professional standard. Showing evidence of independent reading, thinking and analysis. 60 – 69 [2:1] Work that makes a good attempt to address the requirements, realising all to some extent and most well. Well-structured and well presented. 50 – 59 [2:2] Work that attempts to address requirements realising all to some extent and some well but perhaps also including irrelevant or underdeveloped material. Structure and presentation may not always be clear. 40 – 49 [3rd class] Work that attempts to address the requirements but only realises them to some extent and may not include important elements or be completely accurate. Structure and presentation may lack clarity. 0 – 39 [fail] Unsatisfactory work that does not adequately address the requirements. Structure and presentation may be confused or incoherent.

checkyourstudy.com Whatsapp +919911743277