2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 1/22 Assignment 2 Due: 6:43pm on Saturday, February 28, 2015 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Adding and Subtracting Vectors Conceptual Question Six vectors (A to F) have the magnitudes and directions indicated in the figure. Part A Which two vectors, when added, will have the largest (positive) x component? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Which two vectors, when added, will have the largest (positive) y component? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: C and E E and F A and F C and D B and D 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 2/22 Part C Which two vectors, when subtracted (i.e., when one vector is subtracted from the other), will have the largest magnitude? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Components of Vectors Shown is a 10 by 10 grid, with coordinate axes x and y . The grid runs from 5 to 5 on both axes. Drawn on this grid are four vectors, labeled through . This problem will ask you various questions about these vectors. All answers should be in decimal notation, unless otherwise specified. Part A C and D A and F E and F A and B E and D A and F A and E D and B C and D E and F _._ _._ ._ 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 3/22 What is the x component of ? Express your answer to two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is the y component of ? Express your answer to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Part C What is the y component of ? Express your answer to the nearest integer. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D What is the component of ? Express your answer to the nearest integer. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: _._ _4 = _._ _5 = _._ _5 = 4 _._ _4 = 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 4/22 The following questions will ask you to give both components of vectors using the ordered pairs method. In this method, the x component is written first, followed by a comma, and then the y component. For example, the components of would be written 2.5,3 in ordered pair notation. The answers below are all integers, so estimate the components to the nearest whole number. Part E In ordered pair notation, write down the components of vector . Express your answers to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Part F In ordered pair notation, write down the components of vector . Express your answers to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Part G What is true about and ? Choose from the pulldown list below. ANSWER: Finding the Cross Product The figure shows two vectors and separated by an angle . You are given that , , and . _._ _._ _4, _5 = _._ _4 , _5 = _._ _._ They have different components and are not the same vectors. They have the same components but are not the same vectors. They are the same vectors. _ ._ _._ J56 _ .__ _ _ _ _.__ _ _ _ _ ._g_.__ _ ._ 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 5/22 Part A Express as an ordered triplet of values, separated by commas. ANSWER: Part B Find the magnitude of . ANSWER: Part C Find the sine of the angle between and . ANSWER: Significant Figures Conceptual Question In the parts that follow select whether the number presented in statement A is greater than, less than, or equal to the number presented in statement B. Be sure to follow all of the rules concerning significant figures. _ ._ _ ._= _ ._ ]_ ]._ = _ ._ _._ TJO J__ = 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 6/22 Part A Statement A: 2.567 , to two significant figures. Statement B: 2.567 , to three significant figures. Determine the correct relationship between the statements. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Statement A: (2.567 + 3.146 ), to two significant figures. Statement B: (2.567 , to two significant figures) + (3.146 , to two significant figures). Determine the correct relationship between the statements. ANSWER: Part C Statement A: Area of a rectangle with measured length = 2.536 and width = 1.4 . Statement B: Area of a rectangle with measured length = 2.536 and width = 1.41 . Since you are not told specific numbers of significant figures to round to, you must use the rules for multiplying numbers while respecting significant figures. If you need a reminder, consult the hint. Determine the correct relationship between the statements. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: LN LN Statement A is greater than less than equal to Statement B. LN LN LN LN Statement A is greater than less than equal to Statement B. N N N N 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 7/22 ± Vector Dot Product Let vectors , , and . Calculate the following: Part A You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is the angle between and ? Express your answer using one significant figure. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C ANSWER: Part D ANSWER: Statement A is greater than less than equal to Statement B. _.__ _ _Ã_ _.__ Ã_ _ _ _.__ Ã_Ã_ _ _._ø _._ = J”# _._ _._ J”# = SBEJBOT __._ø __._ = 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 8/22 Part E Which of the following can be computed? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: and are different vectors with lengths and respectively. Find the following: Part F Express your answer in terms of You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part G If and are perpendicular, You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: _ _._ø __._ = _._ø _._ø _._ _._ø _._ø _._ _._ø _.___._ _ ø _._ _ .__ _ .__ __ __ __ = ø _ .__ _ .__ _ .__ _ .__ = ø _ .__ _ .__ 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 9/22 Part H If and are parallel, Express your answer in terms of and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: ± Resolving Vector Components with Trigonometry Often a vector is specified by a magnitude and a direction; for example, a rope with tension exerts a force of magnitude in a direction 35 north of east. This is a good way to think of vectors; however, to calculate results with vectors, it is best to select a coordinate system and manipulate the components of the vectors in that coordinate system. Part A Find the components of the vector with length = 1.00 and angle =20.0 with respect to the x axis as shown. Enter the x component followed by the y component, separated by a comma. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B _ .__ _ .__ __ __ = ø _ .__ _ .__ _ ._ _ È _._ _ C È _._ = ._ 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 10/22 Find the components of the vector with length = 1.00 and angle =20.0 with respect to the x axis as shown. Enter the x component followed by the y component, separated by a comma. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Find the components of the vector with length = 1.00 and angle 30.0 as shown. Enter the x component followed by the y component, separated by a comma. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Exercise 1.28 Part A How many dollar bills would you have to stack to reach the moon? (Depending on age, dollar bills can be stacked with about 23 per millimeter.) Express your answer using one significant figure. ANSWER: Problem 1.80 A boulder of weight rests on a hillside that rises at a constant angle above the horizontal, as shown in the figure . Its weight is a force on the boulder that has direction vertically downward. _._ _ D È _._ = _._ _ ] _ È _._ = dollar bills 3 C 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 11/22 Part A In terms of and , what is the component of the weight of the boulder in the direction parallel to the surface of the hill? Express your answer in terms of and . ANSWER: Part B What is the component of the weight in the direction perpendicular to the surface of the hill? Express your answer in terms of and . ANSWER: Part C An air conditioner unit is fastened to a roof that slopes upward at an angle of . In order that the unit not slide down the roof, the component of the unit’s weight parallel to the roof cannot exceed 550 N. What is the maximum allowed weight of the unit? ANSWER: Problem 1.84 You are camping with two friends, Joe and Karl. Since all three of you like your privacy, you don’t pitch your tents close together. Joe’s tent is 23.5 from yours, in the direction 19.0 north of east. Karl’s tent is 40.0 from yours, in the direction 36.0 south of east. C 3 C 3 ]3,_. ] = C 3 ]3,!., ] = ____È 3 = / N È N È 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 12/22 Part A What is the distance between Karl’s tent and Joe’s tent? ANSWER: Multiple Choice Question 1.8 Part A The components of vectors and are given as follows: Ax = +5.7 Bx = 9.8 Ay = 3.6 By = 6.5 The magnitude of the vector difference , is closest to: ANSWER: OneDimensional Kinematics with Constant Acceleration Learning Goal: To understand the meaning of the variables that appear in the equations for onedimensional kinematics with constant acceleration. Motion with a constant, nonzero acceleration is not uncommon in the world around us. Falling (or thrown) objects and cars starting and stopping approximate this type of motion. It is also the type of motion most frequently involved in introductory kinematics problems. The kinematic equations for such motion can be written as , , where the symbols are defined as follows: is the position of the particle; _ = N _ ¥ _ ¥ à _ ¥ _ ¥ 5.0 11 5.0 16 250 4 0_ 4J_2J0_ _ __ 0_ 2 0 _ 2J __0 4 0 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 13/22 is the initial position of the particle; is the velocity of the particle; is the initial velocity of the particle; is the acceleration of the particle. In anwering the following questions, assume that the acceleration is constant and nonzero: . Part A The quantity represented by is a function of time (i.e., is not constant). ANSWER: Part B The quantity represented by is a function of time (i.e., is not constant). ANSWER: Part C The quantity represented by is a function of time (i.e., is not constant). ANSWER: Part D The quantity represented by is a function of time (i.e., is not constant). ANSWER: 4J 2 0 2J _ _ Ü _ 4 true false 4J true false 2J true false 2 true false 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 14/22 Part E Which of the given equations is not an explicit function of and is therefore useful when you don’t know or don’t need the time? ANSWER: Part F A particle moves with constant acceleration . The expression represents the particle’s velocity at what instant in time? ANSWER: More generally, the equations of motion can be written as and . Here is the time that has elapsed since the beginning of the particle’s motion, that is, , where is the current time and is the time at which we start measuring the particle’s motion. The terms and are, respectively, the position and velocity at . As you can now see, the equations given at the beginning of this problem correspond to the case , which is a convenient choice if there is only one particle of interest. To illustrate the use of these more general equations, consider the motion of two particles, A and B. The position of particle A depends on time as . That is, particle A starts moving at time with velocity , from . At time , particle B has twice the acceleration, half the velocity, and the same position that particle A had at time . Part G What is the equation describing the position of particle B? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: 0 4_ 4J_2J0_ _ __ 0_ 2 _ 2J __0 _ ___ 4à 2_ 2_J 4J _ 2J __0 only at time only at the “initial” time when a time has passed since the particle’s velocity was 0 _ _ 0 2J 4 0_ 4J_2J 0_ _ 0 __ _ 2 0 _ 2J __ 0 0 0 _ 0Ã0J 0 0J 4J 2J 0 _ 0J 0J _ _ 4″ 0 _ 4J _2J0_ ____0_ 0 _ 0J” _ _ 2J” _ 2J 4J” _ 4J 0 _ 0_ 0 _ _ 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 15/22 Part H At what time does the velocity of particle B equal that of particle A? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Given Positions, Find Velocity and Acceleration Learning Goal: To understand how to graph position, velocity, and acceleration of an object starting with a table of positions vs. time. The table shows the x coordinate of a moving object. The position is tabulated at 1s intervals. The x coordinate is indicated below each time. You should make the simplification that the acceleration of the object is bounded and contains no spikes. time (s) 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 x (m) 0 1 4 9 16 24 32 40 46 48 Part A Which graph best represents the function , describing the object’s position vs. time? 4# 0_ 4J__2J0_ _ __ 0_ 4# 0 _ 4J ____2J0__0_ 4# 0_ 4J__2J 0_0__ _ 0_ __ 0__ 4# 0 _ 4J ____2J 0_0_ __ 0_0_ _ 4# 0_ 4J__2J 0Ã0__ _ 0à __ 0__ 4# 0 _ 4J ____2J 0Ã0_ __ 0Ã0_ _ The two particles never have the same velocity. 0_ 0__ 2J __ 0__0__ 2J __ 0__0__ 2J __ 4 0 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 16/22 You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Which of the following graphs best represents the function , describing the object’s velocity as a function of time? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: 1 2 3 4 2 0 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 17/22 Part C Which of the following graphs best represents the function , describing the acceleration of this object? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: A Man Running to Catch a Bus A man is running at speed (much less than the speed of light) to catch a bus already at a stop. At , when he is a distance from the door to the bus, the bus starts moving with the positive acceleration . Use a coordinate system with at the door of the stopped bus. 1 2 3 4 _ 0 1 2 3 4 _ 0 _ _ _ _ 4 _ _ 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 18/22 Part A What is , the position of the man as a function of time? Answer symbolically in terms of the variables , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is , the position of the bus as a function of time? Answer symbolically in terms of and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C What condition is necessary for the man to catch the bus? Assume he catches it at time . You did not open hints for this part. 4NBO 0 _ _ 0 4NBO 0 = 4CVT 0 _ 0 4CVT = 0DBUDI 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 19/22 ANSWER: Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Stopping on Snow Light, dry snow is called powder. Skiing on a powder day is different than skiing on a day when the snow is wet and heavy. When you slow down on dry snow the maximum (negative) acceleration caused by the snow acting on your skis is about twofifths as much as that of stopping on wet snow. Part A For a given initial velocity, how does the time it takes to stop on dry snow differ from the time it takes to stop on wet snow? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B For a given initial velocity, how does the stopping distance on dry snow differ from the stopping distance on wet snow? 4NBO 0DBUDI _ 4CVT 0DBUDI 4NBO 0DBUDI _ 4CVT 0DBUDI 4NBO 0DBUDI _ 4CVT 0DBUDI _ _ _ Ç 0DBUDI 0E 0X 0E _ ___0X 0E _ 0X 0E _ ___0X 4E 4X 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 20/22 You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Exercise 2.34 A subway train starts from rest at a station and accelerates at a rate of for 14.0 . It runs at constant speed for 70.0 and slows down at a rate of until it stops at the next station. Part A Find the total distance covered. ANSWER: Problem 2.57 Dan gets on Interstate Highway I280 at Seward, Nebraska, and drives due west in a straight line and at an average velocity of magnitude 88.0 . After traveling 76 km, he reaches the Aurora exit . Realizing he has gone too far, he turns around and drives due east 34 back to the York exit at an average velocity of magnitude 75.0 . Part A For his whole trip from Seward to the York exit, what is his average speed? 4E _ ___4X 4E _ 4X 4E _ ___4X ____ N_T_ T T ____ N_T_ = LN LN_I LN LN_I 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 21/22 ANSWER: Part B For his whole trip from Seward to the York exit, what is the magnitude of his average velocity? ANSWER: Multiple Choice Question 2.1 Part A A train starts from rest and accelerates uniformly, until it has traveled 5.9 km and acquired a velocity of 35 m/s. The train then moves at a constant velocity of 35 m/s for 400 s. The train then decelerates uniformly at 0.065 m/s2, until it is brought to a halt. The acceleration during the first 5.9 km of travel is closest to: ANSWER: Multiple Choice Question 2.8 Part A A racquetball strikes a wall with a speed of 30 m/s and rebounds with a speed of 26 m/s. The collision takes 20 ms. What is the average acceleration of the ball during collision? ANSWER: 2 = LN_I 2 = LN_I 0.13 m/s2 0.11 m/s2 0.12 m/s2 0.10 m/s2 0.093 m/s2 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0.0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 18 points. zero 200 m/s2 1500 m/s2 1300 m/s2 2800 m/s2

2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 1/22 Assignment 2 Due: 6:43pm on Saturday, February 28, 2015 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Adding and Subtracting Vectors Conceptual Question Six vectors (A to F) have the magnitudes and directions indicated in the figure. Part A Which two vectors, when added, will have the largest (positive) x component? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Which two vectors, when added, will have the largest (positive) y component? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: C and E E and F A and F C and D B and D 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 2/22 Part C Which two vectors, when subtracted (i.e., when one vector is subtracted from the other), will have the largest magnitude? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Components of Vectors Shown is a 10 by 10 grid, with coordinate axes x and y . The grid runs from 5 to 5 on both axes. Drawn on this grid are four vectors, labeled through . This problem will ask you various questions about these vectors. All answers should be in decimal notation, unless otherwise specified. Part A C and D A and F E and F A and B E and D A and F A and E D and B C and D E and F _._ _._ ._ 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 3/22 What is the x component of ? Express your answer to two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is the y component of ? Express your answer to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Part C What is the y component of ? Express your answer to the nearest integer. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D What is the component of ? Express your answer to the nearest integer. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: _._ _4 = _._ _5 = _._ _5 = 4 _._ _4 = 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 4/22 The following questions will ask you to give both components of vectors using the ordered pairs method. In this method, the x component is written first, followed by a comma, and then the y component. For example, the components of would be written 2.5,3 in ordered pair notation. The answers below are all integers, so estimate the components to the nearest whole number. Part E In ordered pair notation, write down the components of vector . Express your answers to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Part F In ordered pair notation, write down the components of vector . Express your answers to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Part G What is true about and ? Choose from the pulldown list below. ANSWER: Finding the Cross Product The figure shows two vectors and separated by an angle . You are given that , , and . _._ _._ _4, _5 = _._ _4 , _5 = _._ _._ They have different components and are not the same vectors. They have the same components but are not the same vectors. They are the same vectors. _ ._ _._ J56 _ .__ _ _ _ _.__ _ _ _ _ ._g_.__ _ ._ 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 5/22 Part A Express as an ordered triplet of values, separated by commas. ANSWER: Part B Find the magnitude of . ANSWER: Part C Find the sine of the angle between and . ANSWER: Significant Figures Conceptual Question In the parts that follow select whether the number presented in statement A is greater than, less than, or equal to the number presented in statement B. Be sure to follow all of the rules concerning significant figures. _ ._ _ ._= _ ._ ]_ ]._ = _ ._ _._ TJO J__ = 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 6/22 Part A Statement A: 2.567 , to two significant figures. Statement B: 2.567 , to three significant figures. Determine the correct relationship between the statements. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Statement A: (2.567 + 3.146 ), to two significant figures. Statement B: (2.567 , to two significant figures) + (3.146 , to two significant figures). Determine the correct relationship between the statements. ANSWER: Part C Statement A: Area of a rectangle with measured length = 2.536 and width = 1.4 . Statement B: Area of a rectangle with measured length = 2.536 and width = 1.41 . Since you are not told specific numbers of significant figures to round to, you must use the rules for multiplying numbers while respecting significant figures. If you need a reminder, consult the hint. Determine the correct relationship between the statements. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: LN LN Statement A is greater than less than equal to Statement B. LN LN LN LN Statement A is greater than less than equal to Statement B. N N N N 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 7/22 ± Vector Dot Product Let vectors , , and . Calculate the following: Part A You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is the angle between and ? Express your answer using one significant figure. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C ANSWER: Part D ANSWER: Statement A is greater than less than equal to Statement B. _.__ _ _Ã_ _.__ Ã_ _ _ _.__ Ã_Ã_ _ _._ø _._ = J”# _._ _._ J”# = SBEJBOT __._ø __._ = 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 8/22 Part E Which of the following can be computed? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: and are different vectors with lengths and respectively. Find the following: Part F Express your answer in terms of You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part G If and are perpendicular, You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: _ _._ø __._ = _._ø _._ø _._ _._ø _._ø _._ _._ø _.___._ _ ø _._ _ .__ _ .__ __ __ __ = ø _ .__ _ .__ _ .__ _ .__ = ø _ .__ _ .__ 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 9/22 Part H If and are parallel, Express your answer in terms of and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: ± Resolving Vector Components with Trigonometry Often a vector is specified by a magnitude and a direction; for example, a rope with tension exerts a force of magnitude in a direction 35 north of east. This is a good way to think of vectors; however, to calculate results with vectors, it is best to select a coordinate system and manipulate the components of the vectors in that coordinate system. Part A Find the components of the vector with length = 1.00 and angle =20.0 with respect to the x axis as shown. Enter the x component followed by the y component, separated by a comma. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B _ .__ _ .__ __ __ = ø _ .__ _ .__ _ ._ _ È _._ _ C È _._ = ._ 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 10/22 Find the components of the vector with length = 1.00 and angle =20.0 with respect to the x axis as shown. Enter the x component followed by the y component, separated by a comma. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Find the components of the vector with length = 1.00 and angle 30.0 as shown. Enter the x component followed by the y component, separated by a comma. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Exercise 1.28 Part A How many dollar bills would you have to stack to reach the moon? (Depending on age, dollar bills can be stacked with about 23 per millimeter.) Express your answer using one significant figure. ANSWER: Problem 1.80 A boulder of weight rests on a hillside that rises at a constant angle above the horizontal, as shown in the figure . Its weight is a force on the boulder that has direction vertically downward. _._ _ D È _._ = _._ _ ] _ È _._ = dollar bills 3 C 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 11/22 Part A In terms of and , what is the component of the weight of the boulder in the direction parallel to the surface of the hill? Express your answer in terms of and . ANSWER: Part B What is the component of the weight in the direction perpendicular to the surface of the hill? Express your answer in terms of and . ANSWER: Part C An air conditioner unit is fastened to a roof that slopes upward at an angle of . In order that the unit not slide down the roof, the component of the unit’s weight parallel to the roof cannot exceed 550 N. What is the maximum allowed weight of the unit? ANSWER: Problem 1.84 You are camping with two friends, Joe and Karl. Since all three of you like your privacy, you don’t pitch your tents close together. Joe’s tent is 23.5 from yours, in the direction 19.0 north of east. Karl’s tent is 40.0 from yours, in the direction 36.0 south of east. C 3 C 3 ]3,_. ] = C 3 ]3,!., ] = ____È 3 = / N È N È 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 12/22 Part A What is the distance between Karl’s tent and Joe’s tent? ANSWER: Multiple Choice Question 1.8 Part A The components of vectors and are given as follows: Ax = +5.7 Bx = 9.8 Ay = 3.6 By = 6.5 The magnitude of the vector difference , is closest to: ANSWER: OneDimensional Kinematics with Constant Acceleration Learning Goal: To understand the meaning of the variables that appear in the equations for onedimensional kinematics with constant acceleration. Motion with a constant, nonzero acceleration is not uncommon in the world around us. Falling (or thrown) objects and cars starting and stopping approximate this type of motion. It is also the type of motion most frequently involved in introductory kinematics problems. The kinematic equations for such motion can be written as , , where the symbols are defined as follows: is the position of the particle; _ = N _ ¥ _ ¥ à _ ¥ _ ¥ 5.0 11 5.0 16 250 4 0_ 4J_2J0_ _ __ 0_ 2 0 _ 2J __0 4 0 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 13/22 is the initial position of the particle; is the velocity of the particle; is the initial velocity of the particle; is the acceleration of the particle. In anwering the following questions, assume that the acceleration is constant and nonzero: . Part A The quantity represented by is a function of time (i.e., is not constant). ANSWER: Part B The quantity represented by is a function of time (i.e., is not constant). ANSWER: Part C The quantity represented by is a function of time (i.e., is not constant). ANSWER: Part D The quantity represented by is a function of time (i.e., is not constant). ANSWER: 4J 2 0 2J _ _ Ü _ 4 true false 4J true false 2J true false 2 true false 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 14/22 Part E Which of the given equations is not an explicit function of and is therefore useful when you don’t know or don’t need the time? ANSWER: Part F A particle moves with constant acceleration . The expression represents the particle’s velocity at what instant in time? ANSWER: More generally, the equations of motion can be written as and . Here is the time that has elapsed since the beginning of the particle’s motion, that is, , where is the current time and is the time at which we start measuring the particle’s motion. The terms and are, respectively, the position and velocity at . As you can now see, the equations given at the beginning of this problem correspond to the case , which is a convenient choice if there is only one particle of interest. To illustrate the use of these more general equations, consider the motion of two particles, A and B. The position of particle A depends on time as . That is, particle A starts moving at time with velocity , from . At time , particle B has twice the acceleration, half the velocity, and the same position that particle A had at time . Part G What is the equation describing the position of particle B? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: 0 4_ 4J_2J0_ _ __ 0_ 2 _ 2J __0 _ ___ 4à 2_ 2_J 4J _ 2J __0 only at time only at the “initial” time when a time has passed since the particle’s velocity was 0 _ _ 0 2J 4 0_ 4J_2J 0_ _ 0 __ _ 2 0 _ 2J __ 0 0 0 _ 0Ã0J 0 0J 4J 2J 0 _ 0J 0J _ _ 4″ 0 _ 4J _2J0_ ____0_ 0 _ 0J” _ _ 2J” _ 2J 4J” _ 4J 0 _ 0_ 0 _ _ 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 15/22 Part H At what time does the velocity of particle B equal that of particle A? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Given Positions, Find Velocity and Acceleration Learning Goal: To understand how to graph position, velocity, and acceleration of an object starting with a table of positions vs. time. The table shows the x coordinate of a moving object. The position is tabulated at 1s intervals. The x coordinate is indicated below each time. You should make the simplification that the acceleration of the object is bounded and contains no spikes. time (s) 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 x (m) 0 1 4 9 16 24 32 40 46 48 Part A Which graph best represents the function , describing the object’s position vs. time? 4# 0_ 4J__2J0_ _ __ 0_ 4# 0 _ 4J ____2J0__0_ 4# 0_ 4J__2J 0_0__ _ 0_ __ 0__ 4# 0 _ 4J ____2J 0_0_ __ 0_0_ _ 4# 0_ 4J__2J 0Ã0__ _ 0à __ 0__ 4# 0 _ 4J ____2J 0Ã0_ __ 0Ã0_ _ The two particles never have the same velocity. 0_ 0__ 2J __ 0__0__ 2J __ 0__0__ 2J __ 4 0 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 16/22 You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Which of the following graphs best represents the function , describing the object’s velocity as a function of time? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: 1 2 3 4 2 0 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 17/22 Part C Which of the following graphs best represents the function , describing the acceleration of this object? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: A Man Running to Catch a Bus A man is running at speed (much less than the speed of light) to catch a bus already at a stop. At , when he is a distance from the door to the bus, the bus starts moving with the positive acceleration . Use a coordinate system with at the door of the stopped bus. 1 2 3 4 _ 0 1 2 3 4 _ 0 _ _ _ _ 4 _ _ 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 18/22 Part A What is , the position of the man as a function of time? Answer symbolically in terms of the variables , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is , the position of the bus as a function of time? Answer symbolically in terms of and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C What condition is necessary for the man to catch the bus? Assume he catches it at time . You did not open hints for this part. 4NBO 0 _ _ 0 4NBO 0 = 4CVT 0 _ 0 4CVT = 0DBUDI 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 19/22 ANSWER: Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Stopping on Snow Light, dry snow is called powder. Skiing on a powder day is different than skiing on a day when the snow is wet and heavy. When you slow down on dry snow the maximum (negative) acceleration caused by the snow acting on your skis is about twofifths as much as that of stopping on wet snow. Part A For a given initial velocity, how does the time it takes to stop on dry snow differ from the time it takes to stop on wet snow? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B For a given initial velocity, how does the stopping distance on dry snow differ from the stopping distance on wet snow? 4NBO 0DBUDI _ 4CVT 0DBUDI 4NBO 0DBUDI _ 4CVT 0DBUDI 4NBO 0DBUDI _ 4CVT 0DBUDI _ _ _ Ç 0DBUDI 0E 0X 0E _ ___0X 0E _ 0X 0E _ ___0X 4E 4X 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 20/22 You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Exercise 2.34 A subway train starts from rest at a station and accelerates at a rate of for 14.0 . It runs at constant speed for 70.0 and slows down at a rate of until it stops at the next station. Part A Find the total distance covered. ANSWER: Problem 2.57 Dan gets on Interstate Highway I280 at Seward, Nebraska, and drives due west in a straight line and at an average velocity of magnitude 88.0 . After traveling 76 km, he reaches the Aurora exit . Realizing he has gone too far, he turns around and drives due east 34 back to the York exit at an average velocity of magnitude 75.0 . Part A For his whole trip from Seward to the York exit, what is his average speed? 4E _ ___4X 4E _ 4X 4E _ ___4X ____ N_T_ T T ____ N_T_ = LN LN_I LN LN_I 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 21/22 ANSWER: Part B For his whole trip from Seward to the York exit, what is the magnitude of his average velocity? ANSWER: Multiple Choice Question 2.1 Part A A train starts from rest and accelerates uniformly, until it has traveled 5.9 km and acquired a velocity of 35 m/s. The train then moves at a constant velocity of 35 m/s for 400 s. The train then decelerates uniformly at 0.065 m/s2, until it is brought to a halt. The acceleration during the first 5.9 km of travel is closest to: ANSWER: Multiple Choice Question 2.8 Part A A racquetball strikes a wall with a speed of 30 m/s and rebounds with a speed of 26 m/s. The collision takes 20 ms. What is the average acceleration of the ball during collision? ANSWER: 2 = LN_I 2 = LN_I 0.13 m/s2 0.11 m/s2 0.12 m/s2 0.10 m/s2 0.093 m/s2 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0.0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 18 points. zero 200 m/s2 1500 m/s2 1300 m/s2 2800 m/s2

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1. According to Ryan & Siebens (2012) __________ of adults 25 years old completed at least a high school degree and more than __________ of all adults had attained at least a bachelor’s degree. A.50.2%; 15.5%. B.70.3%; 18.4%. C.C) 85.3%; 27.9%. D.78.4%; 20.7%. 2. Which of the following was not identified as a manifest function of the social institution of education? A.personal development. B.educate. C.proper socialization. D.supervision. 3. Which of the following sociological perspectives is/are concerned that schools often indoctrinate students in the U.S. in Western bureaucratic ideology? A.Functionalism. B.Interactionism. C.Conflict. D.Conflict and Interactionism. 4. The sociological concept of “definition of the situation” was developed by: A.W.I. Thomas and Dorothy Swaine Thomas. B.W.I. Thomas. C.Rosabeth Moss Kanter. D.R. S. Smith. 5. According to the research of Myra and David Sadker (1994): A.boys receive less praise, corrections, and feedback than girls in school. B.girls receive less attention than boys in school. C.boys receive less attention than girls in school. D.girls and boys receive about the same amount of attention, praise, correction, and feedback in school. 6. The number of elderly Americans in the workforce has decreased over the last decade. True False 7. According to the author, the current call for educational reform was initiated during the __________ administration. A.Clinton. B.Reagan. C.Bush. D.Nixon. 8. The No Child Left Behind Act was passed during the __________ administration. A.Bush. B.Clinton. C.Reagan. D.Ford. 9. While the U.S. spends __________ on education than other high-income countries, our literacy scores are __________ in a world comparison. A.less; above average. B.less; average. C.more; average. D.more; below average. 10. According to the textbook, which of the following countries did not score higher than the U.S. on literacy scores? A.Sweden. B.Japan. C.Canada. D.Norway. 11. The U.S. Bureau of Statistics reported a __________ unemployment rate in December 2009. A.18. 2 million B.7.1 million C.12.7 million. D.18.4 million 12. Frances is working at a job that is below her skill level. Frances can be considered to be __________. A.unemployed. B.underemployed. C.not in the workforce. D.disemployed. 13. Persons who are __________ and __________ have high underemployment rates compared to those outside their groups. A.female; college educated. B.elderly; non-college educated. C.college educated; young. D.young; ethnic/racial minorities. 14. According to the 1993 report cited in your textbook, which of the following groups had the highest rates of labor force nonparticipation? A.blacks and Puerto Ricans. B.blacks and Native-Americans. C.Asians and blacks. D.Asians and Puerto Ricans. 15. Which of the following countries is expected to be the recipient of the largest number of outsourced jobs from the United States? A.Canada. B.India. C.China. D.Brazil. 16. Low-wage workers are characterized as: A.minority. B.female. C.disabled. D.both a and b are correct. 17. __________ defines job stress as the harmful emotional or physical responses that occurs when one’s job characteristics do not match with the capabilities, resources, or needs or the worker. A.Occupational Safety and Health Administration. B.Department of Commerce. C.National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. D.Department of Health and Human Services. 18. Under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, employment discrimination based on __________ is prohibited. A.religion and sexual orientation. B.sex. C.national origin and disability. D.both b and c are correct. 19. While laws were created to stop workplace discrimination on the basis of race, religion, sex, and national origin in 1964, the

1. According to Ryan & Siebens (2012) __________ of adults 25 years old completed at least a high school degree and more than __________ of all adults had attained at least a bachelor’s degree. A.50.2%; 15.5%. B.70.3%; 18.4%. C.C) 85.3%; 27.9%. D.78.4%; 20.7%. 2. Which of the following was not identified as a manifest function of the social institution of education? A.personal development. B.educate. C.proper socialization. D.supervision. 3. Which of the following sociological perspectives is/are concerned that schools often indoctrinate students in the U.S. in Western bureaucratic ideology? A.Functionalism. B.Interactionism. C.Conflict. D.Conflict and Interactionism. 4. The sociological concept of “definition of the situation” was developed by: A.W.I. Thomas and Dorothy Swaine Thomas. B.W.I. Thomas. C.Rosabeth Moss Kanter. D.R. S. Smith. 5. According to the research of Myra and David Sadker (1994): A.boys receive less praise, corrections, and feedback than girls in school. B.girls receive less attention than boys in school. C.boys receive less attention than girls in school. D.girls and boys receive about the same amount of attention, praise, correction, and feedback in school. 6. The number of elderly Americans in the workforce has decreased over the last decade. True False 7. According to the author, the current call for educational reform was initiated during the __________ administration. A.Clinton. B.Reagan. C.Bush. D.Nixon. 8. The No Child Left Behind Act was passed during the __________ administration. A.Bush. B.Clinton. C.Reagan. D.Ford. 9. While the U.S. spends __________ on education than other high-income countries, our literacy scores are __________ in a world comparison. A.less; above average. B.less; average. C.more; average. D.more; below average. 10. According to the textbook, which of the following countries did not score higher than the U.S. on literacy scores? A.Sweden. B.Japan. C.Canada. D.Norway. 11. The U.S. Bureau of Statistics reported a __________ unemployment rate in December 2009. A.18. 2 million B.7.1 million C.12.7 million. D.18.4 million 12. Frances is working at a job that is below her skill level. Frances can be considered to be __________. A.unemployed. B.underemployed. C.not in the workforce. D.disemployed. 13. Persons who are __________ and __________ have high underemployment rates compared to those outside their groups. A.female; college educated. B.elderly; non-college educated. C.college educated; young. D.young; ethnic/racial minorities. 14. According to the 1993 report cited in your textbook, which of the following groups had the highest rates of labor force nonparticipation? A.blacks and Puerto Ricans. B.blacks and Native-Americans. C.Asians and blacks. D.Asians and Puerto Ricans. 15. Which of the following countries is expected to be the recipient of the largest number of outsourced jobs from the United States? A.Canada. B.India. C.China. D.Brazil. 16. Low-wage workers are characterized as: A.minority. B.female. C.disabled. D.both a and b are correct. 17. __________ defines job stress as the harmful emotional or physical responses that occurs when one’s job characteristics do not match with the capabilities, resources, or needs or the worker. A.Occupational Safety and Health Administration. B.Department of Commerce. C.National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. D.Department of Health and Human Services. 18. Under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, employment discrimination based on __________ is prohibited. A.religion and sexual orientation. B.sex. C.national origin and disability. D.both b and c are correct. 19. While laws were created to stop workplace discrimination on the basis of race, religion, sex, and national origin in 1964, the

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Materials and process selection for a bicycle frame Background The principle components of the bike are familiar and their function needs no explanation. The largest of these is the frame. Frames can be made from a remarkable diversity of materials: CFRP, carbon steel, GFRP, nylon, wood, aluminium, titanium etc… How is it that such a diversity of materials can co-exist in a free market in which competition favours the fittest – sure there must be a single “best” material for the job? The mistake here is to assume that all bikes have the same purpose. The specification of a “shopping” or “uni” bike is very different from that of one for speed or for the mountain, as are the objectives of the purchaser. The Project Explore materials and process selection for bike frames (illustrated below) or for any other component of the bike: forks, handle bars, cranks, wheels, brake or gear cables…. 1) Analyse your chosen component, listing its function, the constraints it must meet and the objectives for the bike – This will require a decision about the type of bike you are designing (shopping (booze cruiser), speed / road / track bike, mountain bike, folding, children’s etc). Remember to include a lower cut-off constraint on fracture toughness (K1C > 15MPa √m is a good approximation to start at) – a brittle bike would be a bad idea! 2) List the requirements as Functions, Constraints, Objectives and Free Variables. 3) Identify the materials indices you will use to rank / select your materials. 4) Identify a promising material for the component. 5) Make a choice of material and then use CES EduPack Joining database to select ways of joining the frame. 6) Present the case study for your choice of material and process as a report. Use the charts from CES EduPack and other sources to explain your reasoning. For the purposes of simplicity it is suggested that you avoid accounting for shape in your selection criteria / indices identification. However, you should still consider the form of your component when considering an appropriate manufacturing process. To make the right choices you will need to source some information on typical service conditions for you selected bike type, these might be mechanical, physical or environmental focussed properties. You will also need to consider the type of conditions experienced by the component e.g. bending, tension, torsion, abrasion etc. Assignments will be assessed on the basis of the quality and clarity of the problem construction, the selection of indices, appropriate use of charts / figures and crucially the analysis and interpretation of the results presented.

Materials and process selection for a bicycle frame Background The principle components of the bike are familiar and their function needs no explanation. The largest of these is the frame. Frames can be made from a remarkable diversity of materials: CFRP, carbon steel, GFRP, nylon, wood, aluminium, titanium etc… How is it that such a diversity of materials can co-exist in a free market in which competition favours the fittest – sure there must be a single “best” material for the job? The mistake here is to assume that all bikes have the same purpose. The specification of a “shopping” or “uni” bike is very different from that of one for speed or for the mountain, as are the objectives of the purchaser. The Project Explore materials and process selection for bike frames (illustrated below) or for any other component of the bike: forks, handle bars, cranks, wheels, brake or gear cables…. 1) Analyse your chosen component, listing its function, the constraints it must meet and the objectives for the bike – This will require a decision about the type of bike you are designing (shopping (booze cruiser), speed / road / track bike, mountain bike, folding, children’s etc). Remember to include a lower cut-off constraint on fracture toughness (K1C > 15MPa √m is a good approximation to start at) – a brittle bike would be a bad idea! 2) List the requirements as Functions, Constraints, Objectives and Free Variables. 3) Identify the materials indices you will use to rank / select your materials. 4) Identify a promising material for the component. 5) Make a choice of material and then use CES EduPack Joining database to select ways of joining the frame. 6) Present the case study for your choice of material and process as a report. Use the charts from CES EduPack and other sources to explain your reasoning. For the purposes of simplicity it is suggested that you avoid accounting for shape in your selection criteria / indices identification. However, you should still consider the form of your component when considering an appropriate manufacturing process. To make the right choices you will need to source some information on typical service conditions for you selected bike type, these might be mechanical, physical or environmental focussed properties. You will also need to consider the type of conditions experienced by the component e.g. bending, tension, torsion, abrasion etc. Assignments will be assessed on the basis of the quality and clarity of the problem construction, the selection of indices, appropriate use of charts / figures and crucially the analysis and interpretation of the results presented.

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Use the link provided to answer the questions below. http://www.worlddialogue.org/content.php?id=384 According to the article, what was President George W. Bush’s main rationale for going to war with Iraq? A. Bush believed that by promoting democracy, we promote peace around the world. B. Bush believed that Iraq was a key player in the global drug trade. C. Bush feared Osama bin Laden would assume power in Iraq. D. Intelligence reports showed Iraq was planning to attack Afghanistan. E. Bush had no opinion about invading Iraq. What is the democratic peace theory? A. the theory that indicates that democracy will inevitably spread and we should assist it peacefully B. the theory that economic growth leads to a peaceful democratic state C. the theory that democracies tend not to fight one another D. the theory that the key to a successful democratic transition is through a peaceful transfer of power E. the theory that peace and democracy are actually inconsistent with one another What did Mansfield and Syder conclude happens during the initial phases of democratization? A. Newly democratized countries are incapable of holding independent elections. B. Citizens are more engaged in politics and willing to be peaceful. C. New democracies are the strongest democracies in the world. D. Other countries are more likely to form alliances with new democracies. E. Newly democratized countries become more aggressive and warlike, not less. New democracies are more likely to elect which of the following types of parties into office? A. socialists B. religious extremists C. the country’s elite and wealthy class D. people who personify “the average Joe” E. the largest, most prominent parties According to Mansfield and Snyder’s prescription, what should the United States do with democratizing states? A. provide an international military force to ensure peace B. keep a close eye and replace bad leaders if necessary C. make certain that reforms are implemented in the right order D. strengthen international awareness of democratizing states so that peaceful states can arm themselves E. attempt to push through elections as soon as possible above all else Watch the video below, and then answer the questions below. To save your answers, click the Save to Notebook button above. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=796LfXwzIUk According to Joseph Nye, what is power transition? A. a change of power among states B. a change of power among presidents C. a change of power within the European Union or other leading organizations D. a change of power within cultures E. a change of power to non-state actors How does Nye define power diffusion? A. a change of power among states B. a change of power in regions C. a change of power within cultures D. a change of power from states to non-state actors E. a change of power from non-state actors to states Which of the following is an example of a non-state actor given by Nye? A. Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad B. Oxfam C. the former USSR D. socialism E. the mayor of Tehran Why does Nye claim it is important to be cautious of power projections? A. Simple projections don’t tell us much about power transition. B. History is not linear. C. Simple projections tend to focus soley on GDP. D. Simple projections don’t tell you anything about military or soft power. E. all of these options Nye describes a three-dimensional chess game as a metaphor for modern-day power distribution. What is the top board? A. economic power among states B. military power among states C. power among state leaders D. the deciding board for the other two boards E. the board where Kasparov faces off against the computer What is the middle board in Nye’s chess game metaphor? A. non-state actors B. a metaphor for the international underground economy C. military power among states D. economic power among states E. political power among states What is the bottom board in Nye’s chess game metaphor? A. transnational relations B. things that cross borders outside government control C. a place where power is chaotically distributed D. an area where things cross borders outside the control of governments E. all of these options What is the difference between a positive-sum game and a zero-sum game? A. A positive-sum game is when one person has all the power and a zero-sum game is when power is evenly distributed. B. A positive-sum game is a two-player power game and a zero-sum game is a one-player power game. C. A positive-sum game where my gain is your gain and a zero-sum game is my win and your loss. D. A postive-sum game is when you bet and win and a zero-sum game is when you bet and lose. E. A positive-sum game is like Tetris and a zero-sum game is like Super Mario Brothers. Nye quotes Hillary Clinton, describing her foreign policy agenda as utilizing “smart power.” What does this mean? A. Smart power addresses the two great power shifts in the 21st century. B. Smart power is “using all the tools in our toolbox.” C. Smart power combines both hard and soft power. D. Smart power reflects a new narrative of dealing with power. E. all of these options

Use the link provided to answer the questions below. http://www.worlddialogue.org/content.php?id=384 According to the article, what was President George W. Bush’s main rationale for going to war with Iraq? A. Bush believed that by promoting democracy, we promote peace around the world. B. Bush believed that Iraq was a key player in the global drug trade. C. Bush feared Osama bin Laden would assume power in Iraq. D. Intelligence reports showed Iraq was planning to attack Afghanistan. E. Bush had no opinion about invading Iraq. What is the democratic peace theory? A. the theory that indicates that democracy will inevitably spread and we should assist it peacefully B. the theory that economic growth leads to a peaceful democratic state C. the theory that democracies tend not to fight one another D. the theory that the key to a successful democratic transition is through a peaceful transfer of power E. the theory that peace and democracy are actually inconsistent with one another What did Mansfield and Syder conclude happens during the initial phases of democratization? A. Newly democratized countries are incapable of holding independent elections. B. Citizens are more engaged in politics and willing to be peaceful. C. New democracies are the strongest democracies in the world. D. Other countries are more likely to form alliances with new democracies. E. Newly democratized countries become more aggressive and warlike, not less. New democracies are more likely to elect which of the following types of parties into office? A. socialists B. religious extremists C. the country’s elite and wealthy class D. people who personify “the average Joe” E. the largest, most prominent parties According to Mansfield and Snyder’s prescription, what should the United States do with democratizing states? A. provide an international military force to ensure peace B. keep a close eye and replace bad leaders if necessary C. make certain that reforms are implemented in the right order D. strengthen international awareness of democratizing states so that peaceful states can arm themselves E. attempt to push through elections as soon as possible above all else Watch the video below, and then answer the questions below. To save your answers, click the Save to Notebook button above. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=796LfXwzIUk According to Joseph Nye, what is power transition? A. a change of power among states B. a change of power among presidents C. a change of power within the European Union or other leading organizations D. a change of power within cultures E. a change of power to non-state actors How does Nye define power diffusion? A. a change of power among states B. a change of power in regions C. a change of power within cultures D. a change of power from states to non-state actors E. a change of power from non-state actors to states Which of the following is an example of a non-state actor given by Nye? A. Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad B. Oxfam C. the former USSR D. socialism E. the mayor of Tehran Why does Nye claim it is important to be cautious of power projections? A. Simple projections don’t tell us much about power transition. B. History is not linear. C. Simple projections tend to focus soley on GDP. D. Simple projections don’t tell you anything about military or soft power. E. all of these options Nye describes a three-dimensional chess game as a metaphor for modern-day power distribution. What is the top board? A. economic power among states B. military power among states C. power among state leaders D. the deciding board for the other two boards E. the board where Kasparov faces off against the computer What is the middle board in Nye’s chess game metaphor? A. non-state actors B. a metaphor for the international underground economy C. military power among states D. economic power among states E. political power among states What is the bottom board in Nye’s chess game metaphor? A. transnational relations B. things that cross borders outside government control C. a place where power is chaotically distributed D. an area where things cross borders outside the control of governments E. all of these options What is the difference between a positive-sum game and a zero-sum game? A. A positive-sum game is when one person has all the power and a zero-sum game is when power is evenly distributed. B. A positive-sum game is a two-player power game and a zero-sum game is a one-player power game. C. A positive-sum game where my gain is your gain and a zero-sum game is my win and your loss. D. A postive-sum game is when you bet and win and a zero-sum game is when you bet and lose. E. A positive-sum game is like Tetris and a zero-sum game is like Super Mario Brothers. Nye quotes Hillary Clinton, describing her foreign policy agenda as utilizing “smart power.” What does this mean? A. Smart power addresses the two great power shifts in the 21st century. B. Smart power is “using all the tools in our toolbox.” C. Smart power combines both hard and soft power. D. Smart power reflects a new narrative of dealing with power. E. all of these options

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Chapter 7 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, March 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy A Book on a Table A book weighing 5 N rests on top of a table. Part A A downward force of magnitude 5 N is exerted on the book by the force of ANSWER: Part B An upward force of magnitude _____ is exerted on the _____ by the table. the table gravity inertia . ANSWER: Part C Do the downward force in Part A and the upward force in Part B constitute a 3rd law pair? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D The reaction to the force in Part A is a force of magnitude _____, exerted on the _____ by the _____. Its direction is _____ . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: 6 N / table 5 N / table 5 N / book 6 N / book yes no Part E The reaction to the force in Part B is a force of magnitude _____, exerted on the _____ by the _____. Its direction is _____. ANSWER: Part F Which of Newton’s laws dictates that the forces in Parts A and B are equal and opposite? ANSWER: Part G Which of Newton’s laws dictates that the forces in Parts B and E are equal and opposite? ANSWER: 5 N / earth / book / upward 5 N / book / table / upward 5 N / book / earth / upward 5 N / earth / book / downward 5 N / table / book / upward 5 N / table / earth / upward 5 N / book / table / upward 5 N / table / book / downward 5 N / earth / book / downward Newton’s 1st or 2nd law Newton’s 3rd law Blocks in an Elevator Ranking Task Three blocks are stacked on top of each other inside an elevator as shown in the figure. Answer the following questions with reference to the eight forces defined as follows. the force of the 3 block on the 2 block, , the force of the 2 block on the 3 block, , the force of the 3 block on the 1 block, , the force of the 1 block on the 3 block, , the force of the 2 block on the 1 block, , the force of the 1 block on the 2 block, , the force of the 1 block on the floor, , and the force of the floor on the 1 block, . Part A Assume the elevator is at rest. Rank the magnitude of the forces. Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Newton’s 1st or 2nd law Newton’s 3rd law kg kg F3 on 2 kg kg F2 on 3 kg kg F3 on 1 kg kg F1 on 3 kg kg F2 on 1 kg kg F1 on 2 kg F1 on floor kg Ffloor on 1 Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Newton’s 3rd Law Discussed Learning Goal: To understand Newton’s 3rd law, which states that a physical interaction always generates a pair of forces on the two interacting bodies. In Principia, Newton wrote: To every action there is always opposed an equal reaction: or, the mutual actions of two bodies upon each other are always equal, and directed to contrary parts. (translation by Cajori) The phrase after the colon (often omitted from textbooks) makes it clear that this is a statement about the nature of force. The central idea is that physical interactions (e.g., due to gravity, bodies touching, or electric forces) cause forces to arise between pairs of bodies. Each pairwise interaction produces a pair of opposite forces, one acting on each body. In summary, each physical interaction between two bodies generates a pair of forces. Whatever the physical cause of the interaction, the force on body A from body B is equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to the force on body B from body A. Incidentally, Newton states that the word “action” denotes both (a) the force due to an interaction and (b) the changes in momentum that it imparts to the two interacting bodies. If you haven’t learned about momentum, don’t worry; for now this is just a statement about the origin of forces. Mark each of the following statements as true or false. If a statement refers to “two bodies” interacting via some force, you are not to assume that these two bodies have the same mass. Part A Every force has one and only one 3rd law pair force. ANSWER: Part B The two forces in each pair act in opposite directions. ANSWER: Part C The two forces in each pair can either both act on the same body or they can act on different bodies. ANSWER: true false true false Part D The two forces in each pair may have different physical origins (for instance, one of the forces could be due to gravity, and its pair force could be due to friction or electric charge). ANSWER: Part E The two forces of a 3rd law pair always act on different bodies. ANSWER: Part F Given that two bodies interact via some force, the accelerations of these two bodies have the same magnitude but opposite directions. (Assume no other forces act on either body.) You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: true false true false true false Part G According to Newton’s 3rd law, the force on the (smaller) moon due to the (larger) earth is ANSWER: Pulling Three Blocks Three identical blocks connected by ideal strings are being pulled along a horizontal frictionless surface by a horizontal force . The magnitude of the tension in the string between blocks B and C is = 3.00 . Assume that each block has mass = 0.400 . true false greater in magnitude and antiparallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. greater in magnitude and parallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. equal in magnitude but antiparallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. equal in magnitude and parallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. smaller in magnitude and antiparallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. smaller in magnitude and parallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. F T N m kg Part A What is the magnitude of the force? Express your answer numerically in newtons. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is the tension in the string between block A and block B? Express your answer numerically in newtons You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Pulling Two Blocks In the situation shown in the figure, a person is pulling with a constant, nonzero force on string 1, which is attached to block A. Block A is also attached to block B via string 2, as shown. For this problem, assume that neither string stretches and that friction is negligible. Both blocks have finite (nonzero) mass. F F = N TAB TAB = N F Part A Which one of the following statements correctly descibes the relationship between the accelerations of blocks A and B? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B How does the magnitude of the tension in string 1, , compare with the tension in string 2, ? You did not open hints for this part. Block A has a larger acceleration than block B. Block B has a larger acceleration than block A. Both blocks have the same acceleration. More information is needed to determine the relationship between the accelerations. T1 T2 ANSWER: Tension in a Massless Rope Learning Goal: To understand the concept of tension and the relationship between tension and force. This problem introduces the concept of tension. The example is a rope, oriented vertically, that is being pulled from both ends. Let and (with u for up and d for down) represent the magnitude of the forces acting on the top and bottom of the rope, respectively. Assume that the rope is massless, so that its weight is negligible compared with the tension. (This is not a ridiculous approximation–modern rope materials such as Kevlar can carry tensions thousands of times greater than the weight of tens of meters of such rope.) Consider the three sections of rope labeled a, b, and c in the figure. At point 1, a downward force of magnitude acts on section a. At point 1, an upward force of magnitude acts on section b. At point 1, the tension in the rope is . At point 2, a downward force of magnitude acts on section b. At point 2, an upward force of magnitude acts on section c. At point 2, the tension in the rope is . Assume, too, that the rope is at equilibrium. Part A What is the magnitude of the downward force on section a? Express your answer in terms of the tension . ANSWER: More information is needed to determine the relationship between and . T1 > T2 T1 = T2 T1 < T2 T1 T2 Fu Fd Fad Fbu T1 Fbd Fcu T2 Fad T1 Part B What is the magnitude of the upward force on section b? Express your answer in terms of the tension . ANSWER: Part C The magnitude of the upward force on c, , and the magnitude of the downward force on b, , are equal because of which of Newton's laws? ANSWER: Part D The magnitude of the force is ____ . ANSWER: Fad = Fbu T1 Fbu = Fcu Fbd 1st 2nd 3rd Fbu Fbd Part E Now consider the forces on the ends of the rope. What is the relationship between the magnitudes of these two forces? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part F The ends of a massless rope are attached to two stationary objects (e.g., two trees or two cars) so that the rope makes a straight line. For this situation, which of the following statements are true? Check all that apply. ANSWER: less than greater than equal to Fu > Fd Fu = Fd Fu < Fd The tension in the rope is everywhere the same. The magnitudes of the forces exerted on the two objects by the rope are the same. The forces exerted on the two objects by the rope must be in opposite directions. The forces exerted on the two objects by the rope must be in the direction of the rope. Two Hanging Masses Two blocks with masses and hang one under the other. For this problem, take the positive direction to be upward, and use for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. Case 1: Blocks at rest For Parts A and B assume the blocks are at rest. Part A Find , the tension in the lower rope. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: M1 M2 g T2 M1 M2 g Part B Find , the tension in the upper rope. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Case 2: Accelerating blocks For Parts C and D the blocks are now accelerating upward (due to the tension in the strings) with acceleration of magnitude . Part C Find , the tension in the lower rope. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: T2 = T1 M1 M2 g T1 = a T2 M1 M2 a g Part D Find , the tension in the upper rope. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Video Tutor: Suspended Balls: Which String Breaks? First, launch the video below. You will be asked to use your knowledge of physics to predict the outcome of an experiment. Then, close the video window and answer the question at right. You can watch the video again at any point. T2 = T1 M1 M2 a g T1 = Part A A heavy crate is attached to the wall by a light rope, as shown in the figure. Another rope hangs off the opposite edge of the box. If you slowly increase the force on the free rope by pulling on it in a horizontal direction, which rope will break? Ignore friction and the mass of the ropes. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. The rope attached to the wall will break. The rope that you are pulling on will break. Both ropes are equally likely to break.

Chapter 7 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, March 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy A Book on a Table A book weighing 5 N rests on top of a table. Part A A downward force of magnitude 5 N is exerted on the book by the force of ANSWER: Part B An upward force of magnitude _____ is exerted on the _____ by the table. the table gravity inertia . ANSWER: Part C Do the downward force in Part A and the upward force in Part B constitute a 3rd law pair? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D The reaction to the force in Part A is a force of magnitude _____, exerted on the _____ by the _____. Its direction is _____ . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: 6 N / table 5 N / table 5 N / book 6 N / book yes no Part E The reaction to the force in Part B is a force of magnitude _____, exerted on the _____ by the _____. Its direction is _____. ANSWER: Part F Which of Newton’s laws dictates that the forces in Parts A and B are equal and opposite? ANSWER: Part G Which of Newton’s laws dictates that the forces in Parts B and E are equal and opposite? ANSWER: 5 N / earth / book / upward 5 N / book / table / upward 5 N / book / earth / upward 5 N / earth / book / downward 5 N / table / book / upward 5 N / table / earth / upward 5 N / book / table / upward 5 N / table / book / downward 5 N / earth / book / downward Newton’s 1st or 2nd law Newton’s 3rd law Blocks in an Elevator Ranking Task Three blocks are stacked on top of each other inside an elevator as shown in the figure. Answer the following questions with reference to the eight forces defined as follows. the force of the 3 block on the 2 block, , the force of the 2 block on the 3 block, , the force of the 3 block on the 1 block, , the force of the 1 block on the 3 block, , the force of the 2 block on the 1 block, , the force of the 1 block on the 2 block, , the force of the 1 block on the floor, , and the force of the floor on the 1 block, . Part A Assume the elevator is at rest. Rank the magnitude of the forces. Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Newton’s 1st or 2nd law Newton’s 3rd law kg kg F3 on 2 kg kg F2 on 3 kg kg F3 on 1 kg kg F1 on 3 kg kg F2 on 1 kg kg F1 on 2 kg F1 on floor kg Ffloor on 1 Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Newton’s 3rd Law Discussed Learning Goal: To understand Newton’s 3rd law, which states that a physical interaction always generates a pair of forces on the two interacting bodies. In Principia, Newton wrote: To every action there is always opposed an equal reaction: or, the mutual actions of two bodies upon each other are always equal, and directed to contrary parts. (translation by Cajori) The phrase after the colon (often omitted from textbooks) makes it clear that this is a statement about the nature of force. The central idea is that physical interactions (e.g., due to gravity, bodies touching, or electric forces) cause forces to arise between pairs of bodies. Each pairwise interaction produces a pair of opposite forces, one acting on each body. In summary, each physical interaction between two bodies generates a pair of forces. Whatever the physical cause of the interaction, the force on body A from body B is equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to the force on body B from body A. Incidentally, Newton states that the word “action” denotes both (a) the force due to an interaction and (b) the changes in momentum that it imparts to the two interacting bodies. If you haven’t learned about momentum, don’t worry; for now this is just a statement about the origin of forces. Mark each of the following statements as true or false. If a statement refers to “two bodies” interacting via some force, you are not to assume that these two bodies have the same mass. Part A Every force has one and only one 3rd law pair force. ANSWER: Part B The two forces in each pair act in opposite directions. ANSWER: Part C The two forces in each pair can either both act on the same body or they can act on different bodies. ANSWER: true false true false Part D The two forces in each pair may have different physical origins (for instance, one of the forces could be due to gravity, and its pair force could be due to friction or electric charge). ANSWER: Part E The two forces of a 3rd law pair always act on different bodies. ANSWER: Part F Given that two bodies interact via some force, the accelerations of these two bodies have the same magnitude but opposite directions. (Assume no other forces act on either body.) You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: true false true false true false Part G According to Newton’s 3rd law, the force on the (smaller) moon due to the (larger) earth is ANSWER: Pulling Three Blocks Three identical blocks connected by ideal strings are being pulled along a horizontal frictionless surface by a horizontal force . The magnitude of the tension in the string between blocks B and C is = 3.00 . Assume that each block has mass = 0.400 . true false greater in magnitude and antiparallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. greater in magnitude and parallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. equal in magnitude but antiparallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. equal in magnitude and parallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. smaller in magnitude and antiparallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. smaller in magnitude and parallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. F T N m kg Part A What is the magnitude of the force? Express your answer numerically in newtons. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is the tension in the string between block A and block B? Express your answer numerically in newtons You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Pulling Two Blocks In the situation shown in the figure, a person is pulling with a constant, nonzero force on string 1, which is attached to block A. Block A is also attached to block B via string 2, as shown. For this problem, assume that neither string stretches and that friction is negligible. Both blocks have finite (nonzero) mass. F F = N TAB TAB = N F Part A Which one of the following statements correctly descibes the relationship between the accelerations of blocks A and B? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B How does the magnitude of the tension in string 1, , compare with the tension in string 2, ? You did not open hints for this part. Block A has a larger acceleration than block B. Block B has a larger acceleration than block A. Both blocks have the same acceleration. More information is needed to determine the relationship between the accelerations. T1 T2 ANSWER: Tension in a Massless Rope Learning Goal: To understand the concept of tension and the relationship between tension and force. This problem introduces the concept of tension. The example is a rope, oriented vertically, that is being pulled from both ends. Let and (with u for up and d for down) represent the magnitude of the forces acting on the top and bottom of the rope, respectively. Assume that the rope is massless, so that its weight is negligible compared with the tension. (This is not a ridiculous approximation–modern rope materials such as Kevlar can carry tensions thousands of times greater than the weight of tens of meters of such rope.) Consider the three sections of rope labeled a, b, and c in the figure. At point 1, a downward force of magnitude acts on section a. At point 1, an upward force of magnitude acts on section b. At point 1, the tension in the rope is . At point 2, a downward force of magnitude acts on section b. At point 2, an upward force of magnitude acts on section c. At point 2, the tension in the rope is . Assume, too, that the rope is at equilibrium. Part A What is the magnitude of the downward force on section a? Express your answer in terms of the tension . ANSWER: More information is needed to determine the relationship between and . T1 > T2 T1 = T2 T1 < T2 T1 T2 Fu Fd Fad Fbu T1 Fbd Fcu T2 Fad T1 Part B What is the magnitude of the upward force on section b? Express your answer in terms of the tension . ANSWER: Part C The magnitude of the upward force on c, , and the magnitude of the downward force on b, , are equal because of which of Newton's laws? ANSWER: Part D The magnitude of the force is ____ . ANSWER: Fad = Fbu T1 Fbu = Fcu Fbd 1st 2nd 3rd Fbu Fbd Part E Now consider the forces on the ends of the rope. What is the relationship between the magnitudes of these two forces? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part F The ends of a massless rope are attached to two stationary objects (e.g., two trees or two cars) so that the rope makes a straight line. For this situation, which of the following statements are true? Check all that apply. ANSWER: less than greater than equal to Fu > Fd Fu = Fd Fu < Fd The tension in the rope is everywhere the same. The magnitudes of the forces exerted on the two objects by the rope are the same. The forces exerted on the two objects by the rope must be in opposite directions. The forces exerted on the two objects by the rope must be in the direction of the rope. Two Hanging Masses Two blocks with masses and hang one under the other. For this problem, take the positive direction to be upward, and use for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. Case 1: Blocks at rest For Parts A and B assume the blocks are at rest. Part A Find , the tension in the lower rope. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: M1 M2 g T2 M1 M2 g Part B Find , the tension in the upper rope. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Case 2: Accelerating blocks For Parts C and D the blocks are now accelerating upward (due to the tension in the strings) with acceleration of magnitude . Part C Find , the tension in the lower rope. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: T2 = T1 M1 M2 g T1 = a T2 M1 M2 a g Part D Find , the tension in the upper rope. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Video Tutor: Suspended Balls: Which String Breaks? First, launch the video below. You will be asked to use your knowledge of physics to predict the outcome of an experiment. Then, close the video window and answer the question at right. You can watch the video again at any point. T2 = T1 M1 M2 a g T1 = Part A A heavy crate is attached to the wall by a light rope, as shown in the figure. Another rope hangs off the opposite edge of the box. If you slowly increase the force on the free rope by pulling on it in a horizontal direction, which rope will break? Ignore friction and the mass of the ropes. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. The rope attached to the wall will break. The rope that you are pulling on will break. Both ropes are equally likely to break.

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1) If a superalloy jet engine is heated so that its length in each direction expands by 1%, what is its percentage change in volume (assume it is roughly cubic)? Hint: Calculate its volume before and after heating, assuming that its length, height, and width are the same, i.e., a cubic engine. 2) Calculate the density of Al in g/cm3, given that it forms an FCC crystal structure with an atomic radius of 0.143 nm (10-7 cm) and a mass of 27 g/mole. Avogadro’s number is 6.02 x 1023 atoms/mole. Hint: calculate the number of atoms in each cell carefully. 3) Calculate the vacancy concentration in aluminum at 50%, 70%, and 90% of TMP=923 K. Gvf = 0.66 eV, and k = 8.62 x 10-5 eV/K. Calculate ln (nv/N) and 1/T, and plot on a linear scale (hint: should be a straight line). 4) a) If the vacancy concentration in Cu is measured to be 10-5 at 1300K (near its melting point), what is Evf? (assume the pre-exponential factor is 1; ie, nv/N = exp (-Evf/kT) b) What would be the concentration at 650 K? 5) Determine the largest size of an interstitial hole in FCC Fe. RFe = 0.124 nm. Would a C atom sit in an interstitial or substitutional site (rC = 0.077 nm)?

1) If a superalloy jet engine is heated so that its length in each direction expands by 1%, what is its percentage change in volume (assume it is roughly cubic)? Hint: Calculate its volume before and after heating, assuming that its length, height, and width are the same, i.e., a cubic engine. 2) Calculate the density of Al in g/cm3, given that it forms an FCC crystal structure with an atomic radius of 0.143 nm (10-7 cm) and a mass of 27 g/mole. Avogadro’s number is 6.02 x 1023 atoms/mole. Hint: calculate the number of atoms in each cell carefully. 3) Calculate the vacancy concentration in aluminum at 50%, 70%, and 90% of TMP=923 K. Gvf = 0.66 eV, and k = 8.62 x 10-5 eV/K. Calculate ln (nv/N) and 1/T, and plot on a linear scale (hint: should be a straight line). 4) a) If the vacancy concentration in Cu is measured to be 10-5 at 1300K (near its melting point), what is Evf? (assume the pre-exponential factor is 1; ie, nv/N = exp (-Evf/kT) b) What would be the concentration at 650 K? 5) Determine the largest size of an interstitial hole in FCC Fe. RFe = 0.124 nm. Would a C atom sit in an interstitial or substitutional site (rC = 0.077 nm)?

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5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 Problem List 5.1 Total mass of a shell 5.2 Tunnel through the moon 5.3 Gravitational eld above the center of a thin hoop 5.4 Gravitational force near a metal-cored planet surrounded by a gaseous cloud 5.5 Sphere with linearly increasing mass density 5.6 Jumping o Vesta 5.7 Gravitational force between two massive rods 5.8 Potential energy { Check your answer! 5.9 Ways of solving gravitational problems 5.10 Rod with linearly increasing mass density 5.11 Sphere with constant internal gravitational eld 5.12 Throwing a rock o the moon These problems are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Un- ported License. Please share and/or modify. Back to Problem List 1 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.1 Total mass of a shell Given: Marino { Fall 2011 Consider a spherical shell that extends from r = R to r = 2R with a non-uniform density (r) = 0r. What is the total mass of the shell? Back to Problem List 2 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.2 Tunnel through the moon Given: Marino { Fall 2011 Imagine that NASA digs a straight tunnel through the center of the moon (see gure) to access the Moon’s 3He deposits. An astronaut places a rock in the tunnel at the surface of the moon, and releases it (from rest). Show that the rock obeys the force law for a mass connected to a spring. What is the spring constant? Find the oscillation period for this motion if you assume that Moon has a mass of 7.351022 kg and a radius of 1.74106 m. Assume the moon’s density is uniform throughout its volume, and ignore the moon’s rotation. Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 Imagine (in a parallel universe of unlimited budgets) that NASA digs a straight tunnel through the center of the moon (see gure). A robot place a rock in the tunnel at position r = r0 from the center of the moon, and releases it (from rest). Use Newton’s second law to write the equation of motion of the rock and solve for r(t). Explain in words the rock’s motion. Does the rock return to its initial position at any later time? If so, how long does it takes to return to it? (Give a formula, and a number.) Assume the moon’s density is uniform throughout its volume, and ignore the moon’s rotation. Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Now lets consider our (real) planet Earth, with total mass M and radius R which we will approximate as a uniform mass density, (r) = 0. (a) Neglecting rotational and frictional e ects, show that a particle dropped into a hole drilled straight through the center of the earth all the way to the far side will oscillate between the two endpoints. (Hint: you will need to set up, and solve, an ODE for the motion) (b) Find the period of the oscillation of this motion. Get a number (in minutes) as a nal result, using data for the earth’s size and mass. (How does that compare to ying to Perth and back?!) Extra Credit: OK, even with unlimited budgets, digging a tunnel through the center of the earth is preposterous. But, suppose instead that the tunnel is a straight-line \chord” through the earth, say directly from New York to Los Angeles. Show that your nal answer for the time taken does not depend on the location of that chord! This is rather remarkable – look again at the time for a free-fall trip (no energy required, except perhaps to compensate for friction) How long would that trip take? Could this work?! Back to Problem List 3 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.3 Gravitational eld above the center of a thin hoop Given: Pollock { Spring 2011, Spring 2012 Consider a very (in nitesimally!) thin but massive loop, radius R (total mass M), centered around the origin, sitting in the x-y plane. Assume it has a uniform linear mass density  (which has units of kg/m) all around it. (So, it’s like a skinny donut that is mostly hole, centered around the z-axis) (a) What is  in terms of M and R? What is the direction of the gravitational eld generated by this mass distribution at a point in space a distance z above the center of the donut, i.e. at (0; 0; z) Explain your reasoning for the direction carefully, try not to simply \wave your hands.” (The answer is extremely intuitive, but can you justify that it is correct?) (b) Compute the gravitational eld, ~g, at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating Newton’s law of gravity, summing over all in nitesimal \chunks” of mass along the loop. (c) Compute the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating ?Gdm=r, sum- ming over all in nitesimal \chunks” dm along the loop. Then, take the z-component of the gradient of this potential to check that you agree with your result from the previous part. (d) In the two separate limits z << R and z >> R, Taylor expand your g- eld (in the z-direction)out only to the rst non-zero term, and convince us that both limits make good physical sense. (e) Can you use Gauss’ law to gure out the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z)? (If so, do it and check your previous answers. If not, why not?) Extra credit: If you place a small mass a small distance z away from the center, use your Taylor limit for z << R above to write a simple ODE for the equation of motion. Solve it, and discuss the motion Back to Problem List 4 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.4 Gravitational force near a metal-cored planet surrounded by a gaseous cloud Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 Jupiter is composed of a dense spherical core (of liquid metallic hydrogen!) of radius Rc. It is sur- rounded by a spherical cloud of gaseous hydrogen of radius Rg, where Rg > Rc. Let’s assume that the core is of uniform density c and the gaseous cloud is also of uniform density g. What is the gravitational force on an object of mass m that is located at a radius r from the center of Jupiter? Note that you must consider the cases where the object is inside the core, within the gas layer, and outside of the planet. Back to Problem List 5 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.5 Sphere with linearly increasing mass density Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 A planet of mass M and radius R has a nonuniform density that varies with r, the distance from the center according to  = Ar for 0  r  R. (a) What is the constant A in terms of M and R? Does this density pro le strike you as physically plausible, or is just designed as a mathematical exercise? (Brie y, explain) (b) Determine the gravitational force on a satellite of mass m orbiting this planet. In words, please outline the method you plan to use for your solution. (Use the easiest method you can come up with!) In your calculation, you will need to argue that the magnitude of ~g(r; ; ) depends only on r. Be very explicit about this – how do you know that it doesn’t, in fact, depend on  or ? (c) Determine the gravitational force felt by a rock of mass m inside the planet, located at radius r < R. (If the method you use is di erent than in part b, explain why you switched. If not, just proceed!) Explicitly check your result for this part by considering the limits r ! 0 and r ! R. Back to Problem List 6 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.6 Jumping o Vesta Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 You are stranded on the surface of the asteroid Vesta. If the mass of the asteroid is M and its radius is R, how fast would you have to jump o its surface to be able to escape from its gravitational eld? (Your estimate should be based on parameters that characterize the asteroid, not parameters that describe your jumping ability.) Given your formula, look up the approximate mass and radius of the asteroid Vesta 3 and determine a numerical value of the escape velocity. Could you escape in this way? (Brie y, explain) If so, roughly how big in radius is the maximum the asteroid could be, for you to still escape this way? If not, estimate how much smaller an asteroid you would need, to escape from it in this way? Figure 1: Back to Problem List 7 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.7 Gravitational force between two massive rods Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 Consider two identical uniform rods of length L and mass m lying along the same line and having their closest points separated by a distance d as shown in the gure (a) Calculate the mutual force between these rods, both its direction and magnitude. (b) Now do several checks. First, make sure the units worked out (!) The, nd the magnitude of the force in the limit L ! 0. What do you expect? Brie y, discuss. Lastly, nd the magnitude of the force in the limit d ! 1 ? Again, is it what you expect? Brie y, discuss. Figure 2: Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Determining the gravitational force between two rods: (a) Consider a thin, uniform rod of mass m and length L (and negligible other dimensions) lying on the x axis (from x=-L to 0), as shown in g 1a. Derive a formula for the gravitational eld \g" at any arbitrary point x to the right of the origin (but still on the x-axis!) due to this rod. (b) Now suppose a second rod of length L and mass m sits on the x axis as shown in g 1b, with the left edge a distance \d" away. Calculate the mutual gravitational force between these rods. (c) Let's do some checks! Show that the units work out in parts a and b. Find the magnitude of the force in part a, in the limit x >> L: What do you expect? Brie y, discuss! Finally, verify that your answer to part b gives what you expect in the limit d >> L. ( Hint: This is a bit harder! You need to consistently expand everything to second order, not just rst, because of some interesting cancellations) Fig 1a Fig 1b L m +x x=0 L x=0 x=d m Fig 1a Fig 1b L m +x x=0 L +x x=0 x=d L m m Back to Problem List 8 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.8 Potential energy { Check your answer! Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 On the last exam, we had a problem with a at ring, uniform mass per unit area of , inner radius of R, outer radius of 2R. A satellite (mass m) sat a distance z above the center of the ring. We asked for the gravitational potential energy, and the answer was U(z) = ?2Gm( p 4R2 + z2 ? p R2 + z2) (1) (a) If you are far from the disk (on the z axis), what do you expect for the formula for U(z)? (Don’t say \0″ – as usual, we want the functional form of U(z) as you move far away. Also, explicitly state what we mean by \far away”. (Please don’t compare something with units to something without units!) (b) Show explicitly that the formula above does indeed give precisely the functional dependence you expect. Back to Problem List 9 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.9 Ways of solving gravitational problems Given: Pollock { Spring 2011, Spring 2012 Infinite cylinder ρ=cr x z (a) Half-infinite line mass, uniform linear mass density, λ x (b) R z  P Figure 3: (a) An in nite cylinder of radius R centered on the z-axis, with non-uniform volume mass density  = cr, where r is the radius in cylindrical coordinates. (b) A half-in nite line of mass on the x-axis extending from x = 0 to x = +1, with uniform linear mass density . There are two general methods we use to solve gravitational problems (i.e. nd ~g given some distribution of mass). (a) Describe these two methods. We claim one of these methods is easiest to solve for ~g of mass distribution (a) above, and the other method is easiest to solve for ~g of the mass distribution (b) above. Which method goes with which mass distribution? Please justify your answer. (b) Find ~g of the mass distribution (a) above for any arbitrary point outside the cylinder. (c) Find the x component of the gravitational acceleration, gx, generated by the mass distribution labeled (b) above, at a point P a given distance z up the positive z-axis (as shown). Back to Problem List 10 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.10 Rod with linearly increasing mass density Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Consider a very (in nitesimally!) thin but massive rod, length L (total mass M), centered around the origin, sitting along the x-axis. (So the left end is at (-L/2, 0,0) and the right end is at (+L/2,0,0) Assume the mass density  (which has units of kg/m)is not uniform, but instead varies linearly with distance from the origin, (x) = cjxj. (a) What is that constant \c” in terms of M and L? What is the direction of the gravitational eld generated by this mass distribution at a point in space a distance z above the center of the rod, i.e. at (0; 0; z) Explain your reasoning for the direction carefully, try not to simply \wave your hands.” (The answer is extremely intuitive, but can you justify that it is correct?) (b) Compute the gravitational eld, ~g, at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating Newton’s law of gravity, summing over all in nitesimal \chunks” of mass along the rod. (c) Compute the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating ?Gdm=r, sum- ming over all in nitesimal \chunks” dm along the rod. Then, take the z-component of the gradient of this potential to check that you agree with your result from the previous part. (d) In the limit of large z what do you expect for the functional form for gravitational potential? (Hint: Don’t just say it goes to zero! It’s a rod of mass M, when you’re far away what does it look like? How does it go to zero?) What does \large z” mean here? Use the binomial (or Taylor) expansion to verify that your formula does indeed give exactly what you expect. (Hint: you cannot Taylor expand in something BIG, you have to Taylor expand in something small.) (e) Can you use Gauss’ law to gure out the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z)? (If so, do it and check your previous answers. If not, why not?) Back to Problem List 11 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.11 Sphere with constant internal gravitational eld Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 (a) Imagine a planet of total mass M and radius R which has a nonuniform mass density that varies just with r, the distance from the center. For this (admittedly very unusual!) planet, suppose the gravitational eld strength inside the planet turns out to be independent of the radial distance within the sphere. Find the function describing the mass density  = (r) of this planet. (Your nal answer should be written in terms of the given constants.) (b) Now, determine the gravitational force on a satellite of mass m orbiting this planet at distance r > R. (Use the easiest method you can come up with!) Explain your work in words as well as formulas. For instance, in your calculation, you will need to argue that the magnitude of ~g(r; ; ) depends only on r. Be explicit about this – how do you know that it doesn’t, in fact, depend on  or ? (c) As a nal check, explicitly show that your solutions inside and outside the planet (parts a and b) are consistent when r = R. Please also comment on whether this density pro le strikes you as physically plausible, or is it just designed as a mathematical exercise? Defend your reasoning. Back to Problem List 12 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.12 Throwing a rock o the moon Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Assuming that asteroids have roughly the same mass density as the moon, make an estimate of the largest asteroid that an astronaut could be standing on, and still have a chance of throwing a small object (with their arms, no machinery!) so that it completely escapes the asteroid’s gravitational eld. (This minimum speed is called \escape velocity”) Is the size you computed typical for asteroids in our solar system? Back to Problem List 13

5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 Problem List 5.1 Total mass of a shell 5.2 Tunnel through the moon 5.3 Gravitational eld above the center of a thin hoop 5.4 Gravitational force near a metal-cored planet surrounded by a gaseous cloud 5.5 Sphere with linearly increasing mass density 5.6 Jumping o Vesta 5.7 Gravitational force between two massive rods 5.8 Potential energy { Check your answer! 5.9 Ways of solving gravitational problems 5.10 Rod with linearly increasing mass density 5.11 Sphere with constant internal gravitational eld 5.12 Throwing a rock o the moon These problems are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Un- ported License. Please share and/or modify. Back to Problem List 1 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.1 Total mass of a shell Given: Marino { Fall 2011 Consider a spherical shell that extends from r = R to r = 2R with a non-uniform density (r) = 0r. What is the total mass of the shell? Back to Problem List 2 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.2 Tunnel through the moon Given: Marino { Fall 2011 Imagine that NASA digs a straight tunnel through the center of the moon (see gure) to access the Moon’s 3He deposits. An astronaut places a rock in the tunnel at the surface of the moon, and releases it (from rest). Show that the rock obeys the force law for a mass connected to a spring. What is the spring constant? Find the oscillation period for this motion if you assume that Moon has a mass of 7.351022 kg and a radius of 1.74106 m. Assume the moon’s density is uniform throughout its volume, and ignore the moon’s rotation. Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 Imagine (in a parallel universe of unlimited budgets) that NASA digs a straight tunnel through the center of the moon (see gure). A robot place a rock in the tunnel at position r = r0 from the center of the moon, and releases it (from rest). Use Newton’s second law to write the equation of motion of the rock and solve for r(t). Explain in words the rock’s motion. Does the rock return to its initial position at any later time? If so, how long does it takes to return to it? (Give a formula, and a number.) Assume the moon’s density is uniform throughout its volume, and ignore the moon’s rotation. Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Now lets consider our (real) planet Earth, with total mass M and radius R which we will approximate as a uniform mass density, (r) = 0. (a) Neglecting rotational and frictional e ects, show that a particle dropped into a hole drilled straight through the center of the earth all the way to the far side will oscillate between the two endpoints. (Hint: you will need to set up, and solve, an ODE for the motion) (b) Find the period of the oscillation of this motion. Get a number (in minutes) as a nal result, using data for the earth’s size and mass. (How does that compare to ying to Perth and back?!) Extra Credit: OK, even with unlimited budgets, digging a tunnel through the center of the earth is preposterous. But, suppose instead that the tunnel is a straight-line \chord” through the earth, say directly from New York to Los Angeles. Show that your nal answer for the time taken does not depend on the location of that chord! This is rather remarkable – look again at the time for a free-fall trip (no energy required, except perhaps to compensate for friction) How long would that trip take? Could this work?! Back to Problem List 3 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.3 Gravitational eld above the center of a thin hoop Given: Pollock { Spring 2011, Spring 2012 Consider a very (in nitesimally!) thin but massive loop, radius R (total mass M), centered around the origin, sitting in the x-y plane. Assume it has a uniform linear mass density  (which has units of kg/m) all around it. (So, it’s like a skinny donut that is mostly hole, centered around the z-axis) (a) What is  in terms of M and R? What is the direction of the gravitational eld generated by this mass distribution at a point in space a distance z above the center of the donut, i.e. at (0; 0; z) Explain your reasoning for the direction carefully, try not to simply \wave your hands.” (The answer is extremely intuitive, but can you justify that it is correct?) (b) Compute the gravitational eld, ~g, at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating Newton’s law of gravity, summing over all in nitesimal \chunks” of mass along the loop. (c) Compute the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating ?Gdm=r, sum- ming over all in nitesimal \chunks” dm along the loop. Then, take the z-component of the gradient of this potential to check that you agree with your result from the previous part. (d) In the two separate limits z << R and z >> R, Taylor expand your g- eld (in the z-direction)out only to the rst non-zero term, and convince us that both limits make good physical sense. (e) Can you use Gauss’ law to gure out the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z)? (If so, do it and check your previous answers. If not, why not?) Extra credit: If you place a small mass a small distance z away from the center, use your Taylor limit for z << R above to write a simple ODE for the equation of motion. Solve it, and discuss the motion Back to Problem List 4 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.4 Gravitational force near a metal-cored planet surrounded by a gaseous cloud Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 Jupiter is composed of a dense spherical core (of liquid metallic hydrogen!) of radius Rc. It is sur- rounded by a spherical cloud of gaseous hydrogen of radius Rg, where Rg > Rc. Let’s assume that the core is of uniform density c and the gaseous cloud is also of uniform density g. What is the gravitational force on an object of mass m that is located at a radius r from the center of Jupiter? Note that you must consider the cases where the object is inside the core, within the gas layer, and outside of the planet. Back to Problem List 5 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.5 Sphere with linearly increasing mass density Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 A planet of mass M and radius R has a nonuniform density that varies with r, the distance from the center according to  = Ar for 0  r  R. (a) What is the constant A in terms of M and R? Does this density pro le strike you as physically plausible, or is just designed as a mathematical exercise? (Brie y, explain) (b) Determine the gravitational force on a satellite of mass m orbiting this planet. In words, please outline the method you plan to use for your solution. (Use the easiest method you can come up with!) In your calculation, you will need to argue that the magnitude of ~g(r; ; ) depends only on r. Be very explicit about this – how do you know that it doesn’t, in fact, depend on  or ? (c) Determine the gravitational force felt by a rock of mass m inside the planet, located at radius r < R. (If the method you use is di erent than in part b, explain why you switched. If not, just proceed!) Explicitly check your result for this part by considering the limits r ! 0 and r ! R. Back to Problem List 6 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.6 Jumping o Vesta Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 You are stranded on the surface of the asteroid Vesta. If the mass of the asteroid is M and its radius is R, how fast would you have to jump o its surface to be able to escape from its gravitational eld? (Your estimate should be based on parameters that characterize the asteroid, not parameters that describe your jumping ability.) Given your formula, look up the approximate mass and radius of the asteroid Vesta 3 and determine a numerical value of the escape velocity. Could you escape in this way? (Brie y, explain) If so, roughly how big in radius is the maximum the asteroid could be, for you to still escape this way? If not, estimate how much smaller an asteroid you would need, to escape from it in this way? Figure 1: Back to Problem List 7 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.7 Gravitational force between two massive rods Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 Consider two identical uniform rods of length L and mass m lying along the same line and having their closest points separated by a distance d as shown in the gure (a) Calculate the mutual force between these rods, both its direction and magnitude. (b) Now do several checks. First, make sure the units worked out (!) The, nd the magnitude of the force in the limit L ! 0. What do you expect? Brie y, discuss. Lastly, nd the magnitude of the force in the limit d ! 1 ? Again, is it what you expect? Brie y, discuss. Figure 2: Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Determining the gravitational force between two rods: (a) Consider a thin, uniform rod of mass m and length L (and negligible other dimensions) lying on the x axis (from x=-L to 0), as shown in g 1a. Derive a formula for the gravitational eld \g" at any arbitrary point x to the right of the origin (but still on the x-axis!) due to this rod. (b) Now suppose a second rod of length L and mass m sits on the x axis as shown in g 1b, with the left edge a distance \d" away. Calculate the mutual gravitational force between these rods. (c) Let's do some checks! Show that the units work out in parts a and b. Find the magnitude of the force in part a, in the limit x >> L: What do you expect? Brie y, discuss! Finally, verify that your answer to part b gives what you expect in the limit d >> L. ( Hint: This is a bit harder! You need to consistently expand everything to second order, not just rst, because of some interesting cancellations) Fig 1a Fig 1b L m +x x=0 L x=0 x=d m Fig 1a Fig 1b L m +x x=0 L +x x=0 x=d L m m Back to Problem List 8 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.8 Potential energy { Check your answer! Given: Pollock { Spring 2011 On the last exam, we had a problem with a at ring, uniform mass per unit area of , inner radius of R, outer radius of 2R. A satellite (mass m) sat a distance z above the center of the ring. We asked for the gravitational potential energy, and the answer was U(z) = ?2Gm( p 4R2 + z2 ? p R2 + z2) (1) (a) If you are far from the disk (on the z axis), what do you expect for the formula for U(z)? (Don’t say \0″ – as usual, we want the functional form of U(z) as you move far away. Also, explicitly state what we mean by \far away”. (Please don’t compare something with units to something without units!) (b) Show explicitly that the formula above does indeed give precisely the functional dependence you expect. Back to Problem List 9 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.9 Ways of solving gravitational problems Given: Pollock { Spring 2011, Spring 2012 Infinite cylinder ρ=cr x z (a) Half-infinite line mass, uniform linear mass density, λ x (b) R z  P Figure 3: (a) An in nite cylinder of radius R centered on the z-axis, with non-uniform volume mass density  = cr, where r is the radius in cylindrical coordinates. (b) A half-in nite line of mass on the x-axis extending from x = 0 to x = +1, with uniform linear mass density . There are two general methods we use to solve gravitational problems (i.e. nd ~g given some distribution of mass). (a) Describe these two methods. We claim one of these methods is easiest to solve for ~g of mass distribution (a) above, and the other method is easiest to solve for ~g of the mass distribution (b) above. Which method goes with which mass distribution? Please justify your answer. (b) Find ~g of the mass distribution (a) above for any arbitrary point outside the cylinder. (c) Find the x component of the gravitational acceleration, gx, generated by the mass distribution labeled (b) above, at a point P a given distance z up the positive z-axis (as shown). Back to Problem List 10 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.10 Rod with linearly increasing mass density Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Consider a very (in nitesimally!) thin but massive rod, length L (total mass M), centered around the origin, sitting along the x-axis. (So the left end is at (-L/2, 0,0) and the right end is at (+L/2,0,0) Assume the mass density  (which has units of kg/m)is not uniform, but instead varies linearly with distance from the origin, (x) = cjxj. (a) What is that constant \c” in terms of M and L? What is the direction of the gravitational eld generated by this mass distribution at a point in space a distance z above the center of the rod, i.e. at (0; 0; z) Explain your reasoning for the direction carefully, try not to simply \wave your hands.” (The answer is extremely intuitive, but can you justify that it is correct?) (b) Compute the gravitational eld, ~g, at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating Newton’s law of gravity, summing over all in nitesimal \chunks” of mass along the rod. (c) Compute the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z) by directly integrating ?Gdm=r, sum- ming over all in nitesimal \chunks” dm along the rod. Then, take the z-component of the gradient of this potential to check that you agree with your result from the previous part. (d) In the limit of large z what do you expect for the functional form for gravitational potential? (Hint: Don’t just say it goes to zero! It’s a rod of mass M, when you’re far away what does it look like? How does it go to zero?) What does \large z” mean here? Use the binomial (or Taylor) expansion to verify that your formula does indeed give exactly what you expect. (Hint: you cannot Taylor expand in something BIG, you have to Taylor expand in something small.) (e) Can you use Gauss’ law to gure out the gravitational potential at the point (0; 0; z)? (If so, do it and check your previous answers. If not, why not?) Back to Problem List 11 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.11 Sphere with constant internal gravitational eld Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 (a) Imagine a planet of total mass M and radius R which has a nonuniform mass density that varies just with r, the distance from the center. For this (admittedly very unusual!) planet, suppose the gravitational eld strength inside the planet turns out to be independent of the radial distance within the sphere. Find the function describing the mass density  = (r) of this planet. (Your nal answer should be written in terms of the given constants.) (b) Now, determine the gravitational force on a satellite of mass m orbiting this planet at distance r > R. (Use the easiest method you can come up with!) Explain your work in words as well as formulas. For instance, in your calculation, you will need to argue that the magnitude of ~g(r; ; ) depends only on r. Be explicit about this – how do you know that it doesn’t, in fact, depend on  or ? (c) As a nal check, explicitly show that your solutions inside and outside the planet (parts a and b) are consistent when r = R. Please also comment on whether this density pro le strikes you as physically plausible, or is it just designed as a mathematical exercise? Defend your reasoning. Back to Problem List 12 5 { GRAVITATION Last Updated: July 16, 2012 5.12 Throwing a rock o the moon Given: Pollock { Spring 2012 Assuming that asteroids have roughly the same mass density as the moon, make an estimate of the largest asteroid that an astronaut could be standing on, and still have a chance of throwing a small object (with their arms, no machinery!) so that it completely escapes the asteroid’s gravitational eld. (This minimum speed is called \escape velocity”) Is the size you computed typical for asteroids in our solar system? Back to Problem List 13