Book review The Shareholder Value Myth: How Putting Shareholders First Harms Investors, Corporations, and the Public by Lynn Stout Provide 1) a 900 word review of this book (word range 900-1,200) and 2) a 350 word reflection where you force yourself to relate the message of the book . As per the format of the review, I like the ones done by the folks of the WSJ. This is an example: http://forums.delphiforums.com/diversecity/messages?msg=17531.1264 or http://www.wsj.com/articles/book-review-how-adam-smith-can-change-your-life-by-russ-roberts-1413846808?KEYWORDS=book+reviews

Book review The Shareholder Value Myth: How Putting Shareholders First Harms Investors, Corporations, and the Public by Lynn Stout Provide 1) a 900 word review of this book (word range 900-1,200) and 2) a 350 word reflection where you force yourself to relate the message of the book . As per the format of the review, I like the ones done by the folks of the WSJ. This is an example: http://forums.delphiforums.com/diversecity/messages?msg=17531.1264 or http://www.wsj.com/articles/book-review-how-adam-smith-can-change-your-life-by-russ-roberts-1413846808?KEYWORDS=book+reviews

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Select Case 1, 2, or 8 in the back of the textbook. After you have read the case, select at least one of the questions presented at the end.-If you select only one question, then you will need to elaborate with more examples and perspectives than if you select more than one, but the choice is yours. Fair warning: It is possible to fall into the trap of repeating oneself. To avoid that threat, think in advance of the different perspectives that you wish to explore. If you select more than one question, each answer will naturally be shorter. This may be a good approach if you discern that the questions lack strong potential to elicit in-depth answers. Remember to reply to the contributions of two other students in this exercise. This is a rule that we are only observing in the case analyses, given the relative complexity of the cases, compared to the chapter discussion questions. Always add value, from the textbook, news, personal experience, or all three. Indicate the case and question at the beginning, but avoid restating the question in your answer. In this respect, use the same method as in the chapter discussion questions, described in the Week 2 forum. Write at least 500 words (no minimum for replies, but do add value). Quoted passages do not contribute to the word count (so you will need to write more if you insert any quoted material). Post-edit your work carefully to catch errors. Avoid plagiarism at all cost. ——— Note on anomalous questions. Some questions will require you to work around selected details to fit the requisite discussion format. For example, Question 2 in Case 1 asks how your proposal will solve certain problems noted in answer to the previous question. If you have not actually answered Question 1, then you will have to assert one or more problems from the case, a proposed solution, and then an explanation of how your proposal may help. Question 3 is similar, in that you will need to identify a problem and a solution, followed by an argument about the budget. Although Alistair was expecting to hire a Project Engineer rather than a Quality Compliance Manager, the methods used to make the decision should be similar. The main difference in the Quality Compliance Manager position is that it is in a joint venture with a Hungarian government backed firm. International Joint Ventures (IJV) makes HRM practices more complicated because HRM practices and strategies are required for each IJV entity (Dowling, Festing, & Engle, 2013). HRM must address IJV in four stages, in which, each stage has an impact on the next. It is important for HRM to very thorough with each stage and communication through each stage is vital. To be successful, HRM must combine the IJV strategy along with the recruitment, selection, training, and development processes (Dowling et al., 2013). In light of the needs of the company and the new Quality Compliance Manager position, Alistair should choose the first candidate, Marie Erten-Loiseau. The fact that the job requires travel to France and Germany is a positive for Marie because she was born in France and was educated in France and Germany. The familiarity of these locations will help her as she meets with new business partners because she will have a good understanding of the policy and procedures required for companies in these two countries. Dowling et al., (2013), points out that the manager needs to be able to assess the desires of the stakeholders and be able to implement strategies based on their desires. Another reason for choosing Marie is that she has the most experience and has worked with Trianon for 13 years. The experience she has with the company is invaluable because she knows the goals of the company and strategies for implementing those goals. The last reason for choosing Marie is that she has been successful in her previous positions. She has lead two projects in two different countries and both were successful. This shows that she is able to adapt to the different practices of each country. There are many factors that Alistair should take into consideration to determine the correct choice for the Quality Compliance Manager position. The major factors that require consideration are the specificities of the entire situation, the reason for the assignment, and type of assignment. The four main specificities include context specificities, firm specific variables, local unit specificities, and IHRM practices (Dowling et al., 2013). The context specificities would include the differences in cultures between the assignment in Hungary and the base location for the Trianon, Marseilles. The firm specific variable includes any changes in the way operations in Hungary are conducted, whether it is strategy or HRM policies. The local unit specificities include the role of the joint venture in relation to Trianon and how this joint venture will fit into the long-term plan of the company. The company hopes that it will provide a good working relationship with the state supported airline, which will lead to more business in the future. The IHRM practices determine the employees that are hired and the training that is available to the employees. The reason for the assignment also is a major factor in determining the correct candidate. In the situation of Trianon, a joint venture with a Hungarian government back firm created a position that needed filling. The Quality Compliance Manager position allows Trianon to manage the joint venture operation, make sure it is successful, and build a strong relationship with Malev. The last major factor is the type of assignment. The Quality Compliance Manager assignment is long-term assignment because it is 3 years in duration. The joint venture is the first that the company has been involved in outside the UK so there is less familiarity on the administrative/compliance side. The candidate must act as an agent of direct control (Dowling et al., 2013) by assuring that compliance policies are followed and company strategy is implemented. Assessing whether a male or female would be the best fit for the position is also a factor that deserves consideration. The low number of female expatriates led Jessens, Cappellen, &Zanoni (2006) to research the following three myths: women have no desire to be in positions of authority in a foreign country, companies do not desire to place females in positions of authority while a foreign country, and women would be ineffective because of the views towards women in foreign countries. The research indicated that female expatriates do have conflict that arises related to their gender but the successful ones were able to turn the conflicts around based on the qualities that these women possess (Jessens et al., 2006). With all of these factors considered, I believe Marie Erten-Loiseau is the best candidate for the Quality Compliance Manager. References Dowling, P.J., Festing, M., & Engle, A.D. Sr. (2013). International Human Resource Management (6th ed.). Stamford, CT: Cengage Learning Janssens, M., Cappellen, T., &Zanoni, P. (2006). Successful female expatriates as agents: Positioning oneself through gender, hierarchy, and culture. Journal of World Business, 1-16. doi:10.1016/j.jwb.2006.01.001 2.) Case 8 – Questions 1 & 4 Multinational firms are often faced with recruiting and staffing decisions that could ultimately enhance or diminish the firm’s ability to be successful in a competitive global market. Perlmutter identified four staffing approaches for MNEs to consider based on the primary attitudes of international executives that would lay the foundation for MNEs during the recruitment and hiring process (Dowling, Festing, & Engle, 2013). At one point or another throughout the MacDougall family journey Lachlan and Lisa have served in one of the four capacities as an ethnocentric, polycentric, geocentric, and regiocentric employee. The ability to encompass all four attitudes that Perlmutter set forth is something that the MacDougall family has managed to do extremely well. The possibility for a multinational firm to recruit a family of this caliber that has been exposed and has an understanding of the positive and negative aspects of each attitude is phenomenal. This would be resourceful for any multinational firm. The MacDougal family’s exposure to cross-cultural management is also valuable. The diverse cultural background that the family has encountered on their international journey is a rarity. Cultural diversity and cross-cultural management play a critical role in MNEs because it produces a work environment that can transform the workplace into a place of learning and give the firm the availability to create new ideas for a more productive and competitive advantage over other firms (Sultana, Rashid, Mohiuddin, &Mazumder, 2013). This is something that is easy for the MacDougall family to bring to the table with the family’s given history. The expatriate lifestyle that has become second nature to the MacDougall family is beneficial for multinational firms for multifarious reasons Being raised around different cultures and then choosing to work internationally and learn different cultures has attributed to Lachlan’s successful career. The family’s ability to communicate and blend in socially among diverse cultures is an important aspect for international firms that want to stay competitive and be successful. The family has acclimated fairly easy to all of the places they have been and this is something that can be favorable when firms are recruiting employees. The MacDougall family has an upper-hand in the international marketplace naturally due to previous experiences with other countries and cultures. The exceptional way that the family has managed to conform to a multitude of other cultures and flourish is not an easy task. Marriage is not easy and many families experience a greater challenge avoiding divorcees when international mobility is involved. Lachlan and Lisa have been able to move together and this is an important aspect to the success of their marriage. Based on the case study they have a common desire to travel and both are successful in their careers. Lisa’s devotion to her husband’s successful career has put some strain on the marriage as she has had times where she felt she did not have her own identity. Military spouses experience this type of stress during long deployments and times that they have to hold the household together on their own. Another example is with employers who are transferred internationally for a short period of time or travel often. Separation of spouses can strain any marriage, but Lisa and Lachlan have been fortunate to avoid separation for any extended length of time. References Dowling, P.J., Festing, M., & Engle, A.D.Sr.(2013). International Human Resource Management. (6thed.). Stamford, CT: Cengage Sultana, M., Rashid, M., Mohiuddin, M. &Mazumder, M. (2013).Cross-cultural management and organizational performance.A Contnet analysis perspective.International Journal of Business and Management, 8(8), 133-146.

Select Case 1, 2, or 8 in the back of the textbook. After you have read the case, select at least one of the questions presented at the end.-If you select only one question, then you will need to elaborate with more examples and perspectives than if you select more than one, but the choice is yours. Fair warning: It is possible to fall into the trap of repeating oneself. To avoid that threat, think in advance of the different perspectives that you wish to explore. If you select more than one question, each answer will naturally be shorter. This may be a good approach if you discern that the questions lack strong potential to elicit in-depth answers. Remember to reply to the contributions of two other students in this exercise. This is a rule that we are only observing in the case analyses, given the relative complexity of the cases, compared to the chapter discussion questions. Always add value, from the textbook, news, personal experience, or all three. Indicate the case and question at the beginning, but avoid restating the question in your answer. In this respect, use the same method as in the chapter discussion questions, described in the Week 2 forum. Write at least 500 words (no minimum for replies, but do add value). Quoted passages do not contribute to the word count (so you will need to write more if you insert any quoted material). Post-edit your work carefully to catch errors. Avoid plagiarism at all cost. ——— Note on anomalous questions. Some questions will require you to work around selected details to fit the requisite discussion format. For example, Question 2 in Case 1 asks how your proposal will solve certain problems noted in answer to the previous question. If you have not actually answered Question 1, then you will have to assert one or more problems from the case, a proposed solution, and then an explanation of how your proposal may help. Question 3 is similar, in that you will need to identify a problem and a solution, followed by an argument about the budget. Although Alistair was expecting to hire a Project Engineer rather than a Quality Compliance Manager, the methods used to make the decision should be similar. The main difference in the Quality Compliance Manager position is that it is in a joint venture with a Hungarian government backed firm. International Joint Ventures (IJV) makes HRM practices more complicated because HRM practices and strategies are required for each IJV entity (Dowling, Festing, & Engle, 2013). HRM must address IJV in four stages, in which, each stage has an impact on the next. It is important for HRM to very thorough with each stage and communication through each stage is vital. To be successful, HRM must combine the IJV strategy along with the recruitment, selection, training, and development processes (Dowling et al., 2013). In light of the needs of the company and the new Quality Compliance Manager position, Alistair should choose the first candidate, Marie Erten-Loiseau. The fact that the job requires travel to France and Germany is a positive for Marie because she was born in France and was educated in France and Germany. The familiarity of these locations will help her as she meets with new business partners because she will have a good understanding of the policy and procedures required for companies in these two countries. Dowling et al., (2013), points out that the manager needs to be able to assess the desires of the stakeholders and be able to implement strategies based on their desires. Another reason for choosing Marie is that she has the most experience and has worked with Trianon for 13 years. The experience she has with the company is invaluable because she knows the goals of the company and strategies for implementing those goals. The last reason for choosing Marie is that she has been successful in her previous positions. She has lead two projects in two different countries and both were successful. This shows that she is able to adapt to the different practices of each country. There are many factors that Alistair should take into consideration to determine the correct choice for the Quality Compliance Manager position. The major factors that require consideration are the specificities of the entire situation, the reason for the assignment, and type of assignment. The four main specificities include context specificities, firm specific variables, local unit specificities, and IHRM practices (Dowling et al., 2013). The context specificities would include the differences in cultures between the assignment in Hungary and the base location for the Trianon, Marseilles. The firm specific variable includes any changes in the way operations in Hungary are conducted, whether it is strategy or HRM policies. The local unit specificities include the role of the joint venture in relation to Trianon and how this joint venture will fit into the long-term plan of the company. The company hopes that it will provide a good working relationship with the state supported airline, which will lead to more business in the future. The IHRM practices determine the employees that are hired and the training that is available to the employees. The reason for the assignment also is a major factor in determining the correct candidate. In the situation of Trianon, a joint venture with a Hungarian government back firm created a position that needed filling. The Quality Compliance Manager position allows Trianon to manage the joint venture operation, make sure it is successful, and build a strong relationship with Malev. The last major factor is the type of assignment. The Quality Compliance Manager assignment is long-term assignment because it is 3 years in duration. The joint venture is the first that the company has been involved in outside the UK so there is less familiarity on the administrative/compliance side. The candidate must act as an agent of direct control (Dowling et al., 2013) by assuring that compliance policies are followed and company strategy is implemented. Assessing whether a male or female would be the best fit for the position is also a factor that deserves consideration. The low number of female expatriates led Jessens, Cappellen, &Zanoni (2006) to research the following three myths: women have no desire to be in positions of authority in a foreign country, companies do not desire to place females in positions of authority while a foreign country, and women would be ineffective because of the views towards women in foreign countries. The research indicated that female expatriates do have conflict that arises related to their gender but the successful ones were able to turn the conflicts around based on the qualities that these women possess (Jessens et al., 2006). With all of these factors considered, I believe Marie Erten-Loiseau is the best candidate for the Quality Compliance Manager. References Dowling, P.J., Festing, M., & Engle, A.D. Sr. (2013). International Human Resource Management (6th ed.). Stamford, CT: Cengage Learning Janssens, M., Cappellen, T., &Zanoni, P. (2006). Successful female expatriates as agents: Positioning oneself through gender, hierarchy, and culture. Journal of World Business, 1-16. doi:10.1016/j.jwb.2006.01.001 2.) Case 8 – Questions 1 & 4 Multinational firms are often faced with recruiting and staffing decisions that could ultimately enhance or diminish the firm’s ability to be successful in a competitive global market. Perlmutter identified four staffing approaches for MNEs to consider based on the primary attitudes of international executives that would lay the foundation for MNEs during the recruitment and hiring process (Dowling, Festing, & Engle, 2013). At one point or another throughout the MacDougall family journey Lachlan and Lisa have served in one of the four capacities as an ethnocentric, polycentric, geocentric, and regiocentric employee. The ability to encompass all four attitudes that Perlmutter set forth is something that the MacDougall family has managed to do extremely well. The possibility for a multinational firm to recruit a family of this caliber that has been exposed and has an understanding of the positive and negative aspects of each attitude is phenomenal. This would be resourceful for any multinational firm. The MacDougal family’s exposure to cross-cultural management is also valuable. The diverse cultural background that the family has encountered on their international journey is a rarity. Cultural diversity and cross-cultural management play a critical role in MNEs because it produces a work environment that can transform the workplace into a place of learning and give the firm the availability to create new ideas for a more productive and competitive advantage over other firms (Sultana, Rashid, Mohiuddin, &Mazumder, 2013). This is something that is easy for the MacDougall family to bring to the table with the family’s given history. The expatriate lifestyle that has become second nature to the MacDougall family is beneficial for multinational firms for multifarious reasons Being raised around different cultures and then choosing to work internationally and learn different cultures has attributed to Lachlan’s successful career. The family’s ability to communicate and blend in socially among diverse cultures is an important aspect for international firms that want to stay competitive and be successful. The family has acclimated fairly easy to all of the places they have been and this is something that can be favorable when firms are recruiting employees. The MacDougall family has an upper-hand in the international marketplace naturally due to previous experiences with other countries and cultures. The exceptional way that the family has managed to conform to a multitude of other cultures and flourish is not an easy task. Marriage is not easy and many families experience a greater challenge avoiding divorcees when international mobility is involved. Lachlan and Lisa have been able to move together and this is an important aspect to the success of their marriage. Based on the case study they have a common desire to travel and both are successful in their careers. Lisa’s devotion to her husband’s successful career has put some strain on the marriage as she has had times where she felt she did not have her own identity. Military spouses experience this type of stress during long deployments and times that they have to hold the household together on their own. Another example is with employers who are transferred internationally for a short period of time or travel often. Separation of spouses can strain any marriage, but Lisa and Lachlan have been fortunate to avoid separation for any extended length of time. References Dowling, P.J., Festing, M., & Engle, A.D.Sr.(2013). International Human Resource Management. (6thed.). Stamford, CT: Cengage Sultana, M., Rashid, M., Mohiuddin, M. &Mazumder, M. (2013).Cross-cultural management and organizational performance.A Contnet analysis perspective.International Journal of Business and Management, 8(8), 133-146.

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What is the prime purpose of selecting a composite material over material from the other family groups? MODULE 3 – STRUCTURE OF SOLID MATERIALS The ability of a material to exist in different space lattices is called a. Allotropic b. Crystalline c. Solvent d. Amorphous Amorphous metals develop their microstructure as a result of ___________. a. Dendrites b. Directional solidification c. Slip d. Extremely rapid cooling In an alloy, the material that dissolves the alloying element is the ___________. a. Solute b. Solvent c. Matrix d. Allotrope What is the coordination number (CN) for the fcc structure formed by ions of sodium and chlorine that is in the chemical compound NaCl (salt) ? a. 6 b. 8 c. 14 d. 16 What pressure is normally used in constructing a phase diagram? a. 100 psi b. Depends on material c. Ambient d. Normal atmospheric pressure What line on a binary diagram indicates the upper limit of the solid solution phase? a. Liquidus b. Eutectic c. Eutectoid d. Solidus What holds the atoms (ions) together in a compound such as NaCl are electrostatic forces between ___________. a. Atom and ion b. Covalent bonds c. Electrons and nuclei d. Neutrons Diffusion of atoms through a solid takes place by two main mechanisms. One is diffusion through vacancies in the atomic structure. Another method of diffusion is ___________. a. Cold b. APF c. Substitutional d. Interstitial Give a brief explanation of the Lever rule (P117) Grain boundaries ___________ movement of dislocations through a solid. a. Improve b. Inhibit c. Do not affect Iron can be alloyed with carbon because it is ___________. a. Crystalline b. Amorphous c. A mixture d. Allotropic Metals can be cooled only to crystalline solids. a. T (true) b. F (false) Sketch an fcc unit cell. Metals are classified as crystalline materials. Name one metal that is an amorphous solid and name at least one recent application in which its use is saving energy or providing greater strength and/or corrosion resistance. MODULE 4 – MECHANICAL PROPERTIES Give two examples of a mechanical property. a. Thermal resistance b. Wear resistance c. Hardness d. Strength Scissors used in the home cut material by concentrating forces that ultimately produce a certain type of stress within the material. Identify this stress. a. Bearing stress b. Shearing stress c. Compressive stress An aluminum rod 1 in. in diameter (E =10.4 x 106psi) experiences an elastic tensile strain of 0.0048 in./in. Calculate the stress in the rod. a. 49,920 ksi b. 49,920 psi c. 49,920 msi A 1-in.-diameter steel circular rod is subject to a tensile load that reduces its cross-sectional area to 0.64 in2. Express the rod’s ductility using a standard unit of measure. a. 18.5% b. 1.85% c. 18.5 d. (a) and (c) What term is used to describe the low-temperature creep of polymerics? a. Springback b. Creep rupture c. Cold flow d. Creep forming MODULE 7 – TESTING, FAILURE ANALYSIS, STANDARDS, & INSPECTION Factors of safety are defined either in terms of the ultimate strength of a material or its yield strength. In other words, by the use of a suitable factor, the ultimate or yield strength is reduced in size to what is known as the design stress or safe working stress. Which factor of safety would be more appropriate for a material that will be subjected to repetitious, suddenly applied loads? Product liability court cases have risen sharply in recent years because of poor procedures in selecting materials for particular applications. Assuming that a knowledge of a material’s properties is a valid step in the selection process, cite two examples where such lack of knowledge could or did lead to failure or unsatisfactory performance. Make a sketch and fully dimension an Izod impact test specimen. Which agency publishes the Annual Book of standard test methods used worldwide for evaluation of materials? a. NASA b. NIST c. ASTM d. SPE

What is the prime purpose of selecting a composite material over material from the other family groups? MODULE 3 – STRUCTURE OF SOLID MATERIALS The ability of a material to exist in different space lattices is called a. Allotropic b. Crystalline c. Solvent d. Amorphous Amorphous metals develop their microstructure as a result of ___________. a. Dendrites b. Directional solidification c. Slip d. Extremely rapid cooling In an alloy, the material that dissolves the alloying element is the ___________. a. Solute b. Solvent c. Matrix d. Allotrope What is the coordination number (CN) for the fcc structure formed by ions of sodium and chlorine that is in the chemical compound NaCl (salt) ? a. 6 b. 8 c. 14 d. 16 What pressure is normally used in constructing a phase diagram? a. 100 psi b. Depends on material c. Ambient d. Normal atmospheric pressure What line on a binary diagram indicates the upper limit of the solid solution phase? a. Liquidus b. Eutectic c. Eutectoid d. Solidus What holds the atoms (ions) together in a compound such as NaCl are electrostatic forces between ___________. a. Atom and ion b. Covalent bonds c. Electrons and nuclei d. Neutrons Diffusion of atoms through a solid takes place by two main mechanisms. One is diffusion through vacancies in the atomic structure. Another method of diffusion is ___________. a. Cold b. APF c. Substitutional d. Interstitial Give a brief explanation of the Lever rule (P117) Grain boundaries ___________ movement of dislocations through a solid. a. Improve b. Inhibit c. Do not affect Iron can be alloyed with carbon because it is ___________. a. Crystalline b. Amorphous c. A mixture d. Allotropic Metals can be cooled only to crystalline solids. a. T (true) b. F (false) Sketch an fcc unit cell. Metals are classified as crystalline materials. Name one metal that is an amorphous solid and name at least one recent application in which its use is saving energy or providing greater strength and/or corrosion resistance. MODULE 4 – MECHANICAL PROPERTIES Give two examples of a mechanical property. a. Thermal resistance b. Wear resistance c. Hardness d. Strength Scissors used in the home cut material by concentrating forces that ultimately produce a certain type of stress within the material. Identify this stress. a. Bearing stress b. Shearing stress c. Compressive stress An aluminum rod 1 in. in diameter (E =10.4 x 106psi) experiences an elastic tensile strain of 0.0048 in./in. Calculate the stress in the rod. a. 49,920 ksi b. 49,920 psi c. 49,920 msi A 1-in.-diameter steel circular rod is subject to a tensile load that reduces its cross-sectional area to 0.64 in2. Express the rod’s ductility using a standard unit of measure. a. 18.5% b. 1.85% c. 18.5 d. (a) and (c) What term is used to describe the low-temperature creep of polymerics? a. Springback b. Creep rupture c. Cold flow d. Creep forming MODULE 7 – TESTING, FAILURE ANALYSIS, STANDARDS, & INSPECTION Factors of safety are defined either in terms of the ultimate strength of a material or its yield strength. In other words, by the use of a suitable factor, the ultimate or yield strength is reduced in size to what is known as the design stress or safe working stress. Which factor of safety would be more appropriate for a material that will be subjected to repetitious, suddenly applied loads? Product liability court cases have risen sharply in recent years because of poor procedures in selecting materials for particular applications. Assuming that a knowledge of a material’s properties is a valid step in the selection process, cite two examples where such lack of knowledge could or did lead to failure or unsatisfactory performance. Make a sketch and fully dimension an Izod impact test specimen. Which agency publishes the Annual Book of standard test methods used worldwide for evaluation of materials? a. NASA b. NIST c. ASTM d. SPE

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Reading Guide 3 CHEM 101 Check here if you want your paper returned Chapter 3 – Section 3.1-3.4 Introduction to Chemistry Dr. Bragg Printed Last Name: First Name: WKUID: 1. Express in your own words the meaning of these terms: a. Hypothesis b. Law c. Theory d. Conservation e. Proportion f. Radioactive g. Atomic Number h. Mass Number i. Isotope j. Spectrum k. Ground State l. Excited State m. Quantum n. Valence o. Shell p. Subshell q. Orbital 2. Briefly describe the main points of Dalton’s Atomic Theory. On Time: Complete: Questions: Total Score: 3. Who experimentally verified the Law of Conservation of Matter? 4. Who experimentally verified the Law of Definite Proportions? 5. What are the three most important subatomic particles, and what is the charge on each? 6. Who discovered natural radioactivity? 7. What are the three main radioactive ‘particles,’ and what is the charge on each? 8. Who was the student that set up the experiments and made the observations that lead to the discovery of the nucleus of the atom? 9. Considering atomic numbers and mass numbers, which is the same among a set of isotopes and which is different? 10. What is the difference between a continuous spectrum and a line spectrum? 11. Who proposed the Shell Model of the hydrogen atom based on small energy steps between adjacent levels for electrons? 12. Which end of the electromagnetic spectrum is higher in ENERGY, ı-rays or radio waves? 13. Who proposed the mathematical wave theory that explained the existence of orbitals? 14. Give the general subshell filling order for electrons in ground state atoms. Reading Guide 3 CHEM 101 Dr. Bragg Chapter 3 – Sections 3.1 – 3.4 Introduction to Chemistry Page 2

Reading Guide 3 CHEM 101 Check here if you want your paper returned Chapter 3 – Section 3.1-3.4 Introduction to Chemistry Dr. Bragg Printed Last Name: First Name: WKUID: 1. Express in your own words the meaning of these terms: a. Hypothesis b. Law c. Theory d. Conservation e. Proportion f. Radioactive g. Atomic Number h. Mass Number i. Isotope j. Spectrum k. Ground State l. Excited State m. Quantum n. Valence o. Shell p. Subshell q. Orbital 2. Briefly describe the main points of Dalton’s Atomic Theory. On Time: Complete: Questions: Total Score: 3. Who experimentally verified the Law of Conservation of Matter? 4. Who experimentally verified the Law of Definite Proportions? 5. What are the three most important subatomic particles, and what is the charge on each? 6. Who discovered natural radioactivity? 7. What are the three main radioactive ‘particles,’ and what is the charge on each? 8. Who was the student that set up the experiments and made the observations that lead to the discovery of the nucleus of the atom? 9. Considering atomic numbers and mass numbers, which is the same among a set of isotopes and which is different? 10. What is the difference between a continuous spectrum and a line spectrum? 11. Who proposed the Shell Model of the hydrogen atom based on small energy steps between adjacent levels for electrons? 12. Which end of the electromagnetic spectrum is higher in ENERGY, ı-rays or radio waves? 13. Who proposed the mathematical wave theory that explained the existence of orbitals? 14. Give the general subshell filling order for electrons in ground state atoms. Reading Guide 3 CHEM 101 Dr. Bragg Chapter 3 – Sections 3.1 – 3.4 Introduction to Chemistry Page 2

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Chapter 15 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 16, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Fluid Pressure in a U-Tube A U-tube is filled with water, and the two arms are capped. The tube is cylindrical, and the right arm has twice the radius of the left arm. The caps have negligible mass, are watertight, and can freely slide up and down the tube. Part A A one-inch depth of sand is poured onto the cap on each arm. After the caps have moved (if necessary) to reestablish equilibrium, is the right cap higher, lower, or the same height as the left cap? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Pressure in the Ocean The pressure at 10 below the surface of the ocean is about 2.00×105 . Part A higher lower the same height m Pa Which of the following statements is true? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Now consider the pressure 20 below the surface of the ocean. Which of the following statements is true? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Relating Pressure and Height in a Container Learning Goal: To understand the derivation of the law relating height and pressure in a container. The weight of a column of seawater 1 in cross section and 10 high is about 2.00×105 . The weight of a column of seawater 1 in cross section and 10 high plus the weight of a column of air with the same cross section extending up to the top of the atmosphere is about 2.00×105 . The weight of 1 of seawater at 10 below the surface of the ocean is about 2.00×105 . The density of seawater is about 2.00×105 times the density of air at sea level. m2 m N m2 m N m3 m N m The pressure is twice that at a depth of 10 . The pressure is the same as that at a depth of 10 . The pressure is equal to that at a depth of 10 plus the weight per 1 cross sectional area of a column of seawater 10 high. The pressure is equal to the weight per 1 cross sectional area of a column of seawater 20 high. m m m m2 m m2 m In this problem, you will derive the law relating pressure to height in a container by analyzing a particular system. A container of uniform cross-sectional area is filled with liquid of uniform density . Consider a thin horizontal layer of liquid (thickness ) at a height as measured from the bottom of the container. Let the pressure exerted upward on the bottom of the layer be and the pressure exerted downward on the top be . Assume throughout the problem that the system is in equilibrium (the container has not been recently shaken or moved, etc.). Part A What is , the magnitude of the force exerted upward on the bottom of the liquid? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is , the magnitude of the force exerted downward on the top of the liquid? A  dy y p p + dp Fup Fup = Fdown You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C What is the weight of the thin layer of liquid? Express your answer in terms of quantities given in the problem introduction and , the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D Since the liquid is in equilibrium, the net force on the thin layer of liquid is zero. Complete the force equation for the sum of the vertical forces acting on the liquid layer described in the problem introduction. Express your answer in terms of quantities given in the problem introduction and taking upward forces to be positive. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Fdown = wlayer g wlayer = Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). A Submerged Ball A ball of mass and volume is lowered on a string into a fluid of density . Assume that the object would sink to the bottom if it were not supported by the string. Part A  = = i Fy,i mb V f What is the tension in the string when the ball is fully submerged but not touching the bottom, as shown in the figure? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the given quantities and , the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Archimedes’ Principle Learning Goal: To understand the applications of Archimedes’ principle. Archimedes’ principle is a powerful tool for solving many problems involving equilibrium in fluids. It states the following: When a body is partially or completely submerged in a fluid (either a liquid or a gas), the fluid exerts an upward force on the body equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the body. As a result of the upward Archimedes force (often called the buoyant force), some objects may float in a fluid, and all of them appear to weigh less. This is the familiar phenomenon of buoyancy. Quantitatively, the buoyant force can be found as , where is the force, is the density of the fluid, is the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity, and is the volume of the displaced fluid. In this problem, you will be asked several qualitative questions that should help you develop a feel for Archimedes’ principle. An object is placed in a fluid and then released. Assume that the object either floats to the surface (settling so that the object is partly above and partly below the fluid surface) or sinks to the bottom. (Note that for Parts A through D, you should assume that the object has settled in equilibrium.) Part A Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force is equal to the weight of fluid displaced by the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? T g T = Fbuoyant = fluidgV Fbuoyant fluid g V You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force is equal to the weight of the amount of fluid that has the same total volume as the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force equals the weight of the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? for every object submerged partially or completely in a fluid only for an object that floats only for an object that sinks for no object submerged in a fluid for an object that is partially submerged in a fluid only for an object that floats for an object completely submerged in a fluid for no object partially or completely submerged in a fluid You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force is less than the weight of the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? ANSWER: Now apply what you know to some more complicated situations. Part E An object is floating in equilibrium on the surface of a liquid. The object is then removed and placed in another container, filled with a denser liquid. What would you observe? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: for every object submerged partially or completely in a fluid for an object that floats only for an object that sinks for no object submerged in a fluid for every object submerged partially or completely in a fluid for an object that floats for an object that sinks for no object submerged in a fluid Part F An object is floating in equilibrium on the surface of a liquid. The object is then removed and placed in another container, filled with a less dense liquid. What would you observe? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part G Two objects, T and B, have identical size and shape and have uniform density. They are carefully placed in a container filled with a liquid. Both objects float in equilibrium. Less of object T is submerged than of object B, which floats, fully submerged, closer to the bottom of the container. Which of the following statements is true? ANSWER: The object would sink all the way to the bottom. The object would float submerged more deeply than in the first container. The object would float submerged less deeply than in the first container. More than one of these outcomes is possible. The object would sink all the way to the bottom. The object would float submerged more deeply than in the first container. The object would float submerged less deeply than in the first container. More than one of these outcomes is possible. Object T has a greater density than object B. Object B has a greater density than object T. Both objects have the same density. ± Buoyant Force Conceptual Question A rectangular wooden block of weight floats with exactly one-half of its volume below the waterline. Part A What is the buoyant force acting on the block? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B W The buoyant force cannot be determined. 2W W 1 W 2 The density of water is 1.00 . What is the density of the block? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). g/cm3 2.00 between 1.00 and 2.00 1.00 between 0.50 and 1.00 0.50 The density cannot be determined. g/cm3 g/cm3 g/cm3 g/cm3 g/cm3 Flow Velocity of Blood Conceptual Question Arteriosclerotic plaques forming on the inner walls of arteries can decrease the effective cross-sectional area of an artery. Even small changes in the effective area of an artery can lead to very large changes in the blood pressure in the artery and possibly to the collapse of the blood vessel. Imagine a healthy artery, with blood flow velocity of and mass per unit volume of . The kinetic energy per unit volume of blood is given by Imagine that plaque has narrowed an artery to one-fifth of its normal cross-sectional area (an 80% blockage). Part A Compared to normal blood flow velocity, , what is the velocity of blood as it passes through this blockage? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C v0 = 0.14 m/s  = 1050 kg/m3 K0 =  . 1 2 v20 v0 80v0 20v0 5v0 v0/5 This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). For parts D – F imagine that plaque has grown to a 90% blockage. Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). ± Playing with a Water Hose Two children, Ferdinand and Isabella, are playing with a water hose on a sunny summer day. Isabella is holding the hose in her hand 1.0 meters above the ground and is trying to spray Ferdinand, who is standing 10.0 meters away. Part A Will Isabella be able to spray Ferdinand if the water is flowing out of the hose at a constant speed of 3.5 meters per second? Assume that the hose is pointed parallel to the ground and take the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity to be 9.81 meters per second, per second. You did not open hints for this part. v0 g ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Tactics Box 15.2 Finding Whether an Object Floats or Sinks Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 15.2 Finding whether an object floats or sinks. If you hold an object underwater and then release it, it can float to the surface, sink, or remain “hanging” in the water, depending on whether the fluid density is larger than, smaller than, or equal to the object’s average density . These conditions are summarized in this Tactics Box. Yes No f avg TACTICS BOX 15.2 Finding whether an object floats or sinks Object sinks Object floats Object has neutral buoyancy An object sinks if it weighs more than the fluid it displaces, that is, if its average density is greater than the density of the fluid: . An object floats on the surface if it weighs less than the fluid it displaces, that is, if its average density is less than the density of the fluid: . An object hangs motionless in the fluid if it weighs exactly the same as the fluid it displaces. It has neutral buoyancy if its average density equals the density of the fluid: . Part A Ice at 0.0 has a density of 917 . A 3.00 ice cube is gently released inside a small container filled with oil and is observed to be neutrally buoyant. What is the density of the oil, ? Express your answer in kilograms per meter cubed to three significant figures. ANSWER: Part B Once the ice cube melts, what happens to the liquid water that it produces? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: avg > f avg < f avg = f 'C kg/m3 cm3 oil oil = kg/m3 Part C What happens if some ethyl alcohol of density 790 is poured into the container after the ice cube has melted? ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. The liquid water sinks to the bottom of the container. The liquid water rises to the surface and floats on top of the oil. The liquid water is in static equilibrium at the location where the ice cube was originally placed. kg/m3 A layer of ethyl alcohol forms between the oil and the water. The layer of ethyl alcohol forms at the bottom of the container. The layer of ethyl alcohol forms on the surface.

Chapter 15 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 16, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Fluid Pressure in a U-Tube A U-tube is filled with water, and the two arms are capped. The tube is cylindrical, and the right arm has twice the radius of the left arm. The caps have negligible mass, are watertight, and can freely slide up and down the tube. Part A A one-inch depth of sand is poured onto the cap on each arm. After the caps have moved (if necessary) to reestablish equilibrium, is the right cap higher, lower, or the same height as the left cap? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Pressure in the Ocean The pressure at 10 below the surface of the ocean is about 2.00×105 . Part A higher lower the same height m Pa Which of the following statements is true? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Now consider the pressure 20 below the surface of the ocean. Which of the following statements is true? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Relating Pressure and Height in a Container Learning Goal: To understand the derivation of the law relating height and pressure in a container. The weight of a column of seawater 1 in cross section and 10 high is about 2.00×105 . The weight of a column of seawater 1 in cross section and 10 high plus the weight of a column of air with the same cross section extending up to the top of the atmosphere is about 2.00×105 . The weight of 1 of seawater at 10 below the surface of the ocean is about 2.00×105 . The density of seawater is about 2.00×105 times the density of air at sea level. m2 m N m2 m N m3 m N m The pressure is twice that at a depth of 10 . The pressure is the same as that at a depth of 10 . The pressure is equal to that at a depth of 10 plus the weight per 1 cross sectional area of a column of seawater 10 high. The pressure is equal to the weight per 1 cross sectional area of a column of seawater 20 high. m m m m2 m m2 m In this problem, you will derive the law relating pressure to height in a container by analyzing a particular system. A container of uniform cross-sectional area is filled with liquid of uniform density . Consider a thin horizontal layer of liquid (thickness ) at a height as measured from the bottom of the container. Let the pressure exerted upward on the bottom of the layer be and the pressure exerted downward on the top be . Assume throughout the problem that the system is in equilibrium (the container has not been recently shaken or moved, etc.). Part A What is , the magnitude of the force exerted upward on the bottom of the liquid? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is , the magnitude of the force exerted downward on the top of the liquid? A  dy y p p + dp Fup Fup = Fdown You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C What is the weight of the thin layer of liquid? Express your answer in terms of quantities given in the problem introduction and , the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D Since the liquid is in equilibrium, the net force on the thin layer of liquid is zero. Complete the force equation for the sum of the vertical forces acting on the liquid layer described in the problem introduction. Express your answer in terms of quantities given in the problem introduction and taking upward forces to be positive. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Fdown = wlayer g wlayer = Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). A Submerged Ball A ball of mass and volume is lowered on a string into a fluid of density . Assume that the object would sink to the bottom if it were not supported by the string. Part A  = = i Fy,i mb V f What is the tension in the string when the ball is fully submerged but not touching the bottom, as shown in the figure? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the given quantities and , the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Archimedes’ Principle Learning Goal: To understand the applications of Archimedes’ principle. Archimedes’ principle is a powerful tool for solving many problems involving equilibrium in fluids. It states the following: When a body is partially or completely submerged in a fluid (either a liquid or a gas), the fluid exerts an upward force on the body equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the body. As a result of the upward Archimedes force (often called the buoyant force), some objects may float in a fluid, and all of them appear to weigh less. This is the familiar phenomenon of buoyancy. Quantitatively, the buoyant force can be found as , where is the force, is the density of the fluid, is the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity, and is the volume of the displaced fluid. In this problem, you will be asked several qualitative questions that should help you develop a feel for Archimedes’ principle. An object is placed in a fluid and then released. Assume that the object either floats to the surface (settling so that the object is partly above and partly below the fluid surface) or sinks to the bottom. (Note that for Parts A through D, you should assume that the object has settled in equilibrium.) Part A Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force is equal to the weight of fluid displaced by the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? T g T = Fbuoyant = fluidgV Fbuoyant fluid g V You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force is equal to the weight of the amount of fluid that has the same total volume as the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force equals the weight of the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? for every object submerged partially or completely in a fluid only for an object that floats only for an object that sinks for no object submerged in a fluid for an object that is partially submerged in a fluid only for an object that floats for an object completely submerged in a fluid for no object partially or completely submerged in a fluid You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D Consider the following statement: The magnitude of the buoyant force is less than the weight of the object. Under what circumstances is this statement true? ANSWER: Now apply what you know to some more complicated situations. Part E An object is floating in equilibrium on the surface of a liquid. The object is then removed and placed in another container, filled with a denser liquid. What would you observe? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: for every object submerged partially or completely in a fluid for an object that floats only for an object that sinks for no object submerged in a fluid for every object submerged partially or completely in a fluid for an object that floats for an object that sinks for no object submerged in a fluid Part F An object is floating in equilibrium on the surface of a liquid. The object is then removed and placed in another container, filled with a less dense liquid. What would you observe? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part G Two objects, T and B, have identical size and shape and have uniform density. They are carefully placed in a container filled with a liquid. Both objects float in equilibrium. Less of object T is submerged than of object B, which floats, fully submerged, closer to the bottom of the container. Which of the following statements is true? ANSWER: The object would sink all the way to the bottom. The object would float submerged more deeply than in the first container. The object would float submerged less deeply than in the first container. More than one of these outcomes is possible. The object would sink all the way to the bottom. The object would float submerged more deeply than in the first container. The object would float submerged less deeply than in the first container. More than one of these outcomes is possible. Object T has a greater density than object B. Object B has a greater density than object T. Both objects have the same density. ± Buoyant Force Conceptual Question A rectangular wooden block of weight floats with exactly one-half of its volume below the waterline. Part A What is the buoyant force acting on the block? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B W The buoyant force cannot be determined. 2W W 1 W 2 The density of water is 1.00 . What is the density of the block? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). g/cm3 2.00 between 1.00 and 2.00 1.00 between 0.50 and 1.00 0.50 The density cannot be determined. g/cm3 g/cm3 g/cm3 g/cm3 g/cm3 Flow Velocity of Blood Conceptual Question Arteriosclerotic plaques forming on the inner walls of arteries can decrease the effective cross-sectional area of an artery. Even small changes in the effective area of an artery can lead to very large changes in the blood pressure in the artery and possibly to the collapse of the blood vessel. Imagine a healthy artery, with blood flow velocity of and mass per unit volume of . The kinetic energy per unit volume of blood is given by Imagine that plaque has narrowed an artery to one-fifth of its normal cross-sectional area (an 80% blockage). Part A Compared to normal blood flow velocity, , what is the velocity of blood as it passes through this blockage? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C v0 = 0.14 m/s  = 1050 kg/m3 K0 =  . 1 2 v20 v0 80v0 20v0 5v0 v0/5 This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). For parts D – F imagine that plaque has grown to a 90% blockage. Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). ± Playing with a Water Hose Two children, Ferdinand and Isabella, are playing with a water hose on a sunny summer day. Isabella is holding the hose in her hand 1.0 meters above the ground and is trying to spray Ferdinand, who is standing 10.0 meters away. Part A Will Isabella be able to spray Ferdinand if the water is flowing out of the hose at a constant speed of 3.5 meters per second? Assume that the hose is pointed parallel to the ground and take the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity to be 9.81 meters per second, per second. You did not open hints for this part. v0 g ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Tactics Box 15.2 Finding Whether an Object Floats or Sinks Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 15.2 Finding whether an object floats or sinks. If you hold an object underwater and then release it, it can float to the surface, sink, or remain “hanging” in the water, depending on whether the fluid density is larger than, smaller than, or equal to the object’s average density . These conditions are summarized in this Tactics Box. Yes No f avg TACTICS BOX 15.2 Finding whether an object floats or sinks Object sinks Object floats Object has neutral buoyancy An object sinks if it weighs more than the fluid it displaces, that is, if its average density is greater than the density of the fluid: . An object floats on the surface if it weighs less than the fluid it displaces, that is, if its average density is less than the density of the fluid: . An object hangs motionless in the fluid if it weighs exactly the same as the fluid it displaces. It has neutral buoyancy if its average density equals the density of the fluid: . Part A Ice at 0.0 has a density of 917 . A 3.00 ice cube is gently released inside a small container filled with oil and is observed to be neutrally buoyant. What is the density of the oil, ? Express your answer in kilograms per meter cubed to three significant figures. ANSWER: Part B Once the ice cube melts, what happens to the liquid water that it produces? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: avg > f avg < f avg = f 'C kg/m3 cm3 oil oil = kg/m3 Part C What happens if some ethyl alcohol of density 790 is poured into the container after the ice cube has melted? ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. The liquid water sinks to the bottom of the container. The liquid water rises to the surface and floats on top of the oil. The liquid water is in static equilibrium at the location where the ice cube was originally placed. kg/m3 A layer of ethyl alcohol forms between the oil and the water. The layer of ethyl alcohol forms at the bottom of the container. The layer of ethyl alcohol forms on the surface.

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Ch 2 Questions that might be on the test. If you cannot answer them, check your class notes or the textbook. 1. A mineral is a naturally occurring substance formed through geological processes that has: a) a characteristic chemical composition, b) a highly ordered atomic structure c) specific physical properties d) all of the above 2. There are currently more than ______ known minerals, according to the International Mineralogical Association, a) 40 b) 400 c) 4000 d) 40 000 3. Some minerals, like quartz, mica or feldspar are: a) rare b) common c) valuable d) priceless 4. Rocks from which minerals are mined for economic purposes are referred to as: a) gangue b) tailings c) ores d) granite 5. Electrons, which have a _____ charge, a size which is so small as to be currently unmeasurable, and which are the least massive of the three types of basic particles. a) positive b) negative c) neutral 6. Both protons and neutrons are themselves now thought to be composed of even more elementary particles called: a) quarks b) quakes c) parsons d) megans 7. In processes which change the number of protons in a nucleus, the atom becomes an atom of a different chemical: a) isotope b) compound c) element d) planet 8. Atoms which have either a deficit or a surplus of electrons are called: a) elements b) isotopes c) ions d) molecules 9. In the Bohr model of the atom, electrons can only orbit the nucleus in particular circular orbits with fixed angular momentum and energy, their distances from the nucleus being proportional to their respective energies. They can only make _____ leaps between the fixed energy levels. a) tiny b) quantum c) gradual 10. It is impossible to simultaneously derive precise values for both the position and momentum of a particle for any given point in time; this became known as the ______ principle. a) Bohr b) Einstein c) uncertainty d) quantum 11. The modern model of the atom describes the positions of electrons in an atom in terms of: a) quantum levels b) orbital paths c) probabilities d) GPS 12. Isotopes of an element have nuclei with the same number of protons (the same atomic number) but different numbers of: a) electrons b) neutrons c) ions d) photons 13. In helium-3 (or 3He), how many protons are present? a) 1 b) 2 c) 3 d) 4 14. In helium-3 (or 3He), how many neutrons are present? a) 1 b) 2 c) 3 d) 4 15. The relative abundance of an isotope is strongly correlated with its tendency toward nuclear _____, short-lived nuclides quickly go away, while their long-lived counterparts endure. a) fission b) fusion c) decay d) bombardment 16. The isotopic composition of elements is different on different planets. a) True b) False 17. As a general rule, the fewer electrons in an atom’s valence shell, the ____ reactive it is. Lithium, sodium, and potassium have one electron in their outer shells. a) more b) less 18. Every atom is much more stable, or less reactive, with a ____ valence shell. a) partly full b) completely full 19. A positively-charged ion, which has fewer electrons than protons, is known as a: a) anion b) cation c) fermion d) bation 20. Bonds vary widely in their strength. Generally covalent and ionic bonds are often described as “strong”, whereas ______ bonds are generally considered to be “weak”. a) van der Waals b) Faradays c) van Neumans 21. This bonding involves sharing of electrons in which the positively charged nuclei of two or more atoms simultaneously attract the negatively charged electrons that are being shared a) ionic b) covalent c) van der Waals d) metallic 22. This bond results from electrostatic attraction between atoms: a) ionic b) covalent c) van der Waals d) metallic 23. A sea of delocalized electrons causes this bonding: a) ionic b) covalent c) van der Waals d) metallic 24. The chemical composition of minerals may vary between end members of a mineral system. For example the ______ feldspars comprise a continuous series from sodiumrich albite to calcium-rich anorthite. a) plagioclase b) orthoclase c) alkaline d) acidic 25. Crystal structure is based on ____ internal atomic arrangement. a) irregular b) regular c) random d) curvilinear 26. Pyrite and marcasite are both _______, but their arrangement of atoms differs. a) iron sulfide b) lead sulfide c) copper silfide d) silver sulfide 27. The carbon atoms in ______ are arranged into sheets which can slide easily past each other, while the carbon atoms in diamond form a strong, interlocking three-dimensional network. a) sapphire b) graphite c) aluminum d) carbonate 28. TGCFAOQTCD a) Crystal habit b) Hardness scale c) Luster scale 29. Dull to metallic, submetallic, adamantine, vitreous, pearly, resinous, or silky. a) Crystal habit b) Hardness scale c) Luster scale d) Heft scale 30. The color of the powder a mineral leaves after rubbing it on unglazed porcelain. a) color b) streak c) lustre d) iridescense 31. Describes the way a mineral may split apart along various planes. a) fracture b) streak c) lustre d) cleavage 32. In modern physics, the position of electrons about a nucleus are defined in terms of: a) probabilities b) circles c) ellipses d) chromodomes 33. The symbol H+ suggests a: a) hydrogen atom b) hydrogen isotope c) hydrogen cation d) hydrogen anion 34. The tabulated atomic mass of natural carbon is not exactly 12 because carbon in nature always has multiple ________ present. a) electrons b) isotopes c) quarks d) protons 35. This type of bonding due to delocalized electrons leads to malleability, ductility, and high melting points: a) covalent b) ionic c) van der Waals d) metallic 36. The mineral ___________ is 3 on Mohs Scale whereas the mineral ___________ is 9. a) calcite, corundum b) corundum, calcite c) caliche, calcite d) chalcedony, quartz 37. In hand specimens, geologists identify most minerals based on: a) physical properties b) chemical analyses c) xray diffraction 38. This type of chemical bonding is the weakest but occurs in all substances. a) covalent b) ionic c) metallic d) none of the above 39. Quartz, feldspar, mica, chlorite, kaolin, calcite, epidote, olivine, augite, hornblende, magnetite, hematite, limonite: these minerals are: a) common in rocks b) occasionally found c) rare d) extremely rare 40. Characteristics of a mineral do NOT include: a) naturally occurring b) characteristic chemical formula c) crystalline d) organic e) all of the above 41. The chemical composition of a particular mineral may vary between end members. For example, the common mineral plagioclase feldspar varies from being _______-rich to being _________-rich. a) sodium, calcium b) potassium, sodium c) iron, magnesium d) carbon, oxygen 42. Sharing of electrons typifies the __________ bond whereas electrostatic attraction typifies the _______ bond. a) ionic, covalent b) ionic, triclinic c) covalent, ionic d) triclinic, covalent 43. If number of protons does not equal the number of electrons, the atom is a(n) : a) isotope b) ion c) quark d) simplex e) google 44. Atoms generally consist of: a) electrons b) protons c) neutrons d) all of the above 45. Not counting rare minerals, about how many mineral species are at least occasionally encountered in rocks? a) 20 b) 200 c) 2000 46. Carbon is atomic number 6. Carbon-13 has _______ protons and _______ neutrons. a) thirteen, six b) six, seven c) twelve, twenty-five d) twelve, twelve 47. Which of these particles are not nucleons? a) electrons b) neutrons c) protons 48. A mineral with visibly recognizable crystals is said to have good crystal habit; otherwise the mineral is said to be: a) massive b) granular c) compact d) any of the above 49. In chemical bonding, two atoms become linked by moving or sharing __________. a) neutrons b) protons c) electrons 50. The name of an element is determined by the number of ______ present in the ______ of an atom. a) electrons, nucleus b) neutrons, nucleus c) protons, nucleus d) protons, electron cloud e) neutrons, electron cloud 51. Generally ________ and ____________ bonds are strong whereas the ______________ bond is weak. a) covalent, ionic, van der Waals b) van der Waals, covalent, ionic c) ionic, van der Waals, covalent 52. Which of the following are held together by chemical bonds? a) molecules b) crystals c) diatomic gases 53. An ion with fewer electrons than protons is called an ______ and it carries a _________ electric charge. a) cation, positive b) anion, negative c) cation, negative d) anion, positive 54. Two or more minerals may have the same _________ composition but different _______ structure. These are called polymorphs. a) crystal, chemical b) chemical, crystal 55. Industrial minerals are: a) gem quality b) commercially valuable c) tailings d) worthless 56. All minerals are crystalline. If the crystals are too small to see, they can be detected by: a) x-ray diffraction b) cosmic rays c) sound waves d) odor 57. If two atomes have the same number of protons but different numbers of neutrons, the atoms are _______ of the same _________. a) elements, mineral b) atoms, isotope c) elements, isotope d) isotopes, element 58. Modern physics recognizes that electrons show both particle and ______ behavior. a) wave b) emotional c) thermal d) revolting 59. Sodium and potassium have one ______ electron in their outer shells and are extremely ________. a) valence, stable b) inverted, reactive c) valence, reactive d) contaminated, inactive 60. The luster of _______ would be described as ________. a) glass, vitreous b) diamond, dull c) pyrite, silky d) graphite, resinous 61. The minerals ________ and __________ are polymorphs of carbon. a) diamond, graphite b) calcite, silicate c) bonite, bronzite 62. In the ______ atom based on _______ physics, electrons were restricted to circular orbits of fixed energy levels. a) Bohr , quantum b) Rutherford, classical c) Bohr, classical d) Rutherford, quantum 63. Virtually all elements other than ______ and _______ were formed in stars and supernovae long after the Big Bang. a) hydrogen, helium b) carbon, phosphorus c) carbon, oxygen d) silica, carbon 64. Physicist Werner _________ developed the ___________ principle which means that it is impossible to know exactly the position and momentum of a particle. a) Heisenberg, certainty b) Heisenberg, uncertainty c) Bohr, uncertainty d) Bohr, certainty

Ch 2 Questions that might be on the test. If you cannot answer them, check your class notes or the textbook. 1. A mineral is a naturally occurring substance formed through geological processes that has: a) a characteristic chemical composition, b) a highly ordered atomic structure c) specific physical properties d) all of the above 2. There are currently more than ______ known minerals, according to the International Mineralogical Association, a) 40 b) 400 c) 4000 d) 40 000 3. Some minerals, like quartz, mica or feldspar are: a) rare b) common c) valuable d) priceless 4. Rocks from which minerals are mined for economic purposes are referred to as: a) gangue b) tailings c) ores d) granite 5. Electrons, which have a _____ charge, a size which is so small as to be currently unmeasurable, and which are the least massive of the three types of basic particles. a) positive b) negative c) neutral 6. Both protons and neutrons are themselves now thought to be composed of even more elementary particles called: a) quarks b) quakes c) parsons d) megans 7. In processes which change the number of protons in a nucleus, the atom becomes an atom of a different chemical: a) isotope b) compound c) element d) planet 8. Atoms which have either a deficit or a surplus of electrons are called: a) elements b) isotopes c) ions d) molecules 9. In the Bohr model of the atom, electrons can only orbit the nucleus in particular circular orbits with fixed angular momentum and energy, their distances from the nucleus being proportional to their respective energies. They can only make _____ leaps between the fixed energy levels. a) tiny b) quantum c) gradual 10. It is impossible to simultaneously derive precise values for both the position and momentum of a particle for any given point in time; this became known as the ______ principle. a) Bohr b) Einstein c) uncertainty d) quantum 11. The modern model of the atom describes the positions of electrons in an atom in terms of: a) quantum levels b) orbital paths c) probabilities d) GPS 12. Isotopes of an element have nuclei with the same number of protons (the same atomic number) but different numbers of: a) electrons b) neutrons c) ions d) photons 13. In helium-3 (or 3He), how many protons are present? a) 1 b) 2 c) 3 d) 4 14. In helium-3 (or 3He), how many neutrons are present? a) 1 b) 2 c) 3 d) 4 15. The relative abundance of an isotope is strongly correlated with its tendency toward nuclear _____, short-lived nuclides quickly go away, while their long-lived counterparts endure. a) fission b) fusion c) decay d) bombardment 16. The isotopic composition of elements is different on different planets. a) True b) False 17. As a general rule, the fewer electrons in an atom’s valence shell, the ____ reactive it is. Lithium, sodium, and potassium have one electron in their outer shells. a) more b) less 18. Every atom is much more stable, or less reactive, with a ____ valence shell. a) partly full b) completely full 19. A positively-charged ion, which has fewer electrons than protons, is known as a: a) anion b) cation c) fermion d) bation 20. Bonds vary widely in their strength. Generally covalent and ionic bonds are often described as “strong”, whereas ______ bonds are generally considered to be “weak”. a) van der Waals b) Faradays c) van Neumans 21. This bonding involves sharing of electrons in which the positively charged nuclei of two or more atoms simultaneously attract the negatively charged electrons that are being shared a) ionic b) covalent c) van der Waals d) metallic 22. This bond results from electrostatic attraction between atoms: a) ionic b) covalent c) van der Waals d) metallic 23. A sea of delocalized electrons causes this bonding: a) ionic b) covalent c) van der Waals d) metallic 24. The chemical composition of minerals may vary between end members of a mineral system. For example the ______ feldspars comprise a continuous series from sodiumrich albite to calcium-rich anorthite. a) plagioclase b) orthoclase c) alkaline d) acidic 25. Crystal structure is based on ____ internal atomic arrangement. a) irregular b) regular c) random d) curvilinear 26. Pyrite and marcasite are both _______, but their arrangement of atoms differs. a) iron sulfide b) lead sulfide c) copper silfide d) silver sulfide 27. The carbon atoms in ______ are arranged into sheets which can slide easily past each other, while the carbon atoms in diamond form a strong, interlocking three-dimensional network. a) sapphire b) graphite c) aluminum d) carbonate 28. TGCFAOQTCD a) Crystal habit b) Hardness scale c) Luster scale 29. Dull to metallic, submetallic, adamantine, vitreous, pearly, resinous, or silky. a) Crystal habit b) Hardness scale c) Luster scale d) Heft scale 30. The color of the powder a mineral leaves after rubbing it on unglazed porcelain. a) color b) streak c) lustre d) iridescense 31. Describes the way a mineral may split apart along various planes. a) fracture b) streak c) lustre d) cleavage 32. In modern physics, the position of electrons about a nucleus are defined in terms of: a) probabilities b) circles c) ellipses d) chromodomes 33. The symbol H+ suggests a: a) hydrogen atom b) hydrogen isotope c) hydrogen cation d) hydrogen anion 34. The tabulated atomic mass of natural carbon is not exactly 12 because carbon in nature always has multiple ________ present. a) electrons b) isotopes c) quarks d) protons 35. This type of bonding due to delocalized electrons leads to malleability, ductility, and high melting points: a) covalent b) ionic c) van der Waals d) metallic 36. The mineral ___________ is 3 on Mohs Scale whereas the mineral ___________ is 9. a) calcite, corundum b) corundum, calcite c) caliche, calcite d) chalcedony, quartz 37. In hand specimens, geologists identify most minerals based on: a) physical properties b) chemical analyses c) xray diffraction 38. This type of chemical bonding is the weakest but occurs in all substances. a) covalent b) ionic c) metallic d) none of the above 39. Quartz, feldspar, mica, chlorite, kaolin, calcite, epidote, olivine, augite, hornblende, magnetite, hematite, limonite: these minerals are: a) common in rocks b) occasionally found c) rare d) extremely rare 40. Characteristics of a mineral do NOT include: a) naturally occurring b) characteristic chemical formula c) crystalline d) organic e) all of the above 41. The chemical composition of a particular mineral may vary between end members. For example, the common mineral plagioclase feldspar varies from being _______-rich to being _________-rich. a) sodium, calcium b) potassium, sodium c) iron, magnesium d) carbon, oxygen 42. Sharing of electrons typifies the __________ bond whereas electrostatic attraction typifies the _______ bond. a) ionic, covalent b) ionic, triclinic c) covalent, ionic d) triclinic, covalent 43. If number of protons does not equal the number of electrons, the atom is a(n) : a) isotope b) ion c) quark d) simplex e) google 44. Atoms generally consist of: a) electrons b) protons c) neutrons d) all of the above 45. Not counting rare minerals, about how many mineral species are at least occasionally encountered in rocks? a) 20 b) 200 c) 2000 46. Carbon is atomic number 6. Carbon-13 has _______ protons and _______ neutrons. a) thirteen, six b) six, seven c) twelve, twenty-five d) twelve, twelve 47. Which of these particles are not nucleons? a) electrons b) neutrons c) protons 48. A mineral with visibly recognizable crystals is said to have good crystal habit; otherwise the mineral is said to be: a) massive b) granular c) compact d) any of the above 49. In chemical bonding, two atoms become linked by moving or sharing __________. a) neutrons b) protons c) electrons 50. The name of an element is determined by the number of ______ present in the ______ of an atom. a) electrons, nucleus b) neutrons, nucleus c) protons, nucleus d) protons, electron cloud e) neutrons, electron cloud 51. Generally ________ and ____________ bonds are strong whereas the ______________ bond is weak. a) covalent, ionic, van der Waals b) van der Waals, covalent, ionic c) ionic, van der Waals, covalent 52. Which of the following are held together by chemical bonds? a) molecules b) crystals c) diatomic gases 53. An ion with fewer electrons than protons is called an ______ and it carries a _________ electric charge. a) cation, positive b) anion, negative c) cation, negative d) anion, positive 54. Two or more minerals may have the same _________ composition but different _______ structure. These are called polymorphs. a) crystal, chemical b) chemical, crystal 55. Industrial minerals are: a) gem quality b) commercially valuable c) tailings d) worthless 56. All minerals are crystalline. If the crystals are too small to see, they can be detected by: a) x-ray diffraction b) cosmic rays c) sound waves d) odor 57. If two atomes have the same number of protons but different numbers of neutrons, the atoms are _______ of the same _________. a) elements, mineral b) atoms, isotope c) elements, isotope d) isotopes, element 58. Modern physics recognizes that electrons show both particle and ______ behavior. a) wave b) emotional c) thermal d) revolting 59. Sodium and potassium have one ______ electron in their outer shells and are extremely ________. a) valence, stable b) inverted, reactive c) valence, reactive d) contaminated, inactive 60. The luster of _______ would be described as ________. a) glass, vitreous b) diamond, dull c) pyrite, silky d) graphite, resinous 61. The minerals ________ and __________ are polymorphs of carbon. a) diamond, graphite b) calcite, silicate c) bonite, bronzite 62. In the ______ atom based on _______ physics, electrons were restricted to circular orbits of fixed energy levels. a) Bohr , quantum b) Rutherford, classical c) Bohr, classical d) Rutherford, quantum 63. Virtually all elements other than ______ and _______ were formed in stars and supernovae long after the Big Bang. a) hydrogen, helium b) carbon, phosphorus c) carbon, oxygen d) silica, carbon 64. Physicist Werner _________ developed the ___________ principle which means that it is impossible to know exactly the position and momentum of a particle. a) Heisenberg, certainty b) Heisenberg, uncertainty c) Bohr, uncertainty d) Bohr, certainty

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