Individual case study Due date: 1:00pm AEST, Thursday, Week 11 All students are to submit electronically – max file size is 2Mb. ASSESSMENT Weighting: 35% Length: No set length 2 I…Assignment 2 SPECIFICATIONS CIS8011_Digital Innovation Assignment 2 (30%) (1500 words maximum) This assignment continues from the first assignment and your task is to write a report on the following a…1 CSE2DES/CSE5DES – Assignment 1 Due Date: 10 am Monday 22nd September 2014 Assessment: This assignment 1 is worth 15% of the final mark for CSE2DES/CSE5DES. This is an individual assignment. Copying,…All questions are from the textbook: Fatseas, Victor & Williams, John, Cost Management (2013) 3rd edition, McGraw HillMLC 703: PRINCIPLES OF INCOME TAX LAW INSTRUCTIONS Please note that the following will not form part of the word count: ? References, including statute and cases; ? Diagrams; ? Tables; ? Calculations….WRITTEN ESSAY Outline This assessment has been written to develop your understanding of Human Resource Management, assessing learning outcomes a, b, c, h and i: “The external environmental (e.g. econo…Subject: INTERNATIONAL MARKETING B01ITMK208 Assessment item 2: International Marketing Analysis Weighting: 30% Due: Week 10. A daily penalty of 5% will be applied to late assignments. Task: You are a …B01ITMK208 INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT ASSIGNMENT INSTRUCTIONS KEY INFORMATION Maximum Length: 2500 words Due: Week 8. Note that late submission will attract a penalty. Weighting: 30% Instructions: Read …Subject: Advertising Management BO1ADMG207 Assessment item 2: IMC Report Weighting: 30% Due: Week 8. A daily penalty of 5% will be applied to late assignments. Task: You are the Australian-based Marke…Attached are two Memos, please have a lookgetEconomics topic Assignment 2 Value: 40% Due date: 01-Sep-2014 Return date: 22-Sep-2014 Length: about 1500-2000 words each Submission method options Alternative submission method Task Analytical essays…Accounting for Business Decisions –HI5001 Trimester 2 2014 The assignment allows students to exhibit their knowledge and understanding of the subject matter of Accounting. The students will use the sk…HOLMES INSTITUTE FACULTY OF HIGHER EDUCATION HI6007 SPSS Assignment 02 Due Friday 4pm week 11 WORTH 30% The data set you need to do the assignment can be found on Blackboard in the folder “Assignments…Assignmnet of Economic Assignment (Written report): 25% 1. Organize yourselves into groups. Each group is to have Four or Five members. 2. Groups need to choose a topic from the list of topics provide…2. Rio Tinto Annual Report Financial Analysis [10 marks] Consider the sources below and answer the following questions. Source 1: Rio Tinto Annual Report 2012 (see report uploaded on the portal) Sourc…Quantitative Methods for Business Business Statistics Assignment – Semester, 2 2014 Total Marks: 60, Worth: 20% of final assessment This assignment requires a considerable amount of computer work and …BUACC 2613 Management Accounting 1 Semester 2, 2014 Assignment Contribution to overall assessment: 25% Due date: 26/09/2014 • This assignment has two parts: o Part 1

Individual case study Due date: 1:00pm AEST, Thursday, Week 11 All students are to submit electronically – max file size is 2Mb. ASSESSMENT Weighting: 35% Length: No set length 2 I…Assignment 2 SPECIFICATIONS CIS8011_Digital Innovation Assignment 2 (30%) (1500 words maximum) This assignment continues from the first assignment and your task is to write a report on the following a…1 CSE2DES/CSE5DES – Assignment 1 Due Date: 10 am Monday 22nd September 2014 Assessment: This assignment 1 is worth 15% of the final mark for CSE2DES/CSE5DES. This is an individual assignment. Copying,…All questions are from the textbook: Fatseas, Victor & Williams, John, Cost Management (2013) 3rd edition, McGraw HillMLC 703: PRINCIPLES OF INCOME TAX LAW INSTRUCTIONS Please note that the following will not form part of the word count: ? References, including statute and cases; ? Diagrams; ? Tables; ? Calculations….WRITTEN ESSAY Outline This assessment has been written to develop your understanding of Human Resource Management, assessing learning outcomes a, b, c, h and i: “The external environmental (e.g. econo…Subject: INTERNATIONAL MARKETING B01ITMK208 Assessment item 2: International Marketing Analysis Weighting: 30% Due: Week 10. A daily penalty of 5% will be applied to late assignments. Task: You are a …B01ITMK208 INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT ASSIGNMENT INSTRUCTIONS KEY INFORMATION Maximum Length: 2500 words Due: Week 8. Note that late submission will attract a penalty. Weighting: 30% Instructions: Read …Subject: Advertising Management BO1ADMG207 Assessment item 2: IMC Report Weighting: 30% Due: Week 8. A daily penalty of 5% will be applied to late assignments. Task: You are the Australian-based Marke…Attached are two Memos, please have a lookgetEconomics topic Assignment 2 Value: 40% Due date: 01-Sep-2014 Return date: 22-Sep-2014 Length: about 1500-2000 words each Submission method options Alternative submission method Task Analytical essays…Accounting for Business Decisions –HI5001 Trimester 2 2014 The assignment allows students to exhibit their knowledge and understanding of the subject matter of Accounting. The students will use the sk…HOLMES INSTITUTE FACULTY OF HIGHER EDUCATION HI6007 SPSS Assignment 02 Due Friday 4pm week 11 WORTH 30% The data set you need to do the assignment can be found on Blackboard in the folder “Assignments…Assignmnet of Economic Assignment (Written report): 25% 1. Organize yourselves into groups. Each group is to have Four or Five members. 2. Groups need to choose a topic from the list of topics provide…2. Rio Tinto Annual Report Financial Analysis [10 marks] Consider the sources below and answer the following questions. Source 1: Rio Tinto Annual Report 2012 (see report uploaded on the portal) Sourc…Quantitative Methods for Business Business Statistics Assignment – Semester, 2 2014 Total Marks: 60, Worth: 20% of final assessment This assignment requires a considerable amount of computer work and …BUACC 2613 Management Accounting 1 Semester 2, 2014 Assignment Contribution to overall assessment: 25% Due date: 26/09/2014 • This assignment has two parts: o Part 1

info@checkyourstudy.com
PHET ElectroMagnetism Key to this Document Instructions are in black. Experimental questions that you need to solve through experimentation with an online animation are in green highlighted. Important instructions are in red highlighted. Items that need a response from you are in yellow highlighted. Please put your answers to this activity in RED. Part I- Comparing Permanent Magnets and Electromagnets: 1. Select the simulation “Magnets and Electromagnets.” It is at this link: http://phet.colorado.edu/new/simulations/sims.php?sim=Magnets_and_Electromagnets 2. Move the compass slowly along a semicircular path above the bar magnet until you’ve put it on the opposite side of the bar magnet. Describe what happens to the compass needle. 3. Move the compass along a semicircular path below the bar magnet until you’ve put it on the opposite side of the bar magnet. Describe what happens to the compass needle. 4. What do you suppose the compass needles drawn all over the screen tell you? 5. Use page 10 in your book to look up what it looks like when scientists use a drawing to represent a magnetic field. Describe the field around a bar magnet here. 6. Put the compass to the left or right of the magnet. Click “flip polarity” and notice what happens to the compass. Using the compass needle as your observation tool, describe the effect that flipping the poles of the magnet has on the magnetic field. 7. Click on the electromagnet tab along the top of the simulation window. Place the compass on the left side of the coil so that the compass center lies along the axis of the coil. <--like this 8. Move the compass along a semicircular path above the coil until you’ve put it on the opposite side of the coil. Then do the same below the coil. Notice what happens to the compass needle. Compare this answer to the answer you got to Number 2 and 3. 9. Compare the shape of the magnetic field of a bar magnet to the magnetic field of an electromagnet. 10. Use the voltage slider to change the direction of the current and investigate the shape of the magnetic field the coil using the compass after you’ve let the compass stabilize. Summarize, the effect that the direction of current has on the shape of the magnetic field around an electrified coil of wires. 11. What happens to the current in the coil when you set the voltage of the battery to zero? 12. What happens to the magnetic field around the coil when you set the voltage of the battery to zero? Part II – Investigating relationships- No Answers are written on this document after this point. All three data tables, graphs and conclusion statements go on the Google Spreadsheet that you can download from Ms. Pogge’s website. Experimental Question #1: How does distance affect the strength of the magnetic field around an electromagnet? 1. Using the Electromagnet simulation, click on “Show Field Meter.” 2. Set the battery voltage to 10V where the positive is on the right of the battery (slide the switch all the way to the right). 3. Magnetic field strength (symbol B on the top line of the meter) is measured in gauss (G). You’ll only need to record the value on the top line of the Field Meter. 4. Position zero will be right on top of the coil. Negative number positions will be to the left and positive number positions to the right of the coil. 5. Move the field meter one compass needle to the right and record the value of B at position 1. 6. This data table below will be used to help you fill in the first spreadsheet you downloaded from Ms. Pogge’s website. You will end up with 3 data tables, 3 graphs and 3 conclusion statements in your document, one for each mini-experiment you are doing. a. NOTE: Be sure to take all of your values along the horizontal axis of the coil. You’ll know you’re on the axis because the B-y measurement of the magnetic field is zero along the axis. Compass position (no units) Magnetic Field Strength ( )<--Fill in units! -5 (5 needles to the left of coil) Don’t fill in the table here...do it on the Google Spreadsheet you downloaded -4 -3 -2 -1 0 (middle of coil) 1 2 3 4 5 (5 needles to right of coil) 7. In your Google Spreadsheet: Graph the compass position on the horizontal (x) axis and magnetic field magnitude on the vertical (y) axis. 8. Make sure to label the axes and title the graph. Share this spreadsheet with your teacher. 9. Analyze your graph to discover how the two variables are related, and report the relationship between magnetic field strength and position using 1-3 complete sentences. Experimental Question #2: How does the number of coils affect the strength of the magnetic field around an electromagnet? Design an experiment to test how field strength varies with the number of coils. Enter your data, graph your results and write your conclusion statement on the Google Spreadsheet. Experimental Question #3: How does the amount of current affect the strength of the magnetic field around an electromagnet? Design an experiment to test how field strength varies with the Current. (Recall that voltage is directly proportional to current….Ohm’s Law.) Enter your data, graph your results and write your conclusion statement on the Google Spreadsheet.

PHET ElectroMagnetism Key to this Document Instructions are in black. Experimental questions that you need to solve through experimentation with an online animation are in green highlighted. Important instructions are in red highlighted. Items that need a response from you are in yellow highlighted. Please put your answers to this activity in RED. Part I- Comparing Permanent Magnets and Electromagnets: 1. Select the simulation “Magnets and Electromagnets.” It is at this link: http://phet.colorado.edu/new/simulations/sims.php?sim=Magnets_and_Electromagnets 2. Move the compass slowly along a semicircular path above the bar magnet until you’ve put it on the opposite side of the bar magnet. Describe what happens to the compass needle. 3. Move the compass along a semicircular path below the bar magnet until you’ve put it on the opposite side of the bar magnet. Describe what happens to the compass needle. 4. What do you suppose the compass needles drawn all over the screen tell you? 5. Use page 10 in your book to look up what it looks like when scientists use a drawing to represent a magnetic field. Describe the field around a bar magnet here. 6. Put the compass to the left or right of the magnet. Click “flip polarity” and notice what happens to the compass. Using the compass needle as your observation tool, describe the effect that flipping the poles of the magnet has on the magnetic field. 7. Click on the electromagnet tab along the top of the simulation window. Place the compass on the left side of the coil so that the compass center lies along the axis of the coil. <--like this 8. Move the compass along a semicircular path above the coil until you’ve put it on the opposite side of the coil. Then do the same below the coil. Notice what happens to the compass needle. Compare this answer to the answer you got to Number 2 and 3. 9. Compare the shape of the magnetic field of a bar magnet to the magnetic field of an electromagnet. 10. Use the voltage slider to change the direction of the current and investigate the shape of the magnetic field the coil using the compass after you’ve let the compass stabilize. Summarize, the effect that the direction of current has on the shape of the magnetic field around an electrified coil of wires. 11. What happens to the current in the coil when you set the voltage of the battery to zero? 12. What happens to the magnetic field around the coil when you set the voltage of the battery to zero? Part II – Investigating relationships- No Answers are written on this document after this point. All three data tables, graphs and conclusion statements go on the Google Spreadsheet that you can download from Ms. Pogge’s website. Experimental Question #1: How does distance affect the strength of the magnetic field around an electromagnet? 1. Using the Electromagnet simulation, click on “Show Field Meter.” 2. Set the battery voltage to 10V where the positive is on the right of the battery (slide the switch all the way to the right). 3. Magnetic field strength (symbol B on the top line of the meter) is measured in gauss (G). You’ll only need to record the value on the top line of the Field Meter. 4. Position zero will be right on top of the coil. Negative number positions will be to the left and positive number positions to the right of the coil. 5. Move the field meter one compass needle to the right and record the value of B at position 1. 6. This data table below will be used to help you fill in the first spreadsheet you downloaded from Ms. Pogge’s website. You will end up with 3 data tables, 3 graphs and 3 conclusion statements in your document, one for each mini-experiment you are doing. a. NOTE: Be sure to take all of your values along the horizontal axis of the coil. You’ll know you’re on the axis because the B-y measurement of the magnetic field is zero along the axis. Compass position (no units) Magnetic Field Strength ( )<--Fill in units! -5 (5 needles to the left of coil) Don’t fill in the table here...do it on the Google Spreadsheet you downloaded -4 -3 -2 -1 0 (middle of coil) 1 2 3 4 5 (5 needles to right of coil) 7. In your Google Spreadsheet: Graph the compass position on the horizontal (x) axis and magnetic field magnitude on the vertical (y) axis. 8. Make sure to label the axes and title the graph. Share this spreadsheet with your teacher. 9. Analyze your graph to discover how the two variables are related, and report the relationship between magnetic field strength and position using 1-3 complete sentences. Experimental Question #2: How does the number of coils affect the strength of the magnetic field around an electromagnet? Design an experiment to test how field strength varies with the number of coils. Enter your data, graph your results and write your conclusion statement on the Google Spreadsheet. Experimental Question #3: How does the amount of current affect the strength of the magnetic field around an electromagnet? Design an experiment to test how field strength varies with the Current. (Recall that voltage is directly proportional to current….Ohm’s Law.) Enter your data, graph your results and write your conclusion statement on the Google Spreadsheet.

Use the link provided to answer the questions below. http://www.worlddialogue.org/content.php?id=384 According to the article, what was President George W. Bush’s main rationale for going to war with Iraq? A. Bush believed that by promoting democracy, we promote peace around the world. B. Bush believed that Iraq was a key player in the global drug trade. C. Bush feared Osama bin Laden would assume power in Iraq. D. Intelligence reports showed Iraq was planning to attack Afghanistan. E. Bush had no opinion about invading Iraq. What is the democratic peace theory? A. the theory that indicates that democracy will inevitably spread and we should assist it peacefully B. the theory that economic growth leads to a peaceful democratic state C. the theory that democracies tend not to fight one another D. the theory that the key to a successful democratic transition is through a peaceful transfer of power E. the theory that peace and democracy are actually inconsistent with one another What did Mansfield and Syder conclude happens during the initial phases of democratization? A. Newly democratized countries are incapable of holding independent elections. B. Citizens are more engaged in politics and willing to be peaceful. C. New democracies are the strongest democracies in the world. D. Other countries are more likely to form alliances with new democracies. E. Newly democratized countries become more aggressive and warlike, not less. New democracies are more likely to elect which of the following types of parties into office? A. socialists B. religious extremists C. the country’s elite and wealthy class D. people who personify “the average Joe” E. the largest, most prominent parties According to Mansfield and Snyder’s prescription, what should the United States do with democratizing states? A. provide an international military force to ensure peace B. keep a close eye and replace bad leaders if necessary C. make certain that reforms are implemented in the right order D. strengthen international awareness of democratizing states so that peaceful states can arm themselves E. attempt to push through elections as soon as possible above all else Watch the video below, and then answer the questions below. To save your answers, click the Save to Notebook button above. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=796LfXwzIUk According to Joseph Nye, what is power transition? A. a change of power among states B. a change of power among presidents C. a change of power within the European Union or other leading organizations D. a change of power within cultures E. a change of power to non-state actors How does Nye define power diffusion? A. a change of power among states B. a change of power in regions C. a change of power within cultures D. a change of power from states to non-state actors E. a change of power from non-state actors to states Which of the following is an example of a non-state actor given by Nye? A. Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad B. Oxfam C. the former USSR D. socialism E. the mayor of Tehran Why does Nye claim it is important to be cautious of power projections? A. Simple projections don’t tell us much about power transition. B. History is not linear. C. Simple projections tend to focus soley on GDP. D. Simple projections don’t tell you anything about military or soft power. E. all of these options Nye describes a three-dimensional chess game as a metaphor for modern-day power distribution. What is the top board? A. economic power among states B. military power among states C. power among state leaders D. the deciding board for the other two boards E. the board where Kasparov faces off against the computer What is the middle board in Nye’s chess game metaphor? A. non-state actors B. a metaphor for the international underground economy C. military power among states D. economic power among states E. political power among states What is the bottom board in Nye’s chess game metaphor? A. transnational relations B. things that cross borders outside government control C. a place where power is chaotically distributed D. an area where things cross borders outside the control of governments E. all of these options What is the difference between a positive-sum game and a zero-sum game? A. A positive-sum game is when one person has all the power and a zero-sum game is when power is evenly distributed. B. A positive-sum game is a two-player power game and a zero-sum game is a one-player power game. C. A positive-sum game where my gain is your gain and a zero-sum game is my win and your loss. D. A postive-sum game is when you bet and win and a zero-sum game is when you bet and lose. E. A positive-sum game is like Tetris and a zero-sum game is like Super Mario Brothers. Nye quotes Hillary Clinton, describing her foreign policy agenda as utilizing “smart power.” What does this mean? A. Smart power addresses the two great power shifts in the 21st century. B. Smart power is “using all the tools in our toolbox.” C. Smart power combines both hard and soft power. D. Smart power reflects a new narrative of dealing with power. E. all of these options

Use the link provided to answer the questions below. http://www.worlddialogue.org/content.php?id=384 According to the article, what was President George W. Bush’s main rationale for going to war with Iraq? A. Bush believed that by promoting democracy, we promote peace around the world. B. Bush believed that Iraq was a key player in the global drug trade. C. Bush feared Osama bin Laden would assume power in Iraq. D. Intelligence reports showed Iraq was planning to attack Afghanistan. E. Bush had no opinion about invading Iraq. What is the democratic peace theory? A. the theory that indicates that democracy will inevitably spread and we should assist it peacefully B. the theory that economic growth leads to a peaceful democratic state C. the theory that democracies tend not to fight one another D. the theory that the key to a successful democratic transition is through a peaceful transfer of power E. the theory that peace and democracy are actually inconsistent with one another What did Mansfield and Syder conclude happens during the initial phases of democratization? A. Newly democratized countries are incapable of holding independent elections. B. Citizens are more engaged in politics and willing to be peaceful. C. New democracies are the strongest democracies in the world. D. Other countries are more likely to form alliances with new democracies. E. Newly democratized countries become more aggressive and warlike, not less. New democracies are more likely to elect which of the following types of parties into office? A. socialists B. religious extremists C. the country’s elite and wealthy class D. people who personify “the average Joe” E. the largest, most prominent parties According to Mansfield and Snyder’s prescription, what should the United States do with democratizing states? A. provide an international military force to ensure peace B. keep a close eye and replace bad leaders if necessary C. make certain that reforms are implemented in the right order D. strengthen international awareness of democratizing states so that peaceful states can arm themselves E. attempt to push through elections as soon as possible above all else Watch the video below, and then answer the questions below. To save your answers, click the Save to Notebook button above. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=796LfXwzIUk According to Joseph Nye, what is power transition? A. a change of power among states B. a change of power among presidents C. a change of power within the European Union or other leading organizations D. a change of power within cultures E. a change of power to non-state actors How does Nye define power diffusion? A. a change of power among states B. a change of power in regions C. a change of power within cultures D. a change of power from states to non-state actors E. a change of power from non-state actors to states Which of the following is an example of a non-state actor given by Nye? A. Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad B. Oxfam C. the former USSR D. socialism E. the mayor of Tehran Why does Nye claim it is important to be cautious of power projections? A. Simple projections don’t tell us much about power transition. B. History is not linear. C. Simple projections tend to focus soley on GDP. D. Simple projections don’t tell you anything about military or soft power. E. all of these options Nye describes a three-dimensional chess game as a metaphor for modern-day power distribution. What is the top board? A. economic power among states B. military power among states C. power among state leaders D. the deciding board for the other two boards E. the board where Kasparov faces off against the computer What is the middle board in Nye’s chess game metaphor? A. non-state actors B. a metaphor for the international underground economy C. military power among states D. economic power among states E. political power among states What is the bottom board in Nye’s chess game metaphor? A. transnational relations B. things that cross borders outside government control C. a place where power is chaotically distributed D. an area where things cross borders outside the control of governments E. all of these options What is the difference between a positive-sum game and a zero-sum game? A. A positive-sum game is when one person has all the power and a zero-sum game is when power is evenly distributed. B. A positive-sum game is a two-player power game and a zero-sum game is a one-player power game. C. A positive-sum game where my gain is your gain and a zero-sum game is my win and your loss. D. A postive-sum game is when you bet and win and a zero-sum game is when you bet and lose. E. A positive-sum game is like Tetris and a zero-sum game is like Super Mario Brothers. Nye quotes Hillary Clinton, describing her foreign policy agenda as utilizing “smart power.” What does this mean? A. Smart power addresses the two great power shifts in the 21st century. B. Smart power is “using all the tools in our toolbox.” C. Smart power combines both hard and soft power. D. Smart power reflects a new narrative of dealing with power. E. all of these options

Use the link provided to answer the questions below. http://www.worlddialogue.org/content.php?id=384 … Read More...
The key target for psychotherapy, according to Bandura, is to ________. change the client’s overt behavior to match the demands of the situation Correct Response achieve a better match between the client’s efficacy expectations and capabilities change the client’s reinforcement values to match their behaviors modify the client’s habit hierarchy

The key target for psychotherapy, according to Bandura, is to ________. change the client’s overt behavior to match the demands of the situation Correct Response achieve a better match between the client’s efficacy expectations and capabilities change the client’s reinforcement values to match their behaviors modify the client’s habit hierarchy

The key target for psychotherapy, according to Bandura, is to … Read More...
Assignment 9 Due: 11:59pm on Friday, April 11, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Problem 11.2 Part A Evaluate the dot product if and . Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part B Evaluate the dot product if and . Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Problem 11.4  A B = 5 − 6 A i ^ j ^ = −9 − 5 B i ^ j ^ A  B  = -15  A B = −5 + 9 A i ^ j ^ = 5 + 6 B i ^ j ^ A  B  = 29 Part A What is the angle between vectors and if and ? Express your answer as an integer and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the angle between vectors and if and ? Express your answer as an integer and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct ± All Work and No Play Learning Goal: To be able to calculate work done by a constant force directed at different angles relative to displacement If an object undergoes displacement while being acted upon by a force (or several forces), it is said that work is being done on the object. If the object is moving in a straight line and the displacement and the force are known, the work done by the force can be calculated as , where is the work done by force on the object that undergoes displacement directed at angle relative to .  A B A = 2 + 5 ı ^  ^ B = −2 − 4 ı ^  ^  = 175  A B A = −6 + 2 ı ^  ^ B = − − 3 ı ^  ^  = 90 W =  = cos  F  s  F   s  W F  s  F  Note that depending on the value of , the work done can be positive, negative, or zero. In this problem, you will practice calculating work done on an object moving in a straight line. The first series of questions is related to the accompanying figure. Part A What can be said about the sign of the work done by the force ? ANSWER: Correct When , the cosine of is zero, and therefore the work done is zero. Part B cos  F  1 It is positive. It is negative. It is zero. There is not enough information to answer the question.  = 90  What can be said about the work done by force ? ANSWER: Correct When , is positive, and so the work done is positive. Part C The work done by force is ANSWER: Correct When , is negative, and so the work done is negative. Part D The work done by force is ANSWER: F  2 It is positive. It is negative. It is zero. 0 <  < 90 cos  F  3 positive negative zero 90 <  < 180 cos  F  4 Correct Part E The work done by force is ANSWER: Correct positive negative zero F  5 positive negative zero Part F The work done by force is ANSWER: Correct Part G The work done by force is ANSWER: Correct In the next series of questions, you will use the formula to calculate the work done by various forces on an object that moves 160 meters to the right. F  6 positive negative zero F  7 positive negative zero W =  = cos  F  s  F   s  Part H Find the work done by the 18-newton force. Use two significant figures in your answer. Express your answer in joules. ANSWER: Correct Part I Find the work done by the 30-newton force. Use two significant figures in your answer. Express your answer in joules. ANSWER: Correct Part J Find the work done by the 12-newton force. Use two significant figures in your answer. Express your answer in joules. W W = 2900 J W W = 4200 J W ANSWER: Correct Part K Find the work done by the 15-newton force. Use two significant figures in your answer. Express your answer in joules. ANSWER: Correct Introduction to Potential Energy Learning Goal: Understand that conservative forces can be removed from the work integral by incorporating them into a new form of energy called potential energy that must be added to the kinetic energy to get the total mechanical energy. The first part of this problem contains short-answer questions that review the work-energy theorem. In the second part we introduce the concept of potential energy. But for now, please answer in terms of the work-energy theorem. Work-Energy Theorem The work-energy theorem states , where is the work done by all forces that act on the object, and and are the initial and final kinetic energies, respectively. Part A The work-energy theorem states that a force acting on a particle as it moves over a ______ changes the ______ energy of the particle if the force has a component parallel to the motion. W = -1900 J W W = -1800 J Kf = Ki + Wall Wall Ki Kf Choose the best answer to fill in the blanks above: ANSWER: Correct It is important that the force have a component acting in the direction of motion. For example, if a ball is attached to a string and whirled in uniform circular motion, the string does apply a force to the ball, but since the string's force is always perpendicular to the motion it does no work and cannot change the kinetic energy of the ball. Part B To calculate the change in energy, you must know the force as a function of _______. The work done by the force causes the energy change. Choose the best answer to fill in the blank above: ANSWER: Correct Part C To illustrate the work-energy concept, consider the case of a stone falling from to under the influence of gravity. Using the work-energy concept, we say that work is done by the gravitational _____, resulting in an increase of the ______ energy of the stone. Choose the best answer to fill in the blanks above: distance / potential distance / kinetic vertical displacement / potential none of the above acceleration work distance potential energy xi xf ANSWER: Correct Potential Energy You should read about potential energy in your text before answering the following questions. Potential energy is a concept that builds on the work-energy theorem, enlarging the concept of energy in the most physically useful way. The key aspect that allows for potential energy is the existence of conservative forces, forces for which the work done on an object does not depend on the path of the object, only the initial and final positions of the object. The gravitational force is conservative; the frictional force is not. The change in potential energy is the negative of the work done by conservative forces. Hence considering the initial and final potential energies is equivalent to calculating the work done by the conservative forces. When potential energy is used, it replaces the work done by the associated conservative force. Then only the work due to nonconservative forces needs to be calculated. In summary, when using the concept of potential energy, only nonconservative forces contribute to the work, which now changes the total energy: , where and are the final and initial potential energies, and is the work due only to nonconservative forces. Now, we will revisit the falling stone example using the concept of potential energy. Part D Rather than ascribing the increased kinetic energy of the stone to the work of gravity, we now (when using potential energy rather than work-energy) say that the increased kinetic energy comes from the ______ of the _______ energy. Choose the best answer to fill in the blanks above: ANSWER: force / kinetic potential energy / potential force / potential potential energy / kinetic Kf + Uf = Ef = Wnc + Ei = Wnc + Ki + Ui Uf Ui Wnc Correct Part E This process happens in such a way that total mechanical energy, equal to the ______ of the kinetic and potential energies, is _______. Choose the best answer to fill in the blanks above: ANSWER: Correct Problem 11.7 Part A How much work is done by the force 2.2 6.6 on a particle that moves through displacement 3.9 Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: work / potential force / kinetic change / potential sum / conserved sum / zero sum / not conserved difference / conserved F  = (− + i ^ ) N j ^ ! = r m i ^ Correct Part B How much work is done by the force 2.2 6.6 on a particle that moves through displacement 3.9 Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 11.10 A 1.8 book is lying on a 0.80- -high table. You pick it up and place it on a bookshelf 2.27 above the floor. Part A How much work does gravity do on the book? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B W = -8.6 J F  = (− + i ^ ) N j ^ ! = r m? j ^ W = 26 J kg m m Wg = -26 J How much work does your hand do on the book? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 11.12 The three ropes shown in the bird's-eye view of the figure are used to drag a crate 3.3 across the floor. Part A How much work is done by each of the three forces? Express your answers using two significant figures. Enter your answers numerically separated by commas. ANSWER: WH = 26 J m W1 , W2 , W3 = 1.9,1.2,-2.1 kJ Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 11.16 A 1.2 particle moving along the x-axis experiences the force shown in the figure. The particle's velocity is 4.6 at . You may want to review ( pages 286 - 287) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: The Definite Integral Part A What is its velocity at ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is the work–kinetic energy theorem? What is the kinetic energy at ? How is the work done in going from to related to force shown in the graph? Using the work–kinetic energy theorem, what is the kinetic energy at ? What is the velocity at ? ANSWER: kg m/s x = 0m x = 2m x = 0 m x = 0 m x = 2 m x = 2 m x = 2 m Correct Part B What is its velocity at ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is the work–kinetic energy theorem? What is the kinetic energy at ? How is the work done in going from to related to force shown in the graph? Can the work be negative? Using the work–kinetic energy theorem, what is the kinetic energy at ? What is the velocity at ? ANSWER: Correct Work on a Sliding Block A block of weight sits on a frictionless inclined plane, which makes an angle with respect to the horizontal, as shown. A force of magnitude , applied parallel to the incline, pulls the block up the plane at constant speed. v = 6.2 ms x = 4m x = 0 m x = 0 m x = 4 m x = 4 m x = 4 m v = 4.6 ms w  F Part A The block moves a distance up the incline. The block does not stop after moving this distance but continues to move with constant speed. What is the total work done on the block by all forces? (Include only the work done after the block has started moving, not the work needed to start the block moving from rest.) Express your answer in terms of given quantities. Hint 1. What physical principle to use To find the total work done on the block, use the work-energy theorem: . Hint 2. Find the change in kinetic energy What is the change in the kinetic energy of the block, from the moment it starts moving until it has been pulled a distance ? Remember that the block is pulled at constant speed. Hint 1. Consider kinetic energy If the block's speed does not change, its kinetic energy cannot change. ANSWER: ANSWER: L Wtot Wtot = Kf − Ki L Kf − Ki = 0 Wtot = 0 Correct Part B What is , the work done on the block by the force of gravity as the block moves a distance up the incline? Express the work done by gravity in terms of the weight and any other quantities given in the problem introduction. Hint 1. Force diagram Hint 2. Force of gravity component What is the component of the force of gravity in the direction of the block's displacement (along the inclined plane)? Express your answer in terms of and . Hint 1. Relative direction of the force and the motion Remember that the force of gravity acts down the plane, whereas the block's displacement is directed up the plane. ANSWER: Wg L w w  ANSWER: Correct Part C What is , the work done on the block by the applied force as the block moves a distance up the incline? Express your answer in terms of and other given quantities. Hint 1. How to find the work done by a constant force Remember that the work done on an object by a particular force is the integral of the dot product of the force and the instantaneous displacement of the object, over the path followed by the object. In this case, since the force is constant and the path is a straight segment of length up the inclined plane, the dot product becomes simple multiplication. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is , the work done on the block by the normal force as the block moves a distance up the inclined plane? Express your answer in terms of given quantities. Hint 1. First step in computing the work Fg|| = −wsin() Wg = −wLsin() WF F L F L WF = FL Wnormal L The work done by the normal force is equal to the dot product of the force vector and the block's displacement vector. The normal force and the block's displacement vector are perpendicular. Therefore, what is their dot product? ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Problem 11.20 A particle moving along the -axis has the potential energy , where is in . Part A What is the -component of the force on the particle at ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the -component of the force on the particle at ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. N  L = 0 Wnormal = 0 y U = 3.2y3 J y m y y = 0 m Fy = 0 N y y = 1 m ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the -component of the force on the particle at ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 11.28 A cable with 25.0 of tension pulls straight up on a 1.08 block that is initially at rest. Part A What is the block's speed after being lifted 2.40 ? Solve this problem using work and energy. Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Fy = -9.6 N y y = 2 m Fy = -38 N N kg m vf = 8.00 ms Problem 11.29 Part A How much work does an elevator motor do to lift a 1500 elevator a height of 110 ? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How much power must the motor supply to do this in 50 at constant speed? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 11.32 How many energy is consumed by a 1.20 hair dryer used for 10.0 and a 11.0 night light left on for 16.0 ? Part A Hair dryer: Express your answer with the appropriate units. kg m Wext = 1.62×106 J s = 3.23×104 P W kW min W hr ANSWER: Correct Part B Night light: Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 11.42 A 2500 elevator accelerates upward at 1.20 for 10.0 , starting from rest. Part A How much work does gravity do on the elevator? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct W = 7.20×105 J = 6.34×105 W J kg m/s2 m −2.45×105 J Part B How much work does the tension in the elevator cable do on the elevator? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C Use the work-kinetic energy theorem to find the kinetic energy of the elevator as it reaches 10.0 . Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the speed of the elevator as it reaches 10.0 ? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct 2.75×105 J m 3.00×104 J m 4.90 ms Problem 11.47 A horizontal spring with spring constant 130 is compressed 17 and used to launch a 2.4 box across a frictionless, horizontal surface. After the box travels some distance, the surface becomes rough. The coefficient of kinetic friction of the box on the surface is 0.15. Part A Use work and energy to find how far the box slides across the rough surface before stopping. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 11.49 Truck brakes can fail if they get too hot. In some mountainous areas, ramps of loose gravel are constructed to stop runaway trucks that have lost their brakes. The combination of a slight upward slope and a large coefficient of rolling friction as the truck tires sink into the gravel brings the truck safely to a halt. Suppose a gravel ramp slopes upward at 6.0 and the coefficient of rolling friction is 0.45. Part A Use work and energy to find the length of a ramp that will stop a 15,000 truck that enters the ramp at 30 . Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct N/m cm kg l = 53 cm kg m/s l = 83 m Problem 11.51 Use work and energy to find an expression for the speed of the block in the following figure just before it hits the floor. Part A Find an expression for the speed of the block if the coefficient of kinetic friction for the block on the table is . Express your answer in terms of the variables , , , , and free fall acceleration . ANSWER: Part B Find an expression for the speed of the block if the table is frictionless. Express your answer in terms of the variables , , , and free fall acceleration . ANSWER: μk M m h μk g v = M m h g Problem 11.57 The spring shown in the figure is compressed 60 and used to launch a 100 physics student. The track is frictionless until it starts up the incline. The student's coefficient of kinetic friction on the incline is 0.12 . Part A What is the student's speed just after losing contact with the spring? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How far up the incline does the student go? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: v = cm kg 30 v = 17 ms Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 93.6%. You received 112.37 out of a possible total of 120 points. !s = 41 m

Assignment 9 Due: 11:59pm on Friday, April 11, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Problem 11.2 Part A Evaluate the dot product if and . Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part B Evaluate the dot product if and . Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Problem 11.4  A B = 5 − 6 A i ^ j ^ = −9 − 5 B i ^ j ^ A  B  = -15  A B = −5 + 9 A i ^ j ^ = 5 + 6 B i ^ j ^ A  B  = 29 Part A What is the angle between vectors and if and ? Express your answer as an integer and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the angle between vectors and if and ? Express your answer as an integer and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct ± All Work and No Play Learning Goal: To be able to calculate work done by a constant force directed at different angles relative to displacement If an object undergoes displacement while being acted upon by a force (or several forces), it is said that work is being done on the object. If the object is moving in a straight line and the displacement and the force are known, the work done by the force can be calculated as , where is the work done by force on the object that undergoes displacement directed at angle relative to .  A B A = 2 + 5 ı ^  ^ B = −2 − 4 ı ^  ^  = 175  A B A = −6 + 2 ı ^  ^ B = − − 3 ı ^  ^  = 90 W =  = cos  F  s  F   s  W F  s  F  Note that depending on the value of , the work done can be positive, negative, or zero. In this problem, you will practice calculating work done on an object moving in a straight line. The first series of questions is related to the accompanying figure. Part A What can be said about the sign of the work done by the force ? ANSWER: Correct When , the cosine of is zero, and therefore the work done is zero. Part B cos  F  1 It is positive. It is negative. It is zero. There is not enough information to answer the question.  = 90  What can be said about the work done by force ? ANSWER: Correct When , is positive, and so the work done is positive. Part C The work done by force is ANSWER: Correct When , is negative, and so the work done is negative. Part D The work done by force is ANSWER: F  2 It is positive. It is negative. It is zero. 0 <  < 90 cos  F  3 positive negative zero 90 <  < 180 cos  F  4 Correct Part E The work done by force is ANSWER: Correct positive negative zero F  5 positive negative zero Part F The work done by force is ANSWER: Correct Part G The work done by force is ANSWER: Correct In the next series of questions, you will use the formula to calculate the work done by various forces on an object that moves 160 meters to the right. F  6 positive negative zero F  7 positive negative zero W =  = cos  F  s  F   s  Part H Find the work done by the 18-newton force. Use two significant figures in your answer. Express your answer in joules. ANSWER: Correct Part I Find the work done by the 30-newton force. Use two significant figures in your answer. Express your answer in joules. ANSWER: Correct Part J Find the work done by the 12-newton force. Use two significant figures in your answer. Express your answer in joules. W W = 2900 J W W = 4200 J W ANSWER: Correct Part K Find the work done by the 15-newton force. Use two significant figures in your answer. Express your answer in joules. ANSWER: Correct Introduction to Potential Energy Learning Goal: Understand that conservative forces can be removed from the work integral by incorporating them into a new form of energy called potential energy that must be added to the kinetic energy to get the total mechanical energy. The first part of this problem contains short-answer questions that review the work-energy theorem. In the second part we introduce the concept of potential energy. But for now, please answer in terms of the work-energy theorem. Work-Energy Theorem The work-energy theorem states , where is the work done by all forces that act on the object, and and are the initial and final kinetic energies, respectively. Part A The work-energy theorem states that a force acting on a particle as it moves over a ______ changes the ______ energy of the particle if the force has a component parallel to the motion. W = -1900 J W W = -1800 J Kf = Ki + Wall Wall Ki Kf Choose the best answer to fill in the blanks above: ANSWER: Correct It is important that the force have a component acting in the direction of motion. For example, if a ball is attached to a string and whirled in uniform circular motion, the string does apply a force to the ball, but since the string's force is always perpendicular to the motion it does no work and cannot change the kinetic energy of the ball. Part B To calculate the change in energy, you must know the force as a function of _______. The work done by the force causes the energy change. Choose the best answer to fill in the blank above: ANSWER: Correct Part C To illustrate the work-energy concept, consider the case of a stone falling from to under the influence of gravity. Using the work-energy concept, we say that work is done by the gravitational _____, resulting in an increase of the ______ energy of the stone. Choose the best answer to fill in the blanks above: distance / potential distance / kinetic vertical displacement / potential none of the above acceleration work distance potential energy xi xf ANSWER: Correct Potential Energy You should read about potential energy in your text before answering the following questions. Potential energy is a concept that builds on the work-energy theorem, enlarging the concept of energy in the most physically useful way. The key aspect that allows for potential energy is the existence of conservative forces, forces for which the work done on an object does not depend on the path of the object, only the initial and final positions of the object. The gravitational force is conservative; the frictional force is not. The change in potential energy is the negative of the work done by conservative forces. Hence considering the initial and final potential energies is equivalent to calculating the work done by the conservative forces. When potential energy is used, it replaces the work done by the associated conservative force. Then only the work due to nonconservative forces needs to be calculated. In summary, when using the concept of potential energy, only nonconservative forces contribute to the work, which now changes the total energy: , where and are the final and initial potential energies, and is the work due only to nonconservative forces. Now, we will revisit the falling stone example using the concept of potential energy. Part D Rather than ascribing the increased kinetic energy of the stone to the work of gravity, we now (when using potential energy rather than work-energy) say that the increased kinetic energy comes from the ______ of the _______ energy. Choose the best answer to fill in the blanks above: ANSWER: force / kinetic potential energy / potential force / potential potential energy / kinetic Kf + Uf = Ef = Wnc + Ei = Wnc + Ki + Ui Uf Ui Wnc Correct Part E This process happens in such a way that total mechanical energy, equal to the ______ of the kinetic and potential energies, is _______. Choose the best answer to fill in the blanks above: ANSWER: Correct Problem 11.7 Part A How much work is done by the force 2.2 6.6 on a particle that moves through displacement 3.9 Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: work / potential force / kinetic change / potential sum / conserved sum / zero sum / not conserved difference / conserved F  = (− + i ^ ) N j ^ ! = r m i ^ Correct Part B How much work is done by the force 2.2 6.6 on a particle that moves through displacement 3.9 Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 11.10 A 1.8 book is lying on a 0.80- -high table. You pick it up and place it on a bookshelf 2.27 above the floor. Part A How much work does gravity do on the book? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B W = -8.6 J F  = (− + i ^ ) N j ^ ! = r m? j ^ W = 26 J kg m m Wg = -26 J How much work does your hand do on the book? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 11.12 The three ropes shown in the bird's-eye view of the figure are used to drag a crate 3.3 across the floor. Part A How much work is done by each of the three forces? Express your answers using two significant figures. Enter your answers numerically separated by commas. ANSWER: WH = 26 J m W1 , W2 , W3 = 1.9,1.2,-2.1 kJ Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 11.16 A 1.2 particle moving along the x-axis experiences the force shown in the figure. The particle's velocity is 4.6 at . You may want to review ( pages 286 - 287) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: The Definite Integral Part A What is its velocity at ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is the work–kinetic energy theorem? What is the kinetic energy at ? How is the work done in going from to related to force shown in the graph? Using the work–kinetic energy theorem, what is the kinetic energy at ? What is the velocity at ? ANSWER: kg m/s x = 0m x = 2m x = 0 m x = 0 m x = 2 m x = 2 m x = 2 m Correct Part B What is its velocity at ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is the work–kinetic energy theorem? What is the kinetic energy at ? How is the work done in going from to related to force shown in the graph? Can the work be negative? Using the work–kinetic energy theorem, what is the kinetic energy at ? What is the velocity at ? ANSWER: Correct Work on a Sliding Block A block of weight sits on a frictionless inclined plane, which makes an angle with respect to the horizontal, as shown. A force of magnitude , applied parallel to the incline, pulls the block up the plane at constant speed. v = 6.2 ms x = 4m x = 0 m x = 0 m x = 4 m x = 4 m x = 4 m v = 4.6 ms w  F Part A The block moves a distance up the incline. The block does not stop after moving this distance but continues to move with constant speed. What is the total work done on the block by all forces? (Include only the work done after the block has started moving, not the work needed to start the block moving from rest.) Express your answer in terms of given quantities. Hint 1. What physical principle to use To find the total work done on the block, use the work-energy theorem: . Hint 2. Find the change in kinetic energy What is the change in the kinetic energy of the block, from the moment it starts moving until it has been pulled a distance ? Remember that the block is pulled at constant speed. Hint 1. Consider kinetic energy If the block's speed does not change, its kinetic energy cannot change. ANSWER: ANSWER: L Wtot Wtot = Kf − Ki L Kf − Ki = 0 Wtot = 0 Correct Part B What is , the work done on the block by the force of gravity as the block moves a distance up the incline? Express the work done by gravity in terms of the weight and any other quantities given in the problem introduction. Hint 1. Force diagram Hint 2. Force of gravity component What is the component of the force of gravity in the direction of the block's displacement (along the inclined plane)? Express your answer in terms of and . Hint 1. Relative direction of the force and the motion Remember that the force of gravity acts down the plane, whereas the block's displacement is directed up the plane. ANSWER: Wg L w w  ANSWER: Correct Part C What is , the work done on the block by the applied force as the block moves a distance up the incline? Express your answer in terms of and other given quantities. Hint 1. How to find the work done by a constant force Remember that the work done on an object by a particular force is the integral of the dot product of the force and the instantaneous displacement of the object, over the path followed by the object. In this case, since the force is constant and the path is a straight segment of length up the inclined plane, the dot product becomes simple multiplication. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is , the work done on the block by the normal force as the block moves a distance up the inclined plane? Express your answer in terms of given quantities. Hint 1. First step in computing the work Fg|| = −wsin() Wg = −wLsin() WF F L F L WF = FL Wnormal L The work done by the normal force is equal to the dot product of the force vector and the block's displacement vector. The normal force and the block's displacement vector are perpendicular. Therefore, what is their dot product? ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Problem 11.20 A particle moving along the -axis has the potential energy , where is in . Part A What is the -component of the force on the particle at ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the -component of the force on the particle at ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. N  L = 0 Wnormal = 0 y U = 3.2y3 J y m y y = 0 m Fy = 0 N y y = 1 m ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the -component of the force on the particle at ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 11.28 A cable with 25.0 of tension pulls straight up on a 1.08 block that is initially at rest. Part A What is the block's speed after being lifted 2.40 ? Solve this problem using work and energy. Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Fy = -9.6 N y y = 2 m Fy = -38 N N kg m vf = 8.00 ms Problem 11.29 Part A How much work does an elevator motor do to lift a 1500 elevator a height of 110 ? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How much power must the motor supply to do this in 50 at constant speed? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 11.32 How many energy is consumed by a 1.20 hair dryer used for 10.0 and a 11.0 night light left on for 16.0 ? Part A Hair dryer: Express your answer with the appropriate units. kg m Wext = 1.62×106 J s = 3.23×104 P W kW min W hr ANSWER: Correct Part B Night light: Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 11.42 A 2500 elevator accelerates upward at 1.20 for 10.0 , starting from rest. Part A How much work does gravity do on the elevator? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct W = 7.20×105 J = 6.34×105 W J kg m/s2 m −2.45×105 J Part B How much work does the tension in the elevator cable do on the elevator? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C Use the work-kinetic energy theorem to find the kinetic energy of the elevator as it reaches 10.0 . Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the speed of the elevator as it reaches 10.0 ? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct 2.75×105 J m 3.00×104 J m 4.90 ms Problem 11.47 A horizontal spring with spring constant 130 is compressed 17 and used to launch a 2.4 box across a frictionless, horizontal surface. After the box travels some distance, the surface becomes rough. The coefficient of kinetic friction of the box on the surface is 0.15. Part A Use work and energy to find how far the box slides across the rough surface before stopping. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 11.49 Truck brakes can fail if they get too hot. In some mountainous areas, ramps of loose gravel are constructed to stop runaway trucks that have lost their brakes. The combination of a slight upward slope and a large coefficient of rolling friction as the truck tires sink into the gravel brings the truck safely to a halt. Suppose a gravel ramp slopes upward at 6.0 and the coefficient of rolling friction is 0.45. Part A Use work and energy to find the length of a ramp that will stop a 15,000 truck that enters the ramp at 30 . Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct N/m cm kg l = 53 cm kg m/s l = 83 m Problem 11.51 Use work and energy to find an expression for the speed of the block in the following figure just before it hits the floor. Part A Find an expression for the speed of the block if the coefficient of kinetic friction for the block on the table is . Express your answer in terms of the variables , , , , and free fall acceleration . ANSWER: Part B Find an expression for the speed of the block if the table is frictionless. Express your answer in terms of the variables , , , and free fall acceleration . ANSWER: μk M m h μk g v = M m h g Problem 11.57 The spring shown in the figure is compressed 60 and used to launch a 100 physics student. The track is frictionless until it starts up the incline. The student's coefficient of kinetic friction on the incline is 0.12 . Part A What is the student's speed just after losing contact with the spring? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How far up the incline does the student go? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: v = cm kg 30 v = 17 ms Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 93.6%. You received 112.37 out of a possible total of 120 points. !s = 41 m

please email info@checkyourstudy.com
PSY4411 Written Assignment Outline The outline should contain the details of the content you will be including in your final paper (which will be a summary of the journal article). The paper will consist of 2 parts: Part I Description/ summary of the relevant historical topic. This will be determined by the article you selected. It should be approximately ¼ of your total paper. Part II Each section of the article (Introduction, methods, etc) should be summarized as follows: Introduction: Summarize the basics from the background information, and define any key terms. Name the type of study (experiment, correlational study, case study, etc) State the author’s hypothesis and if relevant, describe/ define the independent and dependent variables. Methods: Describe the participants and relevant recruiting/ inclusion/ exclusion information. Describe the variable groups (control vs experimental groups,). Samples sizes for groups do not need to be included. Briefly describe any tests performed by or on the participants (for example, if personality tests were used, it is sufficient to say: The MMPI is a standard personality assessment tool….). Results: A description of the specific statistical tests is not necessary, just a basic summation of the results (ie was there a significant difference between the groups? Was the difference predicted by the hypothesis? Did the data support or refute the hypothesis?). Discussion What do the results mean? If the hypothesis was correct, what does that suggest about the effect of the independent variable on the dependent variable? What further research is suggested? If the hypothesis was not supported, what does that mean? The outline can be structured any way you want, but be consistent; incomplete sentences/ bullet points are okay.

PSY4411 Written Assignment Outline The outline should contain the details of the content you will be including in your final paper (which will be a summary of the journal article). The paper will consist of 2 parts: Part I Description/ summary of the relevant historical topic. This will be determined by the article you selected. It should be approximately ¼ of your total paper. Part II Each section of the article (Introduction, methods, etc) should be summarized as follows: Introduction: Summarize the basics from the background information, and define any key terms. Name the type of study (experiment, correlational study, case study, etc) State the author’s hypothesis and if relevant, describe/ define the independent and dependent variables. Methods: Describe the participants and relevant recruiting/ inclusion/ exclusion information. Describe the variable groups (control vs experimental groups,). Samples sizes for groups do not need to be included. Briefly describe any tests performed by or on the participants (for example, if personality tests were used, it is sufficient to say: The MMPI is a standard personality assessment tool….). Results: A description of the specific statistical tests is not necessary, just a basic summation of the results (ie was there a significant difference between the groups? Was the difference predicted by the hypothesis? Did the data support or refute the hypothesis?). Discussion What do the results mean? If the hypothesis was correct, what does that suggest about the effect of the independent variable on the dependent variable? What further research is suggested? If the hypothesis was not supported, what does that mean? The outline can be structured any way you want, but be consistent; incomplete sentences/ bullet points are okay.

HST 102: Paper 7 Formal essay, due in class on the day of the debate No late papers will be accepted. Answer the following inquiry in a typed (and stapled) 2 page essay in the five-paragraph format. Present and describe three of your arguments that you will use to defend your position concerning eugenics. Each argument must be unique (don’t describe the same argument twice from a different angle). Each argument must include at least one quotation from the texts to support your position (a minimum of 3 total). You may discuss your positions and arguments with other people on your side (but not your opponents); however, each student must write their own essay in their own words. Do not copy sentences or paragraphs from another student’s paper, this is plagiarism and will result in a failing grade for the assignment. HST 102: Debate 4 Eugenics For or Against? Basics of the debate: The term ‘Eugenics’ was derived from two Greek words and literally means ‘good genes’. Eugenics is the social philosophy or practice of engineering society based on genes, or promoting the reproduction of good genes while reducing (or prohibiting) the reproduction of bad genes. Your group will argue either for or against the adoption of eugenic policies in your society. Key Terms: Eugenics – The study of or belief in the possibility of improving the qualities of the human species or a human population, especially by such means as discouraging reproduction by persons having genetic defects or presumed to have inheritable undesirable traits (negative eugenics) or encouraging reproduction by persons presumed to have inheritable desirable traits (positive eugenics). Darwinism – The Darwinian theory that species originate by descent, with variation, from parent forms, through the natural selection of those individuals best adapted for the reproductive success of their kind. Social Darwinism – A 19th-century theory, inspired by Darwinism, by which the social order is accounted as the product of natural selection of those persons best suited to existing living conditions. Mendelian Inheritance – Theory proposed by Gregor Johann Mendal in 1865 that became the first theory of genetic inheritance derived from experiments with peas. Birth Control – Any means to artificially prevent biological conception. Euthanasia – A policy of ending the life of an individual for their betterment (for example, because of excessive pain, brain dead, etc.) or society’s benefit. Genocide – A policy of murdering all members of a specific group of people who share a common characteristic. Deductive Logic – Deriving a specific conclusion based on a set of general definitions. Inductive Logic – Deriving a general conclusion based on a number of specific examples. Brief Historical Background: Eugenics was first proposed by Francis Galton in his 1883 work, Inquiries into Human Faculty and its Development. Galton was a cousin of Charles Darwin and an early supporter of Darwin’s theories of natural selection and evolution. Galton defined eugenics as the study of all agencies under human control which can improve or impair the racial quality of future generations. Galton’s work utilized a number of other scientific pursuits at the time including the study of heredity, genes, chromosomes, evolution, social Darwinism, zoology, birth control, sociology, psychology, chemistry, atomic theory and electrodynamics. The number of significant scientific advances was accelerating throughout the 19th century altering what science was and what its role in society could and should be. Galton’s work had a significant influence throughout all areas of society, from scientific communities to politics, culture and literature. A number of organizations were created to explore the science of eugenics and its possible applications to society. Ultimately, eugenics became a means by which to improve society through policies based on scientific study. Most of these policies related to reproductive practices within a society, specifically who could or should not reproduce. Throughout the late 1800s and early 1900s a number of policies were enacted at various levels throughout Europe and the United States aimed at controlling procreation. Some specific policies included compulsory sterilization laws (usually concerning criminals and the mentally ill) as well as banning interracial marriages to prevent ‘cross-racial’ breeding. In the United States a number of individuals and foundations supported the exploration of eugenics as a means to positively influence society, including: the Rockefeller Foundation, the Carnegie Institution, the Race Betterment Foundation of Battle Creek, MI, the Eugenics Record Office, the American Breeders Association, the Euthanasia Society of America; and individuals such as Charles Davenport, Madison Grant, Alexander Graham Bell, Irving Fisher, John D. Rockefeller, Margaret Sanger, Marie Stopes, David Starr Jordan, Vernon Kellogg, H. G. Wells (though he later changed sides) Winston Churchill, George Bernard Shaw, John Maynard Keynes, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes and Presidents Woodrow Wilson, Herbert Hoover and Theodore Roosevelt. Some early critics of eugenics included: Dr. John Haycroft, Halliday Sutherland, Lancelot Hogben, Franz Boaz, Lester Ward, G. K. Chesterton, J. B. S. Haldane, and R. A. Fisher. In 1911 the Carnegie Institute recommended constructing gas chambers around the country to euthanize certain elements of the American population (primarily the poor and criminals) considered to be harmful to the future of society as a possible eugenic solution. President Woodrow Wilson signed the first Sterilization Act in US history. In the 1920s and 30s, 30 states passed various eugenics laws, some of which were overturned by the Supreme Court. Eugenics of various forms was a founding principle of the Progressive Party, strongly supported by the first progressive president Theodore Roosevelt, and would continue to play an important part in influencing progressive policies into at least the 1940s. Many American individuals and societies supported German research on eugenics that would eventually be used to develop and justify the policies utilized by the NAZI party against minority groups including Jews, Africans, gypsies and others that ultimately led to programs of genocide and the holocaust. Following WWII and worldwide exposure of the holocaust eugenics generally fell out of favor among the public, though various lesser forms of eugenics are still advocated for today by such individuals as Dottie Lamm, Geoffrey Miller, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg, John Glad and Richard Dawson. Eugenics still influences many modern debates including: capital punishment, over-population, global warming, medicine (disease control and genetic disorders), birth control, abortion, artificial insemination, evolution, social engineering, and education. Key Points to discuss during the debate: • Individual rights vs. collective rights • The pros and cons of genetically engineering society • The practicality of genetically engineering society • Methods used to determine ‘good traits’ and ‘bad traits’ • Who determines which people are ‘fit’ or ‘unfit’ for future society • The role of science in society • Methods used to derive scientific conclusions • Ability of scientists to determine the future hereditary conditions of individuals • The value/accuracy of scientific conclusions • The role of the government to implement eugenic policies • Some possible eugenic political policies or laws • The ways these policies may be used effectively or abused • The relationship between eugenics and individual rights • The role of ethics in science and eugenics Strategies: 1. Use this guide to help you (particularly the key points). 2. Read all of the texts. 3. If needed, read secondary analysis concerning eugenics. 4. Identify key quotations as you read each text. Perhaps make a list of them to print out and/or group quotes by topic or point. 5. Develop multiple arguments to defend your position. 6. Prioritize your arguments from most persuasive to least persuasive and from most evidence to least evidence. 7. Anticipate the arguments of your opponents and develop counter-arguments for them. 8. Anticipate counter-arguments to your own arguments and develop responses to them.

HST 102: Paper 7 Formal essay, due in class on the day of the debate No late papers will be accepted. Answer the following inquiry in a typed (and stapled) 2 page essay in the five-paragraph format. Present and describe three of your arguments that you will use to defend your position concerning eugenics. Each argument must be unique (don’t describe the same argument twice from a different angle). Each argument must include at least one quotation from the texts to support your position (a minimum of 3 total). You may discuss your positions and arguments with other people on your side (but not your opponents); however, each student must write their own essay in their own words. Do not copy sentences or paragraphs from another student’s paper, this is plagiarism and will result in a failing grade for the assignment. HST 102: Debate 4 Eugenics For or Against? Basics of the debate: The term ‘Eugenics’ was derived from two Greek words and literally means ‘good genes’. Eugenics is the social philosophy or practice of engineering society based on genes, or promoting the reproduction of good genes while reducing (or prohibiting) the reproduction of bad genes. Your group will argue either for or against the adoption of eugenic policies in your society. Key Terms: Eugenics – The study of or belief in the possibility of improving the qualities of the human species or a human population, especially by such means as discouraging reproduction by persons having genetic defects or presumed to have inheritable undesirable traits (negative eugenics) or encouraging reproduction by persons presumed to have inheritable desirable traits (positive eugenics). Darwinism – The Darwinian theory that species originate by descent, with variation, from parent forms, through the natural selection of those individuals best adapted for the reproductive success of their kind. Social Darwinism – A 19th-century theory, inspired by Darwinism, by which the social order is accounted as the product of natural selection of those persons best suited to existing living conditions. Mendelian Inheritance – Theory proposed by Gregor Johann Mendal in 1865 that became the first theory of genetic inheritance derived from experiments with peas. Birth Control – Any means to artificially prevent biological conception. Euthanasia – A policy of ending the life of an individual for their betterment (for example, because of excessive pain, brain dead, etc.) or society’s benefit. Genocide – A policy of murdering all members of a specific group of people who share a common characteristic. Deductive Logic – Deriving a specific conclusion based on a set of general definitions. Inductive Logic – Deriving a general conclusion based on a number of specific examples. Brief Historical Background: Eugenics was first proposed by Francis Galton in his 1883 work, Inquiries into Human Faculty and its Development. Galton was a cousin of Charles Darwin and an early supporter of Darwin’s theories of natural selection and evolution. Galton defined eugenics as the study of all agencies under human control which can improve or impair the racial quality of future generations. Galton’s work utilized a number of other scientific pursuits at the time including the study of heredity, genes, chromosomes, evolution, social Darwinism, zoology, birth control, sociology, psychology, chemistry, atomic theory and electrodynamics. The number of significant scientific advances was accelerating throughout the 19th century altering what science was and what its role in society could and should be. Galton’s work had a significant influence throughout all areas of society, from scientific communities to politics, culture and literature. A number of organizations were created to explore the science of eugenics and its possible applications to society. Ultimately, eugenics became a means by which to improve society through policies based on scientific study. Most of these policies related to reproductive practices within a society, specifically who could or should not reproduce. Throughout the late 1800s and early 1900s a number of policies were enacted at various levels throughout Europe and the United States aimed at controlling procreation. Some specific policies included compulsory sterilization laws (usually concerning criminals and the mentally ill) as well as banning interracial marriages to prevent ‘cross-racial’ breeding. In the United States a number of individuals and foundations supported the exploration of eugenics as a means to positively influence society, including: the Rockefeller Foundation, the Carnegie Institution, the Race Betterment Foundation of Battle Creek, MI, the Eugenics Record Office, the American Breeders Association, the Euthanasia Society of America; and individuals such as Charles Davenport, Madison Grant, Alexander Graham Bell, Irving Fisher, John D. Rockefeller, Margaret Sanger, Marie Stopes, David Starr Jordan, Vernon Kellogg, H. G. Wells (though he later changed sides) Winston Churchill, George Bernard Shaw, John Maynard Keynes, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes and Presidents Woodrow Wilson, Herbert Hoover and Theodore Roosevelt. Some early critics of eugenics included: Dr. John Haycroft, Halliday Sutherland, Lancelot Hogben, Franz Boaz, Lester Ward, G. K. Chesterton, J. B. S. Haldane, and R. A. Fisher. In 1911 the Carnegie Institute recommended constructing gas chambers around the country to euthanize certain elements of the American population (primarily the poor and criminals) considered to be harmful to the future of society as a possible eugenic solution. President Woodrow Wilson signed the first Sterilization Act in US history. In the 1920s and 30s, 30 states passed various eugenics laws, some of which were overturned by the Supreme Court. Eugenics of various forms was a founding principle of the Progressive Party, strongly supported by the first progressive president Theodore Roosevelt, and would continue to play an important part in influencing progressive policies into at least the 1940s. Many American individuals and societies supported German research on eugenics that would eventually be used to develop and justify the policies utilized by the NAZI party against minority groups including Jews, Africans, gypsies and others that ultimately led to programs of genocide and the holocaust. Following WWII and worldwide exposure of the holocaust eugenics generally fell out of favor among the public, though various lesser forms of eugenics are still advocated for today by such individuals as Dottie Lamm, Geoffrey Miller, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg, John Glad and Richard Dawson. Eugenics still influences many modern debates including: capital punishment, over-population, global warming, medicine (disease control and genetic disorders), birth control, abortion, artificial insemination, evolution, social engineering, and education. Key Points to discuss during the debate: • Individual rights vs. collective rights • The pros and cons of genetically engineering society • The practicality of genetically engineering society • Methods used to determine ‘good traits’ and ‘bad traits’ • Who determines which people are ‘fit’ or ‘unfit’ for future society • The role of science in society • Methods used to derive scientific conclusions • Ability of scientists to determine the future hereditary conditions of individuals • The value/accuracy of scientific conclusions • The role of the government to implement eugenic policies • Some possible eugenic political policies or laws • The ways these policies may be used effectively or abused • The relationship between eugenics and individual rights • The role of ethics in science and eugenics Strategies: 1. Use this guide to help you (particularly the key points). 2. Read all of the texts. 3. If needed, read secondary analysis concerning eugenics. 4. Identify key quotations as you read each text. Perhaps make a list of them to print out and/or group quotes by topic or point. 5. Develop multiple arguments to defend your position. 6. Prioritize your arguments from most persuasive to least persuasive and from most evidence to least evidence. 7. Anticipate the arguments of your opponents and develop counter-arguments for them. 8. Anticipate counter-arguments to your own arguments and develop responses to them.

This is your final discussion board. Use the Week 8 Discussion Board to discuss the following questions and topics. Interact with at least two other students and do more than just agree with their comments. Provide expanded ideas or other informative comments related to their posts. After collecting and analyzing your data, you must write the last two chapters of your research report. What changes must be made to the title page (Student Guide to MSA Capstone Project, p. 15)? Should you write the last two chapters before writing the Executive Summary? Why or why not? The Executive Summary cannot exceed two double-spaced pages in length. What key facts from the research study must be included? In writing Chapter 5 Summary, Conclusions and Recommendations, what content is included in the Summary sub-section? Specifically, what are the conclusions? Are the recommendations important? Should they be numbered? What level of detail should be included for each recommendation? What is the difference between references and bibliography? Is either or both required to be included? What are your final thoughts about this learning experience? Do you feel you have a better understanding of administrative research now than when you started the class?

This is your final discussion board. Use the Week 8 Discussion Board to discuss the following questions and topics. Interact with at least two other students and do more than just agree with their comments. Provide expanded ideas or other informative comments related to their posts. After collecting and analyzing your data, you must write the last two chapters of your research report. What changes must be made to the title page (Student Guide to MSA Capstone Project, p. 15)? Should you write the last two chapters before writing the Executive Summary? Why or why not? The Executive Summary cannot exceed two double-spaced pages in length. What key facts from the research study must be included? In writing Chapter 5 Summary, Conclusions and Recommendations, what content is included in the Summary sub-section? Specifically, what are the conclusions? Are the recommendations important? Should they be numbered? What level of detail should be included for each recommendation? What is the difference between references and bibliography? Is either or both required to be included? What are your final thoughts about this learning experience? Do you feel you have a better understanding of administrative research now than when you started the class?

info@checkyourstudy.com