My Success Assignment ‘where you want to be in ten years’ Objective Make a plan and try to see all the details. Does some research, ask questions, and consider what it’s going to take to get where you want to be.

My Success Assignment ‘where you want to be in ten years’ Objective Make a plan and try to see all the details. Does some research, ask questions, and consider what it’s going to take to get where you want to be.

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1 CE 321 PRINCIPLES ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING LAB WORKSHEET No. 1 Due: One (1) Week After Each Lab Section, respectively MICROBIOLOGY Environmental engineers employ microbiology in a variety of applications. Testing for coliform bacteria is used to assess whether pathogens may be present in a water or wastewater sample. Coliforms are a type of bacteria that live in the intestines of warm blooded mammals, such as humans and cattle. They are not pathogens, but if they are present in a sample, it is taken as an indication that fecal material from humans or cattle has contacted the water. If fecal material is present, pathogens may be present, too. In water treatment, coliform counts must average less than one colony per 100 milliliters of sample tested. In wastewater treatment, typical acceptable levels might be 200-colonies/100 mL. There are two standard ways to test for coliforms, the Most Probable Number test, MPN (also called the multiple tube fermentation technique, MTF) and the membrane filter test, MF. Several companies market testing systems that are somewhat simpler, but these cannot be used by treatment plants until they receive EPA approval. Two recently accepted methods are the Minimal Media Test (Colilert system), and the Presence-Absence coliform test (P-A test). Wastewater treatment plant operators study the microorganism composition of the activated sludge units in order to assess and predict the performance of the biological floc. A sample of mixed liquor from the aeration basin is examined under the microscope, and based on the relative predominance of a variety of organisms that might be present; the operator can tell if the BOD application rates and wasting rates are as they should be. For your worksheet, please submit the items requested below (10 pts. each): 1. Examine a sample of activated sludge under the microscope (To be done together in class). Use the Atlas, Standard Methods, or other references to identify at least 5 different organisms you observed. List them and sketch them neatly on unlined paper. Describe their motility and any other distinctive characteristics as you observed it. 2. Explain what types of organisms you might expect to find in sludge with a high mean cell residence time (MCRT), and explain why these would predominate over the other types. 3. How can the predominance of a certain kind of microorganism in activated sludge affect the settling characteristics of the sludge? Give several examples. 2 4. Explain why coliforms are used as “indicator organisms” for water and wastewater testing. Name two pathogenic bacteria, two pathogenic viruses, and one pathogenic protozoan sometimes found in water supplies. 5. There is also a test for fecal coliforms. Use your class notes and outside references to explain the distinctions between the tests for total and fecal coliforms. Explain why one would use the fecal coliform test instead of the test for total coliforms. 6. Using outside references, indicate typical coliform limits for surface waters used for swimming and fishing; potable water; and wastewater treatment plant effluent. 7). In the recent past, EPA instituted regulations designed to insure that Giardia are removed from the water. Using your text or other references, explain what kind of organism this is, and explain the way in which EPA has set standards to insure they are removed during water treatment. 8. What is meant by “population dynamics”? What two factors usually control the population dynamics of a mixed culture? 9. Use the MPN test data from the samples prepared for class prior to determine the number of coliforms present in the wastewater samples. Please show your work and explain your reasoning. Total Coliforms Raw Intermediate Effluent Sample Volume No. Positive No. Positive No. Positive 10 5 5 4 1 5 5 2 0.1 5 3 1 0.01 5 1 0 0.001 2 1 —- 0.0001 1 —- —- FecalColiforms Raw Intermediate Effluent Sample Volume No. Positive No. Positive No. Positive 10 5 5 2 1 5 4 0 0.1 5 2 1 0.01 1 0 0 0.001 0 0 —– 0.0001 2 —– —– 3 10. Use the membrane filter test data given in class to determine the number of total coliforms and fecal coliforms present in the sample. Please show your work and explain your reasoning. Total Coliforms Fecal Coliforms Dilution Colonies Dilution Colonies Raw Influent 0.1 mL/100 mL 58 1 mL/100 mL 47 Intermediate 1 mL/100 mL 13 10 mL/100 mL 28 Wetland Effluent 10 mL/100 mL 10 100 mL/100 mL 15

1 CE 321 PRINCIPLES ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING LAB WORKSHEET No. 1 Due: One (1) Week After Each Lab Section, respectively MICROBIOLOGY Environmental engineers employ microbiology in a variety of applications. Testing for coliform bacteria is used to assess whether pathogens may be present in a water or wastewater sample. Coliforms are a type of bacteria that live in the intestines of warm blooded mammals, such as humans and cattle. They are not pathogens, but if they are present in a sample, it is taken as an indication that fecal material from humans or cattle has contacted the water. If fecal material is present, pathogens may be present, too. In water treatment, coliform counts must average less than one colony per 100 milliliters of sample tested. In wastewater treatment, typical acceptable levels might be 200-colonies/100 mL. There are two standard ways to test for coliforms, the Most Probable Number test, MPN (also called the multiple tube fermentation technique, MTF) and the membrane filter test, MF. Several companies market testing systems that are somewhat simpler, but these cannot be used by treatment plants until they receive EPA approval. Two recently accepted methods are the Minimal Media Test (Colilert system), and the Presence-Absence coliform test (P-A test). Wastewater treatment plant operators study the microorganism composition of the activated sludge units in order to assess and predict the performance of the biological floc. A sample of mixed liquor from the aeration basin is examined under the microscope, and based on the relative predominance of a variety of organisms that might be present; the operator can tell if the BOD application rates and wasting rates are as they should be. For your worksheet, please submit the items requested below (10 pts. each): 1. Examine a sample of activated sludge under the microscope (To be done together in class). Use the Atlas, Standard Methods, or other references to identify at least 5 different organisms you observed. List them and sketch them neatly on unlined paper. Describe their motility and any other distinctive characteristics as you observed it. 2. Explain what types of organisms you might expect to find in sludge with a high mean cell residence time (MCRT), and explain why these would predominate over the other types. 3. How can the predominance of a certain kind of microorganism in activated sludge affect the settling characteristics of the sludge? Give several examples. 2 4. Explain why coliforms are used as “indicator organisms” for water and wastewater testing. Name two pathogenic bacteria, two pathogenic viruses, and one pathogenic protozoan sometimes found in water supplies. 5. There is also a test for fecal coliforms. Use your class notes and outside references to explain the distinctions between the tests for total and fecal coliforms. Explain why one would use the fecal coliform test instead of the test for total coliforms. 6. Using outside references, indicate typical coliform limits for surface waters used for swimming and fishing; potable water; and wastewater treatment plant effluent. 7). In the recent past, EPA instituted regulations designed to insure that Giardia are removed from the water. Using your text or other references, explain what kind of organism this is, and explain the way in which EPA has set standards to insure they are removed during water treatment. 8. What is meant by “population dynamics”? What two factors usually control the population dynamics of a mixed culture? 9. Use the MPN test data from the samples prepared for class prior to determine the number of coliforms present in the wastewater samples. Please show your work and explain your reasoning. Total Coliforms Raw Intermediate Effluent Sample Volume No. Positive No. Positive No. Positive 10 5 5 4 1 5 5 2 0.1 5 3 1 0.01 5 1 0 0.001 2 1 —- 0.0001 1 —- —- FecalColiforms Raw Intermediate Effluent Sample Volume No. Positive No. Positive No. Positive 10 5 5 2 1 5 4 0 0.1 5 2 1 0.01 1 0 0 0.001 0 0 —– 0.0001 2 —– —– 3 10. Use the membrane filter test data given in class to determine the number of total coliforms and fecal coliforms present in the sample. Please show your work and explain your reasoning. Total Coliforms Fecal Coliforms Dilution Colonies Dilution Colonies Raw Influent 0.1 mL/100 mL 58 1 mL/100 mL 47 Intermediate 1 mL/100 mL 13 10 mL/100 mL 28 Wetland Effluent 10 mL/100 mL 10 100 mL/100 mL 15

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Question 1 1. When the rules of perspective are applied in order to represent unusual points of view, we call this ________. a. foreshortening b. chiaroscuro c. convergence d. highlight e. overlapping 10 points Question 2 1. A flat work of art has two dimensions: ________ and width. a. breadth b. depth c. size d. mass e. height 10 points Question 3 1. Méret Oppenheim was part of an art movement that rejected rational, conscious thought. Her fur-lined teacup and saucer, Object, conjures an unexpected and illogical sensation for the viewer by using ________ texture. a. smooth b. familiar c. expected d. subversive e. silky 10 points Question 4 1. In James Allen’s etching The Connectors, an image of workers erecting the Empire State Building, the artist created a feeling of great height by using ________ line to lead the viewer’s eye diagonally downward. a. horizontal b. communicative c. regular d. directional e. implied 10 points Question 5 1. Because it is three-dimensional, a form has these three spatial measurements: height, width, and ________. a. mass b. length c. size d. depth e. strength 10 points Question 6 1. The ancient Egyptian depiction of the journey of the Sun god Re (0.1) was painted on ________. a. stone b. a coffin c. the wall of a tomb d. copper e. a vase 10 points Question 7 1. The area covered by a pattern is called the ________. a. field b. motif c. background d. size e. foreground 10 points Question 8 1. ________ balance is achieved when two halves of a composition are not mirror images of each other. a. unified b. radial c. varied d. asymmetrical e. symmetrical 10 points Question 9 1. In Audrey Flack’s Marilyn Monroe, the burning candle, the flower, and the hourglass are typical of a kind of symbolism in art that reminds us of death. This kind of symbolism is known as ________. a. vanitas b. feminism c. abstract d. eternal e. none of the other answers 10 points Question 10 1. Tibetan Buddhist monks create colored sand images with a radial design. This representation of the universe is called a ________. a. prayer wheel b. rotunda c. mandala d. prayer flag e. lotus 10 points Question 11 1. In The School of Athens, Raphael focused our attention on two Greek philosophers positioned in the center of the work. They are ________ and ________. a. Plato . . . Aristotle b. Aristotle . . . Socrates c. Diogenes . . . Socrates d. Diogenes . . . Aristotle e. Socrates . . . Plato 10 points Question 12 1. In his Obey campaign poster Shepard Fairey used a striking contrast between positive and ________ shapes to attract the attention of the public. a. figure–ground reversal b. implied c. geometric d. organic e. negative 10 points Question 13 1. The Italian architect Andrea Palladio created a radial design in his plan for the Villa Capra. This building is also called the ________. a. Colosseum b. Pantheon c. Villa Rotonda d. Villa Caprese e. Parthenon 10 points Question 14 1. The French artist Georges Seurat employed a new technique to create a jewel-like diffusion of light and vibration of color in his work The Circus. This type of painting, made up of small dots of color, is known as ________. a. Fauvism b. Luminism c. pointillism d. Pop art e. Impressionism 10 points Question 15 1. The rarity of an artwork, and its value, are often closely related. True False 10 points Question 16 1. By orienting lines so that they attract attention to a specific area of a work of art the artist is using ________. a. actual line b. implied line c. directional line d. measured line e. chaotic line 10 points Question 17 1. Kindred Spirits by Asher Brown Durand uses the effects of ________ to give a sense of the vastness of the American landscape. a. pencil drawing b. geometry c. atmospheric perspective d. foreshortening e. color 10 points Question 18 1. The opposite of emphasis is ________. a. subordination b. tone c. focal point d. color e. proportion 10 points Question 19 1. Gustav Klimt’s portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer was typical of his portraits of the wives and sisters of ________. a. foreign tourists b. Nazi rulers c. German scientists d. Austrian businessmen e. important politicians 10 points Question 20 1. The combination of jarring vertical and diagonal lines in Vincent van Gogh’s The Bedroom creates an atmosphere of ________. a. happiness b. rest c. anxiety d. expectation e. calm 10 points Question 21 1. If the clothing of the saint was the only light area in The Funeral of St. Bonaventure, the viewer’s eye would not be easily drawn to any other areas of the composition. True False 10 points Question 22 1. Miriam Schapiro’s collage Baby Blocks combines two different kinds of shape. ________ is the term used to describe a shape that suggests the natural world, while the term geometric suggests mathematical regularity. a. conceptual b. implied c. organic d. regular e. artificial 10 points Question 23 1. Any of the ________ of art can help focus our interest on specific areas of a work of art. a. styles b. elements c. periods d. tones e. themes 10 points Question 24 1. An artwork can be described as non-objective if its subject matter is ________. a. three-dimensional b. difficult c. unrecognizable d. recognizable e. animals 10 points Question 25 1. Match the methodological approach with its definition: biographical analysis feminist analysis formal analysis contextual analysis 2. iconographical analysis a. analyzes the use of formal elements in a work. b. considers the role of women in an artwork c. interprets objects and figures in the artwork as symbols d. considers the artist’s personal experiences e. considers the religious, political, and social environment in which the artwork was made and viewed 10 points Question 26 1. Alexander Calder invented the ________, a type of suspended, balanced sculpture that uses air currents to power its movement. a. mime b. relief c. mobile d. stabile e. zoetrope 10 points Question 27 1. Louise Nevelson’s work White Vertical Water is a realistic depiction of fish in a river. True False 10 points Question 28 1. William G. Wall’s Fort Edward was published as a ________. a. print b. watercolor c. photograph d. oil painting e. newspaper article 10 points Question 29 1. Artemisia Gentileschi worked during this stylistic and historical period. a. Surrealism b. Impressionism c. Baroque d. Renaissance e. Pop art 10 points Question 30 1. The process of using a series of parallel lines set close to one another to differentiate planes of value in a work of art is called ________. a. highlight b. core shadow c. perspective d. hatching e. palette 10 points Question 31 1. The artist Canaletto, in his drawing of the Ducal Palace in Venice, created an impression of three dimensions by using line to show the division between ________. a. planes b. two figures c. colors d. time periods e. mountains 10 points Question 32 1. Marisol’s work Father Damien was created to memorialize the heroism of a priest who lost his life helping the victims of leprosy. This sculpture stands in front of the State Capitol Building in the U.S. State of ________. a. Arizona b. Pennsylvania c. Utah d. Tennessee e. Hawaii 10 points Question 33 1. The medium of Marc Quinn’s Self is: a. clay b. the artist’s toenail clippings c. wood d. real human hair e. the artist’s own blood 10 points Question 34 1. The work now known as the Watts Towers was in fact given a different title by its creator. That title was ________. a. Nuestro Pueblo b. LA Towers c. Found Objects d. it had no title originally e. Skyscrapers 1 and 2 10 points Question 35 1. Why do we presume that the head of a woman from Benin (0.18) was made for someone wealthy? a. because it was made to be shown in a museum b. because it strongly resembles the Queen c. because it has a price carved on the back d. because it was made from rare ivory e. it was definitely not made for anyone wealthy 10 points Question 36 1. Shahzia Sikander’s art is best described as Abstract Expressionism Naturalist sculpture Pop Art Miniature Painting 10 points Question 37 1. A sunset is a work of art. True False 10 points Question 38 1. A mens’ urinal became a well known artwork in the 20th century. True False 10 points Question 39 1. Which artist has torn out people’s lawns to design and build edible gardens across the country? Andrea Zittel Fritz Haeg Ruben Ortiz Torres Mark Newport

Question 1 1. When the rules of perspective are applied in order to represent unusual points of view, we call this ________. a. foreshortening b. chiaroscuro c. convergence d. highlight e. overlapping 10 points Question 2 1. A flat work of art has two dimensions: ________ and width. a. breadth b. depth c. size d. mass e. height 10 points Question 3 1. Méret Oppenheim was part of an art movement that rejected rational, conscious thought. Her fur-lined teacup and saucer, Object, conjures an unexpected and illogical sensation for the viewer by using ________ texture. a. smooth b. familiar c. expected d. subversive e. silky 10 points Question 4 1. In James Allen’s etching The Connectors, an image of workers erecting the Empire State Building, the artist created a feeling of great height by using ________ line to lead the viewer’s eye diagonally downward. a. horizontal b. communicative c. regular d. directional e. implied 10 points Question 5 1. Because it is three-dimensional, a form has these three spatial measurements: height, width, and ________. a. mass b. length c. size d. depth e. strength 10 points Question 6 1. The ancient Egyptian depiction of the journey of the Sun god Re (0.1) was painted on ________. a. stone b. a coffin c. the wall of a tomb d. copper e. a vase 10 points Question 7 1. The area covered by a pattern is called the ________. a. field b. motif c. background d. size e. foreground 10 points Question 8 1. ________ balance is achieved when two halves of a composition are not mirror images of each other. a. unified b. radial c. varied d. asymmetrical e. symmetrical 10 points Question 9 1. In Audrey Flack’s Marilyn Monroe, the burning candle, the flower, and the hourglass are typical of a kind of symbolism in art that reminds us of death. This kind of symbolism is known as ________. a. vanitas b. feminism c. abstract d. eternal e. none of the other answers 10 points Question 10 1. Tibetan Buddhist monks create colored sand images with a radial design. This representation of the universe is called a ________. a. prayer wheel b. rotunda c. mandala d. prayer flag e. lotus 10 points Question 11 1. In The School of Athens, Raphael focused our attention on two Greek philosophers positioned in the center of the work. They are ________ and ________. a. Plato . . . Aristotle b. Aristotle . . . Socrates c. Diogenes . . . Socrates d. Diogenes . . . Aristotle e. Socrates . . . Plato 10 points Question 12 1. In his Obey campaign poster Shepard Fairey used a striking contrast between positive and ________ shapes to attract the attention of the public. a. figure–ground reversal b. implied c. geometric d. organic e. negative 10 points Question 13 1. The Italian architect Andrea Palladio created a radial design in his plan for the Villa Capra. This building is also called the ________. a. Colosseum b. Pantheon c. Villa Rotonda d. Villa Caprese e. Parthenon 10 points Question 14 1. The French artist Georges Seurat employed a new technique to create a jewel-like diffusion of light and vibration of color in his work The Circus. This type of painting, made up of small dots of color, is known as ________. a. Fauvism b. Luminism c. pointillism d. Pop art e. Impressionism 10 points Question 15 1. The rarity of an artwork, and its value, are often closely related. True False 10 points Question 16 1. By orienting lines so that they attract attention to a specific area of a work of art the artist is using ________. a. actual line b. implied line c. directional line d. measured line e. chaotic line 10 points Question 17 1. Kindred Spirits by Asher Brown Durand uses the effects of ________ to give a sense of the vastness of the American landscape. a. pencil drawing b. geometry c. atmospheric perspective d. foreshortening e. color 10 points Question 18 1. The opposite of emphasis is ________. a. subordination b. tone c. focal point d. color e. proportion 10 points Question 19 1. Gustav Klimt’s portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer was typical of his portraits of the wives and sisters of ________. a. foreign tourists b. Nazi rulers c. German scientists d. Austrian businessmen e. important politicians 10 points Question 20 1. The combination of jarring vertical and diagonal lines in Vincent van Gogh’s The Bedroom creates an atmosphere of ________. a. happiness b. rest c. anxiety d. expectation e. calm 10 points Question 21 1. If the clothing of the saint was the only light area in The Funeral of St. Bonaventure, the viewer’s eye would not be easily drawn to any other areas of the composition. True False 10 points Question 22 1. Miriam Schapiro’s collage Baby Blocks combines two different kinds of shape. ________ is the term used to describe a shape that suggests the natural world, while the term geometric suggests mathematical regularity. a. conceptual b. implied c. organic d. regular e. artificial 10 points Question 23 1. Any of the ________ of art can help focus our interest on specific areas of a work of art. a. styles b. elements c. periods d. tones e. themes 10 points Question 24 1. An artwork can be described as non-objective if its subject matter is ________. a. three-dimensional b. difficult c. unrecognizable d. recognizable e. animals 10 points Question 25 1. Match the methodological approach with its definition: biographical analysis feminist analysis formal analysis contextual analysis 2. iconographical analysis a. analyzes the use of formal elements in a work. b. considers the role of women in an artwork c. interprets objects and figures in the artwork as symbols d. considers the artist’s personal experiences e. considers the religious, political, and social environment in which the artwork was made and viewed 10 points Question 26 1. Alexander Calder invented the ________, a type of suspended, balanced sculpture that uses air currents to power its movement. a. mime b. relief c. mobile d. stabile e. zoetrope 10 points Question 27 1. Louise Nevelson’s work White Vertical Water is a realistic depiction of fish in a river. True False 10 points Question 28 1. William G. Wall’s Fort Edward was published as a ________. a. print b. watercolor c. photograph d. oil painting e. newspaper article 10 points Question 29 1. Artemisia Gentileschi worked during this stylistic and historical period. a. Surrealism b. Impressionism c. Baroque d. Renaissance e. Pop art 10 points Question 30 1. The process of using a series of parallel lines set close to one another to differentiate planes of value in a work of art is called ________. a. highlight b. core shadow c. perspective d. hatching e. palette 10 points Question 31 1. The artist Canaletto, in his drawing of the Ducal Palace in Venice, created an impression of three dimensions by using line to show the division between ________. a. planes b. two figures c. colors d. time periods e. mountains 10 points Question 32 1. Marisol’s work Father Damien was created to memorialize the heroism of a priest who lost his life helping the victims of leprosy. This sculpture stands in front of the State Capitol Building in the U.S. State of ________. a. Arizona b. Pennsylvania c. Utah d. Tennessee e. Hawaii 10 points Question 33 1. The medium of Marc Quinn’s Self is: a. clay b. the artist’s toenail clippings c. wood d. real human hair e. the artist’s own blood 10 points Question 34 1. The work now known as the Watts Towers was in fact given a different title by its creator. That title was ________. a. Nuestro Pueblo b. LA Towers c. Found Objects d. it had no title originally e. Skyscrapers 1 and 2 10 points Question 35 1. Why do we presume that the head of a woman from Benin (0.18) was made for someone wealthy? a. because it was made to be shown in a museum b. because it strongly resembles the Queen c. because it has a price carved on the back d. because it was made from rare ivory e. it was definitely not made for anyone wealthy 10 points Question 36 1. Shahzia Sikander’s art is best described as Abstract Expressionism Naturalist sculpture Pop Art Miniature Painting 10 points Question 37 1. A sunset is a work of art. True False 10 points Question 38 1. A mens’ urinal became a well known artwork in the 20th century. True False 10 points Question 39 1. Which artist has torn out people’s lawns to design and build edible gardens across the country? Andrea Zittel Fritz Haeg Ruben Ortiz Torres Mark Newport

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Q3a. Describe into details two principles of access control.

Q3a. Describe into details two principles of access control.

ITU-T suggested standard X.800 defines access control as follows: “The … Read More...
. Pt 1. Making Observations (Introduction) Write a brief, introductory paragraph that includes general observations related to the topic. You may consider information from the news, media (tv, movies), social media, popular views, ideas from the general public, or your personal experiences. Your paragraph should specifically mention three (3) observations related to this topic and be sure to cite your sources. You should also include your thoughts on why this topic is of interest to you or relevant to society (i.e. what is the significance?). Pt 2. Apply The Content Choose five (5) terms or concepts that we have covered in this unit that are related to the chosen topic. Define each term in your own words and then write one (1) sentence that explains how it is related to the topic. The concept are: Define evolution. What was Darwin’s role in establishing the theory of evolution? What does the phrase “descent with modification” mean? How are fossils, anatomical studies, and molecular biology used to provide evidence for the theory of evolution? What is “fitness” in a biological organism? What role do mutations have in natural selection? What are the types of natural selection? How do they effect the genetic variation in a population? What is genetic drift? gene flow? How do they effect the genetic variation in a population? What forces can lead to adaptive evolution? What is the biological definition of a species? What are the three domains of living organisms? What are the six kingdoms? For each kingdom you should be able to describe the cellular structure, means of reproduction, ways of getting nutrients/food, general/adaptive features, and an example organism. How does Helicobacter pylori avoid competition? What extreme environment does a hermoacidophile occupy? What is unique about the Volvox compared to other protists? How do pitcher plants thrive in low nutrient environments? How does the puffball mushroom achieve reproductive success? What adaptations allowed plants to live on the land? What major adaptations occurred in the animal kingdom? In vertebrates? What domain, kingdom, phylum, sub phylum, and class do humans belong to? What do we share with organisms in these groups? What are the ecological levels of the biological hierarchy? What are the elements of a habitat? What are the criteria used by ecologists to measure and observe populations? What common patterns of population distribution are seen in nature? Compare the three kinds of survivorship curves? What do they show? What kind of reproductive behaviors lead to type I, II, and III survivorship curves? How does idealized population growth differ from how actual populations grow? What are factors that affect the growth of a population? How do density-dependent factors affect population growth? What are examples of density-independent factors that can affect population growth? What is a population boom? What is a population bust? Describe the boom and bust cycles often observed in nature. What kinds of competition occur in a habitat? What kinds of symbiotic relationships occur in a habitat? How do organisms avoid predation? What are the levels in a trophic structure? How can plants and animals avoid being eaten? Why is a food web a more accurate representation of the organisms in a community compared to a food chain? Why are most food chains limited to only three or four trophic levels.What are some common threats to biodiversity? What are common types of pollution? Explain why we must be concerned about even small levels of polluting chemicals in the environment. What is sustainability? How can we contribute to the sustainability of life on our planet? Pt 3. Form A Claim Write a claim statement related to the chosen topic. Consider the major question that you are addressing and then develop a statement that will guide your research and writing as you develop your scientific explanation (in Pt 4). Pt 4. Construct a Scientific Explanation Write a scientific explanation that includes evidence and reasoning to support your claim. Your explanation should demonstrate your understanding of the chosen topic using discussion and content from this course as a starting point. Your explanation should include information from a minimum of three (3) sources and one (1) of these sources must be a peer-reviewed scientific article or a review of a scientific study or studies (i.e. a primary or secondary source). You should cite your sources within the body of your explanation and include a list of references at the end (any standard formatting method is acceptable).

. Pt 1. Making Observations (Introduction) Write a brief, introductory paragraph that includes general observations related to the topic. You may consider information from the news, media (tv, movies), social media, popular views, ideas from the general public, or your personal experiences. Your paragraph should specifically mention three (3) observations related to this topic and be sure to cite your sources. You should also include your thoughts on why this topic is of interest to you or relevant to society (i.e. what is the significance?). Pt 2. Apply The Content Choose five (5) terms or concepts that we have covered in this unit that are related to the chosen topic. Define each term in your own words and then write one (1) sentence that explains how it is related to the topic. The concept are: Define evolution. What was Darwin’s role in establishing the theory of evolution? What does the phrase “descent with modification” mean? How are fossils, anatomical studies, and molecular biology used to provide evidence for the theory of evolution? What is “fitness” in a biological organism? What role do mutations have in natural selection? What are the types of natural selection? How do they effect the genetic variation in a population? What is genetic drift? gene flow? How do they effect the genetic variation in a population? What forces can lead to adaptive evolution? What is the biological definition of a species? What are the three domains of living organisms? What are the six kingdoms? For each kingdom you should be able to describe the cellular structure, means of reproduction, ways of getting nutrients/food, general/adaptive features, and an example organism. How does Helicobacter pylori avoid competition? What extreme environment does a hermoacidophile occupy? What is unique about the Volvox compared to other protists? How do pitcher plants thrive in low nutrient environments? How does the puffball mushroom achieve reproductive success? What adaptations allowed plants to live on the land? What major adaptations occurred in the animal kingdom? In vertebrates? What domain, kingdom, phylum, sub phylum, and class do humans belong to? What do we share with organisms in these groups? What are the ecological levels of the biological hierarchy? What are the elements of a habitat? What are the criteria used by ecologists to measure and observe populations? What common patterns of population distribution are seen in nature? Compare the three kinds of survivorship curves? What do they show? What kind of reproductive behaviors lead to type I, II, and III survivorship curves? How does idealized population growth differ from how actual populations grow? What are factors that affect the growth of a population? How do density-dependent factors affect population growth? What are examples of density-independent factors that can affect population growth? What is a population boom? What is a population bust? Describe the boom and bust cycles often observed in nature. What kinds of competition occur in a habitat? What kinds of symbiotic relationships occur in a habitat? How do organisms avoid predation? What are the levels in a trophic structure? How can plants and animals avoid being eaten? Why is a food web a more accurate representation of the organisms in a community compared to a food chain? Why are most food chains limited to only three or four trophic levels.What are some common threats to biodiversity? What are common types of pollution? Explain why we must be concerned about even small levels of polluting chemicals in the environment. What is sustainability? How can we contribute to the sustainability of life on our planet? Pt 3. Form A Claim Write a claim statement related to the chosen topic. Consider the major question that you are addressing and then develop a statement that will guide your research and writing as you develop your scientific explanation (in Pt 4). Pt 4. Construct a Scientific Explanation Write a scientific explanation that includes evidence and reasoning to support your claim. Your explanation should demonstrate your understanding of the chosen topic using discussion and content from this course as a starting point. Your explanation should include information from a minimum of three (3) sources and one (1) of these sources must be a peer-reviewed scientific article or a review of a scientific study or studies (i.e. a primary or secondary source). You should cite your sources within the body of your explanation and include a list of references at the end (any standard formatting method is acceptable).

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For this assignment, you will compose a letter designed to recruit students to join and support the agenda of one of three nonexistent student organizations that, were they to exist, would likely be very unpopular. The student organization for which you will be recruiting is determined by your last name: The first letter of your last name is… Your student organization assignment is… A – F The SETS Collective: SETS (Skip the Elevator, Take the Stairs) is dedicated to energy conservation on campus, particularly by eliminating elevator usage by pedestrians in any buildings on the UT-Austin campus. G – N O – Z Your recruiting letter must include eight (8) different persuasive strategies. Each strategy must be used in the service of encouraging students to join the organization and/or endorse its cause. In addition to your recruiting letter, you will also submit a commentary describing the different strategies you used in the recruiting letter. In this course, we utilize the TurnItIn tool. This service helps educators prevent plagiarism by detecting unoriginal content in student papers. In addition to acting as a plagiarism deterrent, it also has features designed to aid in educating students about plagiarism and importance of proper attribution of any borrowed content. For more information, please visit http://turnitin.com/. Below are a series of requirements for the paper assignment. Failure to satisfy these requirements will result in substantial point penalties. Also, failure to abide by the academic honesty policy described in the syllabus and maintained by the CMS department, the Moody College of Communication, and/or The University of Texas will result in a grade of F on the assignment and referral to the Dean of Students. Assignment Requirements • You must portray yourself as a recruiting officer (or Secretary of Recruitment) – not the President, VP, etc. – of the organization described in your letter. As a recruiting officer, you are not authorized to offer any rewards or bribes (gifts in the form of sports tickets, free meals, etc.) to people as an incentive to join the organization, nor are you allowed to make up fictional incentives (e.g., OBC students will enjoy an opportunity to participate in international conferences). Your letter should focus exclusively on the merits of joining the organization based on commitment to its cause. • Assume that organization has just been formed – i.e., do not portray it as having existed prior to the Spring of 2017. • You may also assume that there are currently only three members of the organization, the president, vice-president, and yourself (the Secretary of Recruitment). You CANNOT claim that there are “many members.” • You must use the following format for the recruiting letter AND the commentary: 12-point Times New Roman font, single-spaced (NOT double-spaced) on 8.5 X 11-inch white paper with 1-inch margins on all sides. • The recruiting letter must be no shorter than 2 nor longer than 3 pages; the commentary must be no longer than 2 pages. • Your recruiting letter must include only 8 (eight) DIFFERENT strategies discussed in the lectures and/or readings. You may use any principle/theory we have discussed EXCEPT for balance theory (which is too obvious) or deception (which isn’t persuasion per se). • Your commentary must identify the name OR what you did for of each strategy (e.g., Door In Face or Foot In The Door) used in your letter and describe the specific purpose(s) the strategy was used to achieve. At a minimum, your description of each strategy should consist of at least two complete sentences (16 sentences total). • Each strategy explanation in your commentary should be bulleted or numbered for easy identification • You may not lie under any circumstances. Lies include falsifications and/or distortions of the truth about the student organization (e.g., SURF is endorsed by the Fellowship of Christian Athletes). Also, you may not offer recruits bribes in any form (tickets, discounts, free food, cash, etc.) as an incentive for joining the organization. • Your completed assignment (recruiting letter + commentary) must be turned in on April 13th (a Thursday) at or before 9:30 a.m. Grading Rubric We will use the following rubric to evaluate and grade your letter + commentary. Assignment Component Possible Points Obtained Points Format, Spelling, Grammar, Coherence Are the letter and commentary written in the proper format? Do they consist of grammatical, coherent English sentences? Has the assignment been spell-checked? 4 Strategy 1 Example/Commentary Is the example an acceptable instance of the strategy? Is it different from the other strategies used? Is the strategy correctly identified and adequately explained in the commentary? 2 Strategy 2 Example/Commentary 2 Strategy 3 Example/Commentary 2 Strategy 4 Example/Commentary 2 Strategy 5 Example/Commentary 2 Strategy 6 Example/ Commentary 2 Strategy 7 Example/ Commentary 2 Strategy 8 Example/ Commentary 2 Lies/Deception/Bribes (-3 pts per instance) -3 (per instance) Total Score 20 Cannot use strategy of Balance Theory, Lie Write a persuasive essay and a commentary Commentary is about 8 strategies in letter • 8 bullets separate from the letter “foot-in-the-door” – “door-in-the-face” (rejection then retreat) o 1. Make a large (but reasonable) request to target  World you lend me $50? o 2. After request is rejected, make a smaller request  Well then, could you lend me $10? o Creating a “big” favor out of thin air! “low-balling” • An advantage is offered that induces a favorable purchase decision. Then, sometime after the decision has been made, but before the bargain is sealed, the original purchase buyer is deftly removed. 1.) Loss framing: Loss aversion 2.) Restriction: scarcity 3.) Positive self-feeling: Principle commitment 4.) Identification: Social Proof 5.) “Using Rhymes” is what you would write instead of Stroop effect: Fluency 6.) Virtual ownership: Endowment effect 7.) That’s not all: reciprocity 8.) Flattery: Likability 9.) Expertise strategy: Authority principle 10.) Inducing dissonance reduction: Norm of consistency 11.) Conformity concession: social proof 12.) Association similarity: Liking & Association principle Strategies – Use 8 (Cannot use Balance Theory or deception) Strategy Principle Sources/Notes Door in the Face Reciprocity 9/16 lecture Foot in the Door Consistency Norm 9/30 lecture That’s not all Reciprocity 9/16 lecture Flattery Likability Could someone give an example for Flattery?! I’m a little stuck… “Providing a statistic” Social Proof? why is this yellow? What principle is this? How did you use this as a strategy?? plz help AUTHORITY it depends how you use it ID-ing yourself as a student Likability <in cialdini chapter 5 they are talked about as 2 different things, so if you can argue it your way,Cialdini can support it what is the strategy for this? Perceptual Contrast What is this for? Low-Balling Might be considered lying. Soft-Sell Humor appeal did anyone use this?? Anyone??? What principle is this? Hard-sell ???????? Seek-and-Hide Fear Appeal ???? What principle does this fall under???? Pump and Dump social proof 10/9 lecture Bait-and-switch this kind of seems like deception, can we use it? Moral Appeal Commitment Rebecca’s Lecture 10/2 Voluntary instead of Mandatory Consistency Norm 9/30 lecture herd mentality social proof 10/14 lecture Loss framing Loss Aversion Endowment Effect this is a principle FYI Mere ownership Scarcity Dissonance Reduction Positive/negative self feelings Commitment to gain compliance Rebecca’s Lecture Principles Name STRATEGIES/Ideas Source/Notes Reciprocity That’s not all! Likability/Association Flattery, agreeing with said person, state similar social standings, “work with” them, show evidence of “good things” likeability/association ppt Consistency/Commitment Foot in the door, positive self-feelings, moral appeal, Social Proof/Conformity norm works when someone is uncertain about the right thing to do, and when the person they are watching is similar to them. Provide target with “evidence” that compliance is a common/frequent response among desired social group “we made other people happy, we’ll make you happy too” Priming the pump (tip jar example) Pump and dump (Scam, could be considered deception) Conformity and social proff ppt Authority Wearing a uniform, Titles, books, diplomas, awards, success, using a spokesperson, Scarcity/Supply and demand “Only a certain number of students allowed in” “only for college students” “Exclusive except to X” “Only a certain number of seats” Scarcity ppt Psychological Reactance Restricting access, censoring something, implying scarcity, Scarcity ppt Attractiveness Similarity Mentioning you are a student Perceptual Contrast Loss aversion gain or loss framing Scarcity ppt Balance Theory We aren’t allowed to use this Judgement Heuristic Price = product quality Use of long unfamilar words = intelligence fluency = trustworthinesss Fluency ppt Availability Heuristic Can you think of one example (out of ten) (for us) vs Can you think of then for the competitor - here’s our ten. Fluency ppt

For this assignment, you will compose a letter designed to recruit students to join and support the agenda of one of three nonexistent student organizations that, were they to exist, would likely be very unpopular. The student organization for which you will be recruiting is determined by your last name: The first letter of your last name is… Your student organization assignment is… A – F The SETS Collective: SETS (Skip the Elevator, Take the Stairs) is dedicated to energy conservation on campus, particularly by eliminating elevator usage by pedestrians in any buildings on the UT-Austin campus. G – N O – Z Your recruiting letter must include eight (8) different persuasive strategies. Each strategy must be used in the service of encouraging students to join the organization and/or endorse its cause. In addition to your recruiting letter, you will also submit a commentary describing the different strategies you used in the recruiting letter. In this course, we utilize the TurnItIn tool. This service helps educators prevent plagiarism by detecting unoriginal content in student papers. In addition to acting as a plagiarism deterrent, it also has features designed to aid in educating students about plagiarism and importance of proper attribution of any borrowed content. For more information, please visit http://turnitin.com/. Below are a series of requirements for the paper assignment. Failure to satisfy these requirements will result in substantial point penalties. Also, failure to abide by the academic honesty policy described in the syllabus and maintained by the CMS department, the Moody College of Communication, and/or The University of Texas will result in a grade of F on the assignment and referral to the Dean of Students. Assignment Requirements • You must portray yourself as a recruiting officer (or Secretary of Recruitment) – not the President, VP, etc. – of the organization described in your letter. As a recruiting officer, you are not authorized to offer any rewards or bribes (gifts in the form of sports tickets, free meals, etc.) to people as an incentive to join the organization, nor are you allowed to make up fictional incentives (e.g., OBC students will enjoy an opportunity to participate in international conferences). Your letter should focus exclusively on the merits of joining the organization based on commitment to its cause. • Assume that organization has just been formed – i.e., do not portray it as having existed prior to the Spring of 2017. • You may also assume that there are currently only three members of the organization, the president, vice-president, and yourself (the Secretary of Recruitment). You CANNOT claim that there are “many members.” • You must use the following format for the recruiting letter AND the commentary: 12-point Times New Roman font, single-spaced (NOT double-spaced) on 8.5 X 11-inch white paper with 1-inch margins on all sides. • The recruiting letter must be no shorter than 2 nor longer than 3 pages; the commentary must be no longer than 2 pages. • Your recruiting letter must include only 8 (eight) DIFFERENT strategies discussed in the lectures and/or readings. You may use any principle/theory we have discussed EXCEPT for balance theory (which is too obvious) or deception (which isn’t persuasion per se). • Your commentary must identify the name OR what you did for of each strategy (e.g., Door In Face or Foot In The Door) used in your letter and describe the specific purpose(s) the strategy was used to achieve. At a minimum, your description of each strategy should consist of at least two complete sentences (16 sentences total). • Each strategy explanation in your commentary should be bulleted or numbered for easy identification • You may not lie under any circumstances. Lies include falsifications and/or distortions of the truth about the student organization (e.g., SURF is endorsed by the Fellowship of Christian Athletes). Also, you may not offer recruits bribes in any form (tickets, discounts, free food, cash, etc.) as an incentive for joining the organization. • Your completed assignment (recruiting letter + commentary) must be turned in on April 13th (a Thursday) at or before 9:30 a.m. Grading Rubric We will use the following rubric to evaluate and grade your letter + commentary. Assignment Component Possible Points Obtained Points Format, Spelling, Grammar, Coherence Are the letter and commentary written in the proper format? Do they consist of grammatical, coherent English sentences? Has the assignment been spell-checked? 4 Strategy 1 Example/Commentary Is the example an acceptable instance of the strategy? Is it different from the other strategies used? Is the strategy correctly identified and adequately explained in the commentary? 2 Strategy 2 Example/Commentary 2 Strategy 3 Example/Commentary 2 Strategy 4 Example/Commentary 2 Strategy 5 Example/Commentary 2 Strategy 6 Example/ Commentary 2 Strategy 7 Example/ Commentary 2 Strategy 8 Example/ Commentary 2 Lies/Deception/Bribes (-3 pts per instance) -3 (per instance) Total Score 20 Cannot use strategy of Balance Theory, Lie Write a persuasive essay and a commentary Commentary is about 8 strategies in letter • 8 bullets separate from the letter “foot-in-the-door” – “door-in-the-face” (rejection then retreat) o 1. Make a large (but reasonable) request to target  World you lend me $50? o 2. After request is rejected, make a smaller request  Well then, could you lend me $10? o Creating a “big” favor out of thin air! “low-balling” • An advantage is offered that induces a favorable purchase decision. Then, sometime after the decision has been made, but before the bargain is sealed, the original purchase buyer is deftly removed. 1.) Loss framing: Loss aversion 2.) Restriction: scarcity 3.) Positive self-feeling: Principle commitment 4.) Identification: Social Proof 5.) “Using Rhymes” is what you would write instead of Stroop effect: Fluency 6.) Virtual ownership: Endowment effect 7.) That’s not all: reciprocity 8.) Flattery: Likability 9.) Expertise strategy: Authority principle 10.) Inducing dissonance reduction: Norm of consistency 11.) Conformity concession: social proof 12.) Association similarity: Liking & Association principle Strategies – Use 8 (Cannot use Balance Theory or deception) Strategy Principle Sources/Notes Door in the Face Reciprocity 9/16 lecture Foot in the Door Consistency Norm 9/30 lecture That’s not all Reciprocity 9/16 lecture Flattery Likability Could someone give an example for Flattery?! I’m a little stuck… “Providing a statistic” Social Proof? why is this yellow? What principle is this? How did you use this as a strategy?? plz help AUTHORITY it depends how you use it ID-ing yourself as a student Likability

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9. Identify and discuss the trade-offs associated with operating a supply chain that handles both forward and reverse movements as compared with separate supply chains for these movements.

9. Identify and discuss the trade-offs associated with operating a supply chain that handles both forward and reverse movements as compared with separate supply chains for these movements.

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Watch science of dogs documentary in YouTube. Media analysis (write as a summary (this should be one to two pages) This are the analysis questions 1- Authorship : who made this film , what do I need to know about this filmmaker to analysis this film. 2-purpose : what central questions is the film trying to answer ? What does the filmmaker want people to remember ? 3-impact : who might benefit from the messages in this film, and who might be harmed . What I have learned from this film? 4-response :what kind of actions might I take in response to this film !? 5- context : what is this film about And what makes you feel that !? 6- techniques: what techniques does the filmmaker use? – Also, summary of the film (this should be at least two pages and should include the mean ideas)

Watch science of dogs documentary in YouTube. Media analysis (write as a summary (this should be one to two pages) This are the analysis questions 1- Authorship : who made this film , what do I need to know about this filmmaker to analysis this film. 2-purpose : what central questions is the film trying to answer ? What does the filmmaker want people to remember ? 3-impact : who might benefit from the messages in this film, and who might be harmed . What I have learned from this film? 4-response :what kind of actions might I take in response to this film !? 5- context : what is this film about And what makes you feel that !? 6- techniques: what techniques does the filmmaker use? – Also, summary of the film (this should be at least two pages and should include the mean ideas)

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1 IN2009: Language Processors Coursework Part 3: The Interpreter Introduction This is the 3rd and final part of the coursework. In the second part of the coursework you created a parser for the Moopl grammar which, given a syntactically correct Moopl program as input, builds an AST representation of the program. In Part 3 you will develop an interpreter which executes Moopl programs by visiting their AST representations. For this part of the coursework we provide functional code (with limitations, see below) for parsing, building a symbol table, type checking and variable allocation. Marks This part of the coursework is worth 12 of the 30 coursework marks for the Language Processors module. This part of the coursework is marked out of 12. Submission deadline This part of the coursework should be handed in before 5pm on Sunday 9th April 2017. In line with school policy, late submissions will be awarded no marks. Return & Feedback Marks and feedback will be available as soon as possible, certainly on or before Wed 3rd May 2017. Plagiarism If you copy the work of others (either that of fellow students or of a third party), with or without their permission, you will score no marks and further disciplinary action will be taken against you. Group working You will be working in the same groups as for the previous parts of the coursework except where group changes have already been approved. Submission: Submit a zip archive (not a rar file) of all your source code (the src folder of your project). We do not want the other parts of your NetBeans project, only the source code. Note 1: Submissions which do not compile will get zero marks. Note 2: You must not change the names or types of any of the existing packages, classes or public methods. 2 Getting started Download either moopl-interp.zip or moopl-interp.tgz from Moodle and extract all files. Key contents to be aware of: • A fully implemented Moopl parser (also implements a parser for the interpreter command language; see below). • A partially implemented Moopl type checker. • Test harnesses for the type checker and interpreter. • A directory of a few example Moopl programs (see Testing below). • Folder interp containing prototype interpreter code. The type-checker is only partially implemented but a more complete implementation will be provided following Session 6. That version is still not fully complete because it doesn’t support inheritance. Part d) below asks you to remove this restriction. The VarAllocator visitor in the interp package uses a simple implementation which only works for methods in which all parameter and local variable names are different. Part e) below asks you to remove this restriction. The three parts below should be attempted in sequence. When you have completed one part you should make a back-up copy of the work and keep it safe, in case you break it in your attempt at the next part. Be sure to test old functionality as well as new (regression testing). We will not assess multiple versions so, if your attempt at part d) or e) breaks previously working code, you may gain a better mark by submitting the earlier version for assessment. c) [8 marks] The Basic Interpreter: complete the implementation of the Interpreter visitor in the interp package. d) [2 marks] Inheritance: extend the type-checker, variable allocator and interpreter to support inheritance. e) [2 marks] Variable Allocation: extend the variable allocator to fully support blockstructure and lexical scoping, removing the requirement that all parameter and local variable names are different. Aim to minimise the number of local variable slots allocated in a stack frame. Note: variable and parameter names declared at the same scope level are still required to be different from each other (a method cannot have two different parameters called x, for example) and this is enforced by the existing typechecking code. But variables declared in different blocks (even when nested) can have the same name. Exceptions Your interpreter will only ever be run on Moopl code which is type-correct (and free from uninitialised local variables). But it is still possible that the Moopl code contains logical errors which may cause runtime errors (such as null-reference or array-bound errors). Your interpreter should throw a MooplRunTimeException with an appropriate error message in these cases. The only kind of exception your interpreter should ever throw is a MooplRunTimeException. 3 Testing The examples folder does not contain a comprehensive test-suite. You need to invent and run your own tests. The document Moopl compared with Java gives a concise summary of how Moopl programs are supposed to behave. You can (and should) also compare the behaviour of your interpreter with that of the online tool: https://smcse.city.ac.uk/student/sj353/langproc/Moopl.html (Note: the online tool checks for uninitialised local variables. Your implementation is not expected to do this.) To test your work, run the top-level Interpret harness, providing the name of a Moopl source file as a command-line argument. When run on a type-correct Moopl source file, Interpret will pretty-print the Moopl program then display a command prompt (>) at which you can enter one of the following commands: :quit This will quit the interpreter. :call main() This will call the top-level proc main, interpreted in the context defined by the Moopl program. (Any top-level proc can be called this way). :eval Exp ; This will evaluate expression Exp, interpreted in the context defined by the Moopl program, and print the result. Note the required terminating semi-colon. Testing your Expression visitors To unit-test your Exp visit methods, run the top-level Interpret harness on a complete Moopl program (though it can be trivial) and use the :eval command. For example, to test your visit methods for the Boolean-literals (ExpTrue and ExpFalse), you would enter the commands > :eval true ; > :eval false ; which should output 1 and 0, respectively. For the most basic cases, the Moopl program is essentially irrelevant (a single top-level proc with empty body may be sufficient). For other cases you will need to write programs containing class definitions (in order, for example, to test object creation and method call). Testing your Statement visitors To unit-test your Stm visit methods, write very simple Moopl programs, each with a top-level proc main() containing just a few lines of code. Run the top-level Interpret harness on these simple programs and enter the command > :call main() You will find a few examples to get you started in the folder examples/unittests. As for the Exp tests, simple cases can be tested using Moopl programs with just a main proc but for the more complex tests you will need to write Moopl programs containing class definitions. 4 Grading criteria Solutions will be graded according to their functional correctness, and the elegance of their implementation. Below are criteria that guide the award of marks. 70 – 100 [1st class] Work that meets all the requirements in full, constructed and presented to a professional standard. Showing evidence of independent reading, thinking and analysis. 60 – 69 [2:1] Work that makes a good attempt to address the requirements, realising all to some extent and most well. Well-structured and well presented. 50 – 59 [2:2] Work that attempts to address requirements realising all to some extent and some well but perhaps also including irrelevant or underdeveloped material. Structure and presentation may not always be clear. 40 – 49 [3rd class] Work that attempts to address the requirements but only realises them to some extent and may not include important elements or be completely accurate. Structure and presentation may lack clarity. 0 – 39 [fail] Unsatisfactory work that does not adequately address the requirements. Structure and presentation may be confused or incoherent.

1 IN2009: Language Processors Coursework Part 3: The Interpreter Introduction This is the 3rd and final part of the coursework. In the second part of the coursework you created a parser for the Moopl grammar which, given a syntactically correct Moopl program as input, builds an AST representation of the program. In Part 3 you will develop an interpreter which executes Moopl programs by visiting their AST representations. For this part of the coursework we provide functional code (with limitations, see below) for parsing, building a symbol table, type checking and variable allocation. Marks This part of the coursework is worth 12 of the 30 coursework marks for the Language Processors module. This part of the coursework is marked out of 12. Submission deadline This part of the coursework should be handed in before 5pm on Sunday 9th April 2017. In line with school policy, late submissions will be awarded no marks. Return & Feedback Marks and feedback will be available as soon as possible, certainly on or before Wed 3rd May 2017. Plagiarism If you copy the work of others (either that of fellow students or of a third party), with or without their permission, you will score no marks and further disciplinary action will be taken against you. Group working You will be working in the same groups as for the previous parts of the coursework except where group changes have already been approved. Submission: Submit a zip archive (not a rar file) of all your source code (the src folder of your project). We do not want the other parts of your NetBeans project, only the source code. Note 1: Submissions which do not compile will get zero marks. Note 2: You must not change the names or types of any of the existing packages, classes or public methods. 2 Getting started Download either moopl-interp.zip or moopl-interp.tgz from Moodle and extract all files. Key contents to be aware of: • A fully implemented Moopl parser (also implements a parser for the interpreter command language; see below). • A partially implemented Moopl type checker. • Test harnesses for the type checker and interpreter. • A directory of a few example Moopl programs (see Testing below). • Folder interp containing prototype interpreter code. The type-checker is only partially implemented but a more complete implementation will be provided following Session 6. That version is still not fully complete because it doesn’t support inheritance. Part d) below asks you to remove this restriction. The VarAllocator visitor in the interp package uses a simple implementation which only works for methods in which all parameter and local variable names are different. Part e) below asks you to remove this restriction. The three parts below should be attempted in sequence. When you have completed one part you should make a back-up copy of the work and keep it safe, in case you break it in your attempt at the next part. Be sure to test old functionality as well as new (regression testing). We will not assess multiple versions so, if your attempt at part d) or e) breaks previously working code, you may gain a better mark by submitting the earlier version for assessment. c) [8 marks] The Basic Interpreter: complete the implementation of the Interpreter visitor in the interp package. d) [2 marks] Inheritance: extend the type-checker, variable allocator and interpreter to support inheritance. e) [2 marks] Variable Allocation: extend the variable allocator to fully support blockstructure and lexical scoping, removing the requirement that all parameter and local variable names are different. Aim to minimise the number of local variable slots allocated in a stack frame. Note: variable and parameter names declared at the same scope level are still required to be different from each other (a method cannot have two different parameters called x, for example) and this is enforced by the existing typechecking code. But variables declared in different blocks (even when nested) can have the same name. Exceptions Your interpreter will only ever be run on Moopl code which is type-correct (and free from uninitialised local variables). But it is still possible that the Moopl code contains logical errors which may cause runtime errors (such as null-reference or array-bound errors). Your interpreter should throw a MooplRunTimeException with an appropriate error message in these cases. The only kind of exception your interpreter should ever throw is a MooplRunTimeException. 3 Testing The examples folder does not contain a comprehensive test-suite. You need to invent and run your own tests. The document Moopl compared with Java gives a concise summary of how Moopl programs are supposed to behave. You can (and should) also compare the behaviour of your interpreter with that of the online tool: https://smcse.city.ac.uk/student/sj353/langproc/Moopl.html (Note: the online tool checks for uninitialised local variables. Your implementation is not expected to do this.) To test your work, run the top-level Interpret harness, providing the name of a Moopl source file as a command-line argument. When run on a type-correct Moopl source file, Interpret will pretty-print the Moopl program then display a command prompt (>) at which you can enter one of the following commands: :quit This will quit the interpreter. :call main() This will call the top-level proc main, interpreted in the context defined by the Moopl program. (Any top-level proc can be called this way). :eval Exp ; This will evaluate expression Exp, interpreted in the context defined by the Moopl program, and print the result. Note the required terminating semi-colon. Testing your Expression visitors To unit-test your Exp visit methods, run the top-level Interpret harness on a complete Moopl program (though it can be trivial) and use the :eval command. For example, to test your visit methods for the Boolean-literals (ExpTrue and ExpFalse), you would enter the commands > :eval true ; > :eval false ; which should output 1 and 0, respectively. For the most basic cases, the Moopl program is essentially irrelevant (a single top-level proc with empty body may be sufficient). For other cases you will need to write programs containing class definitions (in order, for example, to test object creation and method call). Testing your Statement visitors To unit-test your Stm visit methods, write very simple Moopl programs, each with a top-level proc main() containing just a few lines of code. Run the top-level Interpret harness on these simple programs and enter the command > :call main() You will find a few examples to get you started in the folder examples/unittests. As for the Exp tests, simple cases can be tested using Moopl programs with just a main proc but for the more complex tests you will need to write Moopl programs containing class definitions. 4 Grading criteria Solutions will be graded according to their functional correctness, and the elegance of their implementation. Below are criteria that guide the award of marks. 70 – 100 [1st class] Work that meets all the requirements in full, constructed and presented to a professional standard. Showing evidence of independent reading, thinking and analysis. 60 – 69 [2:1] Work that makes a good attempt to address the requirements, realising all to some extent and most well. Well-structured and well presented. 50 – 59 [2:2] Work that attempts to address requirements realising all to some extent and some well but perhaps also including irrelevant or underdeveloped material. Structure and presentation may not always be clear. 40 – 49 [3rd class] Work that attempts to address the requirements but only realises them to some extent and may not include important elements or be completely accurate. Structure and presentation may lack clarity. 0 – 39 [fail] Unsatisfactory work that does not adequately address the requirements. Structure and presentation may be confused or incoherent.

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. What are the main tenets and concerns of the Epicurean philosophy? Are you persuaded by this general approach? Why or why not?

. What are the main tenets and concerns of the Epicurean philosophy? Are you persuaded by this general approach? Why or why not?

You will discover 3 key tenets as well as concerns … Read More...